Page 1

OHIO

DECEMBER 2019

COOPERATIVE The Frontier Power Company

Silent night ALSO INSIDE Youth Tour all-star Cardinals on the rise Fun holiday events


Winter energy efficiency tips ❆ Seal air leaks and insulate well to prevent heat from escaping and cold air from entering your home. ❆ Open blinds and curtains during the day to allow sunlight in to warm your home.

❆ Lower your water heater temperature. The Department of Energy recommends using the warm setting (120 degrees) during fall and winter months.

❆ Close blinds and curtains at night to keep cold, drafty air out. ❆ Set your thermostat at a maximum of 68 degrees during cold weather.

ohioec.org/energy


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2019

INSIDE FEATURES 14 O TANNENBAUM Is this the year to go with a live tree that you can plant after the holidays?

25 HOLIDAY TRAVEL Eight close-to-home holiday destinations that evoke the story of the first Christmas, foster good cheer, and brighten spirits.

34 SNOWSHOEING Check out a fun, healthy, and relatively inexpensive way to keep exercising — outdoors — during those snowy winter months.

Cover image on most issues: ’Tis the season of hopes and dreams, silence and celebration, wonder and delight. Make sure to check out our guide to holiday-themed events around the state, beginning on page 25, and a full listing in our calendar section.

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

ANOTHER YEAR BETTER

Y

our electric cooperative has no higher purpose than to provide its consumermembers with reliable and affordable electricity and to do so in a safe and environmentally responsible manner. Looking back on 2019, a lot has happened that affects those goals. Improving reliability: Significant investments in the high-voltage grid — lines that move electricity across the state from our generation sources to each co-op — improve reliability in many parts of rural Ohio, but much-needed upgrades are expensive and inevitably lead to escalating costs for the delivery of power to your co-op. Holding down costs: We’ve been able to keep Buckeye Power’s cost to produce and deliver wholesale power to your co-op steady for the past seven years, despite the rising costs of a more reliable grid. We expect we will able to do so again next year; 2019 was our first full year handling operational responsibility at our Cardinal Plant, which generates the lion’s share of the electricity used by our members. In that time, we’ve been able to find efficiencies and operational savings that have enabled us to hold down costs. More common-sense environmental regulations: When U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler needed a host to roll out the EPA’s new Affordable Clean Energy rule in July, he chose the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives statewide office — a nod to how hard co-op leaders around the state have worked to achieve common-sense environmental improvements at the plant, which should keep it viable well into the future. Member satisfaction: Collectively, consumer-members of Ohio electric cooperatives gave their co-ops an unprecedented high score on the American Consumer Satisfaction Index — citing service reliability, friendly and helpful employees, good communications, and having the members’ best interests at heart. Our scores compare favorably to some of the nation’s most popular brands, such as Chick-fil-A, Costco, and Amazon. A few other significant notes from 2019: • The staff at Ohio Cooperative Living magazine won the George W. Haggard Memorial Journalism Award, presented annually to the nation’s top electric cooperative statewide consumer publication. • The Central Ohio Lineworker Training (COLT) center set another record for the number of employees participating in job training and safety programs — preparing our people to meet your needs now and into the future. • The employees at our statewide office and our families took part in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Light the Night walk in Columbus. We were among the top teams for fundraising and participation in the fight against cancer. I’m looking forward to another great year in 2020. Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a blessed holiday season!

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO’S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Collectively, consumer-members of Ohio electric cooperatives gave their co-ops an unprecedented high score on the American Consumer Satisfaction Index.


DECEMBER 2019 • Volume 62, No. 3

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Rebecca Seum Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Dava Hennosy Editorial Intern Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Craig Springer, Damaine Vonada, Margie Wuebker, and Patty Yoder. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

4 POWER LINES

Are we there yet? From Youth Tour to Youth Leadership Council to Harvard, Olivia Velasquez doesn’t shy away from the unfamiliar.

6 CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

Washington Electric Cooperative: The co-op’s rugged service territory includes mountain views, rolling hills, and the Ohio and Muskingum rivers.

8 OHIO ICON

Hanby House: Benjamin Hanby made his name by penning “Up on the House Top,” and for his family’s efforts to aid freedom seekers through the Underground Railroad.

Cheryl Solomon American MainStreet Publications 847-749-4875 | cheryl@amp.coop The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

8

10 CO-OP PEOPLE

Bright Christmas: Thousands of visitors flock each year to this winter wonderland home in Darke County.

12

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE For all advertising inquiries, contact

4

Cardinals: Ohio’s state bird — the highly recognizable “Big Red” — enjoys a population boom in the Buckeye State.

16 GOOD EATS

Going nuts: Chestnuts roasting on an open fire? Winter’s a great time to enjoy a bountiful supply of numerous nutty favorites.

16

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and information from your electric cooperative.

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

37 CALENDAR

What’s happening: December/ January events and other things to do around the state.

40

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Silent night: Members pause for a moment to embrace the holiday cheer.

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


POWER LINES

ARE WE THERE YET? From Youth Tour to Youth Leadership Council to Harvard, Olivia Velasquez doesn’t shy away from the unfamiliar. BY REBECCA SEUM

O

livia Velasquez grew up in Gilboa, a tiny, two-road village in northwest Ohio, and though her path has taken her far away, her home remains the center of her compass.

In 2013, as a sophomore at Pandora-Gilboa High School, Olivia was chosen by Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative as a delegate to the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour, an annual leadership program for high school students from families served by electric cooperatives. Since then, she’s made the most of each experience that has come her way. Much more than a sightseeing trip, Youth Tour was established to inspire our next generation of leaders. The Ohio contingent joins cooperative youth from all over the country for a weeklong trip to Washington, D.C. Students visit important sites, meet members of their congressional delegation, and learn about both public service and the cooperative business model. Olivia has taken the cooperative values to heart, incorporating Commitment to Community in her personal and professional life. “The Youth Tour trip enlightened me,” she says, “showing me that not only do cooperatives light up homes, but lives as well, by representing us, caring about us, and striving to make progress.”

Step by step Youth Tour participants return home with a deeper understanding of what it takes to be a leader and the skills to put that into action. During the trip, each state selects a delegate to serve on Youth Leadership Council, which meets in D.C. about a month after Youth Tour concludes. Olivia was chosen by her peers to represent Ohio on YLC. Olivia’s parents, Rick and Amy Velasquez, recognized her leadership characteristics from the outset. “Ever since she was small, she’s always been outspoken and independent,” Amy says. Olivia was a voracious reader, first listening to her mother read aloud to her and her sisters, then taking the books in her own hands. “I believe her love of learning came from all that reading,” Amy says. YLC delegates play an important role during the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s annual meeting the following spring — they’re not only recognized on stage, but they have a hands-on experience with virtually every facet of the meeting. Olivia took her experience even another step; from the pool of YLC delegates nationwide, she was selected to be that year’s Youth Leadership Council national spokesperson — the first delegate from Ohio to win that honor. Olivia’s speech at the NRECA annual meeting centered on the enduring lessons she gained from Youth Tour. “Although Youth Tour ended a mere week after we boarded that bus, the lessons I and my new friends learned 4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019


“People in little towns like mine are heard, and this is how it’s done.” will last a lifetime,” she said. “I finally figured out my own answer to that question: Are we there yet? Youth Tour taught me that we will never be there. Instead, we must continually ask ourselves these questions — make changes in the directions to make progress. In the end, that progress is our destination.”

After YLC Not long after her YLC experience, Olivia was awarded the Ronald McDonald House Charities HACER National Scholarship, which was created in 1985 to help Hispanic high school students finance their college education. Given to only four students nationwide, the dollar amount is substantial — $100,000 — and with it, Olivia was able to take advantage of her acceptance to Harvard University. Her participation with Youth Tour and YLC allowed her to meet people from all over the country whom she would never have had the chance to otherwise, and at Harvard, she expanded her scope even further — she tried Latin dancing, became a peer counselor, did laboratory research, studied abroad in Argentina, and made friendships with Alzheimer’s patients. “I felt like my mind was being opened day to day,” she says. This spring, she graduated from Harvard with a degree in integrative biology and a secondary in mind, brain, and behavior. Now, she’s working at McLean Hospital, the Harvard-affiliated psychiatric facility, co-leading group therapy sessions and orienting new patients, with an eye toward medical school.

