Page 1

OHIO

NOVEMBER 2019

COOPERATIVE The Frontier Power Company

A place for peace Created out of co-op concern

ALSO INSIDE All about wolverines Ohio-made holiday gifts The Toledo War


VETERANS DAY NOVEMBER 11

Electric cooperatives across Ohio join the nation this month in honoring veterans of the U.S. armed forces — America’s courageous protectors, defenders, and heroes. Not only do we acknowledge veterans’ dedication to our country, but we are truly grateful for the unique strengths and noble characteristics they bring to the cooperative network.

ohioec.org/purpose


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2019

INSIDE FEATURES 24 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE Our annual collection includes a sleighful of made-in-Ohio treasures to delight anyone on your list.

30 ALAKAZAM! Traveling magicians put a little piece of themselves into every show, every bit of magic, that they perform.

34 THE TOLEDO WAR A quirky and often forgotten bit of American history set the stage for what has become one of the country’s most iconic rivalries.

Cover image on most issues: U.S. Army veteran Bill Pike enjoys the serenity at the Chillicothe VA Medical Center’s healing garden, which was built thanks in part to a grant from the South Central Power Company.

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

COOPERATIVES CARE

O

ne of the things I love about working for Ohio’s electric cooperatives is the opportunity to see honest caring in action in the communities we serve.

Yes, concern for the community is one of the seven principles that all cooperatives operate under, but our concern for our communities doesn’t just happen because it’s in the company handbook or posted on the walls — it’s the genuine attitude of the people who come to work with us every day. Co-op employees across Ohio are involved in service organizations, they help sponsor local events, participate in fundraising activities, and provide support for the less fortunate through community-based charities. The employees of South Central Power Company didn’t work so hard to help build a healing garden at the Chillicothe VA Medical Center (see our story on page 4) because a co-op principle compelled them to do so; instead, like dozens of other examples, cooperative employees saw a need in their community and responded out of a sense of compassion and gratitude. This past month, the employees of Buckeye Power and our statewide association in Columbus showed the power of working together. We’ve thrown our collective support behind the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS), as one of our family members has been battling blood cancer for many years. I was proud that our employees set an ambitious fundraising goal of $25,000 for the LLS 2019 Light the Night Walk in Columbus. But I was blown away that our employees were so successful in their efforts. More than 80 of our people participated and actually raised more than $30,000, which was among the highest participation and fundraising total of any group for the event! Special thanks goes to our corporate partners, such as Campbell Transportation and George V. Hamilton Inc., whose sponsorship helped us exceed our goal. I’m grateful that Concern for Community is not a company slogan but a description of the people who work for electric cooperatives throughout Ohio. Thank you for your patronage and support of your electric cooperative. I hope you and yours have a safe and fulfilling Thanksgiving.

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO’S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Special thanks goes to our corporate partners, such as Campbell Transportation and George V. Hamilton Inc., whose sponsorship helped us exceed our goal.


NOVEMBER 2019 • Volume 62, No. 2

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Rebecca Seum Anita Cook Dava Hennosy

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer Editorial Intern

Contributors: Margo Bartlett, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Craig Springer, Damaine Vonada, and Margie Wuebker. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

4 POWER LINES

Co-ops care: Cooperatives across the state show concern for their communities in a multitude of ways.

6 CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

North Western Electric: Serving large and small consumer-members, the coop works to empower the communities in and around Bryan, where it’s based.

8 OHIO ICON

Moore’s Farm Toys: The Dresden manufacturer is one of the only places in the world that specializes in producing ag-related die-cast toys.

Cheryl Solomon American MainStreet Publications 847-749-4875 | cheryl@amp.coop The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member

10

10 CO-OP PEOPLE

Cutlery craftsman: Despite his limitations, sculptor Gary Hovey has carved out his artistic niche working in a unique medium.

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE For all advertising inquiries, contact

4

Wolverines: What’s up with those weasels that Buckeyes everywhere love to hate?

12

16 GOOD EATS

Make-ahead breakfasts: A little advance work lets you start your day with a hearty meal, even when those morning minutes slip away.

16

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and information from your electric cooperative.

37 CALENDAR

What’s happening: November/ December events and other things to do around the state.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

40

Thankful: Gratitude abounds in the season of Thanksgiving.

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


POWER LINES

CO-OPS

care

Member-funded charitable programs can make a big difference to the communities cooperatives serve. BY DAVA HENNOSY

South Central Power Company members and employees were instrumental in the development and construction of the Peace Garden at the Chillicothe VA Medical Center.

A

fter serving the Army in the Vietnam War in 1968–69, Bill Pike returned to his home near Greenfield to get on with a normal life.

Partly because of exposure to Agent Orange, but also for other maladies, he’s needed the type of medical services offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs, so he’s been a regular visitor to the Chillicothe VA Medical Center for treatment, physical therapy, and regular checkups through the years. “I really enjoy going there,” Pike says. “We’re always with the other veterans. It’s really about being with your peers.” The Chillicothe VA Medical Center has been a place of healing for veterans for almost a century. In 2016, the Ross County Veterans Council built a gazebo and later added a healing garden designed to connect the facility with the beautiful surrounding nature of southern Ohio.

