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OHIO

NOVEMBER 2020

COOPERATIVE Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative

Staying in the game

Help for disabled farmers

ALSO INSIDE Bobcats on the prowl Buckeye treasure hunt Ohio (cyber) gift guide


VETERANS DAY NOVEMBER 11

Electric cooperatives across Ohio join the nation this month in honoring veterans of the U.S. armed forces — America’s courageous protectors, defenders, and heroes. Not only do we acknowledge veterans’ dedication to our country, but we are truly grateful for the unique strengths and noble characteristics they bring to the cooperative network.


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2020

INSIDE FEATURES

24 STAYING IN THE GAME Ohio AgrAbility helps disabled farmers keep doing the work that they love.

28 TREASURE HUNT Legends of buried booty stoke imagination and curiosity around the state.

30 SEASON OF GIVING We searched the state for unique, thoughtful, Ohio-made products fit for anyone and everyone on your list. Cover image on most editions: When Jeff Austin’s spine was crushed by a cancerous tumor, leaving him paralyzed below the waist, doctors called it a “nontraumatic spinal cord injury.” Of course, it was extremely traumatic for him and his family. The Ohio AgrAbility program helped him obtain an Action Trackchair and other equipment that has allowed him to continue raising corn, soybeans, and wheat on the family farm in Harrod. Photo by Randy Joseph, courtesy of Easter Seals TriState.

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  1


UP FRONT

Gratitude is its own gift T

his has been a year of unexpected changes, unwelcome developments, and unforeseen adaptations. Like the 10 months that preceded it, November will likely bring more surprises. Sometime this month, we will likely know the results of state and national elections. The seemingly endless pandemic continues to exert unwelcome authority over our lives. Societal unrest has caused us to ponder our assumptions about the way things are, the way things should be, and how to bring about positive change in our community. Despite these trials and tribulations, we are surrounded by so much to be grateful for as we look ahead. Our democratic system is tried and true — representative democracy ultimately works. Hardship and challenge brought neighbors together nearly 90 years ago to form our electric cooperatives, bringing light and power to rural America during the depths of the Great Depression. The “can-do” attitude of people and small businesses in our communities are helping us find new and often better ways to overcome the challenges of the day. The dedication of our employees to find ways to work safely to keep your lights on through 2020’s challenges has been inspiring. It’s been a tough year for the small businesses in our local communities — the backbone of our economy — so we hope that you’ll support our local merchants this holiday season. Our annual gift guide is compiled by one of our regular contributors, who finds hidden gems as she traverses the state in search of stories. Featuring only independent businesses, the guide is a perennial reader favorite, filled with one-of-a-kind items that are born and bred of Buckeye inspiration and ingenuity. Also, in the event that you aren’t comfortable venturing out to the individual stores, we’ve made sure all the gifts are available for order online. Finally, as we gather this month to give thanks, it’s worth noting that gratitude is its own gift — it turns what we have into enough. Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives are thankful for the opportunity to serve, represent, and advocate for scores of members across the Buckeye State. Our power emanates from your light. Best wishes for a safe, happy, and blessed Thanksgiving.

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO’S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives are thankful for the opportunity to serve, represent, and advocate for scores of members across the Buckeye State. Our power emanates from your light.


NOVEMBER 2020 • Volume 63, No. 2

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 www.ohiocoopliving.com

MORE INSIDE

4

DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES

Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Rebecca Seum Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Contributors: Alicia Adams, Margaret Buranen, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Damaine Vonada, and Kevin Williams. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­munication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101. Periodicals postage paid at Pontiac, IL 61764, and at additional mailing offices. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved. The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices.

In the know: Strong communications are a vital part of the cooperative difference.

6 CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

Firelands Electric Cooperative: The northern Ohio co-op serves an area originally settled by New England residents displaced during the Revolutionary War.

10 CO-OP PEOPLE

Healthy innovation: Marysville’s Soda Pharm promotes food as medicine and medicine as food.

Cheryl Solomon American MainStreet Publications 847-749-4875 | cheryl@amp.coop

10

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

On the prowl: Bobcats make a comeback in Ohio’s rural forestland.

12

15 GOOD EATS

Hiding in plain sight: Here are some dishes loaded with “hidden” vegetables that your family will gobble up — and they’ll come back for more.

19 LOCAL PAGES News and information from your

For all advertising inquiries, contact

6

electric cooperative.

15

37 CALENDAR

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

What’s happening: November/ December events and other things to do around the state.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Young chefs: Members show off the talents of their kids in the kitchen.

40

CORRECTION: Our October feature on Ohio’s presidential historic sites referred to the James A. Garfield House as being in Medina. It is in Mentor.

Visit Ohio Cooperative Living magazine online at www.ohiocoopliving.com! Read past issues and watch videos about our articles or our recipes. Our new site features an expanded Member Interactive area where you can share your stories, recipes, and photos and find content submitted by other co-op members across the state.

www.ohiocoopliving.com NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  3


POWER LINES

In the know Communications efforts are a vital part of the cooperative difference. BY JEFF MCCALLISTER

F

or customers of an investor-owned utility like AEP or Dayton Power and Light, communication with their electric company probably extends no further than paying their bill or finding out how long an outage might last. Certainly, these are important aspects of communication, but consumer-members of an electric cooperative find they have opportunities to engage on a deeper level. “Members who are engaged are the ones who will attend the annual meeting — for more than just the chance of getting a bill credit,” says Michael Wilson, director of communications at Logan County Electric Cooperative, based in Bellefontaine. “Without engaged and educated members, the cooperative business model could not exist.” Effective communications, then, is one of the most important services a cooperative can provide. “For outages, timely communication is key,” says Mark Owen, communications manager at Lancaster-based South Central Power Company. “Members want to know what’s happening with outage situations in near real time, and fortunately, today’s technology helps us do that.” Communicating with members on a regular basis, however, also allows them to understand the real value they receive from Good communications efforts help members understand the workings of the co-op and lead to increased satisfaction and participation in governance — such as at this pre-pandemic annual meeting.

4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


the co-op — beyond just having the lights come on when they flip a switch or finding out that a tree branch has fallen on a line and caused an outage. “We have been long focused on providing not just the information we think our members need to have and understand, but on identifying and delivering the information they think they need and want,” says Nanci McMaken, vice president and chief communications officer at Pioneer Electric Cooperative in Piqua. “It’s really at the heart of everything we do in communications.” “Members may see the price per kilowatt-hour on their bills and might think that’s where the value stops,” Wilson says. “Do they know about the scholarships we provide to local students, the grants offered through Operation Round Up, the sponsorships we provide to local organizations, the safety and energy efficiency education we provide? Every co-op was created by the local community, and our service goes well beyond just a light switch and a bill. All of those pieces go into what makes the co-op different, and we try to communicate that as often and in as many ways as we can.” Engaged members who know and understand issues are able — and hopefully willing — to advocate on behalf of the co-op, either with public officials in the face of adverse legislation or with neighbors in the face of unreasonable complaints. More than that, they will make informed votes in trustee elections and perhaps even go even further and run for the board of trustees themselves. Democratic member control is one of the guiding principles of all cooperatives, and that would be impossible without members who understand what the co-op is all about.

Electric cooperatives have tools at their disposal to send immediate messaging when unexpected outages happen.

Ohio electric cooperatives have numerous methods at their disposal to be able to reach as many of their members as possible. The immediacy of text messaging, social media, and app notifications is crucial when members lose power unexpectedly, but not every medium works for every message. Ohio Cooperative Living magazine, for example, is the first place many members find news about the co-op — dates of important meetings, changes in business practices, alerts about utility scams, efficiency tips, and more. Co-ops also place inserts with members’ electric bills, send out direct-mail pieces, post to social media, and update their individual websites. “The more ways we can communicate with our members, the better,” says Leslie Guisinger, director of marketing and communications at Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative, based in North Baltimore. “We want to get information out as soon as possible and use every appropriate avenue. The sooner we begin to let people know we intend to enact a rate change, for example, the more time they can prepare. We also do a lot of communicating about capital credits, because that’s an important part of co-op membership.” Of course, talking with members is still one of the most important tools in the box, one that cooperatives know makes a difference when it comes to their members’ experience versus that of an investor-owned utility customer. “One of the most critical communicators for the co-op is the operations team member who engages with frustrated members,” Wilson says. “That face-to-face communication in a difficult time can do more to explain the cooperative difference than a thousand words written on a page.”

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  5


CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

F

irelands Electric Cooperative serves over 9,100 homes and businesses on more than 900 miles of power lines in rural areas of Ashland, Huron, Lorain, and Richland counties. In 2019, Firelands Electric moved to a new all-in-one facility with a combination office and warehouse, with larger and more secure outside storage and a 152-panel community solar field.

History behind the co-op name In 1792, the Connecticut legislature set aside 500,000 acres in northern Ohio for Connecticut residents whose homes were burned by British forces during the Revolutionary War. Known as the Fire Lands, or Sufferers’ Lands, the tract was located at the western end of the Connecticut Western Reserve in what is now the state of Ohio. The land was intended as financial restitution for residents of the Connecticut towns of Danbury, Fairfield, Greenwich, Groton, New Haven, New London, Norwalk, and Ridgefield. Most of the settlement of the area did not occur until after the War of 1812, and the name was later shortened to one word — Firelands. Some of the original townships in the Firelands territory took their names from locations in Connecticut.

Our members Firelands Electric serves homes, farms, and businesses, including several nature-based organizations. Honey Haven Farm began as a family dairy farm, but the owners stopped dairy operations in 2003 to concentrate on grain farming. They also began adding to a fledgling pumpkin crop, and today, that simple pumpkin patch has grown into a one-of-a-kind fall festival, spring greenhouse, and summer farm market. Fitch Pharm Farm maple syrup has been in production since 1989. The farm has turned to science and modern technology to help run the business. These advancements have made the work less time-consuming than the traditional bucket-and-tap methods of yesterday, but have kept the syrup just as sweet. Firelands Electric also serves Green Valley Growers. Located outside of Ashland, they sow over 2 million seeds every year. Open to the public from April 1 until mid-June, the retail greenhouse offers bedding annuals, perennials, hanging baskets, vegetable plants, and much more.

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020

Co-op Spotlight appears regularly in Ohio Cooperative Living to give a glimpse into the land and the people of Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives.


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Healthy

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Marysville’s Soda Pharm promotes medicine as food, food as medicine. STORY AND PHOTOS BY ALICIA ADAMS

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


Soda Pharm in Marysville, owned by Dawn and Carson Combs (opposite page, inset), features some typical coffeehouse fare but also offers innovative self-care items such as functional food and natural medicine herbs.

A

t first glance, the interior of Soda Pharm looks like your typical coffeehouse: exposed brick wall, comfy chairs and couches that welcome lingering stays, and a variety of chalkboards displaying the seasonal menu and the daily coffee roast. But then, alongside the espresso and treats selection, you’ll notice some not-so-typical offerings: probiotic lemonade, elderberry handcrafted soda, and a fire cider shooter. Welcome to Soda Pharm, where the old-fashioned pharmacy soda fountain concept is reborn — this time with the modern twist of innovative self-care through functional food and natural medicinal herbs. Dawn Combs and her husband, Carson, members of Marysville-based Union Rural Electric Cooperative, own the Marysville-based storefront apothecary. “We wanted to bring health to the level where you are — make it accessible in a way that hasn’t been done before,” says Combs, a certified herbalist who holds an M.A. in ethnobotany and is a nationally recognized functional food specialist. “We approach it from a completely nonjudgmental angle. You don’t want to give up your weekly Big Mac and fries? No problem. But let’s replace the Diet Coke with a healthy, tasty soda made with an herbal syrup that will help your digestion.”

well,” she says. “You can’t just focus on the physical only and expect to fully heal. It has to be more holistic: spiritual, psychological, and nutritional.” Dawn’s passion for health originated from her own struggles with infertility issues. Her quest for answers took her beyond the idea of eating vegetables and exercising to fully understanding the complex relationship between the modern environment and the human body, including reproductive health. Now the mother of two children, she’s poured her knowledge into articles, podcasts, an online study school, and three books on health and herbalism. She has been nationally recognized for her therapeutic honey spreads and other herbal products — all of which come from the Combses’ herb and honey farm, Mockingbird Meadows, also a URE member. “Our motto here at Soda Pharm is, ‘Let your food be your medicine and your medicine be your food,’” Combs says. “You’ll leave a little healthier than when you came in.” Soda Pharm, 123 N. Main St., Marysville, OH 43040. Fall hours are Tue.–Fri. 8 a.m.–7 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.–4 p.m. 614-354-5163; https://mockingbirdmeadows.com/soda-pharm.

Whether it is the genuine sourdough bread, the syrup and seltzer sodas that are made to order right in front of you, or the medicinal product selection, Soda Pharm provides a unique and tasty space to explore health. The store shelves feature Dawn’s own herbal tinctures and syrups with names like “Happy” and “Revive,” honey-and-herb mixtures like “Focus,” and a selection of loose-leaf teas with labels that read, “Headache Ease,” “Good Night,” and “Swallowed Emotions.” “When I do a personal consult with my clients, I address not only the physical side but the emotional side as

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  11


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

On the prowl Bobcats make a comeback in Ohio’s rural forestland. STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

B

obcats were supposedly extirpated from Ohio by 1850, but that may not actually have been the case — especially in the extreme eastern part of the state, particularly Belmont County. “In talking to some real oldtimers here, they tell me there have always been bobcats around,” says Bryan Postlethwait. “Just more now.” A field supervisor for the Division of Wildlife, Postlethwait oversees state wildlife officers in six southeastern counties, and in doing so, he logs a lot of driving time in his 4-wheel-drive pickup truck. “Bobcats certainly aren’t behind every tree,” he says, “but in the last few years, I’ve lost count of the number I’ve seen while driving, both live ’cats and roadkills.” Bobcats were taken off the state-endangered list in 2014. At the time of delisting, the population in Ohio

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020

was about 1,000 individuals, and since that time, the bobcat population has continued to increase in both size and distribution. The main reason for the growth is that Ohio still has a large amount of ideal yet unfilled bobcat habitat. While the bobcat population is well established in southeastern and southern Ohio, bobcats continue to expand and repopulate areas in the northeastern and western parts of the state. In addition, bobcats from neighboring states are augmenting the Ohio population. Traci Keller, wildlife care assistant manager at Lake Metroparks Wildlife Center, located east of Cleveland in Lake County, knows bobcats well. The rehabilitation center has worked with half a dozen bobcats over the past seven years.


Ask

chip!

Email Chip Gross with your outdoors questions at whchipgross@ gmail.com. Be sure to include “Ask Chip” in the subject of the email. Your question may be answered on www.ohiocoopliving.com!

www.ohiocoopliving.com “We are the only wildlife rehab facility in Ohio that works with bobcats, which we began doing in 2013,” says Keller. “Those first two cats, both females, were radio-collared prior to release as part of a study with the Division of Wildlife. We were able to track them for a year, and during that time, both had a litter of kittens. We also know through radio-telemetry data that one of the cats even swam the Muskingum River.” The last two cats that the center worked with — a male and female — were raised and then released back to the wild just this past May. I was fortunate to tag along that day to take the photos for this story. The two were found orphaned as 8-week-old kittens last fall in Belmont County. “They weighed just 2 pounds each when we received them and they definitely did not want anything to do with people — which is a good thing,” Keller says. “We began feeding them formula, which they lapped, then eventually added meat to their diet.” The bobcats were fed and cared for in a way that limited their exposure to humans. “We use specialized outdoor caging facilities with feeding chutes, and that helps us safely care for the cats with minimum human contact,” Keller says. “In fact, to keep them as wild as possible, we were not in direct contact with these last two bobcats for six months prior to their release.” The large cage where the cats were reared was outfitted with cameras so that caregivers could keep an eye on

them. There was also a webcam on the center’s website that allowed the public to check on them, too. The cats were released on a remote state wildlife area in Belmont County, an ideal habitat of dense forest with plenty of prey species and water nearby. They were not radio-collared but did have a microchip inserted beneath the skin at the base of the neck, so if ever found again, they can be individually identified. “It gave me goose bumps to watch them leave their transport crates and take their first steps back into the wild as adults,” Keller says. “After all our work with them over the past year, being able to return a pair of elusive apex predators back into the Ohio bobcat population is very exciting and rewarding.” W.H. “Chip” Gross (whchipgross@gmail.com) is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor and a member of Consolidated Cooperative.

Lake Metroparks employees Becca Moseley and Traci Keller (left) and Division of Wildlife employees Jeff Porter and Bryan Postlethwait (right) transport bobcats for release.