Olivia Velasquez (above) delivers her powerful speech to the delegates of the NRECA annual meeting — an experience that helped propel her to attend Harvard University (below).

New experiences, new challenges Olivia says her Youth Tour and YLC experience allowed her to meet people with big goals. She felt inspired by those around her, who were ambitious, yet grounded in their communities and their families. “You know you can do anything you want to do,” she says, “but you don’t really believe it until you see it in the people around you.” There are some subtler learning opportunities inherent to Youth Tour that go beyond the history and the monuments. “Going to a brand-new place with people you don’t know is daunting, but it really is a great opportunity to learn how to get to know people,” Olivia says. Additionally, the trip opened her eyes to her own community. “I gained a lot of pride in my state and my town, juxtaposing it with D.C.,” she says. “People in little towns like mine are heard, and this is how it’s done.”

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

WASHINGTON ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

W

ashington Electric Cooperative lies in the hilly Appalachian region of southeastern Ohio. Though there is farmland in the western part of the service territory, the best way to describe the surrounding landscape would be “rugged.” The terrain includes mountain views, rolling hills, and the Ohio and Muskingum rivers. About 75% of Washington Electric’s 10,500 members are residential, but the co-op also serves some prominent commercial businesses, including several in the oil and gas industry.

Wayne National Forest and Seneca Lake A good bit of Washington Electric’s territory is located within the eastern portion of Wayne National Forest. In the Appalachian foothills, visitors can appreciate the natural beauty of the park, including rock formations and wildlife. Wayne National Forest is renowned for its biking, camping, and fishing opportunities. The forest has more than 300 miles of trails for hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, and ATV riding. Seneca Lake Park is open year-round, with special events and activities during the summer. The lake, Ohio’s third-largest inland waterway, serves as a border with neighboring Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative, and is known for its boating, fishing, and other opportunities for family fun. Summer activities include a moonlit kayak tour, a magic show, and a movie at the lake. There is also a swimming beach with inflatable water toys for the kids.

Nearby festivals Nearby Marietta hosts a variety of festivals and events that draw tens of thousands to the area. The Marietta Riverfront Roar showcases professional powerboat racing on the Ohio River. Racers and their crews come from around the country for the event. Spectators get free admission, a close-up view of the boats, and the opportunity to meet the drivers and crews. Marietta also hosts the Ohio River Sternwheel Festival, where 30 to 35 authentic old sternwheelers line the riverbank. The festival brings an estimated 100,000 visitors to the area over the weekend and preserves the town’s riverboat heritage. Beyond the sternwheelers, the festival offers family entertainment such as a car show, a photo contest, live music, and fireworks. After the events, visitors can explore downtown Marietta’s dining and unique shopping.

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

Co-op Spotlight appears regularly in Ohio Cooperative Living to give a glimpse into the land and the people of Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives.


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HANBY HOUSE

Westerville BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: In the Columbus suburb of Westerville near the western edge of Otterbein University’s campus. Provenance: Built in 1846, Hanby House was the home of Rev. William Hanby and his family from 1854 to 1870. Hanby was a bishop of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, a co-founder of Otterbein University, an active temperance advocate, and an ardent abolitionist who used the house as a station on the Underground Railroad. Inspired by the story of a broken-hearted slave separated from his sweetheart, Hanby’s son Benjamin wrote a song — “Darling Nelly Gray” — that he debuted in 1856 at a musical gathering in the home’s parlor. Benjamin Hanby’s ballad became enormously popular and helped crystallize anti-slavery sentiment prior to the Civil War. Hanby started a singing school in New Paris, where in 1864, he composed the jolly tune “Up on the House Top” for a children’s Christmas program. Hanby wrote more than 80 songs before dying of tuberculosis at age 33 in 1867. In the 1920s, Otterbein graduates John and Dacia Shoemaker rescued the dilapidated house from the wrecking ball and organized a renovation that turned it into a museum. Hanby House opened to the public in 1937.

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

Significance: Operated by the Westerville Historical Society, Hanby House is part of the Ohio History Connection’s statewide system of historic sites and museums and is an identified destination on the National Park Service’s National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom. Currently: Hanby House honors Benjamin Hanby’s musical legacy as well as his family’s efforts to aid freedom seekers. The exterior of Hanby House recently was painted, changed from white to its original butternut color. According to the site’s manager, Pam Allen, “A paint specialist determined that color by using an electron microscope to analyze all the layers of paint on the house.” It’s a little-known fact that: Christmas open houses at Hanby House feature tours led by guides in period costumes, traditional refreshments such as mulled cider and ginger snaps, and live performances of “Up on the House Top” and other holiday songs. Hanby House, 160 W. Main St., Westerville, OH 43081. Christmas open houses Dec. 3 and Dec. 7, 2019. For information, call 800-600-6843 or visit www. hanbyhouse.org.


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D

ick and Dianne Brown of Greenville welcome visitors by the thousands to their winter wonderland every year, treating guests to holiday trees, whimsical characters, sweet treats, and no fewer than 100,000 brightly colored lights. 2019 marks the 26th year for the Darke County display, and never has a design been repeated from the past — each new season brings a new twist, which draws people from near and far. Dick Brown, a former business owner and real estate appraiser, remembers when holiday preparations involved putting up just two strings of lights — one on each side of the front door. A move to a different house sparked his interest in more lights, and the addition of two daughters only intensified that interest. Soon, Brown had pushed his display to upward of 10,000 bulbs. “There were some problems with not enough outlets,” he recalls with a smile. The Browns even accounted for their display in the plans for their current home on Requarth Road, which includes underground electrical service along the paved driveway and a 300foot swath that serves as a runway for Santa’s reindeerdrawn sleigh. Electricians added 200-amp service in the

10  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019


drawn sleigh. Electricians added 200-amp service in the garage to handle the anticipated load. Brown says it takes a month to complete the decorating once he starts in mid-October. He starts with the tree ornaments, because arranging the group displays and laying cords for the lights must wait until lawn mowing is done for the season. “I prefer to work at my own pace,” he says. “Sometimes I work a while in the morning and then come back outside in the afternoon or the evening.”

A 40- by 100-foot barn, which his granddaughter calls “Paw-Paw’s Christmas House,” houses all the decorations. Carefully labeled plastic totes contain lights and smaller items, and paths wind in and around the statues and larger decorations that are arranged on the concrete floor. A 50-foot counter provides space to perform any needed repairs. The display is open for public viewing from 6 to 11 p.m. from Thanksgiving through Christmas. People can stay in their vehicles for a slow drive through the

wonderland. Others accept invitations to come inside for a quick peek at Dianne’s interior decorations, which include a quaint snow village and a majestic purple tree. “We give everybody who comes a full-size candy cane,” Dick says. “That amounted to 10,000. I gave out the traditional peppermint ones, but Dianne had more than 90 flavors to choose from.” Some visitors come bearing homemade treats or small gifts to show their appreciation, and the Browns sometimes find ornaments or other decorations on their doorstep. “People also want to give us money to help with the cost,” Brown says. “We don’t want anything, because this is our gift to the community.” The Browns reside at 5480 Requarth Road (at the intersection with Jaysville-St. John Road) near Greenville.

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Big Red Cardinals enjoy a population boom in the Buckeye State. STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

P

ublished in 2016, The Second Atlas of Breeding Birds in Ohio is not a casual read. A true tome totaling nearly 600 pages, the book is an inch and a half thick and weighs 6.5 pounds (don’t drop it on your toes). It’s the go-to source for professional ornithologists and serious amateur birders in the Buckeye State for all things bird-related concerning the more than 200 species nesting here. It has some encouraging things to say about the northern cardinal, Ohio’s state bird (and that of six other states, too). For instance, the atlas estimates the number of singing male cardinals in the state at a whopping 2.1 million, with the cardinal population as a whole having increased 1.1% per year since 1966. Yet as common as cardinals are, whether viewed on Christmas cards this time of year or on birdfeeders year-round, they have not always been numerous in Ohio.

