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Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative Official publication | www.hwecoop.com

FEBRUARY JANUARY 2018

Eye in the sky

How one co-op uses drone technology to save money and improve safety in the workplace

ALSO INSIDE The glory of melted cheese Ohio’s place in a driverless future A vote of conscience


CONCERN FOR COMMUNITY At Ohio’s electric cooperatives, we work hard to take care of our neighbors—whether that’s across town or across the globe. To learn more about our community initiatives, visit ohioec.org.

ohioec.org

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INSIDE

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

HIGHLIGHT 4

EYE IN THE SKY

Technology has provided a way for electric cooperatives to inspect lines, poles, and towers in dangerous conditions — without having to send up a crew.

FEATURES 10

WINTER VISITORS

Long-eared owls and short-eared owls, once thought to portend disaster, now are considered a seasonal viewing treat for coldweather birders in Ohio.

22

A DRIVERLESS FUTURE

Ohio has been at the leading edge of self-driving automobile technology since the 1960s.

24

EDMUND ROSS’S VOTE

During a critical time in the nation’s history, an Ohio native put his conscience and his country first — regardless of the political price to be paid.

26

HISTORY BY THE PINT

Carillon Brewing Company in Dayton is the nation’s only working, historically accurate brewery that’s housed in a museum.

Cover photo on most editions: Brent Ransome of Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative flies his drone near the co-op’s communications tower in Kenton. (Photo by Jeffry Konczal)

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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UP FRONT

C

KEEPING

SAFE S

afe, Clean, Reliable, and Affordable: I often use these words to describe the electric power supply that Buckeye Power and all of the electric cooperatives around the state strive to provide to our member-consumers. Each of these words is important to us, and each has a different measure of success. “Reliable” may be the easiest for you to observe. Do the lights come on every day? Is the supply adequate for your needs? When something occasionally causes a power outage, is power restored quickly? “Affordable” is a little harder; your bill, in part, depends on how much electricity you consume, and that’s often driven by the weather. Even as wildly unpredictable as Mother Nature can be, every co-op aims to hold costs as low as possible — and as steady as possible — while still keeping your service reliable, clean, and safe. “Clean” is tougher still, because it’s a relative term. While electricity is the cleanest form of energy you can use in your home or business, there are environmental impacts from the fossil fuels used to produce most of that power, and also from the footprint that our facilities require to distribute it to your home. We have, however, worked diligently over the past 20 years to minimize those impacts, and we are proud to operate some of the cleanest power plants of their kind in the world. “Safe” is the most important one. It’s also easy to take for granted, even to overlook. But electricity is powerful and must be respected. While the systems that produce and deliver electricity to your home have been designed specifically with safety in mind, maintaining that safety, all the way from the plant to your light switch, requires training, personal commitment, and constant vigilance. Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide association that provides services to each of the co-ops around the state, has made particular efforts to help improve workplace safety — evidenced by our lineworker training program that has become one of the finest in the industry, with a laser focus on safety. Further, last year was the safest year of operations on record for the staff at our power plants. We’ll work hard to make 2018 even better. Cold winter weather presents plenty of hazards in our daily routine. Please take a moment each day to consider how you stay safe in your own home and workplace, take precautions to prevent unsafe acts, and help make 2018 as safe as possible.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

Pat O’Loughlin

President & CEO Ohio's Electric Cooperatives

It’s easy to take safety for granted, but electricity is powerful and must be respected. Maintaining safety requires training, personal commitment, and constant vigilance.


February 2018 • Volume 60, No. 5

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Samantha Kuhn Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communicati ons Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Brian Albright, Colleen Romick Clark, John Egan, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Pat Keegan, Jeff ry Konczal, Catherine Murray, Craig Springer, and Damaine Vonada. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec tric Co op erati ves, Inc. With a paid circulati on of 294,359, it is the offi cial com mun icati on link be tween the elec tric co operati ves in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem bers. Nothing in this publicati on may be reproduced in any manner without writt en permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperati ves, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 8 OHIO ICON

KROHN CONSERVATORY: Cincinnati’s art deco “rainforest under glass” celebrates its 85th birthday this year in style.

13 GOOD EATS GLORIOUS AND MELTY: Whether it’s for a fancy dinner party or a quick, desperate snack, cheese is at its delicious best when it’s hot and gooey.

21 CO-OP OHIO SERVICE AWARD: South Central Power Company’s chairman is

honored for his work with the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation; several co-ops help build holiday cheer in their communities.

30 CO-OP PEOPLE FISH FARMERS: Transplanted Californians use an innovative

technique to raise tilapia on their Muskingum County farm.

34 CALENDAR WHAT’S HAPPENING: February events and other things to do.

36 MEMBER INTERACTIVE LOVEBIRDS OF ALL KINDS: Readers share loving photos not just

of birds, but also of themselves — and even elephants!

The fact that a product is adverti sed in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en dorse ment. If you fi nd an adverti sement mis leading or a product unsati sfactory, please noti fy us or the Ohio Att orney General’s Offi ce, Consumer Protecti on Sec ti on, 30 E. Broad St., Col um bus, OH 43215, or call 1-800-282-0515. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additi onal mailing offi ces. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and adverti sing offi ces at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes.

IN THIS ISSUE

Kenton (p.4, 21) Cincinnati (p.8) Lancaster (p.21) New London (p.21) Carrollton (p.21) East Liberty (p.22) Dayton (p.26) Ashland (p.24) Frazeysburg (p.30)

Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

3


BY JOHN EGAN; PHOTOS BY BRENT RANSOME

EYE IN THE SKY Drones help co-op cut costs, boost safety, and improve service

T

here is a 140-foot-tall communications tower positioned at Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative’s substation in Ada that’s vital to the co-op’s mission to provide reliable electric service to its more than 8,000 owner-members. At the top are two radios that are part of Mid-Ohio Energy’s microwave communications network — one that communicates with another substation, and another that points back to the co-op office in Kenton — and unless both are working, the co-op would have difficulty communicating with critical systems at several substations. Brent Ransome, manager of operations technology at Mid-Ohio Energy, remembers the bitterly cold day last winter when one of those radios went out. Had there been an outage at the substation, the broken radio would have meant delays in getting power restored on a day when heat was an utter necessity. Usually, that would mean sending a two-man crew to climb up the tower and assess the situation, get them back down to order any necessary equipment, wait for it to arrive, and then re-climb the tower to install the equipment or make repairs. “In winter, we really try to avoid climbing the towers,” Ransome says. “It’s difficult and dangerous

in the best of conditions, and the cold weather makes it much worse. The gear is heavier, your clothes are heavier, so it’s a tough workout. Anything we can do to not climb, we will do.” Fortunately, a few months earlier, Ransome had approached Mid-Ohio Energy’s president and CEO, John Metcalf, with an idea to purchase a cameraequipped unmanned aerial vehicle, or drone; among its many uses, the drone could be used to make those initial visual inspections. “What we had before was just not the most efficient process,” Metcalf says. “It was timeconsuming, hazardous, and expensive.” The drone they purchased is small, about 12 inches square, with four rotors and a camera. Ones like it are available in just about any electronics retailer, and prices have continually fallen as the technology has improved. So they sent up the drone, watching the live video feed in real time, and saw a cable had snapped. “It’s hard to tell how it happened, but we were able to see exactly what we needed to make the repairs,” Ransome says. “It saved our guys a trip up there, and we were able to get that whole job done in about half the time.” Continued on Page 6

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018


FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

5


Continued from Page 4

Ransome and the Mid-Ohio Energy crews pull out the drone about once a week, Metcalf says. They use it to inspect distribution lines, transformers, substations, and communications towers. After severe storms, they send the drone to inspect its poles and wires that cross remote areas, such as the two state wildlife areas in the co-op’s territory. “When we fly a drone over a communications tower, or to review off-road rights-of-way, or to inspect substations, we get a very clear idea of what we’re up against before we start a job. The resolution is incredible,” Metcalf says. “If we can see the problem before we start work, we can repair equipment faster, and that translates into improved reliability and bottom-line savings for our members.”