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  13


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GOOD EATS

Hiding in plain sight Looking for ways to get folks to eat their veggies? Here are some dishes loaded with “hidden” vegetables that your family will gobble up — and they’ll come back for more. RECIPES AND PHOTOS BY CATHERINE MURRAY

PURPLE POWER SMOOTHIE Prep: 2 minutes | Servings: 4 2 cups chopped red cabbage 1 frozen banana 1 cup diced cucumber 6 ounces low-fat vanilla yogurt ¼ cup water fresh blueberries for garnish 3 cups frozen blueberries In a blender or food processor, purée cabbage, cucumber, and water. Add frozen blueberries, frozen banana, and vanilla yogurt. Purée again until smooth. Garnish with fresh blueberries. To add more sweetness and a creamier texture, use an additional frozen banana.  Per serving: 131 calories, 1 gram fat (0.5 gram saturated fat), 3 milligrams cholesterol, 38 milligrams sodium, 29 grams total carbohydrates, 4 grams fiber, 4 grams protein.

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  15


CHEESE AND BACON SMUGGLERS Prep: 30 minutes | Cook: 20 minutes | Servings: 6 1 baking potato ¼ teaspoon black pepper 1 turnip 1 cup shredded cheddar  1 parsnip 8 slices cooked bacon, finely chopped 1 zucchini 1 leek (white part only), sliced 1 cup panko bread crumbs 2 to 4 large eggs ½ cup flour sour cream or applesauce (optional) ½ teaspoon salt Note: Vegetables listed in this recipe can be mixed and matched depending on what you have on hand. Colby jack or Swiss cheese could be used in place of cheddar. Coarsely grate potato, turnip, parsnip, and zucchini. In small batches, take handfuls of the mixture and squeeze out excess liquid into the sink. In a large bowl, combine bread crumbs, flour, salt, and pepper. Mix in grated vegetables, cheddar, bacon, and leek, reserving some bacon and cheddar for garnish. Crack one egg into the mixture at a time, mixing until loose patties can be formed. Carefully drop a handful of vegetable mixture into a greased skillet over medium-high heat and flatten out with spatula. Cook in batches, spaced 1 inch apart, 3 to 4 minutes per side, or until goldenbrown and crispy. Top with extra crumbled bacon, cheddar, sour cream, or applesauce, if desired. Per serving: 402 calories, 16.5 grams fat (5.5 grams saturated fat), 156 milligrams cholesterol, 1,099 milligrams sodium, 39 grams total carbohydrates, 5 grams fiber, 24 grams protein.

FAMILY-STYLE SPAGHETTI AND MEATBALLS Prep: 30 minutes | Cook: 30 minutes | Servings: 6 8 ounces white mushrooms ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese ¾ cup mashed sweet potato 1 egg 1 pound ground turkey 2 cups fresh spinach  2 teaspoons Italian seasoning 2 cups chopped cauliflower  1 teaspoon garlic powder 32-ounce jar pasta sauce  ½ teaspoon salt 12 ounces spaghetti, cooked ½ cup bread crumbs Note: If you’re not so sure about hiding vegetables in both the meatballs and the sauce, try out one at a time. Meatballs can be made ahead in batches and frozen for up to 3 months.  Preheat oven to 425 F. Grind mushrooms in a food processor. Transfer to a large, dry skillet, sprinkle with a dash of salt (optional), and sauté mushrooms on medium-high for 3 to 5 minutes to remove some of the moisture. Set aside and let cool. In a large bowl, thoroughly mix mushrooms, sweet potato, ground turkey, Italian seasoning, garlic powder, salt, bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, and egg. Create 20 to 25 1½-inch meatballs; space evenly on a baking sheet with edges and bake until fully cooked through, about 20 minutes.  In a food processor, purée spinach and cauliflower. Steam in large skillet with a few tablespoons of water for about 5 minutes. Add pasta sauce and meatballs to skillet; stir and cook until heated through. Top pasta with meatballs and sauce. Serve sprinkled with cheese, if desired. Per serving: 548 calories, 16 grams fat (3.5 grams saturated fat), 153 milligrams cholesterol, 1,050 milligrams sodium, 68 grams total carbohydrates, 7 grams fiber, 36 grams protein.

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


SUPERHERO OATMEAL Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 6 to 8 hours | Servings: 8 4 cups rolled oats 2 large carrots, peeled ½ cup packed brown sugar ¼ cup chopped dates or raisins  1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon ground ginger 2 cups milk or alternative milk  ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg 2 cups water ¼ teaspoon ground cloves walnuts, diced apple, dates, or raisins (optional toppings) ½ teaspoon salt  2 large apples, peeled  Coat inside of slow cooker with cooking spray. Mix together oats, brown sugar, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, and salt. Grate apples and carrots in a food processor or hand grater. Place all ingredients into slow cooker (except for toppings); stir well to combine. Cover with lid and cook on low 6 to 8 hours. If desired, serve topped with walnuts, diced apple, dates, or raisins.  Per serving: 274 calories, 4 grams fat (2 grams saturated fat), 5 milligrams cholesterol, 195 milligrams sodium, 53 grams total carbohydrates, 6 grams fiber, 8 grams protein.

Have you tried one of our recipes? Do you have a recipe to share with other Ohio co-op members? Visit the Member Interactive page on www.ohiocoopliving.com to find recipes submitted by our readers and upload yours.

www.ohiocoopliving.com While you’re there, see a video of a couple of these tasty dishes being prepared.

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  17


We would like to thank the following for their generosity in supporting our efforts to fight blood cancers at the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s 2020 virtual Light the Night Walk:

Gold Sponsors Tom and Mary Beth Alban National Rural Utilities Cooperative Finance Corporation

N.F. Mansuetto & Sons, Inc. George V. Hamilton, Inc.

Silver Sponsors James Alban

Donna Cole

American Oncology

F&M Mafco

The Community Foundation of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives

Patrick and Nancy O’Loughlin

National Renewables Cooperative Organization

One Source Advisors Tri-State Coating and Machine

Bronze Sponsors Artina Promotional Products Frank and Jill Carsonie Cleveland Pump and Repair Services Martin and Claire Dasler Doe Weldon Trucking Kurt Helfrich Patrick and Julie Higgins Highland Consulting Gordan and Trudy Iseminger Tom Kain Randy Keefer Rick and Wendy Lemonds

Louis and Barbara Lukancic Nick Mascia Paul and Jayne McKnight Dwight and Denise Miller Moly-Cop USA Neumann Company Ron Overstreet/Worthington DQ Jim Palmisano Bill Roberts Steve Rowe Neal and Erin Shah Niranjan and Vina Shah

Thank you!

Your support was critical as our company exceeded its ambitious goal of $50,000 raised for this year’s event. 18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT/CEO

Energy efficiency at home

I

t’s been a long 2020 for everyone, and as we close the year, we look ahead to the holidays and winter months. Many are spending more time at home, and it would be an excellent opportunity to make your home more energy efficient this winter. This project can be a fun adventure for the entire family and well worth your time when savings add up throughout the entire year. Caulk, weatherstripping, and insulation help seal gaps, keeping heated air in. Heating and cooling your home is 55 to 60% of your home energy cost. Attic insulation should be of R38 to R49 for cold Ohio winters. Don’t forget to check the “over and under.” One of your best bets for saving is a full ductwork inspection under floors and over ceilings. Collapsed connections, tears, animal damage, and register gaps can leak conditioned air into unused spaces. Keeping that extra fridge in the garage or basement? If it’s older than 15 years, you are consuming 40% more energy than today’s ENERGY STAR refrigerators. Refrigeration alone can be 5% of your energy bill! Younger children can be energy efficiency superheroes by making sure lights are turned off in empty rooms and electronics like gaming consoles and TVs have been turned off. Everyone can join in by unplugging phone chargers that aren’t in use. Phantom loads like these are costing

the average American household $100 per year according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Children can also assist with replacing incandescent and/ or CFL bulbs with LED bulbs. Don’t forget to adjust your thermostat when you leave the house. Also make sure you aren’t dressed for summer in your Glenn W. Miller house during the winter. Each PRESIDENT/CEO reduction on your thermostat by one degree can cut heating costs by as much as 5%. Finally, heating water accounts for 12% of the average home’s energy use. Set your water heater’s thermostat to 120 degrees or lower. Minor changes like these can create major savings on your energy bill. As always, if you have any questions regarding your electric consumption or energy efficiency tips, you can contact us directly, visit our website at hwecoop.com, or follow us on Facebook. You can also reach out to schedule a home energy assessment with our energy advisor. We are always here to help you.

NOVEMBER 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


MAKE A DIFFERENCE WANT TO IN YOUR COMMUNITY?

Your co-op is seeking trustee nominees and volunteers to serve on the nominating committee. As a member of Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, you are an owner of your electric cooperative. You have an opportunity every June to express your ownership interest by exercising the cooperative principle of “one member, one vote” during the annual trustee election.

District 7 — Jackson Township, Ashland County, and Congress Township, Wayne County.

The HWEC nine-member board of trustees is the governing body of your cooperative. The board meets monthly to review and renew policies, make business decisions concerning the cooperative, review financial performance, establish rates, and approve all patronage capital credits payments. At the November board meeting, trustees at Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative will appoint a nominating committee, which will be responsible for selecting candidates for the 2021 Holmes-Wayne Electric Board of Trustees election. The nine-member committee consists of one member who resides in each of the nine districts. The nominating committee will meet in early 2021 at the cooperative office to select nominees for trustees from District 1, District 3, and District 7. The committee selects qualified candidates based on members’ applications. If you are interested in participating in the nominating committee or running for trustee, please contact HWEC’s Shay Lynch at 866-674-1055 to receive more information.

District 1 — Paint and Walnut Creek townships, Holmes County; Paint Township, Wayne County; Sugar Creek Township, Stark County; and Wayne Township, Tuscarawas County.

District 3 — Hanover, Lake, Mohican, and Perry townships, Ashland County; Ripley and Washington townships, Holmes County; and Clinton Township, Wayne County.

20  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2020


YOU CAN REPORT YOUR OUTAGE VIA

TEXT 55050

WITH THE WORD “OUTAGE”

You can now report your power outage via TEXT! Outage texting is simple and fast! Text your outage to 55050. You can put any valuable information in your text like “tree on line” or “broken pole,” for example. You will receive a confirmation text of the outage report.

1. You must have your cellphone number associated with your account.

3. If you have more than one account, you can name each account to report specific outages. Example: Account 123456 – House Account 78910 – Barn When you have more than one account and text an outage, you will receive a reply text asking which accounts are out, or you can select all accounts.

2. You can add more than one cellphone number to your account. You can easily add cellphone numbers through our website, www.hwecoop.com, or by calling us.

As always, you can still report outages via our toll-free number, 866-674-1055, and our mobile app, SmartHub, if you prefer.

Key features:

NOVEMBER 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   20A


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Unclaimed capital credits In 2016, Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, Inc. mailed a general retirement of capital credits. Many checks were returned to us as undeliverable and, to date, these refunds remain unclaimed. Per the cooperative’s Code of Regulations, the unclaimed capital credits are reallocated to current cooperative members four years following the original mailing and following two consecutive notices in this publication. This is the second notice. Anyone with information on these members or their heirs whose name and last known residence is listed is asked to contact the cooperative office toll-free at 866-674-1055. Contact must be made by Jan. 1, 2021, 60 days following the last date of the publication of this notice. ACKERET WILMA, WOOSTER, OH ADAMS JOHN S, HOUSTON, TX ADAMS LEROY, WASHINGTON, DC ADENA CORP, MANSFIELD, OH ADKINS DAVID L, WEST SALEM, OH ADKINSON ROBERT G JA, OK ADLER CARL R, SAGAMORE HILLS, OH AGRI-INDUSTRIES CORP, WOOSTER, OH AKINS SHARON R, MILLERSBURG, OH ALEXANDER ANTHONY, AKRON, OH ALLEN RONALD E, WEST SALEM, OH ALLESEE RICHARD W, WOOSTER, OH ALLISON DALE, WEST SALEM, OH ALLISON EUGENE, BIG PRAIRIE, OH ALLRIDGE GRAYLING, ORRVILLE, OH ALLTEL COMMUNICATIONS INC, LITTLE ROCK, AR AMBILT CORP, RITTMAN, OH AMERICAN WEATHERSEAL, URBANDALE, IA AMOS TIMOTHY N, WOOSTER, OH AMTEX OIL & GAS INC, CANTON, OH ANDERSON ROBERT E, WOOSTER, OH ANDERSON TODD D, HILLIARD, OH ANGLE MATTHEW A, RITTMAN, OH ANSLOW LARRY, DOVER, OH ARBOGAST KEITH F, MEDINA, OH ARGABRITE SHANNON D, STRASBURG, OH ARMAN PAUL, BIG PRAIRIE, OH ARMCHAIR THEATER, SEVILLE, OH ARMSTRONG DELLA M, MILAN, OH ARMSTRONG JEFFREY D, MEDINA, OH ARNEY REUBEN S, CLEVELAND, OH ARNOLD RANDY K, LAKEVILLE, OH ARONHALT JAMES W, SHREVE, OH ARTRIP TOMMY M, WOOSTER, OH ATTERHOLT BEN A, LAKEVILLE, OH ATWOOD ENERGY INC, HOUSTON, TX ATWOOD RESOURCES INC, HOUSTON, TX AUSTIN RETIREMENT VILL, CLEVELAND, OH BJ OF OHIO INC, ZANESVILLE, OH BACA JOSEPH W, WOOSTER, OH BAILEY JACK D, SMITHVILLE, OH BAILEY JOHN L, ASHLAND, OH BAIRD MICHAEL S, MILLERSBURG, OH BAIRD SUSAN E, MILLERSBURG, OH BAKER CAROLYN D, WOOSTER, OH BAKER JEFF L, WOOSTER, OH BAKER LUCILLE S, WARSAW, OH BALAS DAVID A, APPLE CREEK, OH BALLANTYNE KATHLEEN A, SEVILLE, OH BALLEK STEVE J, CLEVELAND, OH BARAT SCOTT P, RITTMAN, OH BARKEY STEVEN R, WOOSTER, OH BARNBY RICHARD J, WEST SALEM, OH BARNES JAMES K, ROCK ISLAND, IL BARNES MATTHEW A, WEST SALEM, OH

BARNES RONALD L, SIMPSONVILLE, SC BARNETT DON, WOOSTER, OH BARNETT WILLIAM B, MILLERSBURG, OH BARNETTE EMMA E, KILLBUCK, OH BARNETTE JEWEL A, APPLE CREEK, OH BARONE WESLEY J, BURBANK, OH BARR EDWARD, STOW, OH BARRY JOHN C, CRESTON, OH BATDORF ROBERT M, WOOSTER, OH BATES SHON C, MEDINA, OH BATTERSBY CHARLES, WOOSTER, OH BAYHA WILLIAM E, MILLERSBURG, OH BEACHY HENRY E, WOOSTER, OH BEACHY LEROY II, MILLERSBURG, OH BEACHY MAYNARD E, SUGARCREEK, OH BEACHY ROSS L, MEDINA, OH BEACHY TRUCKING, SUGARCREEK, OH BEAMISH RUSSELL L, MILLERSBURG, OH BEANS PATRICIA E, MINERAL CITY, OH BEASLEY LARRY E, GREENVILLE, SC BEATTY MARTHA, GLENMONT, OH BECK CHRIS J, AUSTIN, TX BECKER JAN F, KILLBUCK, OH BECKER WILLIAM, BOTKINS, OH BELL CHARLES E, WOOSTER, OH BENNETT THOMAS J, LAKEVILLE, OH BENSON RANDALL S, FREDERICKSBURG, OH BENTON LORIE L, WOOSTER, OH BERNHART RONNIE E, FREDERICKSBURG, OH BERRY ROGER H, LOUDONVILLE, OH BIENZ ROBERT A, NORTON, OH BIGGS DAVID E, GALION, OH BIGLEY WELDON SR, WEST SALEM, OH BILLHEIMER RONALD L, SMITHVILLE, OH BILLINGS BRENDA J, BURBANK, OH BISHOP THELMA G, OKAHUMPKA, FL BLACKSTONE LINDA, HAMDEN, OH BLACKWELL DORIS J, MANSFIELD, OH BLAGG GEORGE G, APPLE CREEK, OH BLANKENSHIP LELA A, WEST SALEM, OH BLAYLOCK TONY G, MEDINA, OH BLOCK NANCY B, LINDEN, TN BLOUGH TODD E, WEST SALEM, OH BLU OIL CO, DANVILLE, OH BOGGS MICHAEL K, POWELL, OH BOLES RICHARD, WOOSTER, OH BOOTH JOHN, WOOSTER, OH BOOTH RUTH H, KILLBUCK, OH BOWLING DONALD E, MAX MEADOWS, VA BOYER DANIEL E, PHILO, OH BRAMMER HOMER D, ASHLAND, OH BRANDENBURG ALFRED CJR, WEST SALEM, OH BRAUCHER MICHAEL E, DUNDEE, OH BRAUN ALBERTA A, CLEVELAND, OH BRENEMAN BARRY W, MEDINA, OH