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

When our state was first being settled and the virgin forests cleared, cardinals were found primarily in the southern half of Ohio, expanding their population north during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Today, the familiar red birds are found statewide, but are most numerous in southwest counties where National Audubon Society Christmas Bird Counts can exceed 2,000 individuals. Unlike many other songbirds, cardinals are the paragon of fidelity. Not only are they monogamous for life, or at least until their partner dies, they even stay together throughout the year, not just during breeding season. In preparation for breeding, both sexes begin singing as early as mid-to-late winter. The singing is sometimes solo, but more often counter-singing — one mate begins a song that the other finishes. You could say they complete each other’s sentences, the ultimate sign of both devoted avian and human couples.


Cardinals (male, left; female, right) mate for life and remain together even when it’s not breeding season.

Once spring arrives, the male begins courtship feeding the female by bringing her tidbits of food, their beaks touching briefly — a kiss? — as she accepts the morsel. Due to her muted protective coloration, the female has exclusive control of nesting. She selects the site, usually in dense shrubbery or a brushy field border, constructs the nest, then performs the nearly two weeks of incubation required to hatch her two to five eggs. During that time, the male isn’t just free to go hang out with the boys. He remains somewhere close with an ear cocked, awaiting his mate’s call for food when she grows hungry. Once the eggs hatch, both male and female bring the nestlings food, which is almost exclusively insects, due to their high protein content. After about 11 days, the fledglings leave the nest, and the male is in charge of feeding them on the ground. The female then

immediately begins a second nesting, producing as many as three or four broods of young cardinals per season in Ohio — hence the high population. The next Ohio breeding bird atlas is scheduled to be published in another 20 years; what might it have to say about cardinals? Jim McCormac, one of five editors of the current edition, speculates. “It is safe to say that our ‘redbird’ will be holding strong when the next atlas appears. Adaptability, tolerance of a variety of habitats, and a knack for cohabiting with people should ensure that the cardinal remains abundant into the future.” In other words, Big Red will continue to boom in the Buckeye State. W.H. “Chip” Gross (whchipgross@gmail.com) is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor and a member of Consolidated Cooperative.

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


IS THIS THE YEAR TO GET

A LIVE CHRISTMAS TREE? BY PATTY YODER

A

fter a few years of getting their tree from a corner lot or cutting their own, Hilliard resident Linda Lutz decided she should find out what type of Christmas tree was best for her young family, so she read everything she could find on the subject.

“I researched which option was best for the environment — artificial, live, or cut — then I did a cost analysis to compare prices over time,” she says. “The live tree won, so we tried it.” For several years after, Linda and her husband, Jim, would dig a hole for their Christmas tree before the ground froze and plant it after the holidays. Then, they waited. “Because it was winter, the tree would go dormant, so it would be spring before we knew whether it would survive,” Jim says. Some trees did not last the harshness of winter, but others did. Years later, evergreens of various sizes dotted their yard, marking Christmas memories with their twin sons, Johnny and Justin. “We looked at the trees in our yard as a passage of time, the way some families mark their children’s height on a door frame each year,” Jim says. The couple agreed there are upsides and downsides to having live Christmas trees, so they didn’t get one every year. Live trees weigh around 150 pounds, so they take considerably more effort to move. With a large root ball at the bottom, the tree itself must be smaller, so there are fewer branches for ornaments and, importantly, less room for presents underneath. On the positive side, their boys liked celebrating Christmas with a live tree, and everyone enjoyed the evergreen scent that filled their home. Jim Lutz poses with his twin sons, Justin (left) and Johnny, in front of the family Christmas tree, circa 1990. Linda Lutz says the family enjoyed planting their live trees after the holidays, but they had to get smaller trees to accommodate the root ball in the living room.

14   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

“Even our cat loved the live tree,” Linda says. “She would cuddle up next to it, thinking we went to all that trouble just for her.”


Live tree tips from an Ohio expert Matt Mongin is president of the Ohio Christmas Tree Association and owner of Spring Valley Tree Farm. With more than 30 years in the business, he offers these helpful tips for live tree care: • Select the right species for your property. Popular Canaan firs grow to be 20 feet tall and 12 feet wide, while some spruces can reach beyond 100 feet. Talk to the tree farmer about the right tree for your yard. • Factor in the root ball. A 5-foot live tree comes with an 18-inch root ball, so choose a smaller live tree than you would a cut tree. • Recruit a few friends. Live trees are heavy. Mongin recommends having several people to carry the tree up any steps, then setting it on a rug or plastic sheet to slide it to its final display spot. Some of his customers use skateboards to get the tree where it needs to go. Another option: Have your tree delivered. • Store your tree until spring. After Christmas, keep the tree in a garage or other cool shelter until spring. “Add a cupful of water to the root ball every week, and it will be fine,” he says. “We have a 95% success rate with this method.”

Keep your cut tree beautiful all season Choosing a cut tree this year? Mongin offers this advice:

• Set yourself up for success. For the ultimate stability, use drywall screws to attach a traditional reservoir stand to a 3-foot by 3-foot piece of plywood. “The tree will be immovable,” Mongin says. Put a biodegradable tree bag around the stand for easy post-Christmas cleanup.

• Stop the sap. Sap on the tree base prevents water from moving up the tree. Remove the sap by cutting one-half inch off the base. If you don’t have a saw, ask the tree seller to cut it for you. Once the tree is in the reservoir, add a gallon of very hot water to dissolve any remaining sap.

• Keep it cool. The display room should have moderate or no heat and twilight lighting.

• Check the water level daily. After the first watering, the water can be any temperature, but make sure the tree base always touches water. Additives are optional, but they can add a few more days to your tree.

• Got pets? Consider a Colorado spruce, which has prickly needles and a scent that cats don’t like. Add a hook to the ceiling to anchor the tree for more stability.

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   15


GOOD EATS

Chestnuts roasting on an open fire? Winter’s a great time to enjoy a bountiful supply of numerous nutty favorites. RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHERINE MURRAY

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019


BOURBON PECAN PIE Prep: 20 minutes | Cook: 35 to 40 minutes | Servings: 8 1 9-inch unbaked pie crust 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 3 large eggs 1/2 teaspoon salt 3/4 cup light corn syrup 11/2 teaspoons vanilla 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, 13/4 cups chopped pecans melted  (roasted, unsalted) 3/4 cup light brown sugar, 1/4 cup whole pecans (roasted, firmly packed unsalted) 4 tablespoons bourbon  Preheat oven to 400 F. Place rolled-out pie crust into a 9-inch pie dish. Crimp edges. Chill pie crust in refrigerator while you work on the next step. In a large bowl, use a fork to mix together eggs, corn syrup, butter, brown sugar, bourbon, flour, salt, and vanilla until smooth. Mix in chopped pecans. Remove pie crust from refrigerator and place on top of a cookie sheet. Pour pecan mixture into pie pan. Decorate top of pie with whole pecans. Bake pie on bottom rack at 400 F for 15 minutes, then reduce oven temperature to 350 F and bake for another 20 to 25 minutes. To prevent crust from burning, cover crust edges with aluminum foil. Bake until just set and bubbling at the edges; the inside will still wobble. Let pie cool for an hour before serving. For an added kick, top with bourbon whipped cream.  Per serving: 584 calories, 37 grams fat (15 grams saturated fat), 56 grams total carbs, 1 gram fiber, 6.5 grams protein.

CASHEW CHICKEN Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 20 minutes | Servings: 4 1 pound chicken breast, cut 3 cloves garlic, minced into chunks 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoons water 1 bell pepper, sliced  3/4 cup chicken broth 1 medium onion, sliced  1/4 cup soy sauce 3 Thai (bird’s eye) red chili 2 teaspoons oyster sauce peppers, optional 1 teaspoon sesame oil 2 cups snow peas 2 cups cooked rice 3/4 cup unsalted roasted cashews  In a skillet or wok over medium-high heat, add chicken and olive oil. Brown until almost cooked through. Add bell pepper, onion, and Thai chili peppers. Cook until vegetables are tender and chicken is no longer pink. Add snow peas, cashews, and garlic; cook another minute or two. In a medium bowl, whisk together cornstarch and water until a smooth paste is formed. Mix in chicken broth, soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sesame oil. Pour sauce into pan and stir until incorporated. Let simmer 2 minutes or until sauce has thickened. Remove Thai chili peppers, unless you like things SPICY! Serve over rice. Per serving: 623 calories, 11.5 grams fat (1.5 grams saturated fat), 90 grams total carbs, 5 grams fiber, 37 grams protein.