How electric co-ops can put drones to use • Drones can assess storm damage when roadways are inaccessible. • Infrared capability can detect hot spots on power lines or in substations. • Drones can assess vegetation management needs near power lines. • GPS data can pinpoint areas in the co-op’s service territory that need attention. —NRECA

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

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12/18/17 5:35 PM


OHIO ICON

BY DAMAINE VONADA; PHOTO BY GARY KESSLER

KROHN

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CONSERVATORY

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Cincinnati LOCATION: Cincinnati’s Eden Park, a hilltop oasis that’s also home to the Cincinnati Art Museum; the Presidents’ Grove of trees honoring U.S. chief executives; and the Eden Park Overlook, which offers panoramic views of the Ohio River. PROVENANCE: After the Civil War, Cincinnati laid the groundwork for Krohn Conservatory by acquiring acreage from the heirs of Nicholas Longworth, a prominent banker and horticulturalist who had used the future parkland for a vineyard he called his “Garden of Eden.” Opened in 1933, Krohn Conservatory was designed by Cincinnati’s Rapp & Meacham architectural firm and named for park commissioner Irwin M. Krohn. SIGNIFICANCE: It’s not only one of the nation’s few city park conservatories, but also among the signature art deco landmarks — including Cincinnati Museum Center and Carew Tower — that Cincinnatians treasure. As a botanical showcase, Krohn Conservatory provides greenery and color even on bleak winter days. “We call it a rainforest under glass,” says general manager Andrea Schepmann. CURRENTLY: Krohn Conservatory turns 85 in 2018, and its noteworthy plants include original 8

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

ficus trees from the 1930s; one of the nation’s largest chocolate trees; and fragrant citrus trees. “People are always amazed by our citrus collection; they have fruits or flowers almost year-round,” says Schepmann.

Th co iso co di so m DV ca

While those seasonal spectacles are certainly popular, Krohn Conservatory’s ambitious butterfly shows have implanted it on the horticultural attraction map. “We’re known for being one of the best butterfly exhibitors anywhere,” says Schepmann. Krohn’s 2018 event, “The Butterflies of Madagascar,” is scheduled from March 24 until June 17, and it features the Sunset Moth, a huge species unique to the Indian Ocean island with bright, iridescent coloring.

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IT’S A LITTLE-KNOWN FACT THAT: Besides being an ideal family destination, Krohn Conservatory also offers evening and adult-oriented programs, including “Botany & Brews” on select Wednesdays, and “Love in the Wild” just before Valentine’s Day.

Th po he

Krohn Conservatory annually presents five different shows, and 2018’s lineup includes spring’s candythemed display: “A Garden of Pure Imagination!” (now through March 11); summer’s “An Apothecary Soul Garden” (March 24–June 17); autumn’s “At Home in the Garden” (Sept. 1–Oct. 21); and “A Crystal Holiday” (Nov. 10–Jan. 6, 2019) at Christmastime.

Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Admission fee. For more information, call 513-421-5707.


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STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

LONG AND SHORT OF IT Taking a look at some winter visitors from the far north Each winter, Ohio is invaded by mysterious aliens that sail south from Canada on silent wings. But these migratory birds — short-eared and long-eared owls — are no longer feared as the portenders of death that most owls were during centuries past. Rather, a glimpse of the owls is eagerly sought by today’s birders as a special seasonal treat, another check mark to add to their life list.

Short-eared owls

The pointed protuberances on the heads of these two owl species that give them their names are not really ears, but rather, just feather tufts.

“Wildlife research has shown that when meadow voles move through their runways in the grass, they leave ultraviolet trails, the UV likely being contained in their urine,” McCormac says. “The owls can detect these trails and in turn know that meadow voles are present. If they detect a large number of trails, the owls stay and hunt; if not, they move on.”

“An owl’s real ear openings are hidden beneath feathers along the sides of its head,” says Jim McCormac, one of Ohio’s leading field naturalists. He is the author of Birds of Ohio, a co-author of the Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas II, and a contributing editor for Bird Watcher’s Digest, a prestigious, national birding magazine that is published in Marietta, Ohio, by the Thompson family.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

Sometime this winter, near dusk, if you see a large bird hunting over an open, grassy field, its flight pattern resembling that of a giant, flitting moth, you’ve probably just spotted a short-eared owl. The owl is searching for meadow voles, its preferred food, and knows where to hunt by employing a sense humans don’t possess.

McCormac remembers one extremely large concentration of short-eared owls that occurred one winter about 20 years ago at The Wilds in southeastern Ohio. “One birder counted more than 50 short-eared


Opposite page and below: The “ears” that give the longeared owl its name are not ears at all, but tufts of feathers that help its camouflage. This page, bottom and right: A short-eared owl in flight — the flight pattern while it hunts is reminiscent of a flitting moth.

owls from just one spot,” he says. “High populations of meadow voles can make for very high numbers of short-eared owls.” The owls are considered partially diurnal because they are active not only at night but also just before dark and again just before sunrise. During the day, short-eared owls roost on or near the ground.

Long-eared owls Long-eareds hunt the same habitat and eat much of the same prey as their short-eared brethren, but you won’t see one until long after dark — these birds are completely nocturnal. “They’re very similar in appearance to short-eared owls and are even in the same genus,” McCormac says. “Masters of camouflage, long-eared owls spend the day hiding in dense cover, roosted well off the ground.” During the day, McCormac says to look for roosting long-

eared owls in dense stands of conifers, grapevine tangles, pin oaks (because those particular trees hold their leaves all winter), and willow thickets. “Long-eareds often roost communally,” he adds, “so if you find one owl, there are likely others around, sometimes as many as 20 in one location.” McCormac says that long-eared owls at rest will sometimes lower their ear tufts, making them look like a hound dog. “Once the birds become alert to possible danger, the ear tufts instantly go back up, which helps the owls camouflage themselves and ‘disappear’ against the background of a tree trunk. They also have a trick of compressing their feathers against their body, making them appear long and thin, much like a broken-off tree limb.” But the survival tactics of long-eared owls don’t fool everyone. Considered the Rodney Dangerfields of the owl world — “I don’t get no respect” — long-eareds are often preyed upon by other owls and also hawks. CHIP GROSS is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor. He took these photos of owls on the properties of Tom and Nancy Rensch (members of Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative), and Drs. Scott and Ann Harmon (DVMs). If you have a unique wildlife photo opportunity, send him an e-mail at whchipgross@gmail.com.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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GOOD EATS

RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHERINE MURRAY

Glorious and melty

Cheese is that nearly perfect food — equally appropriate for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, for the fanciest dinner party or a quick, desperate snack. It’s at its comfort-food best, though, when it’s melty and gooey and oh-so-delicious.

JALAPENO POPPER DIP Prep: 10 minutes; Cook: 25 minutes; Servings: 12 7 oz. can pickled 16 oz. cream cheese jalapenos, drained 1 cup mayonnaise and finely diced 3⁄4 cup grated 2 Tbsp. yellow mustard Parmesan 1 cup shredded Mexican cheese TOPPING 1⁄2 cup panko breadcrumbs

1⁄2 cup grated Parmesan

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Place cream cheese in a microwavable mixing bowl. Microwave for 1 minute, or until easily stirred. Add mayo, 3⁄4 cup Parmesan cheese, Mexican cheese, jalapenos, and mustard. Mix well. Spread into small 8-inch round or square oven-safe baking dish. Mix together panko and 1⁄2 cup Parmesan and pour over dip. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until heated through. Serve with tortilla chips, bread, crackers, carrots, or celery for dipping. Per serving: 322 calories; 26 g fat (13 g saturated fat); 0.5 g fiber; 12.5 g protein.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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FRENCH ONION SOUP Prep: 15 minutes; Cook: 1.25 hours; Servings: 6 6 cups beef broth 5 Tbsp. unsalted butter + extra for spreading on bread 2 tsp. garlic powder + extra 2 Tbsp. olive oil for sprinkling 3 large yellow onions, halved and 6 sprigs fresh thyme, bundled thinly sliced lengthwise 1 bay leaf 1 large red onion, thinly sliced 11/2 t sp. black pepper 3 shallots, thinly sliced 12 French baguette slices 1/2 cup dry white wine (Pinot 1½ to 2 cups shredded Grigio or Savignon Blanc) Swiss cheese In a non-reactive stockpot (stainless steel, ceramic, or glass), melt 5 tablespoons butter over medium heat. Add onions and shallots and let them slowly caramelize for 45 to 60 minutes, stirring occasionally and adding olive oil as needed to prevent burning, until they are very soft and stringy, golden brown, and sweet in flavor. Pour wine in with the onion mixture and scrape the bottom of the pot to deglaze. Add beef broth, 2 teaspoons garlic powder, bundled sprigs of thyme, bay leaf, and black pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes. Remove thyme sprigs and bay leaf. While soup is simmering, turn oven to broil. Place baguette slices on a baking sheet, spread with butter, and sprinkle with garlic powder. Broil each side about 1 minute. Place 6 oven-safe crocks or bowls into a tall, oven-safe dish like a roasting pan. Ladle soup into each crock leaving about 1 inch space, and top with 2 baguette slices. Generously cover with cheese. Place in oven 6 inches from top and broil until cheese is browned and bubbly, 3 to 5 minutes. Carefully remove from oven and serve hot. Per serving: 517 calories; 32 g fat (16.5 g saturated fat); 4 g fiber; 21 g protein.