20B  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2020

BRENTLINGER DAVID A, CHIPPEWA LAKE, OH BRIGGS ROGER LJR, WOOSTER, OH BRITT BILLY R, LOUDONVILLE, OH BROCK KENNY V, AUBURN, AL BROGAN LARRY L, BERLIN, OH BROWN ARTHUR J, MELROSE PARK, IL BROWN EVERETT D, TROY, AL BROWN KEVIN D, WEST SALEM, OH BROWN KIMBERLY C, WOOSTER, OH BROWN LINDA A, CLEVELAND, OH BROWN RANDALL, WEST SALEM, OH BROWN RANDI S, WEST SALEM, OH BROWN TAMMY L, BIG PRAIRIE, OH BROZKA LORI, CHATHAM, VA BRYAN PATRICIA A, MOUNT VERNON, OH BULLOCK WILLIAM J, UNIONTOWN, OH BURFORD DOUGLAS J, WOOSTER, OH BURGE GEORGE D, BLUEFIELD, VA BURKEY JAMES A, APPLE CREEK, OH BURKEY LORETTA A, DUNDEE, OH BURKEY THELMA F, KILLBUCK, OH BURLESON CLIFFORD P, UNION CITY, IN BURRIS DEBORAH M, CRESTON, OH BURSON WILLIAM L, LIBBY, MT BURT B R, MILLERSBURG, OH BURWELL WAVA L, COLUMBUS, OH BUTLER JOEL L, MILLERSBURG, OH BUTLER ROBERT W, LOUDONVILLE, OH BUTRAM EDDY M, ASHLAND, OH CADLE SHARON H, MILLERSBURG, OH CAIN DAVID C, BURBANK, OH CALLANDAR-KIMBERELL INC, CERULEAN, KY CAMPBELL GARY PJR, SCIO, OH CAMPBELL JAMES R, NASHVILLE, OH CAMPBELL SUSAN K, SHREVE, OH CAPICCIONI SAMUEL J, MEDINA, OH CAREY JOHN E, WOOSTER, OH CARLESS RESOURCES INC, CAMBRIDGE, OH CARMCO INC, WOOSTER, OH CARPENTER JAMES JR, KILLBUCK, OH CARPENTER P M, SUMMERFIELD, FL CARR SHARON, SHREVE, OH CARROLL CHARLES, WOOSTER, OH CARTER C R, SMITHVILLE, OH CARTER ELIZABETH A, DANVILLE, OH CARTER JERRY D, BURBANK, OH CASEY DANNY K, WOOSTER, OH CASGRAIN PETER B, WOOSTER, OH CASSELL JOHN L, CRESTON, OH CAVE CHARLES A, SPRING, TX CAWTHRA DARCI A, BIG PRAIRIE, OH CCM CORP, WOOSTER, OH CERRETA JEFFREY M, LOUDONVILLE, OH CHAFIN HELEN, WEST SALEM, OH CHAMSPEC USA INC., ORRVILLE, OH


CHAPMAN BRUCE G, SHREVE, OH CHAPMAN JASON, STRASBURG, OH CHASTAIN JAMES E, ELYRIA, OH CHERRY TREVA, BURBANK, OH CHRISTIAN RADIO, MILLERSBURG, OH CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY, BRECKSVILLE, OH CHURCH SCOTT A, MEDINA, OH CINCIALA DIANE M, WEST SALEM, OH CLARK ANNA M, MOUNT VERNON, OH CLARK LUCAS W, SULLIVAN, OH CLARK TROY T, SARASOTA, FL CLEVENGER RODNEY, BURBANK, OH CLINTON OIL, WEST FARMINGTON, OH COBLENTZ MOSES A, HOLMESVILLE, OH COFFMAN WILLIAM P, WEST SALEM, OH COFSCO INC, WOOSTER, OH COGGINS VELDE E, KILLBUCK, OH COLE STACEY L, WEST SALEM, OH COLEGROVE LESLIE O, ASHLAND, OH COLLINS MICHEL G, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL COLOTTO JENNIFER L, BURBANK, OH COLUMBIA NATURAL RES, APPLE CREEK, OH COLUMBUS OILFIELD EXPL, WESTERVILLE, OH CONLEY CHARLES E, CUYAHOGA FALLS, OH CONN ROBERT OJR, WOOSTER, OH CONNOR WILLIAM R, ROCHESTER, MI CONRAIL CORP, CINCINNATI, OH COOK ROBERT A, DENVER, CO COOL ROY L, WEST SALEM, OH COOPER EARNEST M, WOOSTER, OH COOPER STEVEN J, SHREVE, OH CORNET PIETER J, BOKEELIA, FL CORNS JUSTINE, MILLERSBURG, OH CORRELL ELLEN D, LODI, OH CORRIGAN JOSEPH C, MILLERSBURG, OH COSTELLO JOSEPH P, HEATH, TX COSTELLO RICHARD L, MILLERSBURG, OH COTTLE MARTHA M, GLENMONT, OH COUGHLIN THOMAS F, CHARLOTTE, NC COVER REBECCA A, WEST SALEM, OH COX CARL C 3, WOOSTER, OH CRABTREE GEORGE FSR, WEST SALEM, OH CRABTREE HOWARD O, WEST SALEM, OH CRAFT LYNN O, KILLBUCK, OH CRAMER HARRY E, DUNDEE, OH CRAWFORD BARBARA M, WEST SALEM, OH CREBS TODD, POLK, OH CRIDER MARIAN S, MEDINA, OH CRISS JEFFREY G, WOOSTER, OH CRITES ETHAN R, SHREVE, OH CROSS DAN W, SHREVE, OH CRUMMEL EARL R, AKRON, OH CUNNINGHAM MARK E, SHREVE, OH CUNNINGHAM RODNEY W, LAKEVILLE, OH CURTIS DAVID M, FAYETTEVILLE, GA CUSTOM FORKLIFT SERVICE, WEST SALEM, OH CUTTING JAMES E, ITHACA, NY D & C OIL CO, CANTON, OH DAMBERGER WILLIAM E, BURBANK, OH DAMON CLAYTON, WEST SALEM, OH DANA HAWKINS KAYE SHAMP AND, KILLBUCK, OH DARNALL STEVEN L, WEST SALEM, OH DARNELL ELWOOD, CLEVELAND, OH DAUGHERTY JASON A, WOOSTER, OH DAVENPORT LARRY ASR, MEDINA, OH DAVIS BARBARA E, GLENMONT, OH DAVIS EDWARD, MANSFIELD, OH DAVIS RICHARD K, MEDINA, OH DAWSON GREGG W, LOUDONVILLE, OH DAWSON MELBA E, CRESTON, OH

DAYE THOMAS O, WOOSTER, OH DECOST NORMAN J, WOOSTER, OH DEETER PAUL D, ASHLAND, OH DELOR JIM, KILLBUCK, OH DETWEILER JANET P, SHARPSBURG, GA DEVENNEY HELEN K, WEST SALEM, OH DEVORE ESTHER, MOUNT VERNON, OH DEVORE GEORGE B, MOUNT VERNON, OH DEVORE MICHAEL E, JEROMESVILLE, OH DEVORE WALTER L, HARRISVILLE, WV DEWEY J R, PETERSBURG, TN DICKENS RUBY M, WEST SALEM, OH DILYARD THOMAS H, WEST SALEM, OH DITTMER JAMES E, APPLE CREEK, OH DOLAN ELLEN M, GLEN ELLYN, IL DONALDSON MARY E, COSHOCTON, OH DONOHUE FRANKIE, JEROMESVILLE, OH DORETICH EUGENIA M, MILLERSBURG, OH DORIS M. HOUSER POA, WOOSTER, OH DORSEY DAVID A, CRESTON, OH DOTY GLENN, WOOSTER, OH DOUBLE R TRUCKING, MILLERSBURG, OH DOYLE TIMOTHY L, WOOSTER, OH DRAGER DANIEL L, WOOSTER, OH DRAGOVICH JAMES E, RITTMAN, OH DRAKE COLE, WOOSTER, OH DROUHARD CANDACE L, WEST SALEM, OH DUFF CHARLES H, MILLERSBURG, OH DUFF WAYNE A, MILLERSBURG, OH DULUDE ROXIE M, POLK, OH DUMONT FRED E, WEST LIBERTY, OH DUNCAN DOROTHY, MILLERSBURG, OH DUNCAN SUSAN M, WOOSTER, OH DUNHAM TIM A, MANSFIELD, OH DUNN FRED A, WEST SALEM, OH DUNN THOMAS W, BIG PRAIRIE, OH DURR FRED, MILLERSBURG, OH DURST EMERSON L, KILLBUCK, OH DUSTY DRILLING & PROD, NEW LEXINGTON, OH DUVALL MICHAEL D, DOVER, OH DYGERT CLAYTON E, WOOSTER, OH EAST HOLMES WATER CO, MILLERSBURG, OH EASTERDAY DENISE J, LODI, OH EASTON MARK F, GROVE CITY, OH EAVES RHONDA S, WEST SALEM, OH EBERHARDT KEVIN D, WEST SALEM, OH ECONEX NORTH, STANDISH, MI EDGAR KENOVA, DALTON, OH EDGELL BONNIE, WOOSTER, OH EDWARDS RONNIE L, BIG PRAIRIE, OH EHRLINSPIEL MELINDA K, WOOSTER, OH ELLIOTT BRUCE D, WEST SALEM, OH ELLIOTT REX, HOWARD, OH ELLIOTT RICHARD, MILLERSBURG, OH ELLIOTT RICHARD H, WOOSTER, OH ELSON TERRY L, ASHLAND, OH ESTEP CHRISTINE M, DUNCANSVILLE, PA ESTES PAULA M, HOMERVILLE, OH EVANS JERI L, KILLBUCK, OH EVANS ROBERT A, TALLULAH, LA EVANS TIMOTHY D, MILLERSBURG, OH EVANS ZACHARY J, HOLMESVILLE, OH EVELAND THOMAS D, SHREVE, OH FAGAN VIVIAN L, FAIR BLUFF, NC FAIN RONALD C, SHREVE, OH FAIR CLINTON A, MEDINA, OH FAIR FOREST, WEST SALEM, OH FARISON JOHN L, JEROMESVILLE, OH FEHR DAVID P, HOLMESVILLE, OH FEIN MADELINE G, WOOSTER, OH

FENDER CLETUS, WALNUT CREEK, OH FERGUSON EARNEST J, WOOSTER, OH FERGUSON KENNETH H, MILLERSBURG, OH FETTER DANIEL R, INDIANAPOLIS, IN FETZER REED A, MARSHALLVILLE, OH FINDLEY MATTHEW D, MANSFIELD, OH FINN STEVEN J, SHREVE, OH FIQUEROA FRANK J, MILLERSBURG, OH FIRESTONE RONALD, BRECKSVILLE, OH FISCHER EDWARD J, WEST SALEM, OH FISHBURN JEFFREY D, WOOSTER, OH FISHER MICHAEL P, MEDINA, OH FLADDA ROBIN M, BOWERSTON, OH FLENER-MURPHY ORLEANA, WOOSTER, OH FLINN DOROTHY J, MILLERSBURG, OH FLINN MYRTIS L, BURBANK, OH FLURY DOUGLAS G, WEST SALEM, OH FLYNN S D, CRESTON, OH FOLLOWAY BRETT L, WOOSTER, OH FORCE GARY, MILLERSBURG, OH FORD ROBERT A, WEST SALEM, OH FOREMAN GEOFFREY H, WOOSTER, OH FRANKS RUSSELL R, MUSKEGON, MI FRANKS WALTER SJR, CRESTON, OH FRAZEE PAUL O, WALHONDING, OH FREDERICK DORRAINA T, WOOSTER, OH FREDERICK EARL E, WOOSTER, OH FREDERICK EDWARD E, WOOSTER, OH FREEMAN DAVID R, COVENTRY TOWNSHIP, OH FRIEDMAN WILLIAM J, WOOSTER, OH FRIEDRICH DAVID H, SHREVE, OH FRINK COREY M, FORT WAYNE, IN FRONTZ KAREN A, WEST SALEM, OH FUHRER DONALD J, STRASBURG, OH FUQUA WILLIAM A, PARK CITY, IL FURON COMPANY, AURORA, OH GADDIS GALE B, NEW FRANKLIN, OH GAETHKE-BRAND JANE E, EUGENE, OR GALBRAITH FRIEDA M, WOOSTER, OH GALION DUMP BODIES, GALION, OH GALLATIN JOANN, HOMERVILLE, OH GALLEY ELSIE M, MILLERSBURG, OH GALLION BROOKS, MILLERSBURG, OH GARRETT JOSEPH M, BELPRE, OH GARVER RICHARD M, WEST SALEM, OH GEIGER WILLIAM G, ARLINGTON, OH GEISINGER JEROME DSR, BOLIVAR, OH GEMAYAL ANDREA L, PAINESVILLE, OH GEORGE CHARLES D, WOOSTER, OH GEORGE JOHN R, WOOSTER, OH GEORGEN JUNIOR C, WOOSTER, OH GERALD A MARTI, WEST SALEM, OH GERBER DEWEY L, WEST SALEM, OH GILBERT JASON W, WEST SALEM, OH GILES CHARLES, SPOKANE VALLEY, WA GILLISPIE ROBERT, GATES MILLS, OH GILT ANNITA L, LOUDONVILLE, OH GINGERICH DELILA, HENDERSON, NV GLASS TONIA S, MILLERSBURG, OH GMITTER GLENN S, WATERVILLE, OH GOLOJA MIKE, BROOK PARK, OH GOLTRY ROSEMARY A, LOUDONVILLE, OH GOOD ANGIE, BURBANK, OH GOODALL MELISSA M, SHREVE, OH GRABER LEE, PALMVIEW, TX GRAHAM CHARLES T, WEST SALEM, OH GRAHAM DAWN R, WEST SALEM, OH GRANT JEFFREY W, MC DOWELL, VA GRAY ROXIE E, WEST SALEM, OH GRAY TIFFANIE I, WEST SALEM, OH

NOVEMBER 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   20C


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES GREBENIK RICHARD, BROOK PARK, OH GREEN ALICE A, SYRACUSE, OH GREEN DAVID I, SUN CITY, AZ GREEN JAMES A, WOOSTER, OH GREEN JOSEPH O, ORRVILLE, OH GREEN KEITH A, WOOSTER, OH GRESKO TANYA, BUCYRUS, OH GRIFFEY CHARLES, CLINTON, OH GRIFFEY JOSEPH, WEST SALEM, OH GRISCHOW JOHN R, AKRON, OH GRISSINGER RICK, MARENGO, OH GROSS PAT S, BONITA SPRINGS, FL GROSS TIMOTHY P, DALTON, OH GROUVER BARBARA S, WOOSTER, OH GRUESER ROBERT D, VINCENT, OH GTE TELEPHONE OPERATIONS, COLUMBUS, OH GUARDIAN MGMT, MARION, OH GUARDIAN MGMT, MARION, OH GUCKERT B C, FOUNTAIN HILLS, AZ GUERIN PHYLLIS, CHICAGO, IL GUY PERRY D, ISELIN, NJ H & H PRODUCING, BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH HABEGGER JEFFREY S, TALLAHASSEE, FL HAHN EDNA J, BURBANK, OH HAHN STEVE, WOOSTER, OH HAHN TROY A, FINDLAY, OH HALKIAS MARTHA, LUGOFF, SC HALL JONATHAN N, WOOSTER, OH HAMILTON BARBARA A, WOOSTER, OH HAMILTON DONALD, HOMERVILLE, OH HAMILTON DONALD E, WEST SALEM, OH HAMILTON GENEVIEVE, RED WING, MN HAMILTON MICHAEL H, WEST SALEM, OH HAMMERS JUDY L, WEST SALEM, OH HAMRICK DENVER, MEDINA, OH HANEY TAMARA J, WOOSTER, OH HANSEL KEVIN L, BEACH CITY, OH HARBERT ALBERT R, SHREVE, OH HARDWAY CLAYTON J, HASTINGS, FL HARMON MATTHEW O, APPLE CREEK, OH HARRIS JOHN S, WOOSTER, OH HARRIS KATHRYN, HOLMESVILLE, OH HARRIS ROBERT M, LITTLESTOWN, PA HARRIS TONI J, ASHLAND, OH HART KENNETH E, MILLERSBURG, OH HASELOW JULIE A, WEST SALEM, OH HASKINS BETTY, BENTON, PA HASKINS CHRISTINA L, SMITHVILLE, OH HATZIS JAMES G, CUYAHOGA FALLS, OH HAUGHT BERYL, CANTON, OH HAVEN ANDREA D, AKRON, OH HAVEN CHAD, HOLGATE, OH HAVEN JOHN A, BURBANK, OH HAYES JAMES H, NAPLES, FL HAYNES LINDA J, NOVA, OH HECKER JACK E, WEST SALEM, OH HEILMAN FREEDA, WEST SALEM, OH HEIM THOMAS E, ELYRIA, OH HEINEY ROGER, WOOSTER, OH HEINTZ LEAH, WOOSTER, OH HELDRETH EVERETT C, LITCHFIELD, OH HELLER MALCOLM T, BROOKVILLE, OH HELMAN KENNETH, WEST SALEM, OH HENDERSHOTT HELEN, WOOSTER, OH HENDERSON BERCHEL, MILLERSBURG, OH HENKEL JOHN W, CAMBRIDGE, OH HENNESSY JOHN D, DUNDEE, OH HENRY CURTIS P, MANSFIELD, OH HERSHBERGER DALE D, KILLBUCK, OH HERSHBERGER DOROTHY, PASADENA, TX