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


ZUCCHINI ITALIANO Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 8 minutes | Servings: 2 2 cups zucchini, roughly julienned 1/4 teaspoon salt 3 cloves garlic, minced 1/4 teaspoon white pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil dash red pepper flakes 1/4 cup roasted unsalted almonds, 4 large slivers of Parmesan cheese  roughly chopped Toss together zucchini and garlic. Heat olive oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add a single layer of the zucchini/ garlic mixture and cook with skillet uncovered until zucchini starts to sear (brown), stirring occasionally, about 3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. Add another layer of zucchini, repeating steps until all zucchini is lightly seared. Bring all zucchini back to the pan. Add almonds, salt, white pepper, and pepper flakes. Stir until heated through. Transfer to serving dish and immediately top with slivers of Parmesan. This dish can be served as an appetizer or side dish for two. Per serving: 214 calories, 15.5 grams fat (5 grams saturated fat), 10 grams total carbs, 3 grams fiber, 12.5 grams protein.

BUCKEYES Prep: 45 minutes | Cook: 10 minutes | Chill: 1 hour | Servings: 50 2 cups creamy peanut butter (not 1/2 teaspoon vanilla all-natural) 5 to 6 cups powdered sugar, sifted  1/2 teaspoon salt 12 ounces dark chocolate (chips 1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened or melting wafers) Beat peanut butter, salt, butter, and vanilla in large mixer bowl until incorporated. Mix in powdered sugar a half-cup at a time until mixture starts to become firm and pliable. Shape into 1-inch balls. If mixture is crumbly, add more peanut butter. If mixture is sticky, add powdered sugar. Dust hands with powdered sugar when rolling. Set balls on baking sheets, silicone sheets, or wax paper. Place in freezer for 1 hour to firm up before dipping.  Place chocolate in the top of a double boiler and fill the bottom level with water. Bring water to a boil, then lower to a simmer. Continually stir chocolate until smooth and melted. If chocolate is too thick, add a teaspoon of coconut oil, shortening, or butter. Remove chocolate from stove. Take peanut butter balls out of freezer in small batches so they stay cool. Use a toothpick or candy dipping tool to dip 3/4 of each ball into chocolate, leaving some of the peanut butter on top showing, like a buckeye nut. Tap each buckeye to remove excess chocolate, then place on a baking sheet to harden. Store in an airtight container. Buckeyes can be frozen, stored in refrigerator, or at room temperature if eaten within a day or two.  Per serving: 163 calories, 9 grams fat (3.5 grams saturated fat), 18 grams total carbs, 1 gram fiber, 3 grams protein.

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

MEMORIES OF ANDREW KREIDER

I

n June of 1985, then manager Joe Uher met with Andrew (Andy) Kreider, retired employee of The Frontier Power Company, to discuss memories of the early days of rural electrification. We’ve dusted off some of those personal histories from our cooperative to bring them to our current members. Andy was 84 years old at the time of the interview and had retired 18 years previously. Andrew Kreider began his career at the cooperative in 1943. He had formerly worked a machine at the Alva Price Coal Mine. Charles Kiser, cooperative lineman, had asked him on various occasions if he would consider working for the cooperative. One night about nine o’clock when Andy was in Workman’s Restaurant, Charles again asked him and advised that Mr. Buehler, the manager, was in his office then and asked if Andy would go talk with him. Andy finally agreed and was hired that night. He turned in his resignation at the coal mine the next morning and worked out his notice before coming to work for the cooperative. He worked long hours, and the pay was low many years ago, however he continued from 1943 until his retirement in 1967. Following are some interesting accounts Andy recalls during his employment at Frontier Power. • One night Andy made five trips to Tuscarawas County on outages at the same account. They kept blowing fuses. He felt it was their problem, so after the last trip, he went to the fuse box and found a bolt had been used. He advised that when they corrected their problem that he would return and reconnect their service. In those days, they did not have a two-way radio system so before they left the Tuscarawas County area after an outage, they would stop at Pfeiffer’s store in Stone Creek to call the office to check if there were any more outages. • During storm trouble in the Millcreek area, flooding had begun in the area where repairs were needed to the

electric equipment. Andy tied a rope to the waist of Dean Veatch (another Frontier Power lineman) so he could get to the cut-out without washing away in the flood. • On one occasion, the manager came out to the job site. When he got out of his car, he failed to set his brake, and the car rolled into a tree. The manager called the office for other transportation. • Only two men in Grover Daniels, Andy Kreider, Don Gault our organization have accomplished the feat of being able to hang a transformer single-handedly. One of these was Andy and the other was Charles Kiser. The instance that Andy remembers happened when an outage call came in from the Gasser farm near Stone Creek. Andy had to check out this outage by himself. When he got there he found the transformer had burned up. He had a replacement transformer on his truck. The customer asked Andy what he was going to do, and Andy said that he was going to make an effort to hang the transformer by himself, which he did. • When there was line trouble during high water situations, someone needed to go make a repair in the flooded area. Sam Berkey (another Frontier Power lineman) used a boat and was rowing very hard to arrive at the proper place to make the repair only to be carried downstream by the swift current. After making several tries to keep the boat at the right spot, Berkey finally gave up and jumped out of the boat and made the repair. When the rest of the crew came along, they found Berkey on the bank beside a small fire he had built. He had his socks hanging above it because he was trying to get them dry. • On one occasion, Andy and Grover Daniels, another employee, were walking a private right-of-way in Tuscarawas County. Andy advised that he would meet Grover at a particular point. Andy waited and waited for Grover to walk that area, but Grover did not arrive at the appointed place. Finally, Andy decided he’d better Continued on page 20

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES Continued from page 19

look for him. About that time, Grover was coming up the road. He said he lost the line and never did get back to the line. It was very foggy at the time. Andy never could understand how Grover found the road. • Andy remembers the look on faces when the electricity was turned on for the first time. He recounts how many of the more well-to-do farmers had the house wired and appliances in and were ready for electricity. • Andy related how two Amish kids had brought out a lightbulb to him when Frontier Power came to disconnect a service. The kids said they had burned it a couple of times after their parents were gone but now they had no use for it. Andy noted that these particular Amish at that time were allowed to use electricity if they had a mortgage on a property. One man had purchased three tracts of land in order to keep it mortgaged but on one occasion he had failed to have a mortgage so it became necessary for him to have his electric disconnected. It was very soon that an order came through for a reconnection at this location and the Amish man advised Andy that he had purchased another property so he had another mortgage and was now allowed to have electricity again.

• During the early days of the cooperative, the headquarters were on Main Street with the pole yard behind Andy’s Restaurant (now the Yucatan) between Walnut and Orange Streets. • He remembers services being connected in the order of their requests. • Overall, Andy recalled about 98% of the people appreciated what was being done and only a small 2% got upset over bringing electricity to the rural areas. Frontier Power is truly thankful for men like Andy, who brought electricity to our rural community in the early years. Despite the rough conditions and long hours, Andrew Kreider was an integral part of changing the landscape of our communities.

$25 bill credit approved for accounts with water heater switch A $25 credit has been approved by The Frontier Power Company Board of Trustees for more than 2,000 members who have a radio-controlled switch installed on their electric water heaters. The credit will be issued on December electric bills.

Nondiscrimination Statement The Frontier Power Company In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/ parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity, in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA (not all bases apply to all programs). Remedies and complaint filing deadlines vary by program or incident. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the responsible Agency or USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service

20  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2019

Water heater switches are a very important part of our load management program, which is designed to limit our peak demand and maintain our electric rates. By calling The Frontier Power Company at 740-6226755 or 800-624-8050, you can arrange to have a radio-controlled switch installed on your 50-gallon or larger electric water heater for free. Please call for more details or if you have questions. at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. To file a program discrimination complaint, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, AD-3027, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U  .S. Department of Agriculture Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; (2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or (3) email: program.intake@usda.gov. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.


THE THE FRONTIER FRONTIER POWER POWER COMPANY COMPANY LOCAL LOCAL PAGES PAGES

HIGH SCHOOL SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS: Interested in a life-changing leadership experience in Washington, D.C.?