EASY CHEESY ENCHILADAS Prep Time: 15 minutes; Cook: 20 minutes; Servings: 4 8 6-inch yellow corn tortillas 3 c ups shredded Cheddar Jack cheese 5 scallions 10-oz. can red enchilada sauce 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil 1/2 cup sour cream 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 Tbsp. lime juice 4-oz. can mild green chili peppers, drained Preheat oven to 350°. Wrap stacked tortillas in aluminum foil and place in oven for 10 minutes, until warm and pliable. Set aside, but keep them wrapped so they don’t dry out. Finely chop scallions, keeping the hard white parts separated from the dark green leafy parts. In skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add the chopped white scallions and garlic and cook about 3 minutes until golden brown. Add chili peppers and stir. Set mixture aside to cool. Pour 1/4 can of enchilada sauce into bottom of an 11 x 7-inch oven-safe baking dish. In a medium bowl, combine onion mixture with 2 cups of Cheddar Jack cheese. Fill each tortilla with cheese and onion mixture; roll and place seam-side down along short edge of baking dish. Repeat with rest of the tortillas, placing them close together until pan is full. Pour remaining enchilada sauce over top and sprinkle with reserved cup of cheese. Bake until cheese is melted and sauce is bubbling, about 15 to 20 minutes. Mix together sour cream and lime juice. Drizzle over top of each serving and sprinkle with chopped green scallions. Serve hot. Per serving: 349 calories; 18 g fat (8 g saturated fat); 4.5 g fiber; 9 g protein.

14

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018


PARMESAN-CRUSTED ITALIAN GRILLED CHEESE Prep: 5 minutes; Cook: 7 minutes; Servings: 2 2 Tbsp. butter 4 slices Italian bread 4 slices mozzarella cheese 6 slices Italian meat (salami, prosciutto, or capocollo)

4 Tbsp. finely shredded Parmesan cheese 1 tsp. Italian spice blend (basil, oregano, parsley, garlic powder) 1 handful arugula

Butter outsides of bread. Place butter-side down in a nonstick skillet (or electric skillet) over medium heat. Cover bread with mozzarella cheese and Italian meat. Cook until lightly toasted and golden brown. Turn up heat to medium-high. Carefully turn bread on its side and sprinkle Parmesan cheese and Italian spices directly onto the skillet underneath. Immediately place bread back down on top of Parmesan mixture and cook 1 to 3 minutes, until bread easily releases from skillet. Top with arugula and serve hot. Per serving: 446 calories; 29 g fat (15 g saturated fat); 1 g fiber; 32 g protein.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

15


THE EFFICIENCY EXPERT

BY PAT KEEGAN

HEAT BLOCKERS

In many homes, a radiant barrier can help owners save money

H

omeowners are constantly looking for ways to help keep heat in a home during the winter and to keep heat out in the summer. One of the best ways to do that is to use a radiant barrier.

There are three different ways heat travels: Convection is air movement from hot to cold, which happens through openings such as doors, windows, vents, and leaks; conduction is heat traveling through a solid material, such as the sheetrock and framing of a home, which can be minimized by insulation; and radiant heat loss is a transfer of heat from the sun, or when a warmer material transmits infrared radiation to a colder material — and this is what radiant barriers are designed to stop.

16

Radiant barriers are often installed in attics, where radiant energy from the sun is sent back out through the roof before it can heat the air and insulation below. It is commonly sold as a roll of shiny, aluminum material and is usually mounted on the underside of the framing that supports the roof, because it must have at least an inch of air to reflect the energy back into. Importantly, radiant barriers are not effective either as insulation or as wraps that block air loss — but they are effective at their intended purpose, able to reflect as much as 95 percent of the radiated heat back through the roof if installed properly, with an air gap between itself and the roof.

climates, the radiant barrier that reflects unwanted heat back outside of the house in the summer will also reflect heat away from the house in the winter — though it also will reflect radiant heat from inside back into the house instead of letting it escape through the roof.

The net impact of a radiant barrier depends on whether you live in a hot or cold area. In colder

PAT KEEGAN writes for Collaborative Efficiency, an energy communications company.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

So, is a radiant barrier a good investment? Sometimes. Savings vary in different situations, so proper research is absolutely called for. In Ohio, the cold winters make for especially tricky estimates, so a qualified energy advisor from your local electric cooperative may be able to help sort out the potential savings compared with, say, sealing leaks or adding insulation.


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

BEYOND THE

FLIP OF A SWITCH W

ith the mere flip of a switch, electricity illuminates our lives. But have you ever thought about where your power comes from? Most of us don’t give it a second thought until our service is interrupted and we’re left in the dark — even if only for a short amount of time. In today’s world, electricity is a necessity, and this necessity travels a great distance to reach you — our members.

Glenn W. Miller

Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative President/CEO (HWEC) provides electricity to 18,000 meters, and it takes a network of folks to do so. We build and maintain overhead and underground power lines and manage the equipment needed to provide you with safe, reliable power. But did you know that you are also a cooperative memberowner of the generation facility or G&T (generation and transmission cooperative). Holmes-Wayne Electric receives electricity from Buckeye Power, your generator facility and a G&T located in Columbus with multiple energy assets around the state and country — including coal, natural gas, biomass, hydropower, solar, and wind. G&Ts are wholesale power suppliers that are owned and governed by electric distribution cooperatives, just like Holmes-Wayne Electric. Buckeye Power sends that power over high-voltage transmission lines to HWEC. Since G&Ts are owned by multiple distribution cooperatives, operating costs are split among the owners. This process allows us to purchase power at a lower cost. After the power is sent over high-voltage transmission lines, it then makes its way to our substations, where the voltage is reduced in order to make it to your home safely. Holmes-Wayne Electric owns 18 substations, each located within our 8-county service territory. From the substations, power is sent through over 2,250 miles of Holmes-Wayne Electric lines to transformers, those large cans that sit at the top of power poles, then directed to your home. As you can see, there’s a little more to it than flipping a switch, but we’ve got you covered. Holmes-Wayne Electric has provided our members with safe, reliable, and affordable power for 83 years, and that continues to be our number one goal today.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

17


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

OPERATION ROUND UP

2017 Operation Round Up summary Serving our local community’s needs through member support In January 2006, Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative (HWEC) introduced a new community service program called Operation Round Up® (ORU). This program allows HWEC members to round up their monthly electric bill to the next even dollar. The spare change is placed into a foundation to be distributed to those in need within our community. HWEC members have given over $590,000 back to the community since ORU’s inception. This is an amazing testament to our members’ generosity for our community. Applicants for assistance must live within the local community, and all applications are reviewed by a five-

member board. We give a special thanks to the following board members for volunteering their time: President Dan Mathie, Vice President Jonathan Berger, Secretary Lisa Grassbaugh, Matt Johnson, and HWEC CEO Glenn Miller. As your local electric provider, we want to thank you for allowing us to administer such a worthy program. It’s an honor to assist our community and improve our neighborhoods. The following is a summary of the 2017 distribution. If you would like to learn more about the program or how to participate in ORU, please call the office toll-free at 866674-1055.