HERSHBERGER FLORENCE J, WOOSTER, OH HERSHBERGER RAYMOND A, BIG PRAIRIE, OH HERSHBERGER REALTY, WOOSTER, OH HESCHT DOUGLAS K, FREMONT, OH HESKAMP NAN D, MEDINA, OH HICKS CAROLYN J, POLK, OH HIKA INC, WEST SALEM, OH HILBERT LARRY, WOOSTER, OH HILL HALLIE L, DUNDEE, OH HILL HOWARD RJR, DUNDEE, OH HILTY ROSCOE, SMITHVILLE, OH HILTY ROSCOE, APPLE CREEK, OH HINES MARK E, MILLERSBURG, OH HINKLE CYNTHIA A, CANTON, OH HIRSCHL GERTRUDE, WOOSTER, OH HITES JAMES WJR, BIG PRAIRIE, OH HOCHSTETLER INC, HOLMESVILLE, OH HODER HANS L, WOOSTER, OH HODGE MARGARET A, PENINSULA, OH HOFFMAN CAROLE L, STRONGSVILLE, OH HOLCOMB WANDA K, WOOSTER, OH HOLIDAY RUSSELL L, STERLING, OH HOLLIDAY JOSEPH E, CLEVELAND, OH HOLMDEN KENT L, LODI, OH HOLMES LARRY EJR, NEWCOMERSTOWN, OH HOLT HUGH P, SHREVE, OH HOOLEY LISA K, APPLE CREEK, OH HOOVER ALBERT J, SHREVE, OH HOOVER BETTY, DANVILLE, OH HOOVER CHRISTEEN K, SHREVE, OH HOPKINS DIANA D, NASHVILLE, OH HORTIN & HUFFMAN, WORTHINGTON, OH HOSTETLER SAM A, MILLERSBURG, OH HOTT DAVID, SMITHVILLE, OH HOWARD RUSSELL ASR, WINESBURG, OH HOWLAND RHONDA M, THREE RIVERS, MI HOWMAN MERRY J, WEST SALEM, OH HUBNER DAN, SUMTER, SC HUEGLE RUSSELL WSR, DOYLESTOWN, OH HUFFINES CHRISTOPHER D, WOOSTER, OH HUGHES GEORGE A, CRESTON, OH HUGHES JEAN M, DELPHI, IN HUNT DAVID M, SHREVE, OH HUNT JOHN FSR, ASHLAND, OH HUNTER JAMES S, DANVILLE, OH HUNTER NANCY C, KILLBUCK, OH HURAYT ANTHONY A, MILLERSBURG, OH HUTCHINS JAMES A, WALKER, WV HUTTON RONALD C, BURBANK, OH ICKES LUELLA M, WOOSTER, OH ILEY JAMES E, WEST SALEM, OH IMARS RAYMOND M, POLK, OH IPPCO, MILLERSBURG, OH ISAACS WILLIAM E, ASHLAND, OH J & B ENTERPRISE, FREDERICKSBURG, OH J & J OIL & GAS, SMITHVILLE, OH J & J WOODCRAFT, MILLERSBURG, OH JACKSON IRENE C, EAST LIVERPOOL, OH JACOBS CHESTER H, WEST SALEM, OH JACOBS LABEN C, MEDINA, OH JACOBS TAMMY D, CONESVILLE, OH JAMES VERSIL N, SHREVE, OH JANAWAY E E, NEW ALBANY, OH JAROSCAK ANDREW P, AVON LAKE, OH JARRETT DAVID L, STERLING, OH JARVIS DENNIS L, MEDINA, OH JAY PALLET ALL, MILLERSBURG, OH JEANDERVIN THERMAN G, KILLBUCK, OH JENKINS GEORGE K, KILLBUCK, OH JENNEY WILLIAM C, JOHNSTOWN, OH

20D  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2020

JETSTREAM POWER INTERNA, HOLMESVILLE, OH JEVNIKAR GREG M, GALION, OH JILLS COUNTRY ART, WOOSTER, OH JOHNSON FERN F, FRESNO, OH JOHNSON MATTHEW D, CANAL FULTON, OH JOHNSON ROSE G, MILLERSBURG, OH JOHNSON WENDELL C, WEST SALEM, OH JONES DONNA M, APPLE CREEK, OH JONES MARGARET A, DUNDEE, OH JONES MYRA J, DUNDEE, OH JONES OPAL M, HOMERVILLE, OH JONES RICHARD D, MILLERSBURG, OH JONES SPACELINK LTD, LODI, OH JONES WILLIAM H, LAKEVILLE, OH JOSLYN ROBERT O, PRINCEVILLE, HI JOY IDA, MILLERSBURG, OH JRD ENERGY COMPANY, WOOSTER, OH JUREATIC CHARLES RSR, WEST SALEM, OH JUSTICE DANIEL S, MILLERSBURG, OH KAIN NITA, ORRVILLE, OH KANDEL JULIET G, WOOSTER, OH KANDOLA KRISTOFFE J, CLEVELAND, OH KAPPER ROBERT C, APPLE CREEK, OH KASER MARJORIE R, WAYNESBURG, OH KAUFFMAN ETHEL, BERLIN, OH KAUFMAN G E, PHOENIXVILLE, PA KAUFMAN JAMES C, SHREVE, OH KEAL DRIVEAWAY CO, BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH KEEN RICHARD DJR, OAK RIDGE, NC KEENER ALLEN L, WOOSTER, OH KEIFFER VERA, ASHLAND, OH KEIM ORIN D, MILLERSBURG, OH KELLER GEORGE, CLEARWATER, FL KELLEY ARNOLD, WEST SALEM, OH KELLEY WALTER R, WEST SALEM, OH KI JA MAR GREENHOUSE, WOOSTER, OH KIEFER DAVID C, SMITHVILLE, OH KILBANE ADVERTISING INC, BAINBRIDGE ISLAND, WA KILE ANITA L, OAKDALE, CA KILROY THERESA M, MILLERSBURG, OH KIMMELL RICHARD, WOOSTER, OH KINER RONALD E, SHREVE, OH KING GLEN D, MILLERSBURG, OH KINNEY CINDY S, BURBANK, OH KINSLEY AMANDA, WEST SALEM, OH KIRCH MERTIN R, WARSAW, OH KIRKHAM JOHN S, HOPEWELL, VA KIRKPATRICK THOMAS E, TROY, MT KIRKSEY WALTER, MOUNT HOPE, OH KLANN LINDA M, BEAVERTON, OR KLASSEN PETER M, URBANA, OH KLEIN KATHERINE, MILLERSBURG, OH KLEVER HERBERT C, NORTH LAWRENCE, OH KLOSTERMAN EARLE W, WOOSTER, OH KLUK RICHARD L, WEST SALEM, OH KNODERER THOMAS A, KISSIMMEE, FL KNOTTS KENNETH J, NORTH LAWRENCE, OH KRAJICEK RITA D, PERRYSBURG, OH KRANZ RICHARD A, SMITHVILLE, OH KREIDLER JEANETTE R, KILLBUCK, OH KRIDLER JANE C, MILLERSBURG, OH KRIEG DAVID S, WOOSTER, OH KRUEGER JAMES E, CLEVELAND, OH KUNDRACIK GEORGE, WOOSTER, OH KUZAWA GREGG A, WEST SALEM, OH KYLE DONALD D, DENNISON, OH LAKE ROBIN J, WOOSTER, OH LANDIS ROGER W, WEST SALEM, OH LANE LORI L, FLINT, MI LANGDON MARY R, WARSAW, OH


LANGKAMP SAM, DUNDEE, OH LANIER CHARLES C, WEST SALEM, OH LARKIN FRANK G, GUILFORD, VT LAVINDER DEWEY A, WOOSTER, OH LAWSON WILLIAM K, MIDWAY PARK, NC LEACH RICK D, BURBANK, OH LEAMAN ROBERT, WOOSTER, OH LEAMAN RORY S, WOOSTER, OH LECKRONE DAVID E, WEST SALEM, OH LEEDA SERVICES INC, MASSILLON, OH LEIGHTY ROD A, MILLERSBURG, OH LEIST ROBERT P, MILLERSBURG, OH LEMASTER BENJAMIN FJR, MANSFIELD, OH LEMMONS DOROTHY, WALHONDING, OH LENDON THOMAS K, WOOSTER, OH LESTER GARY L, SHOW LOW, AZ LESTER ROBERT L, KILLBUCK, OH LEWIS ROBERT R, DOVER, OH LEZAK JENNY M, MANSFIELD, OH LICHT HENRY A, CLEVELAND, OH LIFER CHAD E, JEROMESVILLE, OH LIFER GENE E, LOUDONVILLE, OH LIMBACHER JOHN, BALTIC, OH LING KATHY M, MILLERSBURG, OH LING ROBERT L, KILLBUCK, OH LINK ROGER BSR, OLMSTED TWP, OH LITTLE IDA J, DUNDEE, OH LLOYD EMMA J, RITTMAN, OH LOCKHART DORIS M, CANAL FULTON, OH LOCKNEY EFFIE, ARNOLDSBURG, WV LONG GEORGE LJR, WEST SALEM, OH LOUDONVILLE CANOE LIVER, LOUDONVILLE, OH LOVE MARC C, RITTMAN, OH LOVELL BARTANYON, LAKEVILLE, OH LOWE MICHAEL W, WOOSTER, OH LOWE TONYA S, NASHVILLE, OH LUCAS WILMA F, WOOSTER, OH LUCIUS STEVE H, BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH LY PHUOC, WOOSTER, OH LYONS ROBERT E, MILLERSBURG, OH M B OPERATING INC, HARTVILLE, OH MACHINAK PAUL, LOUDONVILLE, OH MACHOVINA CHRISTOPHA, CRESTON, OH MACIEL PAUL M, WEST SALEM, OH MACKEY DEAN, WOOSTER, OH MADDAMMA MARC A, MEDINA, OH MADDY JAMES F, CRESTLINE, OH MADER FREDERICK, NORTH OLMSTED, OH MAGYAR JAMES, STERLING, OH MAIBACH ROBERT ESR, JOHNSTOWN, OH MAIRS C J, ROLLING HILLS ESTA, CA MAJEWSKI MICHAEL, NORTH ROYALTON, OH MAKSYMIAK JAY A, WEST SALEM, OH MANACAPILLI PHILIP W, SMITHVILLE, OH MANATTEE OIL CO, FREDERICKSBURG, OH MANN THOMAS W, WEST SALEM, OH MARBURGER SHARON L, WALNUT CREEK, OH MARION RICHARD L, BREVARD, NC MARNER PERRY I, STRASBURG, OH MARSHALL BENTON, WOOSTER, OH MARTIN BETTY L, KILLBUCK, OH MARTIN JAMES D, WOOSTER, OH MARTIN LILLIAN M, WOOSTER, OH MARTIN LOREE L, ASHLAND, OH MARTIN MARION D, KILLBUCK, OH MARTIN RANDY M, BIG PRAIRIE, OH MARTIN RANDY S, ANN ARBOR, MI MARTIN RICHARD C, JEROMESVILLE, OH MARTIN WALTER F, MILLERSBURG, OH MARTINEZ PORFIRIO R, WOOSTER, OH

MASSARO ANTONIO J, WOOSTER, OH MASSIE BETTY J, LIMA, OH MAST IVAN A, DUNDEE, OH MASTERSON BARBARA J, CRESTON, OH MAXWELL CHARLES L, MILLERSBURG, OH MAY JAMES L, ENOSBURG FALLS, VT MAY RONALD, WEST SALEM, OH MAYS DENNIS, MILLERSBURG, OH MAZGAJ ROBERT G, CALDWELL, WV MCCANN JESS RJR, WOOSTER, OH MCCARTNEY JORDAN K, MILLERSBURG, OH MCCLINTOCK AMY S, NEWPORT, TN MCCLOSKEY L W, WOOSTER, OH MCCLUER LINDA M, WOOSTER, OH MCCOMAS RICHARD L, WEST SALEM, OH MCCONAHAY JAMES, WOOSTER, OH MCCOY CARL E, WEST LAFAYETTE, OH MCCULLOUGH DRILLING, UTICA, OH MCCUNE KENNETH D, SMITHVILLE, OH MCDANIEL HARRY E, BIG PRAIRIE, OH MCDONALD GERI, UNIONTOWN, OH MCFARLAND KELLY G, NEW FRANKLIN, OH MCGLOTHLIN BRODERICK, BIG PRAIRIE, OH MCGRAW KEITH D, LODI, OH MCGREEVY THOMAS J, OLMSTED TWP, OH MCKEE JERRY D, HOLMESVILLE, OH MCKELVEY BERNARD, MILLERSBURG, OH MCKINLEY GEORGE R, AKRON, OH MCLAUGHLIN DAVID B, WOOSTER, OH MCNEELY THOMAS L, ASHLAND, OH MCNITT JOHN M, PORT ANGELES, WA MCPHERSON STEVEN D, BLUFFTON, SC MCVICKER C A, WOOSTER, OH MEADE CURTIS L, WEST SALEM, OH MEADE DENNIS, WOOSTER, OH MEEK WILLARD, MADISON, OH MEISNER HELEN R, POMPANO BEACH, FL MELLOTT GEORGE, BURBANK, OH MELLOTT JAMES E, SHREVE, OH MELROSE PARK & SALES, WOOSTER, OH MENG PHIL, BURBANK, OH MESSNER REX M, BIRMINGHAM, OH METHENEY RICHARD T, CRESTON, OH METZGER BRICE A, DANVILLE, OH MEYER SHARON L, WOOSTER, OH MEYERS ARTHUR TSR, MASSILLON, OH MICHALEK GEORGE, WOOSTER, OH MIHALKO ANDREW, WEST SALEM, OH MILAM STEPHEN G, RITTMAN, OH MILLER ABRAHAM, WOOSTER, OH MILLER ALBERT M, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER ALLEN E, WEST SALEM, OH MILLER ANDREW J, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER ANDY J, SUGARCREEK, OH MILLER ANGELA C, WOOSTER, OH MILLER ANNA M, SUGARCREEK, OH MILLER BETTY J, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER CHRISTINA J, WALNUT CREEK, OH MILLER DEAN, WALNUT CREEK, OH MILLER DIANE R, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER DUANE J, APPLE CREEK, OH MILLER EDWARD J, MARBLEHEAD, OH MILLER GLORIA, WALNUT CREEK, OH MILLER GREGG R, DALTON, OH MILLER JEFFREY L, MINERVA, OH MILLER JOHN H, DUNDEE, OH MILLER LAURA E, LEWIS CENTER, OH MILLER LEWIS, KILLBUCK, OH MILLER MARVIN M, BERLIN, OH MILLER MERLE L, SARASOTA, FL

MILLER MICHAEL D, BRINKHAVEN, OH MILLER MOLDING, DUNDEE, OH MILLER NATHAN L, COSHOCTON, OH MILLER PHILIP E, FREDERICKSBURG, OH MILLER ROBERT K, ELGIN, SC MILLER RONALD J, MONTOURSVILLE, PA MILLER RONALD L, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER STEVE R, WOOSTER, OH MILLER TIM M, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER TIMOTHY W, ORMOND BEACH, FL MILLER TRINA, HOLMESVILLE, OH MILLER TRUMAN, SUGARCREEK, OH MILLER TWILA, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER VERNA, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER WAYNE EJR, MILLERSBURG, OH MILLER WILLIAM L, WOOSTER, OH MILLER WILLIAM R, KILLBUCK, OH MILLERSBURG CHURCH OF CHRIST, MILLERSBURG, OH MISCH ROBERTA, LAGRANGE, OH MISURA ALBERT F, MILLERSBURG, OH MITCHELL KEITH A, OCALA, FL MOATS MEADE E, WOOSTER, OH MOHICAN RIVER INN, AKRON, OH MOHLER CHARLES W, MILLERSBURG, OH MOLTER MICHAEL L, WOOSTER, OH MONROE JOHN B, GREENWOOD, SC MOOREHEAD PATRICIA, FREDERICKSBURG, OH MOREHOUSE LINDA D, LEESBURG, FL MORELAND LOLA, KILLBUCK, OH MORGAN CATHY D, WOOSTER, OH MORGAN JACK B, LAKEVILLE, OH MORGAN ROBERT D, LODI, OH MORONEY PAUL F, JEROMESVILLE, OH MORR GLADYS, MECHANICSBURG, OH MORRELLE AARON M, WOOSTER, OH MORRIS J G, WESTERVILLE, OH MORRIS JACK D, WEST SALEM, OH MORRISON LORI L, STERLING, OH MORRISON RICHARD L, MILLERSBURG, OH MOSHER EARL E, LOUDONVILLE, OH MOSHER REX, SHREVE, OH MOSIER DARYL, SHREVE, OH MOSIER MARY E, MILLERSBURG, OH MOUSER CHARLES A, WEST SALEM, OH MOVENS RANDY, MEDINA, OH MOWERY PATRICIA A, WEST LAFAYETTE, OH MOYER ROBERT T, MILLERSBURG, OH MULDREW WILLIAM, WOOSTER, OH MULLIGAN JOHN, DUNDEE, OH MULLINS FRANK D, KILLBUCK, OH MULLINS JODY B, WOOSTER, OH MULTI PRODUCTS, KILLBUCK, OH MUNDAY GARY R, SHREVE, OH MURPHY BESSIE, ORRVILLE, OH MURPHY STEVEN R, WEST SALEM, OH MURRIN DONNA, WEST SALEM, OH MYERS EMMA J, WOOSTER, OH MYERS GLENN C, WOOSTER, OH MYERS JAMES E, WOOSTER, OH MYERS LYNNE L, WOOSTER, OH NAGEL CARL J, BURBANK, OH NAGEL FORREST, MEDINA, OH NATIONAL ADVERTISING CO., PHOENIX, AZ NATLAND ENERGY CORP, NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH NEER BRECK A, WEST SALEM, OH NEFF WALDO W, AMSTERDAM, OH NELSON MAE, WEST SALEM, OH NEMEC CHARLES T, WEST SALEM, OH NICEWANDER RUBY, DUNDEE, OH NICHOLLS DONALD J, WOOSTER, OH