June 19–25, 2020

What is Youth Tour? The Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour is an annual leadership program sponsored by Frontier Power Company. It’s a weeklong, allexpenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C., that gives exceptional high school students the opportunity to meet with their congressional leaders at the U.S. Capitol, make new friends from across the state and country, and see many of the famous Washington sights. Electric cooperatives from 43 states will send about 1,800 delegates this year. Will you be one of them?

For more information and to apply, visit www.frontier-power.com or call the co-op at 740-622-6755. Deadline to apply: Feb. 10, 2020.

2020 GRADS

FOR RULES AND APPLICATIONS:

You could win more than $3,800 in our Children of Members Scholarship program!

  Visit www.frontier-power.com   Call the co-op at 740-622-6755 Deadline to apply: Feb. 10, 2020

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   21


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

Co-op Connections Card Because you are a Frontier Power Company member, your Co-op Connections Card provides you with special discounts online and at participating local retailers. Be sure to visit this month’s highlighted business and check out offers on the internet by clicking the Co-op Connections Card on our website at www.frontierpower.com.

$2.00 off purchases of $10 or more

The Barn

Frontier Community Connection Fund board-approved distributions July and September 2019 Name Amount 4-H/FFA Coshocton County Sheep Committee

$500

Coshocton County Career Center Natural Resources Program

$1,500

Coshocton County Firefighters Association

$2,000

Our Town Coshocton

$1,000

Muskingum Valley Council, Boy Scouts of America

$2,500

Moving Mountains Ranch, Coshocton

$1,000

Zanesville

Wishing you a joyous holiday season! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! We will be closing at noon on Dec. 24 and will be closed on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY CONTACT 800-624-8050 | 740-622-6755 www.frontier-power.com OFFICE 770 S. Second St. P.O. Box 280 Coshocton, OH 43812 OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Robert E. Wise President

James Buxton II Vice President

David P. Mizer Secretary-Treasurer

Tim Anderson Bill Daugherty Tim Dickerson Ann M. Gano Trustees

CEO/GENERAL MANAGER Steven K. Nelson ATTORNEY Michael D. Manning

22  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

PERSONNEL Kimberly Bethel Kyle Cramblett Phil Crowdy Logan Desender Jason Dolick F. Scott Dunn Mark Fabian Michelle Fischer Tyler Frazer Rick Haines Matt Hartley Josh Haumschild Ethan Helmick

Ken Hunter Tim Keirns Kelly Kendall Austin Klein Chad Lecraft Francis “J.R.” McCoy Jr. Mike McCoy Taylor McCullough Blake McKee Melvin McVay Chad Miller Corey Miller

Bill Mizer Tanner Shaw Marty Shroyer Bornwell Sianjina Nate Smith James Stewart Shelly Thompson Jonathon Tolliver Robin Totten Andrew Vickers Vickie Warnock


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24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019


Holiday Travel ’TIS THE SEASON FOR

Think mistletoe. Think holly. Think of Ohio as one big stocking, stuffed with cool Yule celebrations. We’ve selected eight close-to-home holiday destinations that evoke the story of the first Christmas, foster good cheer, and brighten spirits — all of them ideal spots for making merry with family and friends. BY DAMAINE VONADA

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON

At the Manger University of Dayton, Dec. 2–Jan. 12 Artistry, imagination, and the reason for the Christmas season draw visitors to the University of Dayton’s Marian Library for At the Manger, an annual display of Nativity scenes from the library’s collection of 3,500 crèches representing more than 100 countries. The event shows how different people and cultures interpret the birth of Christ, and this year, the exhibit’s volunteers selected which Nativity scenes to display. Tour guide Ann Persensky picked “Black and Beautiful,” a contemporary crèche by a Dutch-born artist. “One of its Magi is a woman,” says Perensky, “and a curled-up sheep is cuddling beside Baby Jesus.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF STAN HYWET HALL & GARDENS

937-229-4214; www.udayton.edu/marianlibrary/art-exhibits/at-the-manger.php.

26   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

Deck the Hall 2019: A Classic Comic Hero Christmas Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens, Akron Select evenings, Nov. 29–Dec. 30 Held at the splendid estate created by Goodyear cofounder F.A. Seiberling and his wife, Gertrude, Deck the Hall offers an array of experiences — a million dazzling lights, wondrous holiday music, a gorgeous Christmas tree, hot cocoa, gingerbread, and boutique shopping in the carriage house — for the entire family. Since its


2019 theme is superheroes, the Manor House’s marvelous décor features Wonder Woman, Superman, Spiderman, Batman, and other comic book favorites. 330-836-5533; www.stanhywet.org/events/ deck-hall-2019-classic-comic-hero-christmas.

Dickens Victorian Village Cambridge, Nov. 1–Jan. 1

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CAMBRIDGE/GUERNSEY COUNTY VCB

With Cambridge’s Victorian-looking downtown as a backdrop, visitors stroll among more than 90 individual scenes with nearly 200 mannequins inspired by A Christmas Carol and Dickens-era England.

Continued on page 28

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   27


Delightfully lifelike figures such as Tiny Tim, Bob Cratchit, carolers, lamplighters, and Father Christmas populate Wheeling Avenue, and at the courthouse, nighttime light and music extravaganzas are a joy to behold. “People tell me they’ve never seen better light shows anywhere,” says group tour coordinator Bev Keller. Also available are Victorian teas, carriage rides, and performances of an original Sherlock Holmes play, “The Case of the Christmas Carbuncle.”

PHOTOS COURTESY HAYES PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY & MUSEUMS

740-421-4956; www.dickensvictorianvillage.com.

Hayes Home Holidays tours Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library and Museums, Fremont Tours, Dec. 20–22 Rare evening tours of the mansion where President Hayes and his wife, Lucy, lived after leaving the White House present a perfectly lovely opportunity to make holiday memories. “Seeing the home at night is a special experience,” says Kristina Smith, the museums’ communications 28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019


manager. “Because almost all the home’s furnishings were their belongings, it feels like Rutherford and Lucy are still here to welcome you.” Other activities include the Hayes Train Special, a model railroad with traditional holiday scenery, and horse-drawn trolley or sleigh rides (depending on the weather) through the grounds surrounding the Hayes Home.

ISAAC MILLER/COURTESY HOCKING VALLEY SCENIC RAILROAD

419-332-2081; www.rbhayes.org/events.

Hocking Valley Scenic Railway holiday trains Nelsonville Depot; Select dates, Nov. 30–Dec. 31 Oh, what fun it is to ride on the HVSR’s trio of festive excursions. The Railway’s Santa Train features the Jolly Old Elf plus a grumpy Grinch, Continued on page 30

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   29


while the New Year’s Eve Train stops for midnight fireworks and offers both a familyfriendly pizza and soda car and an adultoriented wine and cheese car. New for 2019 is the Holiday Express to Robbins Crossing, a re-created log village where passengers can see how the pioneers celebrated Christmas. According to Isaac Miller, the conductor, it’s pulled by Ohio’s only operating standardgauge steam locomotive.

PHOTOS COURTESY PYRAMID HILL SCULPTURE PARK

855-323-3768; www.hvsry.org.

30   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

Holiday Lights on the Hill Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park and Museum Hamilton, Nov. 22–Jan. 5 Drive through tunnels of twinkling lights and alleys of gleaming candy canes at Pyramid Hill, one of the nation’s few outdoor sculpture museums and a Butler Rural Electric Cooperative consumer-member. Covering rolling terrain graced by woodlands and lakes, the self-guided tour showcases the park’s internationally acclaimed collection of monumental sculptures. Executive director Sean FitzGibbons says the event is quite popular because it accomplishes Pyramid Hill’s mission of bringing people to art in nature. 513-868-1234; www.pyramidhill.org/holiday-lights-on-the-hill.


Nutcracker Village and Advent Market Steubenville, Nov. 26–Jan. 4

PHOTOS COURTESY HISTORIC FORT STEUBEN

This truly hometown and homegrown event in Steubenville features the world’s largest collection of life-sized nutcrackers — more than 150 of them. They’re all made in Steubenville and depict characters and individuals ranging from Santa Claus, Jack Frost, and Charlie Brown to Mother Teresa, John Glenn, and Steubenville native Dean Martin. “People like coming during the day to see the wonderful details on the nutcrackers, but at night with the colorful lights and holiday music, they’re just magical,” says Judy Bratton of the Steubenville Visitor Center. Adding to the enchantment is a weekend Advent Market with European-style chalets where local vendors and artisans sell holiday foods, gifts, toys, and, of course, nutcrackers. 740-283-1787; www. steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com.