Assist a family with loss of furniture from fire — Millersburg Assist a family with bed for child — West Salem The Lord’s Pantry — West Salem Assist an individual with medical equipment — Holmesville

$234.00 $1,000.00 $876.52

Adaptive Sports Program — Sled hockey charity game — Wooster

$1,000.00

Farmers & Hunters Feeding the Hungry — Holmes County

$1,000.00

Assist an individual with a bed — Wooster National Alliance on Mental Illness — Wayne & Holmes County Assist an individual with medical equipment — Wooster

$249.00 $300.00 $1,500.00

Assist an individual with a bed — Wooster

$249.00

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Walk — Holmes County

$500.00

Special Olympics — Field of Dreams — Wooster

$250.00

Assist an individual with a bed — Millersburg

$234.00

Community Tennis Court Construction — Wayne County Assist a family with beds — Wooster Moreland Historical Society, community historical building — restorations

$1,000.00 $936.00 $1,000.00

Assist a family with beds — Wooster

$468.00

The Risers — One Eighty — assist with addiction treatment

$500.00

Assist an individual with a bed — Wooster

$274.00

Assist a family with beds — Wooster

$508.00

Assist a family with disabled child — Wooster

$900.00

Hope for This Step — Suicide and overdose awareness and prevention

$500.00

Assist an individual with air-conditioning unit — Lakeville

$359.09

Adaptive Sports Program — 3 on 3 wheelchair basketball tournament — Wooster Assist a family with bed for child — Holmesville 18

$1,000.00

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

$1,000.00 $234.00


2017 Operation Round Up summary, cont. Farmers & Hunters Feeding the Hungry — Wayne County

$1,000.00

Assist a family with beds — Wooster

$508.00

Assist a family with a bed — Wooster

$468.00

Holmes County Home & Senior Center — processing of donated fair animals

$2,500.00

Assist an individual with a gas stove — Millersburg

$470.75

Assist a family with bunk beds — Wooster

$826.85

Assist a family with transportation for medical treatments — Millersburg

$250.00

Camp Ohio 4-H Camp — camp improvements

$200.00

Assist a family with beds — Shreve

$419.00

Assist a family with transportation for medical appointments — Millersburg

$250.00

Assist a family with a bed for a child — Wooster

$259.00

Share-A-Christmas

$1,000.00

Shop With a Teacher — Millersburg

$100.00

Assist a family with beds — Wooster

$493.00

West Salem Outreach & Food Pantry

$1,000.00

Light House Love Center — Holmes County

$1,000.00

Salvation Army — Holmes County

$1,000.00

Meals on Wheels — Holmes County Senior Center

$1,000.00

Assist a family with transportation for medical treatments — Shreve

$250.00

Assist a family with beds for children — Killbuck

$510.00

New Leaf Center — clinic for special children

$1,000.00

Salvation Army — Wayne County

$1,000.00

Town & Country Fire & Rescue — West Salem Toy Drive

$1,000.00

Christian Children’s Home ­— Wooster

$1,000.00

Meals and More — West Salem

$1,000.00

One Eighty — Holmes County

$1,000.00

One Eighty — Wayne County

$1,000.00

American Red Cross — Wayne County

$1,000.00

Hospice — Holmes and Wayne County

$1,000.00

Viola Stutzman Health Clinic — Wooster

$1,000.00

Church of God — Food Pantry — Millersburg

$1,000.00

Meals Together — Wooster Methodist

$1,000.00

Glenmont Food Pantry

$1,000.00

Shreve United Methodist Church — Food Pantry

$1,000.00

Mohican Area Community Fund

$250.00

Goodwill Industries of Wayne & Holmes Counties, Inc

$1,000.00

58:12 Rescue — Domestic Violence Safe Home — Holmes County

$1,000.00

Assist a family with beds — Wooster

$702.00

Assist an individual with medical equipment — Wooster

$1,500.00

Assist an individual with medical equipment

$2,235.00

Wayne County Food Pantries & Agencies —processing of donated fair animals

$2,396.77

Total $52,659.98

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

19


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES EMPLOYEE NEWS

EMPLOYEE SERVICE AWARDS

Holmes-Wayne Electric would like to recognize the following employees and trustees who recently celebrated a milestone in their careers with the cooperative. Their service is greatly appreciated!

Bowe Firebaugh Class A Lineman 15 years

Lisa Gress Member Service Representative 20 years

Greg Lemon Class A Lineman 15 years

Michael Martin Class A Lineman 15 years

Daryl Reynolds Utility Specialist 20 years

Michael Rowe Class A Lineman 15 years

Stacy Shaw Safety Director/ Line Supervisor 20 years

Sean Stewart Apprentice 5 years

Jackie McKee Board Trustee 5 years

Barry Jolliff Board Trustee 10 years

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Randy Sprang Chairman

Dave Mann Vice Chairman

CONTACT

866-674-1055 (toll-free) www.hwecoop.com

OFFICE

6060 St. Rte. 83 P.O. Box 112 Millersburg, OH 44654-0112

Barry Jolliff

Secretary/Treasurer

Jonathan Berger Kenneth Conrad Bill Grassbaugh Jackie McKee Ronnie Schlegel David Tegtmeier

OHIO OHIO COOPERATIVE COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER LIVING • FEBRUARY 2017 2018

CALL US 24/7 Report outages, submit meter readings, and make payments

Trustees

Glenn W. Miller 20J 20

SMARTHUB Report an outage, submit a meter reading, and pay your bill all through our mobile SmartHub application. Available for both Android and Apple devices.

President/CEO

Facebook.com /holmeswayneelectriccoop


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

Davis honored by Ohio Farm Bureau Ken Davis, chairman of the board for South Central Power Company, has been recognized with a Distinguished Service Award from the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation (OFBF) in Columbus. Davis, a former Ohio Farm Bureau president, was recognized in December for his lifetime contributions to Ohio’s agricultural community. Davis lives in Highland County and serves on the Southern Ohio Agricultural and Community Development Foundation Board. Ken Davis

Firelands Electric celebrates holidays with multiple outreach programs In December, Firelands Electric Cooperative office employees donated more than a dozen stockings filled with gifts to help brighten the Christmas season for local children. In addition, employees donated more than $250 to the Greenwich Salvation Army by paying $5 to wear jeans to work on Fridays through the month of December. The co-op’s members, employees, and trustees also collected donations for USO of Northern Ohio’s Step Up for Soldiers annual campaign, taking in snacks, canned goods, and health and wellness products. Radio stations WLKR and K96 will work with the USO to distribute the donations, along with others collected throughout the area, to American soldiers stationed abroad and those returning home from deployment.

Mid-Ohio hosts military care package assembly The Blue Star Mothers of Hardin County gathered in MidOhio Energy’s Kenton office Community Room this winter to pack 368 boxes of comfort and care items to send to troops who are deployed overseas. The group’s annual care package donation sends items such as winter hats, hand warmers, snacks, and personal care items to troops stationed in areas where it is hard to obtain such items. This year’s shipment was sent to 11 different locations, including Afghanistan and Turkey.

Carroll Electric brings cheer, warmth to kids Carroll Electric’s annual Share Christmas Program, hosted by the co-op’s employees, raised and donated about $600 in Christmas gifts to three children in that co-op’s service territory. The office also served as a Carroll County Coats for Kids drive drop-off location, where members donated nearly $200 in addition to winter gear.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

21


BY BRIAN ALBRIGHT

A DRIVERLESS FUTURE

Ohio continues its significant role in the development of self-driving cars

I

n a few years, you may be able to spend your morning commute reading a book, checking e-mail, or even napping, thanks to self-driving car technology.

While they aren’t exactly as high-functioning as KITT, the crime-fighting black Camaro from the old Knight Rider TV series, autonomous vehicles from the likes of Google, Tesla, and other companies have proven that we are on the cusp of being able to take our hands off the wheel. There could be as many as 10 million driverless cars and trucks on the road by 2020, according to some estimates, but Ohio has already seen its fair share of them thanks to the massive Transportation Research Center (TRC) in East Liberty, a 4,500-acre proving ground that is the largest and most advanced facility of its kind in the U.S. Ohio’s role in the development of self-driving cars goes even deeper than that. In fact, researchers at The Ohio State University built and tested some of the earliest autonomous vehicle systems in the 1960s.

The electronic highway Engineers have experimented with automated driving and speed control systems since the 1920s. OSU’s work began in the early 1960s, when an engineering student named Robert Fenton started investigating ways to improve driver performance and reduce traffic congestion. Fenton and other researchers at OSU created a test car that could be operated with a joystick controller within the vehicle. A hydraulic system operated the throttle, brakes, and steering, all managed by a computer that took up the entire trunk. That work then led to the creation of one of the first self-driving cars, which could be guided down the highway using electronics built into the surface of the road. The OSU team also tested radar systems that could bounce signals off of the guard rail in order to guide the automated vehicles. “The difficulty with both of those approaches was that it required cooperation from the road, and our sponsors with the Federal Highway Administration didn’t want that,” Fenton says. “They didn’t want to 22

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

deal with the expense and maintenance associated with the buried wire.”

Rhodes’s gambit Fenton and his team tested vehicles everywhere from the parking lot of St. John Arena on the OSU campus to stretches of the then-newly constructed I-270 outerbelt. Lack of available test tracks eventually led to the creation of the TRC. “We put together a dog-and-pony show for (thengovernor) Jim Rhodes, and we had a nice little model and we told him it would cost no more than $3 million,” Fenton remembers. “He stood back and said, ‘You know, the trouble with you academics is you don’t think big enough.’” In 1968, the state passed a bond issue for more than 10 times the original proposed budget. A few years later, the TRC played a key role in convincing Honda executives to build a new plant near the East Liberty location. “Rhodes did that because he thought it could bring jobs to Ohio,” Fenton says. “It brought the Honda plant and a lot of other auxiliary stuff. It was a brilliant political move on his part.”