NOVEMBER 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   20E


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES NICHOLS ROGER, WEST SALEM, OH NICHOLS SHIRLEY A, GAINESVILLE, FL NICHOLS WILLIAM G, ASHLAND, OH NICKELSON ANNETTE D, WOOSTER, OH NOFTZGER LARRY G, WEST SALEM, OH NORMAN DONALD L, GRANTSVILLE, WV NORMAN MELISSA D, MILLERSBURG, OH NORMAN PETER J, MILLERSBURG, OH NORMAN RICHARD H, WEST SALEM, OH NORMILE CHRISTOPHJ, ROCKY RIVER, OH NORTH COAST ENERGY, AKRON, OH NORTH STEVE R, MC DERMOTT, OH NORTON DOROTHY, WEST SALEM, OH NOVAK SHAWN D, WEST SALEM, OH NOY DEBRA S, DALLAS, TX NUMBERS RONALD, BEACH CITY, OH NUSSBAUM MICHAEL W, LOUDONVILLE, OH OBRECHT JAMES H, SHREVE, OH OBRIEN MICHAEL, BURBANK, OH OCONNOR DANIEL P, WEST SALEM, OH ODONNELL JACK T, WOOSTER, OH OKEY EDWARD J, DUNDEE, OH OLYMPIC RESOURCES, WOOSTER, OH ONEIL DOUGLAS A, DOVER, OH ONEILL JAMES M, CHILLICOTHE, OH OPLIGER ARTHUR, FREDERICKSBURG, OH PACHMAYER CARL E, WOOSTER, OH PAHOUNDIS GEORGE D, MILLERSBURG, OH PARAGON GEOPHYSICAL, MOUNT GILEAD, OH PARKINSON DAVID L, SHREVE, OH PAROBEK JOHN, BRECKSVILLE, OH PARRIS ALAN J, SHREVE, OH PARSONS JAMES S, KILLBUCK, OH PARSONS MARJORIE K, BEDFORD, VA PARSONS RONALD E, COSHOCTON, OH PATCHIN LARRY M, BULLHEAD CITY, AZ PATRICK PETER, WOOSTER, OH PATTERSON HARLAN M, BURBANK, OH PATTERSON JOYCE A, LENOIR, NC PATTERSON NELLIE F, CANTON, OH PATTERSON ROBERT D, ASHLAND, OH PATTERSON WILLIAM CSR, ORRVILLE, OH PAUL DAVID F, ASHLAND, OH PAULIN CAROL M, WEST SALEM, OH PAULLIN EVELYN B, LOUDONVILLE, OH PAVELSCHAK STEPHEN M, WOOSTER, OH PECK PHILLIP W, WOOSTER, OH PEGGY M. TISH ADMINISTRATOR, GLENMONT, OH PENNINGTON DEBRA L, WOOSTER, OH PENNINGTON JESSE, WOOSTER, OH PENTECOST TOM, SUGARCREEK, OH PEPPLER DAVID N, WOOSTER, OH PERRY CLIFFORD A, SIERRA VISTA, AZ PERRY PEARL E, WEST SALEM, OH PETERS RITA P, MILLERSBURG, OH PETERSON W K, VINCENT, OH PETRY RUTH J, WOOSTER, OH PETTRY HOWARD, CLEVELAND, OH PFOUTS VERDA C, WOOSTER, OH PHILLIPS ELLEN D, WEST SALEM, OH PHILLIPS TANYA M, HOLMESVILLE, OH PHILPOTT HEATHER M, HOLMESVILLE, OH PIATT MARY E, WEST SALEM, OH PIOTROWSKI KENNETH M, HENDERSON, NV PIPES TIMOTHY R, WOOSTER, OH PITMAN JAMES H, STERLING, OH PLANT CHARLES W, PERRY, KS PLUMLEY DARIUS R, WOOSTER, OH PORTER DOUGLAS E, WOOSTER, OH PORTER GLENNA, BARTON CITY, MI

POTICKNY JOSEPH D, WOOSTER, OH POWELL CHARLES E, MILLERSBURG, OH POWER GAS MARKETING & TRA, DOVER, OH POWER JERRY W, LAKEVILLE, OH PREMIER HOMES INC, WADSWORTH, OH PRESOCK JAMES L, WEST SALEM, OH PRESSURE FLOW INC, WEST SALEM, OH PRICE-BERNER, NEW CONCORD, OH PRIEST GEORGE, WOOSTER, OH PRODUCERS LIVESTOCK, BALTIC, OH PROPER ARTHUR E, BIG PRAIRIE, OH PRZYBYLA ALAN J, MEDINA, OH PUCKETT THELMA, LAKEVILLE, OH PURDY DANIEL H, WEST SALEM, OH PURDY TERRY A, MILLERSBURG, OH PYERS TRACY, LOUDONVILLE, OH PYLE LARRY K, HOLMESVILLE, OH QUAKER STATE REFINING, BELPRE, OH RABER EDWARD B, DUNDEE, OH RABER LINDA S, MILLERSBURG, OH RABER OWEN A, MILLERSBURG, OH RABER RHODA, BALTIC, OH RALPH A. NOLLETTI, ORRVILLE, OH RAMSEY KRIS E, WEST SALEM, OH RAMSIER EDWARD G, WOOSTER, OH RAMSIER REX A, WOOSTER, OH RAMSIER VICKIE L, WEST SALEM, OH RANDLES JAMES, SHREVE, OH RANDLES MONA, WOOSTER, OH RANDOLPH CATHY A, SHREVE, OH RANG CLETUS, ASHTABULA, OH RASTORFER EDDIE E, CRESTON, OH RAY JOHN N, MILLERSBURG, OH RAY MICHAEL D, CLARKSVILLE, TN RAY W A, NAVARRE, OH REAGAN BOBBY G, ORRVILLE, OH REEDER DEBBY S, WOOSTER, OH REEDSBURG CHURCH OF GOD, JEROMESVILLE, OH REEP LARRY A, LITCHFIELD, OH REESE ALTA L, CANTON, OH REGIONAL CABLE TV (USA), GREENWOOD, IN REIHELD MARCELLA M, GLENMONT, OH REIHELD RANDY C, LAKEVILLE, OH REINHARDT JAN, LADY LAKE, FL RENFREW NETTIE, WOOSTER, OH REUTTER ROBERT W, WOOSTER, OH REYNOLDS DUANE O, SMITHVILLE, OH REYNOLDS ROBERT K, HOLMESVILLE, OH REYNOLDS ROBERT L, SHREVE, OH RHEES JOHNNIE, MILLERSBURG, OH RHEIM WALLACE, LAKEVILLE, OH RICE FRANKLIN D, LODI, OH RICE JERRY L, MILLERSBURG, OH RICE RUSSELL, DAVIDSON, NC RICHESON FLORENCE, WOOSTER, OH RICHESON MILDRED, MILLERSBURG, OH RICHMOND HOLDING, HUNTERSVILLE, NC RICHMOND STEPHEN M, WOOSTER, OH RIDENBAUGH DALE E, MILLERSBURG, OH RIFFLE THOMAS L, AKRON, OH RIG DRILLING, MARIETTA, OH RINGGENBERG LYNN M, BURBANK, OH RITSOS & RITSOS, CHICAGO, IL RITTENHOUSE MEMORIAL, NAVARRE, OH RITTER RICHARD M, WOOSTER, OH ROBERTS ANTHONY T, WOOSTER, OH ROBERTS JOHN G, WOOSTER, OH ROBINSON HELEN, POLK, OH ROCKWELL RESOURCES INC, NEW MATAMORAS, OH RODEHEAVER HARRY B, FREDERICKSBURG, VA

20F  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2020

ROESSNER DAVID, DUBLIN, OH ROGERS BESSIE A, WEST SALEM, OH ROGERS CHARLES F, RITTMAN, OH ROHRBAUGH MARK E, WEST SALEM, OH ROHRER ROBERT J, MILLERSBURG, OH ROHSKOPF JAMES, WOOSTER, OH ROMO JOSE D, WOOSTER, OH ROOK KIM L, WOOSTER, OH ROQUE ALFREDO M, WOOSTER, OH ROSEBERRY RICK D, ORRVILLE, OH ROSS PAMELA A, MILLERSBURG, OH ROSS WAYNE D, BURBANK, OH ROST JORG M, FERNANDINA BEACH, FL ROTTMANN MARY A, WOOSTER, OH ROWE BARBARA J, WOOSTER, OH ROWLAND CHARITY D, WOOSTER, OH ROWLAND GLENN, WEST SALEM, OH ROWLAND MARK D, NASHVILLE, OH ROY KLAUS G, CLEVELAND HEIGHTS, OH RUBBERMAID INC., WOOSTER, OH RUSSELL CONNIE, WOOSTER, OH RUSSELL HELEN, KILLBUCK, OH RUSSELL ROGER L, ASHLAND, OH RYAN DAVID A, WOOSTER, OH SACHARA DARREN J, SEVIERVILLE, TN SAEGER ROBERT R, LAKEVILLE, OH SAFFELL JAMES E, MONTGOMERY, AL SALVINO BRENDAN, SHREVE, OH SAMPSEL WILLIAM E, WOOSTER, OH SATURSKI MYRON, NEWCOMERSTOWN, OH SAUL BARBARA E, ORRVILLE, OH SAUL JAMES E, WEST SALEM, OH SCHAEFFER TIM E, JEROMESVILLE, OH SCHAR MICHAEL T, STERLING, OH SCHEERENS JOSEPH C, WOOSTER, OH SCHERER ADA M, MILLERSBURG, OH SCHERER ALBERT J, MILLERSBURG, OH SCHEUTZOW MARK H, RITTMAN, OH SCHLABACH BERT E, DUNDEE, OH SCHLABACH DANIEL D, WINESBURG, OH SCHLABACH DAVID W, WINESBURG, OH SCHLABACH JIM N, SUGARCREEK, OH SCHLEY LEWIS A, SAVANNAH, GA SCHMUCKER JOHN A, FRESNO, OH SCHODORF GARY E, HOLMESVILLE, OH SCHONAUER ESTHER, KILLBUCK, OH SCHRACK TIMOTHY A, LAKEVILLE, OH SCHULER BRIAN K, BEACH CITY, OH SCHULER EUGENE EJR, CHIPPEWA LAKE, OH SCHULTZ DAWN A, WEST SALEM, OH SCHWARTZWALDEJOYCE K, WOOSTER, OH SCOTT PAUL H, WOOSTER, OH SCOTT RICHARD W, ORRVILLE, OH SEITZ KENNETH R, SILVER LAKE, IN SELL JOHN, ASHLAND, OH SELLERS GREGORY S, WOOSTER, OH SELLERS ROBERT, MASSILLON, OH SENECA ENERGY CORP, DOVER, OH SEPULVADO ROBERT, DUNCAN, OK SEVEN STATES VENEER INC, HOWARD, OH SEXTON LISA M, DUNDEE, OH SEYBERT STANLEY B, SULLIVAN, OH SHAFFER BARBARA L, MEDINA, OH SHAFFER DANIEL W, MILLERSBURG, OH SHAFFER RAYMOND A, HOLMESVILLE, OH SHAMBAUGH RAY A, MEDINA, OH SHAVER TROY D, LODI, OH SHAW SUSAN J, LODI, OH SHEAFFER JUDY K, KILLBUCK, OH SHEARER ANN M, WOOSTER, OH


SHEARER BETTY F, WOOSTER, OH SHEARER JEFFREY D, WOOSTER, OH SHEARER JOEY T, LAKEVILLE, OH SHEPHERD RANDALL S, KILLBUCK, OH SHEPPARD ELIZABETH N, MEDINA, OH SHEPPARD ROBERT W, MEDINA, OH SHERMAN DRILLING INC, MINERAL CITY, OH SHETLER BEN H, LAKEVILLE, OH SHETLER DELBERT M, NAVARRE, OH SHIFFERLY AMY, WOOSTER, OH SHILOH FELLOWSHIP, FREDERICKSBURG, OH SHIRLEY BOREMAN, BURBANK, OH SHORTS WELL DRILLING, MANSFIELD, OH SHOUP RALPH M, NORTH CANTON, OH SHROCK DANIEL L, MILLERSBURG, OH SHULL JOYCE A, WOOSTER, OH SIEDSCHLAG KARL GJR, KENT, OH SIGLER DAVID P, WOOSTER, OH SIGLER DENNIS R, RITTMAN, OH SIGLER RUSSELL R, LODI, OH SILLS BRIAN G, WOOSTER, OH SILVERMAN WILLIAM, PERALTA, NM SIMMS SCREEN PRINT INC, APPLE CREEK, OH SIMPSON HELEN M, MILLERSBURG, OH SIMS ERIC T, WOOSTER, OH SINGER LUCY M, GAMBIER, OH SIVEY ADA M, SHREVE, OH SIVEY ELIZABETH A, WOOSTER, OH SKUBOVIUS SALLY M, WEST SALEM, OH SMAIL A N, KILLBUCK, OH SMAIL JAMES C, MOUNT VERNON, MO SMAIL SCOTT T, MILLERSBURG, OH SMETZER RAY A, MILLERSBURG, OH SMITH CARL R, MARSHALLVILLE, OH SMITH CINDY L, MILLERSBURG, OH SMITH DANIEL L, WOOSTER, OH SMITH DAVID P, WEST SALEM, OH SMITH EDWINA, MEDINA, OH SMITH ELSIE V, WOOSTER, OH SMITH ERIC J, WEST SALEM, OH SMITH ERVIN L, ASHLAND, OH SMITH FRANCES V, NASHVILLE, OH SMITH FRED CJR, KILLBUCK, OH SMITH JEANNETTE A, BIG PRAIRIE, OH SMITH LOIS L, WOOSTER, OH SMITH MARIE J, WEST SALEM, OH SMITH MARK, FREDERICKSBURG, OH SMITH RICKY M, COSHOCTON, OH SMITH ROBERT H, WOOSTER, OH SMITH ST. JOHN, WOOSTER, OH SMITH TIMOTHY E, SANDUSKY, OH SNELL JAMES AJR, HOLMESVILLE, OH SNYDER ALFRED D, DUNDEE, OH SNYDER DAVID H, NEWPORT, TN SNYDER DOUGLAS, NEWPORT, TN SNYDER DUANE D, UHRICHSVILLE, OH SNYDER JAMES J, KILLBUCK, OH SNYDER JANICE, CENTERVILLE, UT SNYDER JOAN, BIG PRAIRIE, OH SNYDER NORMAN JR, SHREVE, OH SOEMISCH MICHAEL P, MILLERSBURG, OH SOFFOS JAMES R, WOOSTER, OH SOMMERS ELIZABETH H, GLENMONT, OH SOMMERS SCOTT D, MILLERSBURG, OH SOUTHSIDE MACHINE CO, SMITHVILLE, OH SPACH JAMES F, GRAFTON, OH SPARKS BEN, DUNDEE, OH SPATZ JOAN M, WARSAW, OH SPECHT JACK, SHREVE, OH SPENCE CARLOS J, FORT GAY, WV