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   31


Yuletides of Yesteryear Sauder Village, Archbold Dec. 6–7 “Our traditional Holiday Lantern Tours offer guests an interactive look at the American Christmas traditions from 1850 through the 1920s,” says Kim Krieger of Sauder Village media relations. Sauder Village is Ohio’s largest living-history museum, and the evening tours include visits to historic houses, an original Mennonite church, a oneroom schoolhouse, and a vintage train depot where people of all ages get to enjoy old-fashioned fun such as singing carols, frosting cookies, and a reading of “’Twas the Night Before Christmas.”

PHOTOS COURTESY SAUDER VILLAGE

800-590-9755; www.saudervillage.org.

32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019


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Winter’s WALK Snowshoeing is fun, easy to learn — and good for you. BY CRAIG SPRINGER

I

f you think of snowshoes as those tennis-racketlooking things strapped to your feet, like in those 1960s adventure movies, you might want to give them a closer look — especially if you’re looking for a fun, healthy, and relatively inexpensive way to keep exercising outdoors during those snowy winter months. “If you can walk, you can snowshoe,” says Anthony Zembrodt, Midwest Regional Manager of L.L. Bean’s outdoors programs. Snowshoes have been around for a long time, born of necessity for traversing the white stuff. Indigenous people of the north have used them for centuries, and European settlers in North America quickly adopted the concept when they arrived and began exploring in the 1600s. Why use showshoes? When the snow gets deep, the walking gets tough. You have to pull your legs out of a hole with each and every step. It’s like slogging through a slug of mud, and it will tire you right quick. It doesn’t take much imagining for you to feel your hip flexors tiring and aching. Snowshoes, however, spread your weight over a larger area of snow, thus allowing you to travel near the surface, aloft on the snow. The less you sink, the easier the walking. Modern snowshoes have certainly evolved from those early versions. Though the concept of the snowshoe seems nearly as involved as that of the wheel, the types of modern snowshoes range in nature depending on how they’re to be used. They’re typically made of aluminum frames with a sheath or decking of strong plastic around the part that binds to your boot. According to Zembrodt, it’s essential that you pick a snowshoe according to your weight, not your height. “The bigger the snowshoe, the more weight it can support,” he says. “It’s also important to consider the types of terrain you will be trekking — some shoes offer better traction than others.” Bear in mind snowshoeing is not skiing. Shoeing is relatively inexpensive; you can buy a pair of recreational

34   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

snowshoes for an adult for less than $100, less than $60 for youngsters. If you venture into more specialized territory, say, long-distance trekking, the shoes become significantly more expensive. Snowshoeing is an opportune sport; you don’t have to go anywhere special to do it — you can snowshoe out your back door. Neither do you have to get on groomed, designated trails, as you do with most skiing. The equipment is low- to no-maintenance, and there’s little chance your shoes will break under normal wear. It’s easy to learn, too, and unlike skiing, there’s almost zero chance you’ll run into trees or careen off a cliff. Even if you do fall, you’re not going far. You can snowshoe as slow or as fast as you desire. If you are a walker or a hiker, snowshoeing is a great way to keep up your routine over the winter — and that speaks to perhaps one of the best reasons to snowshoe: for the exercise. Snowshoeing at a moderate pace burns hundreds of calories in an hour’s time, outpacing running, cycling, or walking in terms of caloric output. “Snowshoeing is a great aerobic activity,” Zembrodt says. “A lot of folks struggle to get outside in the winter months, even if they are frequent hikers during summer. It’s a great way to get outside and have fun in winter.” With shoeing, the learning curve is flat and the investment minimal. With half a foot of snow on the ground, the bike path, nature center, golf course, or walking trail becomes a whole new adventure and the cold, dark winter a little more pleasant. Let’s face it, though: Strapping on an extension to your foot to walk on snow is not normal. Of course, it will be a bit clumsy at first. Outdoors-oriented stores such as L.L. Bean, Cabela’s, Dick’s, and Field & Stream, among others, have the shoes you need, and many have clinics to get you breaking trail with that first big snowfall.


DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   35


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2019–2020

DECEMBER/JANUARY

CALENDAR

COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

DEC. 12–15, 19–22 – Winter Wonderland Light Display, Sandusky Co. Fgds., 901 Rawson Ave., Fremont. Drivethrough Thur./Sun. 6–8 p.m.; walk-through Fri./ Sat. 6–9 p.m. $1, under 12 free. Craft show, games, horse rides, train rides, music, popcorn, cookies, hot chocolate, and Santa! Donations of food items accepted for food pantry. 419-332-5604 or www.sanduskycountyfair.com. DEC. 14 – Train Town Show and Swap Meet, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Operating model railroads; more than 200 tables with model railroad, railfan, and general railroad items for sale. All scales. Food service will be available. 419-228-7141. DEC. 20 – WinterFest and Santa’s House, Saint Andrew’s United Methodist Church, 120 W. Sandusky St., Findlay, 6–8 p.m. Free. Take a horse-drawn wagon ride around downtown, meet with Santa, and enjoy hot chocolate and sweet treats. www.visitfindlay.com. DEC. 20, 22 – Silver Screen Classics: It’s a Wonderful Life, Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St., Toledo, Fri. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $5. See Frank Capra’s classic Christmas tale come to life on the big screen. 419-2422787 or www.valentinetheatre.com. DEC. 21 – Toledo Jazz Orchestra Holiday Concert, Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St., Toledo, 8 p.m. $28–$38 plus fees. 419-242-2787 or www. valentinetheatre.com.

DEC. 26–31 – Horse-Drawn Sleigh Rides at Spiegel Grove, 1337 Hayes Ave., Fremont, 1–4 p.m. $5.50, under 3 free. Ride through the grounds in a horse-drawn sleigh, as President Hayes did. Rides are by South Creek Clydesdales. Horse-drawn trolley ride may be used in addition to or in place of the sleigh depending on demand and staffing. 419-332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org. JAN. 4 – Model Train Clinic, Hayes Presidential Library and Museums, Spiegel Grove, 1337 Hayes Ave., Fremont, 1–4 p.m. $10, C. (6–12) $5, under 6 free; ticket includes access to museum. Veteran model train hobbyists assist you with advice related to model train maintenance and repair, as well as estimating the value of older model trains. 419-332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org. JAN. 4–5 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima (2 miles east of Lima on St. Rte. 309), Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, free for members, under 18 free. Over 400 tables of modern and antique guns, edged weapons, and sportsmen equipment. 419-647-0067 or www.tristategunshow.org. JAN. 10 – Silver Screen Classics Double Feature: Dracula and Frankenstein, Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St., Toledo, 7:30 p.m. $5. Two groundbreaking horror films from 1931, in all their black-and-white cinematic glory. 419-242-2787 or www.valentinetheatre.com.