What’s next? Work on self-driving cars continued in fits and starts until the mid-2000s when work by Google and others emerged. Fenton (who has been retired for decades) is now considered a pioneer in the field, and OSU has remained a leader in self-driving car research. In 2017, OSU and the State of Ohio announced a $45 million expansion of the TRC that includes a 540-acre Smart Mobility Advanced Research and Test (SMART) Center for automated and autonomous vehicle testing. When completed, the new facility will include a test platform that is 50 highway lanes wide and the length of 10 football fields, as well as test areas that simulate both rural and urban driving (including artificial pedestrians and other obstacles), and the industry’s largest high-speed intersection for testing driverless cars. While the electronic highway that Fenton envisioned was never built, there are still plans to add technology to roadways. The TRC and the Ohio Department of


Transportation are installing new fiber-optic cables and wireless sensors along 35 miles of U.S. Route 33 to create a Smart Mobility Corridor where companies can test selfdriving and connected vehicles. There’s a similar project on the Ohio Turnpike for self-driving tractor-trailers. Eventually, cars will be able to talk to each other and to “smart” highways to automatically warn other

vehicles about traffic jams, accidents, or poor driving conditions. “I think it’s probably coming sooner rather than later,” Fenton says. “There are so many different problems — political, psychological, legal, and infrastructure problems. I don’t now how long it will take to get it all sorted out.” BRIAN ALBRIGHT is a freelance writer from Cleveland Heights.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

23


BY CRAIG SPRINGER; PHOTO COURTESY NATIONAL ARCHIVES

OHIO HISTORY

THE VOTE Ohio native Edmund G. Ross wended his way through infamy and eventual renown for acting for the good of the nation.

T

he year 1868 was one of turmoil and uncertainty in this country, when the very Union itself was in crisis. One man’s act of valor — not on a battlefield, but in a legislative body — may have been the deciding factor that held the nation together. Edmund G. Ross cast the deciding vote in the staid United States Senate to acquit the impeached President Andrew Johnson in May of 1868. The vote earned him the widespread scorn at the time. But his act of conviction — ignoring both attempted bribery and physical threats — put him on the right side of history. In 1957, in his book Profiles in Courage, John F. Kennedy, then a senator from Massachusetts, portrayed Ross as a man of righteous certitude for that vote, which preserved the office of the president and avoided more upheaval in a time when the wounds of the Civil War were scarcely scabbed over. Ross was born on a farm in Ashland County and came of age near the county seat, where a plaque with his name (misspelled) was mounted in his honor. He pursued a career in publishing — one that he kept at his entire life. His name was on the masthead at the Sandusky Mirror, where he worked side by side with his brother, Sylvester. Ross and his wife, Fanny Lanthrop, from Sandusky, made their way to Kansas, where Ross published anti-slavery newspapers. Ross took up the abolitionist cause in the Civil War. He joined a Kansas regiment as avprivate, and left as

24

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

a major. At the war’s end, Ross returned to Kansas and was appointed by the governor to represent the state in the U.S. Senate. That was where Ross, a Republican, intersected with Johnson, a Democrat, who was facing charges of malfeasance. Johnson had removed Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, contrary to a law that had been passed specifically to prevent such an act by the executive. Ross viewed the law as unconstitutional. and he held to his conviction that the president should not be removed. In turn, Ross paid a political price and was not returned to the Senate. He continued his career in publishing, however, which eventually landed him in New Mexico. President Grover Cleveland tapped Ross to serve a four-year term as governor of the New Mexico Territory in 1885. Ross reflected on these events in his autobiography that he penned in Santa Fe after his term as governor: “I was again and very promptly relegated to private life and the printer’s case — and am now, by turns, printer, farmer, gentleman at leisure, author, philosopher and tramp — but never a sorehead.” The native Buckeye who helped hold the Union together lies at rest in northern New Mexico beneath a most underwhelming gravestone. He died in 1909. CRAIG SPRINGER writes from Santa Fe County, New Mexico, near where Edmond Ross spent his last days.


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BY DAMAINE VONADA; PHOTOS COURTESY DAYTON HISTORY

HISTORY BY THE

PINT Dayton’s Carillon Brewing Company delivers an authentic 19th-century experience

W

hen people patronize Carillon Brewing Company in Dayton this month, they’ll discover a Valentine-worthy beer — beet ale — that’s vibrant, earthy, and perfect for winning over hearts and waking up taste buds. “It’s a red ale, made from beet sugar, that’s sweet and very tasty,” says Brady Kress, the Dayton History president and CEO who masterminded Carillon Brewing. Dayton History is the Montgomery County historical organization whose operations include Orville Wright’s Hawthorn Hill mansion; the antebellum Patterson Homestead; and Carillon Historical Park, a living history museum with a lush and lovely riverside campus proudly punctuated by the largest carillon in Ohio. It harbors national and international treasures such as the world’s first practical airplane (the 1905 Wright Flyer III) and the oldest existing Americanbuilt locomotive (the 1835 B&O No. 1) — all, as Kress points out, indigenous to the Dayton area, as opposed to other museums that bring in exhibits from around the country. “Everything here is homegrown,” says Kress. “Our collections tell the stories of Dayton’s history, businesses, and inventions.” When Carillon Brewing debuted on Carillon Park’s 65-acre campus in 2014, Dayton got bragging rights to the nation’s first — and only — fully licensed production brewery at a museum. While craft breweries are cropping up everywhere these days, Carillon Brewing is also unique because it’s the only U.S. brewery that uses historic brewing methods to produce pre-Civil War-era ales. Carillon Brewing is a triple-threat attraction — a working museum exhibit, a microbrewery, and a restaurant specializing in the

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018


ThestaffatCarillonBrewingCompanyputasmuchintotheauthentic periodlookofthebreweryasintothe periodproductionmethodstheyuse.

simple fare of Dayton’s erstwhile English, Irish, and German immigrant populations — that immerses visitors into an era when beer was a daily beverage that was safer to drink than the city’s water supply. “Having our own brewery creates another reason for people to come to Carillon Park and enjoy, as we like to say, ‘history by the pint,’” Kress says. Carillon Brewing makes the past eminently palatable by providing a multi-sensory experience that begins with the newly built brewery itself, which, thanks to early 1800s construction details like hand-cut nails and timbering milled with a sash saw, appears to be 170 years old. Inside the brewery, visitors hear a wood-and-charcoal fire crackling beneath a brewing kettle; smell the tantalizing aromas of schnitzel, sauerkraut, and potato soup; and taste Carillon’s flagship Coriander Ale, which, in olden times, was brewed at home by housewives who used it to soothe sore throats. Carrillon’s is made according to an 1830s recipe that was found in a diary. Although other American history venues give brewing demonstrations or make beer in modern, behind-the-scenes facilities that visitors never see, Kress envisioned the Carillon Brewing project as a far more engaging and historically

accurate tool for teaching the largely forgotten story of Dayton’s brewing heritage. “I wanted to condense the historic beer-making process into a single masonry structure so that guests could see every stage of brewing,” Kress says. Because of that focus on the process, Carillon Brewing verges on theater-in-the-round, where patrons sit just a few feet away from the re-created, gravity-feed brewing equipment and watch interpreters dressed in periodappropriate costumes add wood to the fire; tend the mash tun; hand-cut ginger root for the next batch of Ginger Pale Ale; and in the spirit of history, encourage people to try Carillon Concord Semi-Sweet, a recently introduced wine rooted in the early 1800s when southwest Ohio had a thriving wine industry. “This place,” allows Kress, “is as close to the 19th century as you can get.” Carillon Brewing Company, 937-910-0722. To learn more about Carillon Historical Park and other Dayton History sites, call 937-2932841 or go to www.daytonhistory.org.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING READER RECIPE CONTEST

875 700 13 H

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Kids are the most creative and fearless chefs! Do your kids love concocting new creations in the kitchen? Does your grandchild want to be a chef someday? Then this contest is for them — and you! We want to hear about the dishes your young ones like to prepare — preferably independently, but with a bit of help is fine, too. •  To enter, write down your recipe, including all ingredients and measurements, directions, and number of servings. Then tell us how you came up with the recipe and what you love about it. Is it a part of a family tradition? Do you make it for school lunches? Is it your favorite afternoon snack? •  On each recipe, include the child’s name and the address, phone number, and e-mail address of an adult who can be contacted, and the name of the entrant’s electric cooperative. •  Contest winners will be announced in the June edition of Ohio Cooperative Living.