SPIRES DONALD K, HOLMESVILLE, OH SPONSELLER JAMES R, SHREVE, OH SPOTTS BARBARA S, JEROMESVILLE, OH SPRANG BERTHA, BIG PRAIRIE, OH SPRING LAKE DEVELOPMENT, WEST SALEM, OH SPRINGER DAVID M, SWANSEA, SC SQUIRES EDWARD C, GLENMONT, OH STANKIEWICZ JOHN S, KILLBUCK, OH STANLEY JERRY L, MC KENZIE, TN STANLEY SCOTT, HOWARD, OH STARCHER DEBBIE, WEST SALEM, OH STARN THOMAS C, HOLMESVILLE, OH STARRE JEFFREY, WINESBURG, OH STECYK ADA H, WEST SALEM, OH STEELE TIMOTHY L, WOOSTER, OH STEINER RANDALL G, APPLE CREEK, OH STEINER STEVE, DALTON, OH STEPHENS DEBBRA L, WILMOT, OH STEVENS GRADY H, GREENVILLE, SC STEVENS VICTORI L, WEST SALEM, OH STEWART JOSEPH JR, WEST SALEM, OH STILKE LARRY E, PULASKI, VA STILTNER KATHLEEN D, HARRISVILLE, WV STOLL DENISE A, WEST SALEM, OH STONE DAVID M, GLENMONT, OH STOVER DONALD, WEST SALEM, OH STRAIT GLADYS E, PAINTED POST, NY STROHMEYER MILDRED C, OAKWOOD VILLAGE, OH STRUMBLY KATHERINE M, SPENCER, OH STUART JAMES F, GULF BREEZE, FL STURZNICKEL JAMES F, NORTH CANTON, OH STUTZ STEVEN A, WEST SALEM, OH SULLIVAN LORI L, CLEVELAND, OH SUSTERSIC JACK, WOOSTER, OH SWARTZ DEBRA K, ASHLAND, OH SWARTZENTRUBE LULA E, BERLIN, OH SZEKER JOSEPH, WOOSTER, OH TALLHAMER GABRIEL S, DUBLIN, OH TANNER TERRALYNN, WEST SALEM, OH TARTIR KHALED, BIG PRAIRIE, OH TATE FAYE I, MEDINA, OH TAYLOR HOWARD, STRONGSVILLE, OH TAYLOR ORVILLE DSR, COVENTRY TOWNSHIP, OH TAYLOR PAUL L, DOYLESTOWN, OH TEAGUE KATHLEEN A, WOOSTER, OH TENGE CHARLES J, HILLSBORO, KY THEISS PAULA K, WOOSTER, OH THERIAULT VERN R, KILLBUCK, OH THOMAS DONALD E, KILLBUCK, OH THOMAS GLEN A, WOOSTER, OH THOMAS JOHN A, AURORA, CO THOMPSON BEN R, BIG PRAIRIE, OH THOMPSON FLOYD E, COUNTRYSIDE, IL THOMPSON GAIL E, DUNDEE, OH THOMPSON JAMES D, DARIEN, GA THOMPSON JEANINE, WOOSTER, OH THOMPSON MARK A, LOUDONVILLE, OH THOMPSON WILLIAM, AKRON, OH THURMAN WILLIAM N, WEST SALEM, OH TILSON JOHN B, MILLERSBURG, OH TIPTON GRETCHEN L, MILLERSBURG, OH TISH WAYNE L, WOOSTER, OH TITAN ENERGY GROUP INC, ZANESVILLE, OH TOLSON ERIC M, BRYAN, OH TOMLIN TIMOTHY J, MADISON, IN TOPE ANNA, MILLERSBURG, OH TOPS, CANTON, OH TRACY SAMUEL, WEST SALEM, OH TRON GENE G, LOUDONVILLE, OH TROYER ANDREW A, DUNDEE, OH

TROYER DAVID A, UTICA, OH TROYER DAVID D, HARRISONBURG, VA TROYER DONALD P, WOOSTER, OH TROYER JASON J, DUNDEE, OH TROYER JODY S, SHREVE, OH TROYER JONI E, HOWARD, OH TROYER JUNE I, DUNDEE, OH TROYER MARVIN P, SHREVE, OH TROYER MEL L, SHREVE, OH TROYER NORMAN J, DUNDEE, OH TROYER TR VALLEY FARM, DUNDEE, OH TUCKER LEONARD O, SPENCER, OH TUERPITZ PETER, BEREA, OH TWILIGHT MINING CO, BERLIN, OH U S SILICA CO, OTTAWA, IL UHL JERRY, MILLERSBURG, OH UHL KIM M, MILLERSBURG, OH UHLER LARRY E, CRESTON, OH UNITED VIDEO CABLE, CINCINNATI, OH UPHOLD STEVEN P, NASHVILLE, OH URBAN JEFFREY J, HOWARD, OH VAN DYKE ALAN C, APEX, NC VAN WAGENEN JARED, CLEVELAND, OH VANCE CHESTER, POLK, OH VANESS RONALD R, WEST SALEM, OH VANHORN MICHAEL H, PERRYSVILLE, OH VARJU JIMMIE R, APPLE CREEK, OH VAUGHAN MICHAEL A, APPLE CREEK, OH VEHAR VICTOR, EUCLID, OH VINES LINDA M, SHREVE, OH VOGEL BRADLEY LSR, GENOA, OH VONALLMAN ERIC C, KILLBUCK, OH WALENTIK JOHN J, ORRVILLE, OH WALLACE JAMES T, WOOSTER, OH WALLACE THOMAS EJR, LOUISVILLE, OH WALNUT LAND & CATTLE CO, MEDINA, OH WALTON ERICK, OWLS HEAD, ME WARD CLARENCE, SULLIVAN, OH WARD LUCY A, WOOSTER, OH WARD THOMAS L, RITTMAN, OH WARD THOMAS W, SOUTHAMPTON, NY WARREN FRANKLIN T, WOOSTER, OH WATKINS PAMELA S, JACKSON, OH WATSON DANIEL W, CLEVELAND, OH WATSON MARK F, FLORENCE, SC WATSON RODNEY L, WEST SALEM, OH WEARS JASON T, MILLERSBURG, OH WEAVER DAN A, WOOSTER, OH WEAVER IVAN E, FREDERICKSBURG, OH WEAVER LEROY H, BIG PRAIRIE, OH WEAVER MONROE J, BELLVILLE, OH WEAVER SARAH, HOLMESVILLE, OH WEIDMAN CRAIG C, AURORA, OH WEINMAN TIMOTHY, BURBANK, OH WEIRICK RICHARD DJR, MILLERSBURG, OH WELLER DALE L, FRESNO, OH WELLMAN SANDRA K, RITTMAN, OH WENGERD PAUL J, MILLERSBURG, OH WERSTLER DEAN, OLMSTED FALLS, OH WHARFF BUTCH T, NEWCOMERSTOWN, OH WHEELER ARLENE E, NEWCOMERSTOWN, OH WHEELER DONNIE E, ORRVILLE, OH WHITE IRENE F, NEW FRANKLIN, OH WHITEHEAD JOHN D, WEST SALEM, OH WHITLOCK MAXWELL M, VANDALIA, OH WHITMAN RONNIE, MILLERSBURG, OH WIDDER BEN, NEW PHILADELPHIA, OH WIGFIELD ROGER AII, DUNDEE, OH WILCOCK JANET L, CANAL WINCHESTER, OH WILCOX CYNTHIA L, APPLE CREEK, OH

NOVEMBER 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   20G


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES WILDS JACQUELYNM, LAKEVILLE, OH WILE KEVIN E, WOOSTER, OH WILES DONALD L, WOOSTER, OH WILKINSON VIRGINIA, WEST SALEM, OH WILLIAMS BEULAH M, SHREVE, OH WILLIAMS BILLY J, BURBANK, OH WILLIAMS JAMES P, WEST SALEM, OH WILLIAMS PAUL D, BRUNSWICK, OH WILLIAMS SUSAN L, WOOSTER, OH WILLIAMSON DAVID A, GNADENHUTTEN, OH WILLIAMSON KATHLEEN A, ZEPHYRHILLS, FL WILLS BRIAN R, WOODSFIELD, OH WILMOTH HERBERT N, KENT, OH WILSON CHARLES WIII, AKRON, OH WILSON CHERYL L, LOUDONVILLE, OH WILSON COURTNEY A, WINESBURG, OH WILSON DONALD J, CLEVELAND, OH WILSON ERNEST F, CRESTON, OH WILSON GARLAND SR, FORT MC COY, FL WILSON MARY, WOOSTER, OH WILSON MICHAEL C, LAGRANGE, OH WILSON VERNON R, MILLERSBURG, OH WINESBURG COLLECTABLES, WINESBURG, OH

WINRICK DAVID L, STERLING, CO WIPERT CHRISTOPHA, WOOSTER, OH WISSEL SUE A, WEST SALEM, OH WISSEL WILLIAM FSR, WEST SALEM, OH WITT INDUSTRIES, CINCINNATI, OH WOLF THOMAS M, BEDFORD, TX WOLFGANG DON LSR, LOUDONVILLE, OH WOOD VICKIE L, UNIONTOWN, OH WOODY JOHN T, CRESTON, OH WRIGHT CORBIN T, KILLBUCK, OH WRIGHT STEVEN L, WOOSTER, OH WRIGHT THOMAS A, DUNDEE, OH YACAPRARO CARL AJR, WOOSTER, OH YANKEE EXPLORATION INC, WEST FARMINGTON, OH YANNAYON CAROL J, VALLEY CITY, OH YARNELL WESLEY L, ST PETERSBURG, FL YATES EDITH, WEST SALEM, OH YEAGLEY RETTA J, WEST SALEM, OH YEAGLEY SANDRA L, SMITHVILLE, OH YEAKEL J D, CANTON, OH YEATER BRINTON J, HUDSON, OH YENNI JUSTINE N, WEST SALEM, OH YERIAN TIM L, MILLERSBURG, OH

YODER BRUCE A, MILLERSBURG, OH YODER DAVID N, MILLERSBURG, OH YODER DELMAR R, SUGARCREEK, OH YODER ERVIN E, FREDERICKSBURG, OH YODER HAROLD J, PORTAGE, WI YODER HENRY A, MESA, AZ YODER JOHN JR, ORRVILLE, OH YODER LARRY, WARREN, OH YODER MELVIN J, FREDERICKSBURG, OH YODER SAM J, FREDERICKSBURG, OH YODER SARA, FREDERICKSBURG, OH YODER STEVEN J, DUNDEE, OH YODER TRINA K, DANVILLE, OH YORK JAMES M, MILLERSBURG, OH YOST BERNARD, SHERRODSVILLE, OH YOST BRIAN L, HORN LAKE, MS YOUNG SCOTT L, LOUDONVILLE, OH YOUNKER SALLY S, WEST SALEM, OH YUTZY KEITH, MILLERSBURG, OH ZEMLA MICHAEL D, WEST SALEM, OH ZERRER JEFFREY P, WOOSTER, OH ZUBROD PAUL A, ASHLAND, OH ZURAKOWSKI BRUCE, LEBANON, OH

Happy Thanksgiving! The office will be closed Nov. 26 and 27 for Thanksgiving. For outage reporting: 1. Text @ 55050 2. Mobile app, SmartHub 3. Toll-free at 866-674-1055 For payments and meter readings: 1. Mobile app, SmartHub 2. Toll-free at 866-674-1055

20H  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2020


Certification of Active Duty Deployment The cooperative will not disconnect electric service to the residential premises of any residential member who is deployed on active duty for nonpayment for electricity provided to the residential premises. Upon return of the residential member from active duty, the cooperative will offer the residential member a period of time equal to duration of deployment on active duty to pay any arrearage incurred during the period of deployment. If the time period the cooperative offers the residential member for repayment presents a hardship, the member may request a longer period to repay the arrearage. No late payment fees or interest will be charged to the residential member during the period of deployment or the repayment period. “Active duty” means active duty pursuant to an executive order of the President of the United States, an act of the Congress of the United States, or section 5919.29 or 5923.21 of the Ohio Revised Code. The residential member must resume the timely payment of all charges for electric service provided by the cooperative after the return from active duty deployment. In order to avoid disconnection of electric service for nonpayment of electric service during a period of active duty deployment, a completed Certification of Active Duty Deployment form must be submitted to the cooperative. Certification of Active Duty Deployment forms are available from the cooperative upon request.

Fall back! Daylight saving time ends Nov. 1. Don’t forget to change your clocks!

NOVEMBER 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   21


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Power Students Program

Education helps shape the leaders of tomorrow. That’s why Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative wants to recognize students in grades 6–8 for their hard work and dedication to education.

Here’s how it works! Students in grades 6–8, whose parents or guardians are members of Holmes-Wayne Electric Co-op, are eligible to apply. Students must have a minimum of three A’s on their most recent report card (less than six months old). A copy of the report card must be submitted by mail to: Holmes-Wayne Electric Co-op, Attn: Robyn Tate, P.O. Box 112, Millersburg, OH 44654. Entry grade card must include student’s name, parent/guardian name(s), school, grade, address (not published), and contact phone number (not published).  Entries will be placed into a drawing for each grading period. The next drawing date will be Dec. 10, to allow approximately one month after the end of the grading period for entry submission. Three winners will be drawn every grading period (Feb. 10, April 10, July 10, and Dec. 10). An entry is good for two drawings, and a student cannot win more than once a year.  Winners will receive a $25 gift card. Their photo will be published in Ohio Cooperative Living and on the HWEC website and Facebook page.  The photo can be taken by HWEC staff or submitted along with a photo release form signed by a parent/guardian. Please contact us at 866-674-1055 with any questions. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

SMARTHUB

Randy Sprang

Report an outage, submit a meter reading, and pay your bill all through our mobile SmartHub application. Available for both Android and Apple devices

Chairman

Dave Mann Vice Chairman

CONTACT 866-674-1055 (toll-free) www.hwecoop.com OFFICE 6060 St. Rte. 83 P.O. Box 112 Millersburg, OH 44654-0112

Barry Jolliff Secretary/Treasurer

Jonathan Berger Bill Grassbaugh Jackie McKee Ronnie Schlegel David Tegtmeier Chris Young

Report outages, submit meter readings, and make payments

Trustees

Glenn W. Miller President/CEO

22  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2020

CALL US 24/7

Facebook.com/holmeswayneelectriccoop


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STAYING IN THE GAME

Ohio AgrAbility helps disabled farmers keep doing the work they love. BY MARGARET BURANEN

N

ineteen-year-old Kane Lewis’ life changed instantly on Nov. 16, 2019. While he was on a hunting trip, he had a seizure that caused him to fall from his tree stand — breaking his back and leaving him paralyzed.

PHOTO BY RACHEL JARMAN

The fall was devastating for the Wilmington College student, a fifthgeneration farmer. At the hospital, Lewis wondered how he would be able to take over the family farm in West Portsmouth. He has only one

sibling, who does not farm, so “it’s definitely on my shoulders,” he says. Shortly after spinal surgery, doctors and therapists told him about Ohio AgrAbility. Like AgrAbility in other states, Ohio AgrAbility is a partnership between a land grant university (in this case, Ohio State University) and a nonprofit (Easterseals Serving Greater Cincinnati), funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

PHOTO BY MATT LEWIS

Working with state agencies, AgrAbility helped Lewis get a lift to put him on farm machinery, an Action Trackchair that will go over any terrain, and an automatic barn door opener.

A fall left Kane Lewis paralyzed, with his ability to take over the family farm in doubt, but Ohio AgrAbility and its rural rehabilitation specialist, Rachel Jarman, helped him obtain accessibility equipment that has allowed him to keep working.

24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020

“AgrAbility has given me so much more freedom than I could have expected,” Lewis says. “I didn’t [have to] slow down.” Just a month and a week after his accident, Lewis was back in college, where his classmates raised $13,000 to buy him an electric wheelchair to get around campus easily. By spring, he was back planting corn and soybeans.


Ohio AgrAbility helped Jeff Austin and his wife, Kristi, after a tumor crushed his spinal cord and left him paralyzed below the waist.

“Our goal is to help farmers continue to do what they love to do and to live independently,” says Dee Jepsen, Ohio AgrAbility’s program director. Jeff Austin, a third-generation farmer, grows corn, soybeans, and wheat in Harrod, Ohio. Back in April 2013, he had just gotten a new combine and was eagerly anticipating the fall harvest so he could put it to use. But that July, a cancerous tumor crushed his spinal cord, leaving him paralyzed below the waist. Austin’s first thought was that he would never drive that combine again. He worried about how he would support his four children. “The doctors called it a ‘nontraumatic spinal cord injury,’” says his wife, Kristi, “but it was pretty traumatic for us.” That September, Austin’s dad, Gary, and a family friend, Gene McClure, visited the AgrAbility tent at Farm Science Review. The brochures and information they brought back gave Austin hope.

Ohio agr ABILITY

AgrAbility worked with state agencies to secure funding for the lift that he now uses to get onto several farm machines. With his Action Trackchair, “I can stand up to repair equipment and go anywhere on the farm.” To Austin, AgrAbility “means getting back my independence, having the freedom to go where I want to go. It’s given me a sense of freedom and purpose.” Continued on page 26

Jeff Austin uses his Standing Action Trackchair to help him perform routine maintenance and light repair and has a custom lift by Life Essentials for easy access to his farm truck.

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  25


After back surgery, Len Vondenhaar (left) was unable to get around the farm he works with his son, Alan (right) and his grandson, Adam, until a tip from Adam led him to get assistance from Ohio AgrAbility.