DEC. 5–8, 12–23, 26–30 – Deck the Hall, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, 714 N. Portage Path, Akron, 5–8 p.m. $7–$22, under 5 free. The decorating theme this year is “A Classic Comic Hero Christmas,” featuring the stories of Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Spiderman, and others. New this season: Step inside a giant interactive snow globe for your family photos! Santa lights the tree in the courtyard each day at 5:30 p.m. 330-315-3287 or www.stanhywet.org. DEC. 14–15 – Winter Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Federated Church–Family Life Center, 16349 Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Falls, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. THROUGH DEC. 31 – Holidays at the Mansion: “Old $3, under 12 free. Artists and crafters selling their original Fashioned Christmas,” The Victorian House Museum, 484 handmade items. Full concession stand on site. www. Wooster Rd., Millersburg, Sun.–Thur. 1–4 p.m., Fri./Sat. 1–8 avantgardeshows.com. p.m. $10; seniors and veterans/active military, $9; under 12 free. Tour the 28-room mansion, transformed into a holiday DEC. 15 – Flea Market of Collectables, Medina County Fgds. Community Center, 735 Lafayette Rd., Medina, 9 wonderland. Open house is Nov. 16, 4–8 p.m.; $5. “Santa a.m.–3 p.m. $2. Early bird special admission: 6–9 a.m., and Friend — Celebrate the Season!” is Dec. 7. 330-674$3. A treasure trove of vintage items and collectables. 0022 or www.victorianhousemuseum.org. 330-948-4300 or www.conraddowdell.com. THROUGH JAN. 4 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village DEC. 21 – Winter Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, and Advent Market, Fort Steuben Park and 4th and Markets Sts., Steubenville. Free. Over 150 unique, life-size Emerald Event Center, 33040 Just Imagine Dr., Avon, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Artists and crafters selling nutcrackers in an outdoor display with lights and music. their original handmade items. Full concession stand on Market open Fri.–Sun., 3–9 p.m. 740-283-1787 or www. site. www.avantgardeshows.com. steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. JAN. 4 – Antique and Collectible Toy Show, Lakeland THROUGH JAN. 4 – Christmas Wonderland and Gift Community College, AFC Auxiliary Gym, 7700 Clocktower Shop, Historic Fort Steuben, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. $6, C. (6–12) $2, under 6 free. Mon.–Thur. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Free. Christmas gifts, nutcrackers, Nutcracker New and antique toys and dolls to buy, sell, or trade. Diecast cars, trucks, and planes; pressed steel and tin Village memorabilia, and Christmas décor. 740-283-1787 toys and models; farm toys, mechanical toys, and more. or www.steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. 216-470-5780 (ask for Tom), cleveshows@att.net, or www. neocollectibletoys.com.

JAN. 4 – Snow Dogs Train Show, presented by Cuyahoga Valley S Gauge Association, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, under 12 free. Free parking. All-gauge show with over 150 tables of trains and toys, operating layouts, and good food at reasonable prices. 440-833-4366, jvendlinger@gmail. com, or www.cvsga.com. Mailing address: Ken Vendlinger, 28920 W. Willowick Dr., Willowick, OH 44095. JAN. 8–12 – Ohio RV Supershow, I-X Center, One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Wed.–Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. $14, under 13 free. $10 parking. Over 600 of the newest RVs including tent campers, travel trailers, fifth wheels, and motor homes. 330-678-4489 or www.ohiorvshow.com. JAN. 11 – Mohican Winter Fest, 131 W. Main St., Loudonville, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. Aaron Costic and his crew from Elegant Ice Creations will offer six ice carving demonstrations hourly beginning at 11 a.m. Sponsored sculptures will be placed along Main Street on Friday evening or Saturday morning, weather permitting. 419994-2519 or www.discovermohican.com. JAN. 11–12 – Medina Gun Show, Medina County Fgds. Community Center, 735 Lafayette Rd., Medina, Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $7. 450 tables of displays. 330-948-4400 or www.conraddowdell.com. JAN. 12 – Winter Hike, Mohican State Park, 3116 St. Rte. 3, Loudonville, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Free. Take a 5K or 10K hike along Clear Fork Gorge. Enjoy hot soup, cookies, and drinks by the fire after the hike. 419-994-5125 or www. discovermohican.com.

NORTHWEST

THROUGH DEC. 26 – Lake of Lights, Saulisbery Park, 13344 St. Rte. 67 W., Kenton, 6–9 p.m. $5 per car. Special events on Sat. and Sun. evenings. 419-675-2547 or www. facebook.com/LakeOfLights. THROUGH DEC. 31 – Lights Before Christmas, Toledo Zoo, 2 Hippo Way, Toledo, Sun.–Thur. 3–8 p.m., Fri./Sat. 3–9 p.m. $16–$19, under 2 free. Over 1 million lights, the award-winning Big Tree, and more than 200 illuminated animal images. 419-385-5721 or www.toledozoo.org. THROUGH JAN. 5 – North Pole Express, 12505 Co. Rd. 99, Findlay, Fri. and Sat. 5:30–9:30 p.m., Sun. 5:30–8:30 p.m. Adults $4, children $3. Hop on board our quarterscale locomotive for a trip through a winter wonderland of sparkling lights and festive decorations. See operating model trains and hundreds of decorated trees, plus a visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus (on select days). 419-423-2995 or www.nworrp.org.

NORTHEAST

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


2019–2020 CALENDAR

DECEMBER/JANUARY

Continued from page 37

CENTRAL

performance by Columbus Children’s Choir. Hours and schedule of events at www.stateauto.com/Christmas. DEC. 21–22 – Scott Antique Market, Ohio Expo Center, Bricker and Celeste Bldgs., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission; $5 parking. America’s favorite treasure hunt! 800 exhibit booths. info@scottantiquemarket.com or www. scottantiquemarkets.com. JAN. 3 – First Friday Art Walk, downtown Zanesville, 5–8 p.m. Stroll the downtown streets while touring over 35 participating galleries, studios, and local businesses, many of which offer demonstrations, make-and-take THROUGH JAN. 1 – Butch Bando’s Fantasy of Lights, activities, and complimentary refreshments. Free shuttle Alum Creek State Park Campgrounds, 3311 S. Old State Rd., Delaware, Sun.–Thur. 5:30–9:30 p.m., Fri./Sat. 5:30– service available on the Fun Bus. Tour maps available at participating galleries and businesses. www.artcoz.org. 10:30 p.m. $20–$30 per car. Drive-through light show. 614-412-3499 or https://butchbandosfantasyoflights.com. JAN. 3–5 – Columbus Build, Remodel, and Landscape Expo, Ohio Expo Center, Kasich Hall, Columbus, Fri. THROUGH JAN. 1 – “A Storybook Christmas,” 12–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, Zanesville and Muskingum Co. locations. Over 100 under 18 free. From top-quality exhibits, to informative participating businesses. Drive or walk by to view the decorations or to visit. Nightly light and music show at the seminars, to insightful demonstrations and more, courthouse, Sun.–Thur. 6–9 p.m., Fri./Sat. 6–10 p.m. 740- you’ll discover thousands of smart, stylish, and costeffective ways to design or renovate your home. www. 455-8282, 800-743-2303, or www.visitzanesville.com. homeshowcenter.com. THROUGH JAN. 2 – State Auto’s Christmas Corner, 518 JAN. 5 – Columbus Paper, Postcard, and Book E. Broad St., Columbus. Free. Historic life-sized Nativity Show, Ohio Expo Center, Rhodes Center, 717 E. 17th St., display. Official lighting is Dec. 4 at 5:30 p.m., with

Columbus, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $6. Vintage paper collectibles including postcards, books, paper advertisements, stereo view cards, trade cards, old photographs, magazines, documents, non-sports cards, military paper items, paper sports collectibles, and protective storage options. 614-206-9103 or www.facebook.com/Columbus-PaperShow-134469001768. JAN. 10 – Improv in the May, Marion Palace Theatre May Pavilion, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7:30 p.m. $6. An evening of improvisation comedy featuring audience interaction and suggestions for skits and games. 740-3832101 or www.marionpalace.org. JAN. 10–19 – Ohio RV and Boat Show, Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th St., Columbus, Wed.–Fri. 12–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $14, C. (6–13) $3, under 6 free. Hundreds of campers and boats from over 21 dealers, plus camping gear, equipment, and related products. www.ohiorvandboatshow.com. JAN. 11–12 – Columbus Weddings Show, Ohio Expo Center, Kasich Hall, 717 E. 17th St., Columbus, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Sample wedding cakes and reception food, see the latest in wedding styles, and meet hundreds of wedding specialists. Daily runway shows. $12 at door; online discount and packages available. http:// cbusweddings,com.