•  Entries may be submitted by e-mail to memberinteract@ohioec.org, or sent to Catherine Murray, care of Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229.

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BRIG STR ITEM

•  Entrants must be 16 or younger. •  Submissions may be an original recipe or adapted from an existing recipe, with at least three distinct changes.

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•  Children may collaborate with an adult to help write the directions and keep track of measurements. •  Limit of three recipes per entrant.

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Entry Deadline: March 16, 2018. Grand prize winner will receive an Ohio-made KitchenAid stand mixer. Two runners-up will receive kid-friendly cookbooks.

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Send us your pictures! Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/ memberinteractive. For May, send “Scenic Ohio” photos by Feb. 14; for June, send “Funny wedding pictures” by March 14. Make sure to give us your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, and an explanation of the photo, including the names of people shown. 28

Talk to us

ME $

1

MOD

As we prepared our story this month on how co-ops use drones (Page 4), we wondered how others might put the high-tech flying gadgets to use. So we asked our readers: “If you have a drone, what do you use it for?” Here a few responses. “Thermal inspections of homes for energy efficiency.” ~Tim Anderson Jr. “I have a drone, and I use it for the breathtaking views this time of year. It is amazing. I think every search-and-rescue team should have one.” ~Russell Gatten “I mainly use it for pictures and video. I took some pictures of our house during the construction process.” ~Levi Kuhn

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

CO-OP PEOPLE

FISH OUT OF WATER They’re angling for affordable aquaculture at Ripple Rock Fish Farms

A

long a narrow road that snakes through the woodsy hills north of Zanesville, Ripple Rock Farms sits on 15 country acres where Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative members Craig and Traci Bell have lived for several years. That bucolic setting is poles apart from the bustling Los Angeles area where Craig, an engineer, and Traci, a CPA, grew up. “We’re like Oliver and Lisa on Green Acres,” jokes Traci, referring to the 1960s-era sitcom about fish-out-of-water urbanites who move to a farm in the country. That comparison is apt — and a bit ironic — because the “crops” they raise at Ripple Rock actually are fish. The Bells purchased the property because Craig had traveled frequently for his college facilities management job, and, besides offering the rural lifestyle they wanted, it was convenient to his campus accounts. As his travels increasingly infringed on family time, the Bells, who are the parents of four children, determined that an aquaculture business could allow Craig to leave the corporate world and work at home. The local foods movement, coupled with a growing demand for seafood, has made aquaculture — growing fish under controlled conditions in tanks or ponds — one of the fastest-growing segments of U.S. agriculture. “People are more health-conscious and like to know where their food is coming from,” Traci says.

30

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

While taking a Cornell University aquaculture course, the couple discovered research that suggested a recirculating system would be a cost-effective way for small farmers to get into the business. Craig and Traci took on the challenge of proving that the idea was workable and more affordable than the pricey fiberglass tanks conventionally used in aquaculture. After initially experimenting with goldfish in their garage, they received a USDA grant in 2013 to construct and test a recirculating system. Today, the Bells are full-time fish farmers who raise some 20,000 tilapia annually inside a 6,000-squarefoot building with four recirculating raceways, plus tanks for fry and fingerlings. Made of treated lumber and rubber liners, each raceway holds 11,000 gallons of water and basically works like a swimming pool, draining and recycling the water and filtering out waste every 30 minutes. “We use ordinary PVC pipe to carry the water,” says Craig. “Most of the parts are available at any hardware store.” Along with reduced startup costs, the system also is sustainable. “It only uses 1 percent of the water that would be required to raise the same number of fish in an outdoor pond,” Traci says. The Bells keep the water’s temperature between 75 and 80 degrees, and baking soda for adjusting its pH is the only additive. “Our goal is providing a clean, healthy seafood option that people feel confident about eating,” Traci says.


Tilapia do well in an aquaculture environment, and the fish has a mild taste that Traci describes as “the chicken version of seafood.” After obtaining 1-inch fry from a certified breeder, they use soybean-based feed to raise the tilapia to a market weight around 20 to 24 ounces. Most are wholesaled live to specialty grocery stores in Columbus and Cleveland, but because bottom-feeding tilapia retard algae growth without chemicals, Ripple Rock’s customers also include pond owners and golf courses. The farm produces about 30,000 pounds of fish annually, and the Bells expect to reach 50,000 pounds within the next two years. Meanwhile, they give tours of Ripple Rock’s facilities and offer instructional materials aimed at teaching more people how to create and operate a recirculating system. They want to foster aquaculture in the Midwest, and besides, says Traci, “We have fun sharing our operation with others.” Ripple Rock Fish Farms, 6805 Old Stagecoach Rd., Frazeysburg, OH 43822. Tours and sales by appointment. 740-828-2792; www.ripplerockfishfarms.com.

(Top) Red and gray tilapia swim in the purge tank before being harvested at Ripple Rock Farms. Traci Bell and her husband, Craig, moved from Los Angeles to Muskingum County, where they decided to raise fish.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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FEBRUARY 2018 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST

knives, hunting equipment, and associated collectibles for purchase. 419-647-0067 or www.tristategunshow.org.

a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Builders, remodelers, windows, doors, outdoor design, and so much more! 419-255-3300, www.toledo-seagate.com/events, or www.toledohba.com.

FEB. 8–11 – Greater Toledo Auto Show, Seagate Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave.,Toledo, Thur. 3–9 p.m., Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $8, Srs./Stds. $6, under 10 free. Displays of the latest and greatest models and automotive technologies from 26 different manufacturers. 419255-3300 or http://toledoautoshow.org.

FEB. 3 – Dinosaur Zoo Live, Niswonger Performing Arts Ctr., 10700 St. Rte. 118 S., Van Wert, 1 and 4:30 p.m. $20–$35. Take a breathtaking tour through prehistoric Australia. Amazingly life-like dinosaurs and other creatures are presented in a thrilling, entertaining theatrical performance. 419-238-6722 or www.npacvw.org. FEB. 3 – Ice-A-Fair, 685 Main St., Vermilion, 9 a.m.–8 p.m. Free. A daylong winter event for the entire family. More than 40 glittering ice sculptures on display and ice-carving demos throughout the day. Easily walkable or tour by Lolly the Trolley ($2). Sample chocolate confections at Ritter Public Library’s Chocolate Festival. Event ends with a towering Fire & Ice display, followed by an after party at the Vermilion Boat Club. 440-9630772 or www.mainstreetvermilion.org. FEB. 6–7 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima (2 miles east of Lima on St. Rte. 309), Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, free for members, 18 and under free. Over 400 tables of modern and antique guns,

NORTHEAST

FEB. 9–10 – Perrysburg Winterfest, downtown Perrysburg. Over 100 ice carvings on display, plus music, great food, and your favorite craft beers and wines. Featured event is the U.S. National Ice Carving Championship: 20 first-class master and professional ice carvers will compete for $15,000 of prize money and the national title. www.downtownperrysburg.org. FEB. 9–11 – Winterfest/BG Chillabration, Bowling Green. Free. Ice-sculpting demonstrations, ice skating, horse-drawn carriage rides, Frostbite Fun Run, chili and soup cook-off, Youth Window Art Exhibition, and children’s party at the Wood County District Public Library. Chillabration tent and ice garden downtown feature live music, beer, wine, and an ice sculpture display. See Facebook page for full list of events and times. 419-353-9445, 800-866-0046, or www.gobgohio.com. FEB. 11 – Bedazzle Bridal Expo, Wyandot Co. Fgds., Masters Bldg., 10171 St. Hwy. 53 N., Upper Sandusky, 12–2:30 p.m. $7. Over 40 exhibitors showcase their products and services that enhance and create that special day for the bride. Includes photography, event planning, tuxedo rental, dresses, catering, and more. Resources for other special events as well. 419-294-3349 or http://uppersanduskychamber.com.

FEB. 10 – Tree Tapping Ceremony, Burton Log Cabin and Sugar Camp, 14590 E. Park St., Burton, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. The official start to the maple syrup season with demonstrations, hot chocolate, and doughnuts. Tap your own tree in the park

SOUTHEAST

and put your name on it for the length of the season. 440-8344204 or www.burtonchamberofcommerce.org.