Ohio AgrAbility worked with Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) to get Vonderhaar a lift, a camera, and other attachments to make driving the combine safer and easier. He also has a scooter that helps him go from building to building on the farm. “I can’t say enough about how much OOD and AgrAbility have helped me — not only with physical help, but mentally, to do what I like to do,” Vonderhaar says. Continued from page 25

Len Vonderhaar has similar praise for the program. “AgrAbility prolonged my life, because I’m now able to do things that I couldn’t do, and I have a greater outlook on life,” he says. With his son and grandson, he raises corn, soybeans, and alfalfa hay near Camden, Ohio. One of their farm’s grain bins is powered by Butler Rural Electric Cooperative. Vonderhaar needed back surgery to fuse five of his vertebrae, and it left him unable to do the farming work he had always done. He could walk only short distances, and climbing aboard his combine was nearly impossible. His grandson, Adam, an Ohio State graduate, remembered learning about AgrAbility in a farm safety course, and he urged his grandfather to reach out.

At Ohio AgrAbility, “we’re advocates, we’re connectors,” explains Rachel Jarman, rural rehabilitation coordinator. “I can help [vocational rehabilitation] counselors understand why a farmer needs this equipment, help them understand the farmer’s job and what challenges he has.” She says that a serious disability or accident “is crushing to a farmer. I’m their lifeline to getting back to what they need to be doing. It’s really rewarding to see how happy and grateful they are.” “This is our 11th year of USDA grant funding,” says Laura Akgerman, Ohio AgrAbility’s disability services coordinator. “Since 2009, we have helped about 400 farmers — and that’s not including the thousands of people we interact with briefly, with a quick phone call or when they stop by our booth at a farming event.” For additional information, visit agrability.osu.edu or call 614-292-0622.

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Treasure hunt Legends of buried booty stoke imagination and curiosity. BY KEVIN WILLIAMS

W

e all know that Ohio is full of treasures. From Cincinnati chili to Cedar Point to the hollows of Hocking Hills, the gems gleam. Legends abound, however, of treasure in the more traditional sense — buried or stashed around the Ohio countryside. From legends of James Dillinger stashing away money to Civil War gold, Ohio is crawling with tales of buried treasure. After sifting through scores of Ohio tales, we found five we think are the most compelling.

Stark treasure It was 1755, and the French had been trying desperately to repel attacks by the British on Fort Duquesne, France’s outpost in Pittsburgh. Fearing the fort’s imminent fall (it actually held out until 1758), some French soldiers started

28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


Jared Shank, a member of the Dayton Diggers, still ventures out occasionally to check out a new tip on the location of the lost Shawnee silver.

to evacuate valuables from Fort Duquesne — including a hoard of gold and silver used for military payroll. The British pursued, and about halfway to Fort Detroit, with the Redcoats gaining on them, the French reportedly buried everything right there on the spot — around the present-day site of Minerva, in Stark County — with a plan to return later to retrieve the riches. Unfortunately, the terrain makes their directions difficult to follow and, despite numerous attempts, no treasure has ever been found. Roger Bartley, a Minerva historian who has sought the treasure, thinks it’s still out there somewhere. “Treasure hunters come through a couple of times a year,” he says. “They all have their own theories.”

Shawnee silver According to Shawnee and frontiersmen lore, there’s a stash of priceless silver somewhere near the Little Miami River in Greene County. Or it could be farther north. Or east. That’s the problem: The history of the silver stash is a little hazy. While there are variations on the tale, Ohio resident and treasure hunter Jared Shank, a member of the Dayton Diggers treasure-hunting club, says that when the Shawnee were preparing to flee after the Battle of Pickaway near present-day Springfield, they gathered all their silver — they used it in trading, and some estimates say they had more than a ton — and buried it near the Little Miami River to keep it out of the hands of Gen. George Rogers Clark, who was in pursuit. “The first portion they buried in a small pit; they just threw everything into a hole, covered it with brush, and burned it,” he says. “Warriors buried the other part of it near the river.” Shank says as time has passed, many people have speculated about where all the silver is buried, and the Shawnee, who no longer have a presence in Ohio, have expressed interest in it if it’s ever found.

The Bridge family pot of gold In 1995, Popular Mechanics caused a stir in Preble County by including a

well-known local treasure tale in a list of Top 5 stories of hidden riches. As legend has it, sometime in the 1790s, the Bridge family buried an iron cooking pot filled with at least $100,000 in gold coins on their farm southwest of Eaton. Local historian Stephen Pope told the Dayton Daily News in 1995 that the story of the hidden treasure crops up every 15 years or so, but the treasure remains elusive.

Gallia County river treasure The pre-Civil War Ohio River was often lawless, yet laden with valuable commerce, which made the rural stretches in southeast Ohio, with its hidden coves and bluffs, irresistible to pirates who are rumored to have stashed treasures in caches along the river. They are also known to have scuttled a riverboat or two. Treasure hunters to this day report finding gold and silver coins washing up near the town of Cheshire from a sunken riverboat, but the source has never been located.

Dillinger’s money Outlaw James Dillinger and his gang crisscrossed Ohio in the 1930s, robbing banks and generally sowing terror. One of Dillinger’s associates, James Pierpont, used his family farm outside of Leipsic as a base from which to launch dozens of bank robberies across northwest Ohio, and the gang used the farm as a stash house. There’s also rumored to be $825,000 of Dillinger money buried on a farm near Jackson, where a former associate lived.

If you dig Searching for treasure with a metal detector isn’t as easy as just powering up the device and digging; there’s a lot to consider: • Many park systems — like Montgomery’s Five Rivers MetroParks — don’t allow metal detectors in parks. Others, such as Cuyahoga County’s park system, require a permit. Franklin County MetroParks does allow metal-detecting. Bottom line: check the rules. • If you go on private land, get permission from the landowner or else you are trespassing. • Theft of artifacts from private property and transporting them across state lines may also be a violation of the Archeological Resources Protection Act, a federal law. • Watch out for utilities. PUCO has a pretty robust enforcement, so be alert for buried pipes and utility lines.

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  29


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING’S

Holiday Gift Guide BY DAMAINE VONADA

You’ve been earning and learning in your pajamas, so why not do your holiday shopping in them, too? Artisans, craftspeople, and entrepreneurs throughout Ohio produce a wide range of exceptional items that you can buy online or by telephone. No mask is needed, and you’ll be giving twice — once to family and friends and again to Ohio’s economy.

2020

Antiquation, Medina

7Thirty8 Apparel, Zanesfield

Designer Eric Schultz creates rustic and highly original home décor from reclaimed wood and metal. His Ohio-shaped cutouts cleverly showcase both materials and can be made to your specifications. If you like his style but don’t know what to choose, Antiquation offers gift cards that come in a string-drawn burlap sack. 330-722-4339.

Designer and screen printer Matt Overholt makes every T-shirt, hoodie, and sweatshirt that he sells. People love the softness and quality of his garments, and Matt’s Ohio Adventure Club line combines state-themed graphics with his love of the outdoors. He also takes custom orders, and for special events, his food truck-inspired mobile print shop serves up made-to-order tees and tote bags. apparelby7thirty8@gmail.com.

www.shoptheant.com

www.7thirty8apparel.com

30   30  OHIO OHIOCOOPERATIVE COOPERATIVELIVING  LIVING • • NOVEMBER NOVEMBER2020 2020


Blue Jacket Dairy, Bellefontaine Angel and Jim King not only turn local cow and goat milk into artisan cheeses but also give their products names — like Hull’s Trace, a semi-hard cheddar — that reference Ohio history. Their fresh cheese curds come in several yummy flavors; Gretna Grillin’ tastes like a toasted cheese sandwich without the bread, and spreadable Cranberry Quark glides onto crackers for an easy appetizer. 937-292-7327.

www.bluejacketdairy.com

Copper Moon Studio, Holland Led by Stacy and Dan Owen, the artists at Copper Moon Studio excel at creating fun and functional items — including clocks, coasters, and suncatchers — from metal and fused glass. Their “Family Is Forever Tree” is a customer favorite that features a plasmacut steel tree with multicolored glass leaf magnets that you can personalize with names and dates. 419-867-0683.

Dietsch Brothers, Findlay Making fine chocolates and ice cream for generations, the Dietsch family operates two landmark sweet shops in Findlay, where their famous chocolate-covered pretzels and exclusive Snowballs — vanilla cream dipped in dark chocolate and hand-rolled in coconut — are sold year-round. Dietsch’s Candy Cane Bark is ideal for stuffing stocking, but be advised: Its scrumptious brittles — peanut, coconut, and sea salt caramel — are available only from mid-October to Christmas. 419-422-4474; 419-423-3221.

www.coppermstudio.com www.dietschs.com

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER2020 • OHIO 2020 • OHIOCOOPERATIVE COOPERATIVELIVING  31 LIVING  31


Just Pizzelles, Cortland

Lisa Inglert Jewelry, Cincinnati

Pizzelles are a beloved Christmas cookie in Italy, but Christina Benton offers more than the traditional flavors of anise, vanilla, amaretto, and lemon. She bakes the world’s largest selection of pizzelles — more than 90 different kinds ranging from Apple Butter to White Chocolate Raspberry. Her holiday assortments include handwritten gift cards and festive flavor options such as Candy Cane, Gingerbread, and Sugar Plum. 330-638-8707.

Customers call Lisa Inglert’s necklaces, bracelets, and earrings “happy jewelry,” because her vibrant colors and whimsical designs brighten their day whenever they wear them. Joking that she plays with fire in her studio, Lisa handcrafts dazzling glass beads that she envelops in sterling silver and goldfilled metal. Her bestselling collection — Secret Garden — features enchanting butterflies, bees, and blossoms. 513-252-3453.

www.justpizzelles.com

www.lisainglertjewelry.com

Lucky Levi’s Leather, Logan At his workshop in the Hocking Hills, leatherworker and South Central Power Company member Jerry Swank expertly crafts Old West holsters and gun belts year-round. At Christmas, he makes splendidlooking stockings from suede and vegetable-tanned leather. Available in various colors, the stockings can be personalized and are sturdy enough to hold plenty of goodies ... or lumps of coal. 740-380-6190. www.luckylevisleather.com

32   32  OHIO OHIOCOOPERATIVE COOPERATIVELIVING  LIVING • • NOVEMBER NOVEMBER2020 2020


Melody Elizabeth, Hamilton Melody Elizabeth Doyel has been sewing since age 7. She loves antique textiles and is a fashion aficionado. Doyel employs those traits to transform vintage needlepoints and tapestries into handbags and totes. Add leather backings and feminine details like bejeweled ribbons, tassel fringe, and rhinestone closures, and — voila! — her items are durable, beautiful, and unique. 513-907-1752. www.melodyelizabeth.com

Michael’s Artisan Chocolates, Bexley Since chocolatier Michael Gillam specializes in little works of edible art, it’s no surprise that customers often say his Belgian chocolates look almost too pretty to eat. Michael’s vividly colored pecan turtles truly are eye candy, and his spicy caramel collection — handmade soft caramel infused with ghost chili and other peppers — delivers a sweet-spicy flavor combination like no other chocolate. 614-558-1190.

www.michaelsartisanchocolates.com

Packer Creek Pottery, Genoa and Perrysburg Holiday cheer takes on a whole new meaning with Packer Creek Pottery’s bright and boldly colored majolica. Founder Jan Pugh and owner/artist Julie Harbal produce imaginatively patterned pieces — including realistic cabbage leaf platters and bowls in red and green — at their Genoa studio and display their gorgeous wares at galleries in Genoa and Perrysburg. 419-855-3858; 419-806-1355.

www.packercreekpottery.com

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER2020 • OHIO 2020 • OHIOCOOPERATIVE COOPERATIVELIVING  33 LIVING  33


Prospect Jam Co., Cincinnati Owner Emily Hutton crafts jam and marmalade from locally grown fruits and organic cane sugar and takes pride in using the traditional French method of small batches cooked in copper pots. Her repertoire of innovative flavors includes Black Currant Preserves with Bergamot and Dark Chocolate, Strawberry Jam with Rosemary and Terroir Gin, Blood Orange Marmalade with Rye Whiskey and Vanilla Bean, and Yuletide favorite Red Pear with Gingerbread Spice and Molasses.

www.prospectjamco.com

STEM Handmade Soap, Lakewood and Shaker Heights Using natural ingredients and formulations developed in-house, owners Dave Willet and Steve Meka make wonderfully aromatic artisan soaps, body butters, and bath bombs. Holiday scents include Sugar Plum and Frankincense and Myrrh, but for a one-of-a-kind gift, get their six-pack of beer soap. It’s made from local microbrews and includes an IPA, lager, pilsner, stout, hefeweizen, and lambic. 216-505-553.

www.stemsoaps.com

The Fat Cat Factory, Parma Forget about trite and tiresome tomato-shaped pincushions. Kathleen Schmid sews pincushions with personality. Based on her fat cat, Spooky, Kathleen’s original patterns include animals, occupations, hobbies, and holidays, and with their weighted bottoms and large bellies, her pincushions are practical as well as playful. Tip: Her new Plague Doctor pincushion makes a perfect 2020 memento. thefatcatfactory www.etsy.com/shop/thefatcatfactory @gmail.com.

34   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


The Happy Groundhog Studio, Cincinnati

White Collar Woodsmen, Monroe

Groundhogs and narwhals and owls, oh my! Art Academy of Cincinnati graduate Melissa Bracken hand-stitches cute and cuddly stuffed creatures and pillows made from eco-friendly felts and upcycled sweaters. Everything Melissa creates — even her three-eyed monsters — has a small red heart that signifies the love she puts into her work.

In 2015, Patrick Gorden made his first scented beard oil for the groomsmen at his wedding. Today, he and his wife, Sarah, hand-make an entire line of affordable beard oils and waxes that smell great and feel luxurious. White Collar Woodsmen’s signature gift set features five popular scents — including After the Storm, a refreshing blend of jasmine, lemon, and rosemary — handsomely packaged in a charred wine box or crate. 937-514-1295.

www.TheHappyGroundhogStudio.com www.whitecollarwoodsmen.com

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  35


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Geothermal Professionals Northeast OH | 440-543-5740

Roessner Energy Products Inc. Coldwater, OH | 419-678-4858

36   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


2020 CALENDAR

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

NORTHWEST

NOV. 20–DEC. 31 – Lights Before Christmas, Toledo Zoo, 2 Hippo Way, Toledo, Sun.–Thur. 3–8 p.m., Fri./ Sat. 3–9 p.m. Over 1 million lights, the award-winning Big Tree, and more than 200 illuminated animal images. 419-385-5721 or www.toledozoo.org. NOV. 25 – Holiday Lights Grand Illumination, downtown Sidney, 6 p.m. www.sidneyalive.org/events. NOV. 27–JAN. 3 – North Pole Express, 12505 Co. Rd. 99, Findlay, Fri./Sat. 5:30–9:30 p.m., Sun. 5:30–8:30 p.m. $4; under 13, $3. Hop on board our quarter-scale locomotive for a trip through a winter wonderland of

NORTHEAST

PLEASE NOTE: Because of the developing coronavirus situation, many of these planned events may have been postponed or canceled. Please seek updated information before traveling. COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

sparkling lights and festive decorations. See operating model trains and hundreds of decorated trees, plus a visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus on select days. 419-4232995 or www.nworrp.org. NOV. 28–JAN. 1 – Blaze of Lights Festival, N. Main St., Bluffton, 5–8 p.m. Free. Celebrate the season with holiday lights and vintage folk art displays, food and shopping, entertainment, horse-drawn wagon rides, and train rides for the kids. Opening parade on Nov. 28 at 5 p.m. 419-369-2985 or www.explorebluffton.com. DEC. 5 – Winter Wonderland Parade and Christmas of Yesteryear, downtown Sidney. The downtown is all dressed up and lit up for your enjoyment, with shopping, horse and carriage rides, and an evening parade, complete with Santa and Mrs. Claus. The Reason for the Season lighting ceremony begins at 6:30 p.m., parade at 7:30 p.m. 937-658-6945 or www. sidneyalive.org. DEC. 5–6, 12 – Christmas Open House, Logan County History Center, 521 E. Columbus Ave., Bellefontaine, 1–5 p.m. Free; donations accepted. The 1906 neoclassical Orr Mansion is beautifully decorated