SOUTHEAST

Muskingum Valley bluff between 4 and 4:30 p.m. in near perfect alignment with Sacra Via. Maps and a brief commentary will be provided by Castle archaeologist Wes Clarke. 740-373-1480 or www.mariettacastle.org. DEC. 28 – Visit with the Pioneers, Campus Martius Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta. Visit the home of General Rufus Putnam to meet with some of Marietta’s citizens from the early 19th century. 740-373-3750 or www.campusmartiusmuseum.org. DEC. 31 – New Year’s Eve Dance, 26100 Legion Rd., Langsville, 8–12 p.m. $10 cover charge. The Cadillacs out of Racine, Ohio, will be performing live. 740-669-1020 or josephfreeman476@gmail.com. DEC. 31 – New Year’s Eve Gospel Sing, Harvest Christian Fellowship. Free. 740-704-1487. DEC. 31 – New Year’s Eve Train and Fireworks, Hocking Valley Scenic Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 W. Canal St., Nelsonville, 10:30 p.m.–12:30 a.m. $22–$35. 740-2491452 or www.hvsry.org/trainlist. JAN. 12 – Rhonda Vincent and The Rage, Stuart’s Opera House, 52 Public Square, Nelsonville, 3 p.m. $29–$39. A special matinee performance from “The New Queen of Bluegrass” and her award-winning band. 740-753-1924 or www.stuartsoperahouse.org.

performed each evening. 800-933-5480 or www. dickensvictorianvillage.com. THROUGH JAN. 5 – “Space: A Journey to Our Future,” Bossard Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis. Free. Interactive exhibition presented in cooperation with NASA and as seen at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. www.bossardlibrary.org. DEC. 15 – It’s a Wonderful Life: The Musical, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 3 p.m. Presented by the Chillicothe Civic Theatre. Based on the beloved 1946 film, the musical faithfully follows George Bailey’s life THROUGH DEC. 22 – Santa Train, Hocking Valley Scenic from his childhood dreams to his midlife disappointments and beyond, as we all take a journey to discover whether Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 W. Canal St., Nelsonville, every Sat. and Sun., 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., and every Fri. at 6 his life has mattered at all. 740-772-2041 or www. majesticchillicothe.net. p.m. beginning on Nov. 30. $16–$21, under 3 free. www. hvsry.org/trainlist/#santa. DEC. 18 – Phil Dirt and the Dozers, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 8 p.m. $20–$22. Fans THROUGH JAN. 1 – Dickens Victorian Village, of all ages can enjoy this family-friendly stroll through downtown Cambridge. Stroll the streets to view scenes the band’s oldies-but-goodies along with some of depicting life in 1850s England, featuring life-sized, their favorite Christmas songs. 740-772-2041 or www. handmade mannequins wearing real vintage clothing. majesticchillicothe.net. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. DEC. 21 – Solstice Watch, Sacra Via Park (between Third THROUGH JAN. 1 – Guernsey County Courthouse and Second Sts.), Marietta, 4–5:30 p.m. If the weather Holiday Light Show, Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. cooperates, we will view the sun setting on the western nightly. Four different light and music shows

WEST VIRGINIA

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Winter Festival of Lights, Oglebay Resort, Wheeling. Featuring 300 acres of twinkling lights over a 6-mile drive. 3D holographic eyewear transforms every point of light into a magical display. Per-car donation requested; valid for the entire festival season. 877-4361797 or https://oglebay.com/events/festival-of-lights. NOV. 22–DEC. 28 – Celebration of Lights, Morris Park, Fairmont, Fri.–Sun., 6–10 p.m. Suggested donation of $10 per car. See over 475 holiday light displays in this drive-through tour. 304-366-4550 or www. celebrationoflightswv.com.

38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy, but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or send an email to events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.


SOUTHWEST

chocolate and cookies and entertainment by Santa’s elves. Reservations recommended. 513-933-8022 or www.lebanonrr.com/northpole. THROUGH DEC. 31 – Light Up Middletown, Smith Park, 500 Tytus Ave., Middletown, 6–10 p.m. daily. Admission by cash donation — you set the price! A drive-through fantasy light display, open in all weather. Visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus every Fri. and Sat., 7–9 p.m., through Dec. 21. www.lightupmiddletown.org. THROUGH JAN. 1 – Christmas at the EnterTRAINment Junction, 7379 Squire Court, West Chester. See the magic of Christmas at the home of the world’s largest indoor THROUGH DEC. 24 – Christmas in the Greenhouse, train display. Take the family on a “Journey to the North Milford Garden Center (in the Milford Shopping Center), Pole” where you’ll meet Santa and Mrs. Claus. 513-8981025 Lila Ave., Milford. Free. The greenhouse turns into a 8000 or www.entertrainmentjunction.com. Christmas store, with cut and live trees for sale, crafts and goods made by local vendors, a large train display layout, THROUGH JAN. 5 – Holiday Lights on the Hill, Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park and Museum, 1763 Hamilton-Cleves and trains for purchase. Wreath-making classes weekly, Rd., Hamilton. Mon.–Thur. 6–9 p.m., $20 per car; Fri.– and Santa visits on Saturdays! Check website or call for updated hours. 513-248-4531 or www.grantsgreenhouses. Sun. 6–10 p.m., $25 per car; museum members $15. A 2-mile drive-through light display. 513-868-1234 or http:// com. pyramidhill.org/holiday-lights. THROUGH DEC. 28 – North Pole Express, LM&M DEC. 13–14 – “Songs of the Season”: Oxford Musicians Railroad, 16 E. South St., Lebanon. $22–$35; children Holiday Concert, Oxford Community Arts Center, Oxford, under 2, $5. See website for days and times. Take a 7:30 p.m. $10. Each group does two or three numbers. ride on a vintage train to visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus! Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass plays on Sat., Dec. Children will receive a small gift from Santa. Enjoy hot

14; exact time to be announced later. 513-524-8506, info@ oxarts.org, or www.oxarts.org. DEC. 15 – Winter Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Oasis Golf Club and Conference Ctr., 902 Loveland-Miamiville Rd., Loveland, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. www.avantgardeshows.com. DEC. 21 – Winter Solstice Sunset Observance, Serpent Mound, 3850 St. Rte. 73, Peebles, 4–5:30 p.m. 937-2050094 or www.serpentmound.org. JAN. 1 – World Race for Hope 5K, Hobart Arena, 255 Adams St., Troy, 10 a.m.–12 p.m. Free. Join runners and walkers on New Year’s Day to kick off National Slavery Prevention and Human Trafficking Awareness Month. Donations support the nonprofit Free To Run Foundation’s awareness/education programs and charity partners. Register by Dec. 31 at https://runsignup.com/Race/OH/ Troy/WorldRaceforHopeTroy. JAN. 4–5 – Wedding Expo and Show, Wright State University Nutter Center, McLin Gym, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $5 in advance, $8 at door. Fashion shows at 1 and 3 p.m. Giveaways, door prizes, demonstrations, and seminars. www.weddingapolis.com.

DECEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE 1

2

night

SILENT 1. A tranquil early winter night in our neighborhood. Lorie Wilber

3

Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

4

2. The Kirk triplets awaiting Santa’s arrival! My children Steel, Volt, and Sterling. Justin Kirk Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member

3. Curiosity is the cat! Our cat, Chloe, was fascinated by the lights on our Christmas tree. Toni Kellar

5

Washington Electric Cooperative member

4. Chloe, our English springer spaniel, quietly waits for her Christmas treats from Santa. Ingrid Benn Weaver Consolidated Cooperative member

5. A winter walk at home. Richard Breitenbach 6

South Central Power Company member

6. Our 3-year-old granddaughter, Millie Nicholson, up bright and early checking out the Christmas tree. Perry and Dawn Hamman

7

Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative member

7. A view of our barn nestled among the trees during a silent winter night. Julie Wilhelm Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative member

Send us your picture! For March, send “Tip of the Hat” by Dec. 15; for April, send “Easter Egg Hunt” by Jan. 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/ memberinteractive — and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in the photos.

40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2019


HOW DO CAPITAL CREDITS

WORK?

Co-ops are not-for-profit, so when there’s money left after bills are paid, it’s returned to members as “capital credits,” or “patronage capital.” Ohio electric co-ops returned $34 MILLION to members in 2018. Nationally, electric co-ops returned $1.1 BILLION to members in 2017, and $16 BILLION since 1988.

Members paying their bills generates operating revenue for the co-op.

When all the bills are paid, the extra money at the end of each year, called “margins,” is allocated back to each member based on how much electricity they purchased that year.

ohioec.org/purpose

The co-op’s board approves a return of that money to members, often called “capital credits” or “patronage capital.”


Profile for Ohio Cooperative Living

Ohio Cooperative Living - December 2019 - Frontier  

Ohio Cooperative Living - December 2019 - Frontier