FEB. 11 – Mansfield Train Show, hosted by Denny’s Trains, Richland Co. Fgds., 750 N. Home Rd., Mansfield, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 12 free; 3–4 p.m., everyone admitted free! Free parking. All-gauge show including ‘O,’ ‘S,’ ‘HO,’ ‘N,’ ‘Z,’ and large scale with over 100 tables. Watch the trains run on several different operating layouts. New and old trains to buy, sell, or trade, plus parts, repair manuals, books, supplies, and much more. 419606-7934 (Dennis Breese) or coaltrain3@hotmail.com. FEB. 13–18 – Riverdance: The 20th Anniversary World Tour, Playhouse Square, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Tues.–Fri. 7:30 p.m., Sat. 1:30 and 7:30 p.m., Sun. 1 and 6:30 p.m. $10–$75. 216-241-6000 or www.playhousesquare.org. FEB. 16–18 – Great Backyard Bird Count, The West Woods, 9465 Kinsman Rd. (Rte. 87), Russell and Newbury Twps., Russell, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Become an official citizen scientist and participate in this worldwide bird count coordinated by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. Stop by the nature center to help compile a list of birds seen at the big windows! www.geaugaparkdistrict.org. FEB. 3 – “Built by Beaver,” Lake Hope Dam, Lake Hope State Park, 27331 St. Rte. 278, McArthur, 10–11 a.m. Free. Check out a dam and lodge up close and maybe even hear that slap of the beaver’s tail. Prepare for muddy conditions. The walk is less than a half mile. 740-596-3030 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/lakehope. FEB. 9–10 – 40 Years of Music Revue, Cambridge Performing Arts Ctr., 642 Wheeling Ave., Cambridge. $10, Srs./Stds. $8, under 2 free. 740-261-4304, www.cambridgeperformingartscentre.org, or on Facebook. FEB. 10 – Cirque d’Or, Vern Riffe Ctr., 940 Second St., Portsmouth, 7 p.m. $28–$36. This amazing show features beautiful costumes, dynamic sound and lighting, and the world’s greatest acrobatics, contortionists, aerial artists, jugglers, and entertainers. Perfect for the whole family! 740-351-3600 or https://vrcfa.com.

FEB. 2–3 – Always…Patsy Cline, Mid-Ohio Valley Players Theater, 229 Putnam St., Marietta, 8 p.m. Based on the true story of Patsy Cline’s friendship and correspondence with a fan from Houston. The show includes many of Patsy’s unforgettable hits, such as “Crazy” and “I Fall to Pieces.” https://midohiovalleyplayers.org.

34

FEB. 17–19 – Honoring Our Native Heritage Pow Wow, 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima. Grand Entry ceremony Sat. and Sun. at 1 p.m. $5, Srs./C. (5–12) $3, under 5 free. Native American crafts, dancing, singing, and food. 419-587-4249 or dancing_ fawn@watchtv.net. FEB. 17–19 – Horse-Drawn Sleigh Rides, Spiegel Grove, Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library and Museums, Fremont. Ride through the Hayes estate on a horse-drawn sleigh as the president did when he lived here. A horse-drawn trolley may be used instead, depending on demand and staffing levels. $3, under 3 free. 419-332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org. FEB. 21 – Winter Hike, Lowe-Volk Park, 2401 St. Rte. 598, Crestline, 5 p.m. Free. 419-683-9000 or www.crawfordparkdistrict.org. FEB. 24 – Burning Snowman Fest, 252 W. Lakeshore Dr., Port Clinton. Burn up winter with live music, hot tubs, craft beers, food, and a giant burning snowman! Call 419-357-6247 or www. facebook.com/BurningSnowman.

FEB. 16–18 – HBA House and Home Show, SeaGate Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave., Toledo, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 10

FEB. 10, 24 – Geauga Fresh Farmers’ Market/Winter Market, Lowe’s Greenhouse, 16540 Chillicothe Rd., Bainbridge, 9 a.m.–noon. Pastured meats, free-range eggs, winter vegetables, honey, maple syrup, and bakery items are just a sample of what is offered. 330-348-3053 or www.geaugafarmersmarket.com.

FEB. 2–11 – The Great Big Home and Garden Show, IX Center, 1 I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Mon.–Fri. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. (till 6 p.m. on final day). $10–$15, C. (6–12) $5, under 6 free. Explore more than 600 exhibits, engage with more than 1,000 experts, and tour featured homes and the garden showcase. Matt Fox returns as emcee. 440-248-5729 or www.greatbighomeandgarden.com.

FEB. 17 – Frozen in Time, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 1–5 p.m. $13, Stds. $7. Enjoy a day filled with frozen-themed activities like sleigh rides, sledding, bird watching, a nature walk, and an opportunity to learn about ice harvesting. Also indoor activities like parlor games, popcorn popping, a snowman craft, and more. All activities are weather permitting. 800-590-9755 or http://saudervillage.org.

FEB. 10 – Contemporary Gun Makers and Allied Artists, Campus Martius Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta, 9:30 a.m.– 4 p.m. $7, Stds. $4. Features the work of several dozen traditional gunmakers from around the Ohio Valley as well as several other craftsmen who work in the manner of the 18th and 19th centuries. Also featured will be horn makers, hunting bag makers,

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

FEB. 19 – Presidents Day Celebration, McKinley Museum, 800 McKinley Monument Dr. N., Canton, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Gallery tours at 11 and 1 p.m., meet-and-greet with President McKinley at 1 and 3 p.m. 330-455-7043 or http://mckinleymuseum.org. FEB. 23–24 – Annual Spring Arts and Crafts Show, sponsored by Wayne County Arts and Crafts Guild, 50 Riffel Rd., Wooster. Free. Over 100 juried arts and crafts vendors. Handmade items only; no commercial vendors. 330-345-5962 or blough@ sssnet.com. FEB. 23–MAR. 4 – Cleveland Auto Show, IX Center, One I-X Dr., Cleveland. $13, Srs./C. (7–12) $11, under 7 free. Indoor test drives, vehicle giveaway, classic car competition, and other special features. See website for hours and schedule of events. www.clevelandautoshow.com. FEB. 24–25 – Brite Winter, West Bank of the Flats, Cleveland, Sat. 3 p.m.–Sun. 1 a.m. Enjoy diverse musical acts, artwork, and fun outdoor activities. VIP packages available. www. britewinter.com. FEB. 24 – Lake Erie Folk Fest, Shore Cultural Centre, 291 E. 222nd St., Euclid, 1-6 p.m., concert at 7:30 p.m. Free afternoon of music workshops, dances, community jams, and children’s programs. Cap off your day with an inspiring evening concert ($10–$15, under 13 free). lakeeriefolkfest@ gmail.com or www.lakeeriefolkfest.com.

leather workers, tinsmithing, cabinet making, and other allied trades. 740-373-3750 or www.campusmartiusmuseum.org. FEB. 10 – Jammin’ for Johnson, Cambridge Eagles Club, 1930 E. Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, 8 p.m.–midnight. $5 donation. Annual fundraiser in memory of the late “Bunk” Johnson. Jazz jam features Dave Powers on keyboard and vocals and other local musicians. 740-435-4847. FEB. 10 – Winter Hike, Burr Oak State Park, 10220 Burr Oak Lodge Rd., Glouster, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Free. Join fellow outdoors enthusiasts for a great day of hiking! Hike lengths are 1, 3, 5, and 8 miles. Enjoy free bean soup and corn bread after the hike at the lodge. 740-767-3570 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/burroak. FEB. 12 – The Sound of Music, Vern Riffe Ctr., 940 Second St., Portsmouth, 7:30 p.m. $25–$60. A brand-new stage production of the beloved musical. 740-351-3600 or https://vrcfa.com. FEB. 16–17 – River City Blues Competition, Lafayette Hotel, 101 Front St., Marietta. 304-615-7997, 740-376-0222, or http://bjfm.org/blues-competition.