NOV. 24–JAN. 9 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, Historic Fort Steuben, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Free. Over 150 unique, life-size nutcrackers in an outdoor display with lights and music. Market open on weekends. 740-283-1787 or www.steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. NOV. 27–DEC. 30 – Deck the Hall: “We Wish You a Merry Christmas,” Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, 714 N. Portage Path, Akron. Over 1 million lights illuminate the estate in a spectacular display, and the historic Manor House is decorated in style for the season. See website for times and updated event information. NOV. 12–15 – Northeast Ohio PierogiFest, Cuyahoga 330-836-5533 or www.stanhywet.org/events. Co. Fgds., 19201 E. Bagley Rd., Berea, Thur./Fri. 5–9 NOV. 27–DEC. 27 – Drive-Thru Holiday Lights, p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Polish Medina Co. Fgds., 720 W. Smith Rd., Medina, Fri.–Sun. food and music festival featuring a selection from the 6–10 p.m. www.mainstreetmedina.com. area’s best places for authentic Polish cuisine, Polish NOV. 28, DEC. 5 – Christmas in the Alpaca Barn, beer, authentic Polish dancers, shopping bazaar, and 16800 Cowley Rd., Grafton, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Come kids’ activities. Find us on Facebook. enjoy an up-close and personal look at these NOV. 16–DEC. 31 – Holidays at the Mansion, wonderful peaceful creatures. Shop for unique Victorian House Museum, 484 Wooster Rd., gifts at the Farm Store. 440-477-4300 or www. Millersburg, Sun.– Fri. 1–4 p.m., Sat. 1–8 p.m. ourlittleworldalpacas.com. Tour the 28-room mansion, transformed into NOV. 29 – Reverse Holiday Parade of Lights, a holiday wonderland. 330-674-0022, www. Medina Co. Fgds., Community Center parking lot, 735 holmeshistory.com/events, or www.facebook.com/ Lafayette Rd., Medina, 6–9 p.m. The annual event has VictorianHouseMuseum. been altered because of coronavirus precautions: The NOV. 20 – Window Wonderland, downtown parade floats will be parked and stationary, while the Wooster, 6:30–9 p.m. Free. Horse-drawn carriage audience drives past. www.mainstreetmedina.com. rides, decorated storefront windows, Santa DEC. 3 – “Women and Philanthropy: The Monied descending from the rooftop, hot chocolate, live Women of Cleveland and Their Impact,” presented reindeer, lights, and holiday activities. 330-262-6222 by Cleveland History Center, 7–8:30 p.m. via Zoom. or www.mainstreetwooster.org. Dr. Einav Rabinovitch-Fox, visiting professor at Case NOV. 20–22 – Medina Candlelight Walk, downtown Western Reserve University, will examine the role of Medina. Community Christmas tree, lights and the Wade family women and their milieu in shaping decorations, shopping, visits with Santa, photo ops, late 19th-century Cleveland. RSVP information and over 2,000 luminaries. “Run, Santa, Run!” 5K fun available at www.wrhs.org/events/cleveland-civicsrun Nov. 22. www.mainstreetmedina.com. history-series-women-philanthropy.

for the holidays, and the hallways are lined with decorated Christmas trees. Musical entertainment and kids’ crafts. 937-593-7557, www.loganhistory.org, or www.facebook.com/logancountyhistorycenter. DEC. 10 – A Presidential Christmas, Hayes Library and Museums, Spiegel Grove, 1337 Hayes Ave., Fremont. Outdoor tree lighting at 5:30 p.m., with refreshments to follow (free). Horse-drawn sleigh rides 5:30–7:30 p.m. ($5.50 for ages 3 and over). Museum and the “Hayes Train Special” model train display will be open till 8 p.m. ($5–$13, under 6 free). 419-3322081 or www.rbhayes.org. DEC. 10–23 – Winter Wonderland Light Display, Sandusky Co. Fgds., 901 Rawson Ave., Fremont, 6–8 p.m. Display is drive-through only this year. $5 per vehicle. Food items accepted for donation to food pantry. 419-332-5604 or www.sanduskycountyfair.com. DEC. 12 – “Bells, Brass, and Bows,” 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. The Lima Symphony Orchestra and Chorus present their beloved holiday concert featuring traditional favorites and holiday singalongs, 419-2225701 or www.limasymphony.com.

DEC. 4 – Historic Downtown Church Walking Tour, 377 W. Liberty St., Wooster, 5–8 p.m. Start the tour at your leisure; no reservations required. At each church, participants can sing a Christmas carol, hear a bit of the church’s history, and admire their Christmas decorations. 330-262-6222 or www. mainstreetwooster.org. DEC. 4–13 – Candlelight Holiday Tours of Malabar Farm, 4050 Bromfield Rd., Lucas, Fri./Sat. 4–8 p.m., Sun. 1–4 p.m. Tour Louis Bromfield’s Big House, all decked out for the holiday. Enjoy freshly baked cookies and hot cider. You might even see Santa himself! 419892-2784 or www.malabarfarm.org/events. DEC. 5 – Christmas Down on the Farm, Tis the Season and Schrock’s Amish Farm, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Berlin. Bring the family out for sleigh rides, gingerbread house decorating, Christmas cookies, and more. 330893-3604 or www.schrocksvillage.com. DEC. 5 – Sights and Sounds of Christmas: Nutcracker Magic Parade, downtown Steubenville, noon–1 p.m. M ​ any floats and dancers will feature nutcracker-themed decorations and characters, and some of our life-size Village Nutcrackers will be making special appearances! www.facebook.com/ SteubenvilleChristmasParade. DEC. 5–23 – Holiday Lantern Tours, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, 5:40–9 p.m. $12– $20. Take a lantern-lit tour of the Village and visit the historic houses, decorated for the season. Experience the sights, sounds, and flavors of Christmas as celebrated in the 19th-century Western Reserve. Tours depart every 20 minutes. Dress appropriately for this indoor/outdoor activity. Reservations required! 330-666-3711 ext.1720, halereservations@wrhs.org, or www.wrhs.org/events.

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  37


2020 CALENDAR

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

SOUTHWEST

NOV. 11, 18, 25, DEC. 2, 9 – Bluegrass Wednesdays, Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Enjoy dinner, wine, and an evening of lively bluegrass music by Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Restricted seating because of COVID precautions, early reservations are recommended. 513-385-9309 or vinokletwinery@ fuse.net. NOV. 20–22 – Christkindlmarkt, Germania Park, 3529 West Kemper Rd., Cincinnati, Fri. 5–10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $3, under 13 free. The oldest and most authentic German Christmas market in the region. http:// germaniasociety.com/christkindlmarkt. NOV. 21 – Hometown Holiday Horse Parade, S. Broadway, Greenville, 7 p.m. The lighted parade

PLEASE NOTE: Because of the developing coronavirus situation, many of these planned events may have been postponed or canceled. Please seek updated information before traveling.

includes horse-drawn carriages, wagons, riders, and buggies. Voted Best Community Parade for 2019 by readers of Ohio magazine. 937-548-4998 or www.downtowngreenville.org. NOV. 22 – Farm Toy Show, Champaign Co. Fgds., 384 Park Ave., Urbana, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $2. 937-826-4201. NOV. 26–DEC. 31 – Light Up Middletown, Smith Park, 500 Tytus Ave., Middletown, 6–10 p.m. daily. A drive-through fantasy light display. See Santa and Mrs. Claus every Friday and Saturday evening, 7–9 p.m. www.lightupmiddletown.org. NOV. 27–DEC. 27 – Holiday Lights at Lost Creek Reserve, 2385 St. Rte. 41, Troy, Fri./Sat. 6–10 p.m., Sun. 6–9 p.m. $10 per car, $15 per van. Be transported into a winter wonderland filled with over 60 animated light displays. The 1.25mile driving tour takes you through the woods, down charming farm lanes, and past the historic Knoop Homestead aglow with lights. www. homegrowngreat.com. NOV. 27 – Hometown Holiday and Grand Illumination, downtown Troy, 5–8:30 p.m. Children of all ages enjoy visits with Santa in the Santa House, carriage rides, holiday music, hot cocoa and refreshments, shopping at our local merchants, and, of course, the lighting of the

Christmas tree (6:45 p.m.). 937-339-5455 or www. troymainstreet.org. DEC. 4 – Christmas on the Green, downtown Piqua, 6–9 p.m. Community caroling, horsedrawn carriage rides, children’s activities, and live entertainment. 937-773-9355 or www. mainstreetpiqua.com. DEC. 4–6 – Christmas in the Village, downtown Waynesville. Shopping, dining, horse-drawn carriage rides, carolers and choirs, costumed characters, a heated entertainment tent, and daily visits from Santa Claus. 513-897-8855 or www. waynesvilleohio.com. DEC. 5 – Lebanon Horse-Drawn Carriage Parade and Festival, downtown Lebanon, 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Parades at 1, 4, and 7 p.m. Find us on Facebook: @lebanoncarriageparade. DEC. 5 – Piqua Holiday Parade, downtown Piqua, 2–3 p.m. Celebrate the holiday season with an old-fashioned hometown parade. Kids can visit with Santa afterward in the lobby of the Fort Piqua Plaza. www.mainstreetpiqua.com. DEC. 12–13 – Dayton Christkindlmarkt, 1400 E. Fifth St., Dayton, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 12–4 p.m. Celebrate the centuries-old Christmas market tradition that originated in Germany. 937-2239013 or www.daytongermanclub.org.

create your own memories than an overnight trip to Ohio Amish Country. Bring your family, bring your friends, bring your sweetshopping, stock up for holiday meals or enjoy an old fashioned backroad adventure.

www.visitamishcountry.com 330-674-3975 38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


CENTRAL

NOV. 8 – Echoes in Time Theatre Drive-In: “Military,” Ohio History Center and Ohio Village parking lot, 800 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, 1 and 3:30 p.m. $10 per car. Enjoy back-to-back performances from the safety and comfort of your car! Featuring “The Truth About Hangar 18,” “Courage in the Skies: The Story of the Tuskegee Airmen,” and “The ‘Meat Grinder’ War — The Korean Conflict.” 614-297-2300 or www.ohiohistory.org/participate/event-calendar.

SOUTHEAST

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Dickens Victorian Village, downtown Cambridge. Stroll the streets to view scenes depicting life in 1850s England, featuring life-sized, handmade mannequins wearing real vintage clothing. Many Village activities have been curtailed due to coronavirus concerns; check website for updates. 800-933-5480 or www. dickensvictorianvillage.com. THROUGH JAN. 1 – Guernsey County Courthouse Holiday Light Show, Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. nightly. Four different light and music shows performed each evening. 800-933-5480 or www. dickensvictorianvillage.com.

WEST VIRGINIA

NOV. 14 – Holiday Artfest, Welcome Center, 205 N. 5th St., Zanesville, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Art for display and sale includes glass, sculpture, paintings, photography, mixed media, collage, wood, felt, fabric, and other handmade art items. 919-621-9732, studiome. artsupplystore@gmail.com, or www.artcoz.org. NOV. 28 – Small Business Saturday, Pickerington, 9 a.m.–11 p.m. Support your local businesses by shopping at the Village. 614-321-8221 or www. pickeringtonvillage.com. NOV. 28–29 – Scott Antique Market, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker and Celeste Bldgs., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission; $5 parking. 800 exhibit booths. info@scottantiquemarket.com or www. scottantiquemarkets.com. DEC. 5, 12 – Christmas Candlelighting Ceremony, Roscoe Village, Main Stage, 600 N. Whitewoman St., Coshocton, 6 p.m. Free. Begins at the base of the 35-foot tree. Light your candle and sing “Silent Night”

with other guests as you celebrate this heartwarming holiday tradition. 740-622-7644, 800-877-1830, or www.roscoevillage.com. DEC. 8 – Inventors Network Meeting, Rev1 Ventures for Columbus, 1275 Kinnear Rd., Columbus, 7 p.m. The focus this month is “When NOT to Apply for a Patent.” 614-470-0144 or www.inventorscolumbus.com. DEC. 11 – Care Train of Union County Auction, McAuliffe’s Ace Hardware, 1299 W. Fifth St., Marysville. Begins at 9 a.m. online. Proceeds go toward the purchase of food vouchers for financially needy families, seniors, and disabled adults in Union County at Christmastime. 937-303-9453 or www.caretrain.org. DEC. 12 – Annual Holiday Cookie Walk, Fairfield County Genealogical Research Library, 503 Lenwood Dr., Lancaster, 1–4 p.m. Select from a great variety of cookies for $6 a pound. Stock up for the holidays! 740-653-2573.

NOV. 14 – Virtual Gingerbread House Workshop, http://mariettacastle.org, 10 a.m.–noon. $12.50–$20. Suggested for ages 8 and up. Kits can be purchased Nov. 12–13 at The Castle’s Carriage House Gift Shop, 418 Fourth St., Marietta. Call 740-373-4180 or visit our website for more information. NOV. 28 – Holiday Parade, Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, begins at 5 p.m. The theme is “Home for the Holidays.” 740-439-2238 or www. downtowncambridge.com. NOV. 28–DEC. 20 – Santa Train, Hocking Valley Scenic Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 W. Canal St., Nelsonville, every Sat. and Sun., 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., and every Fri. at 6 p.m. beginning on Dec. 4. $16–$21, under 3 free. www.hvsry.org/trainlist/#santa. DEC. 5 – Lancaster WinterFest and Tree Lighting, downtown Lancaster, 12–4:30 p.m. Enjoy shopping and giveaways, dining, music, entertainment, and horse-drawn carriage rides; visit with Santa; and stay for the tree lighting. https://visitfairfieldcounty.org. DEC. 5 – Logan Christmas Parade, Main Street, Logan, begins at 2 p.m. Come see Santa and cheer on this year’s floats! 740-385-6836 or http:// explorehockinghills.com.

DEC. 5–20 – Santa House, Logan, Fri.–Sun., 6–8 p.m. Visit Santa in the newly built warm house in Worthington Park. 740-385-6836 or http:// explorehockinghills.com. DEC. 12 – Christmas in Ash Cave, St. Rte. 56, Logan. Free. Step away from the hectic holiday season and come bundled for the weather while enjoying a lighted stroll back to Ash Cave. Once you arrive at the cave, warm up with refreshments by an open fire. Listen to our holiday music, have the kids visit with an old-fashioned Santa, or help to decorate our Christmas tree for wildlife. 740-385-6841 or www.explorehockinghills.com/festivals-events/ christmas-in-ash-cave. DEC. 12 – Deerassic Park’s Winter Giveaway, 6 p.m. online. Aims to provide funding to complete the final stages of the Ohio Whitetail Hall of Fame and open it to the public in the spring of 2021. The event will be live-streamed on the website and our Facebook page. For tickets, call 740-435-9500, visit www.deerassic.com, or write to/stop by the office at 14250 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge, 43725.

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Winter Festival of Lights, Oglebay Resort, Wheeling. Featuring 300 acres of twinkling lights over a 6-mile drive. 3D holographic eyewear transforms every point of light into a magical display. Per-car donation requested; valid for the entire festival season. 877-436-1797 or https://oglebay. com/events/festival-of-lights. NOV. 14–DEC. 27 – Celebration of Lights, Morris Park, Fairmont, Fri.–Sun. 6–10 p.m. Suggested donation of $10 per car. See over 475 holiday light displays in this drive-through tour. New: Walkers Nights every Thursday, Nov. 19–Dec. 17, 6–10 p.m. 304-366-4550 or www.celebrationoflightswv.com.

Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.

NOVEMBER 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

1. Our daughter, London, loves making chocolate chip cookies! Sam and Keisha Towns South Central Power Company members 2. My granddaughter, Janie Grace, loves baking with her aunt. Teresa Gebhart South Central Power Company member 3. Our son, Cooper (5), helping bake cookies. Kerry Hansen North Central Electric Cooperative member 4. Addie Houser, my granddaughter, making purple cupcakes. Lynda Houser South Central Power Company member 5. My grandson, Bolden, is learning to bake cookies. Jill Briem Pioneer Electric Cooperative member 6. My daughter, Noelle, whipping up some tasty frosting. Jessica Brasee Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member 7. Our grandson, Karsten, loves to cook! Philip and Sheryl Godwin Logan County Electric Cooperative 8. My granddaughter, Kathryn Booker, helps her mom and dad in the kitchen all the time! Fran Booker Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member 9. My daughter, Roslyn Moore, making pecan tassies for Thanksgiving. She loves to bake and has created so many yummy things for her friends and family. Kami Moore Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative member 10. Our son, JJ, wanted to decorate cupcakes. Marie Raynes South Central Power Company member 11. O  ur grandsons, Oliver, 4, and Graham, 2, making their famous chocolate chip cookies. Mark and Kathryne McConnell Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative members 12. Our granddaughter, Anna, made homemade tortillas. Emily Lantz Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative member 13. (in box below) My daughter, Heidi, helping to make her birthday cake. Kendra Smith Midwest Electric member

Send us your picture! For February, send “Golden anniversaries” by Nov. 15; for March, send “In like a lion” by Dec. 15. Upload your photos at www.ohiocoopliving.com/memberinteractive. Your photo may be featured in our magazine or on our website. Find more photos on the Member Interactive page at

www.ohiocoopliving.com

40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2020


How far can you go? ELECTRIC VEHICLES CAN OFTEN GET YOU WHERE YOU NEED TO GO ON A SINGLE CHARGE

AVERAGE MILE COMPARISON Even if you live in a rural area, an electric vehicle can still work for you! Extra planning might be needed for long trips, but for most people, daily driving needs can be met with one charge.

Miles

20

40

60 80 100 120 140

Average milesper-charge for all electric vehicles in 2019 Average miles driven per day by Americans living in rural areas Average miles driven per day by Americans

ohioec.org/energy

0

125

35.7

29.8


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Profile for Ohio Cooperative Living

Ohio Cooperative Living - November - Holmes-Wayne  

Ohio Cooperative Living - November - Holmes-Wayne