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seating, a skate rental tent, and four heated locker rooms. www.nhl.com/bluejackets/fans/winter-park. FEB. 9–11 – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $18, C. $12. The wonder-filled world of Alice is a fantastic magical journey for all ages and gives a modern view to an old classic, where nonsense makes quite good sense. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

ENDS MAR. 4 – “Orchids: Utopia,” Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus, daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $14, Srs./Stds. $11, C. (3–12) $7, under 3 free. 614-715-8000 or http://fpconservatory.org. FEB. 1–18 – Daddy Long Legs, Studio One, Riffe Ctr., 77 S. High St., Columbus. $20–$40. A heartwarming Cinderella story about a witty and winsome young woman and her mysterious benefactor, based on the treasured novel that inspired the classic 1955 film. 614-469-0939 or www.catco.org. FEB. 2–3 – Lancaster Antique Show, Fairfield Co. Fgds., Ed Sands Bldg., 157 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster, Fri. preview 6–8:30 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $10 for two-day pass; $6 for Sat. only. Antique furniture, paintings, stoneware, quilts, coverlets, jewelry, and more, displayed in room settings. 614-325-8873 or on Facebook. FEB. 2–25 – Columbus Blue Jackets Winter Park, McFerson Commons, 218 West St., Columbus. The park features an NHL-sized ice rink that is open for public skating, hockey, and a variety of community events. Equipped with bleacher

SOUTHWEST

FEB. 9–11 – Columbus Fishing Expo, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus. $12, Srs. $10, under 18 free. Military and law enforcement with ID, $10. Three days of sport fishing education and fun, with educational seminars, speakers, and activities to expand your knowledge of fishing. 614-361-5548 or www.columbusfishingexpo.com. FEB. 10 – Sweethearts Hike, Hocking Hills, 19852 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan. Free. Take your sweetheart for a romantic stroll to Ash Cave in the soft light of dusk. Afterward, enjoy a cozy fire and refreshments. 740-385-6842 or http:// parks.ohiodnr.gov/hockinghills. FEB. 15 – An Evening with Artist Julia Hamilton, Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus, 6–8 p.m. $12–$15. Explore the Cardinal Health Gallery with the exhibiting artist and enjoy a demo of her painting process. Afterward, grab a glass of wine while taking a tour of the “Orchids” exhibit. 614-715-8022 or http://fpconservatory.org. FEB. 15–18 – Columbus Jazz Orchestra: 100 Years of Buddy Rich and Dizzy Gillespie, Southern Theatre, 21 E. Main St., Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Starting at $18. 614-294-5200 or www. jazzartsgroup.org. FEB. 16 – Shades of Bublé: A Three-Man Tribute to Michael Bublé, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7:30 p.m. $20–$30. Celebrates the continuing outstanding

20 vendors, games, and music. 937-218-2290 or www. facebook.com/chazziz. FEB. 10–11 – Jungle Jim’s Big Cheese Festival, Oscar Event Ctr., Jungle Jim’s International Market, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 12–5 p.m. $12–$30, C. $2, under 6 free. Sample amazing cheeses plus a variety of meats, olives, and other appetizers, as well as fabulous beers and wines. 513-674-6055 or www.junglejims.com/bigcheesefest. FEB. 10–11, 16–18 – Madagascar: A Musical Adventure, Taft Theater, 317 E. 5th St., Cincinnati. $10–$30. The classic tale to life comes to life on the stage. 800-745-3000 or www. thechildrenstheatre.com.

FEB. 4 – Medina Railroad and Toy Show, Medina Co. Community Ctr. (Medina Co. Fgds.), 735 Lafayette Rd. (St. Rte. 42), Medina, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $6. 330-948-4400 or www. conraddowdell.com. FEB. 10–11 – Chazziz Annual Valentine’s Car Show, Roberts Centre, 123 Gano Rd., Wilmington, Sat. noon–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Open to all makes and models. Door prizes,

WEST VIRGINIA

FEB. 11 – Pinocchio, presented by Playhouse in the Park, Clifton Cultural Arts Ctr., 3711 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati, 2 p.m. $5 for adults, free for kids. The much-loved tale about a wooden puppet who dreams of becoming a real boy is packed with magical characters, cartwheels, circus antics, and dollops of fun for the whole family. www.cliftonculturalarts.org. FEB. 11 – Springfield Swap Meet and Car Show (formerly VCAA Show), 4401 S. Charleston Pike, Springfield, 8 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, free parking. 937-376-0111 or http://ohioswapmeet.com.

FEB. 11 – Hedgesville Lions Club Spaghetti Dinner, Warren District Community Ctr., 70 Hackers Creek Rd., Hedgesville, 12–5 p.m. $8, C. (6–12) $4, under 6 free. Homemade spaghetti sauce! Brooms for sale. Please bring old eyeglasses for recycling. 304-472-3455. FEB. 18–23 – Quilters’ Retreat, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. Enjoy the peaceful atmosphere of the park while working on some long-put-off quilting projects. Spend your days quilting and your nights relaxing by the fire in the lodge lobby. 304-643-2931 or www. northbendsp.com.

career of Michael Bublé by performing his swinging standards and pop hits in an unforgettable high-energy concert event featuring incredible harmonies. 740-383-2101 or www. marionpalace.org. FEB. 16–25 – Titanic: The Musical, Columbus Performing Arts Ctr., Van Fleet Theatre, 549 Franklin Ave., Columbus. $25, Srs./Stds. $22. Come aboard the ship of dreams in this Tony Award–winning Best Musical — a heart-stopping and riveting ride through the final moments of the Titanic’s fateful journey. 614-427-3324, srotheatre@gmail.com, or www.srotheatre.org. FEB. 17–25 – Columbus Dispatch Home and Garden Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker Bldg. and Celeste Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. and Mon. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.– 6 p.m., closed Tues., Wed.–Fri. 12–8 p.m. Expertise from local gurus and craftsmen, how-to sessions and demonstrations, fun for the kids, giveaways, celebrity appearances, and much more. www.dispatchhomeandgardenshow.com. FEB. 18 – Fairfield County Antique Tractor Club Toy and Tractor Show, Fairfield Co. Fgds., AAA Building, 157 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. 740-407-2347 (Doug Shaw), dstractorlover@sbcglobal.net, or www.fairfieldcounty tractorclub.com. FEB. 23 – The Grascals, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7 p.m. $17–$30. Cutting-edge modern bluegrass is delivered with a deep knowledge of and admiration for the work of the music’s founding fathers. 866-775-0700 http:// tecumsehdrama.com/event/the-grascals. FEB. 24 – Motown Sounds of Touch, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7–9 p.m. $18–$20. The Midwest’s number one “Motown sound” vocal group performs all your favorite Motown hits. www.majesticchillicothe.net/events/ event/motown-sounds-touch-3.

FEB. 20 – Winter Hike, Caesar Creek State Park, 8570 E St. Rte. 73, Waynesville, 10 a.m.–noon. Self-guided hike to Horseshoe Falls and our 103-foot swinging bridge. Warm up with a nice soup lunch at the Nature Center before going on to Crawdad Falls. 513-897-2437 or www.facebook.com/ CaesarCreekStatePark. FEB. 24–25 – Dayton Off-Road Expo, Roberts Centre, 123 Gano Rd., Wilmington, Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Vendors, Jeeps, monster trucks, and more! 877-428-4748 or www.daytonoffroadexpo.com. FEB. 24–25 – 20th Century Cincinnati, Sharonville Convention Ctr., 11355 Chester Rd., Cincinnati, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Preview starts Sat. at 9 a.m. $8 admission covers both days. Annual retrospective of vintage modern design: the avantgarde art, architecture, furnishings, décor, and fashions that emerged between WWI and the Information Age. Over 70 vendors. 513-738-7256 or www.20thcenturycincinnati.com. FEB. 25 – Cincinnati Bridal Expo, Centre Park of West Chester, 5800 Mulhauser Rd., West Chester, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $5 in advance, $8 at door, under 13 free. Fashion shows at 12:30 and 3 p.m. Cincinnati’s premier bridal show. 937-550-4138 or http://ohiobridalexpos.com.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.

FEBRUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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LOVEBIRDS OF ALL KINDS

MEMBER INTERACTIVE

1. My son and daughter-in-law, Greg and Lindsay Winer, in Holland. The heart is made up of messages of love — you write your message and attach it to the heart. ~Cecelia Winer Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member 2. Meet Rosa and Zebby. Our chicks have brought so many smiles! We held daily photo shoots to capture their sweetness, and they were such good sports. ~Tiffany Conn Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative member

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6 3. Love the Buckeyes! My son, Beau Whaley, and his fiancée, Andrea Edelmann. ~Jeff Whaley Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member 4. Mute swan pair living in the lakes at Hide-A-Way Hills. ~Suzanne McCollister South Central Power Company member 5. Lovebirds Rachel and Andrew Taylor taking a break for a kiss after backpacking two nights through the Grand Canyon. ~Andrew Taylor Consolidated Electric Cooperative member

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2018

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7 6. “Lovebird” elephants: My grandchildren and I visit the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo frequently. We got to see these two elephants sharing water and embracing. ~Judy O’Brien South Central Power Company member 7. Lovebirds Caullette Iles and Herman Kilby enjoying Amish country near Berlin. ~Caullette Iles South Central Power Company member


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Ohio Cooperative Living - February 2018 - Holmes-Wayne  
Ohio Cooperative Living - February 2018 - Holmes-Wayne