4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019

“I mostly use it for walking and relaxing. It’s really something to see. It sits on a hill and overlooks the golf course. The layout is just beautiful,” says Pike. “It’s really used as a getaway, a calming place to get away from the world. It’s so quiet with a great view. It really puts you in a great frame of mind.” Research sponsored by the VA and others has found that gardens are therapeutic through the fragrance, beauty, colors, and sounds of nature, as well as the opportunity for exercise. Nature is an important part of the healing process. “The garden is designed for veterans suffering from PTSD,” says Michelle Schatzman, project manager. “It’s a place where they can meditate and clear their minds.” The garden is also home to events like the Veterans in Transitions Family Fun Day, an event for veterans and their families to gather for music, games, food, and prizes. It hosted the Ross County National Guard deployment, where families spent time together before the unit deployed. The gazebo and healing garden were made possible in part by $10,000 in grants from the South Central Power Company Foundation. The foundation is funded through Lancaster-based South Central Power


Company’s Operation Round Up — where consumermembers voluntarily round their electric bills up to the next dollar to make a donation to the foundation. Money donated through the program supports schools, civic groups, charitable organizations, food pantries, fire departments, and more in communities throughout the co-op’s service territory. The program is inspired by the seventh cooperative principle, Concern for Community, which all electric cooperatives honor. Most co-ops around the state have similar programs and stories that give testament to coops’ devotion to that principle.

The Rothhaar Family Eastin Rothhaar, a sixth grader at Wynford Local Schools, received a life-changing gift, thanks to Attica-based North Central Electric Cooperative’s People Fund. Maple, a female golden retriever-Labrador mix, now serves as a service dog for Eastin, who is on the autism spectrum. The family needed to raise $15,000 to cover the cost of Maple from 4 Paws for Ability. North Central Electric Cooperative’s People Fund donated $3,000 to the worthy cause. Maple is trained to assist Eastin by providing calming and comforting interactions on the handler’s command. Maple can recognize a wide range of Eastin’s emotions, approach him, and cuddle or provide kisses for comfort.

First responders of the Highland County North JFAD and their South Central Power Company-provided hydraulic rescue tool.

The donation will help cover registration fees, uniforms, umpires, field maintenance, equipment, and more. With their registration fees covered, families won’t have to worry about getting turned away because of finances.

The Highland County North Joint Fire and Ambulance District The South Central Power Company Foundation also provided funds to the Highland County North Joint Fire and Ambulance District (HCNJFAD). The district used the money to purchase a new power unit and hightensile steel cutters, spreaders, and hoses, which enable the HCNJFAD to perform extractions on newer-model automobiles that are made with stronger materials. The district’s first responders put the new equipment to use just four days after it arrived, when they were called to assist at the scene of a motor vehicle accident — a rollover with heavy damage and entrapment. With the new apparatus, the team extracted the victim in only 12 minutes. The person survived after being flown by medical transport to a trauma facility. “Thanks to the generosity of South Central Power members, our capabilities will no longer be hampered by old, obsolete equipment when seconds matter,” says Assistant Chief Erica D. Hurless-Miller, Highland County EMS coordinator.

“This co-op isn’t just about providing electricity — it’s about people caring about other people,” says Sarah Rothhaar, Eastin’s mom. “When you round up on your bill, positive outcomes happen, just like with Eastin and Maple.”

Kenton Little League Kenton Little League’s motto is “No kid gets turned away,” so the league raises funds to cover the registration fees for children from families in need. Kenton Little League works to provide children and families a safe, healthy, and fun place to spend time together. The Community Fund, another member-funded charitable program — this one at Kenton-based MidOhio Energy Cooperative — awarded $1,000 to sponsor youth baseball players.

Mid-Ohio Energy helps the Kenton Little League ensure that every kid has a spot.

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

NORTH WESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

N

orth Western Electric Cooperative (NWEC) is nestled in the northwestern corner of Ohio and serves all of Williams County and the northern part of Defiance County, also delivering power to parts of Paulding, Fulton, and Henry counties. Its headquarters is located just west of Bryan, 50 miles from Toledo and 55 miles from Fort Wayne, Indiana. Bryan is well known as the home of Spangler Candy Company, which makes the worldrenowned Dum Dums lollipops, as well as Circus Peanuts and Spangler Candy Canes. Bryan is also home to Ohio Art Company, where the nostalgic Etch A Sketch is made.

A passion for community service North Western Electric is heavily invested in the communities that it serves. Last year, NWEC returned more than $1 million in excess revenue to members. Community sponsorships stay local, injecting capital into events and organizations. The co-op, for example, is a presenting sponsor for both the Montpelier Bean Days Balloon Festival and Defiance County Hot Air Balloon Festival, where it awards two members a balloon ride they’ll never forget. That investment, in turn, helps the community in other ways. The Defiance County Hot Air Balloon Festival serves as a fundraiser for the United Way’s Community Engagement Center, which invested an estimated $20,700 into the community during its second year, through volunteerism from 35 different agencies.

Membership diversity North Western Electric maintains and operates 1,076 miles of line that serve 5,935 metered accounts. It has a diverse workforce with 18 employees and seven trustees. While the area is mainly residential, the co-op also serves several large agricultural operations. Hillandale Farms, one of the nation’s leading suppliers of shell eggs to retailers and distributors, produces 3.2 million eggs per day from its 4 million hens. Other top accounts in NWEC territory include two school systems; Altenloh, Brinck & Co. U.S., which manufactures fasteners for the construction market; and the Corrections Center of Northwest Ohio. Bridgewater Dairy, another major account, also houses an anaerobic biodigester that produces up to 1.2 MW of electricity for Ohio’s electric cooperatives from the methane gas produced by cow manure.

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019

Co-op Spotlight appears regularly in Ohio Cooperative Living to give a glimpse into the land and the people of Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives.


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OHIO ICON

MOORE’S Dresden

BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: About 2 miles north of Dresden near the intersection of State Route 16 and State Route 60. Provenance: The son of an agricultural equipment dealer in the Dresden area, Jeff Moore grew up appreciating farm machines. He worked in the family dealership as a mechanic and salesman, and when his first child was born in the 1970s, he started collecting and customizing farm toys. “I added extra details like lights, mirrors, wheels, and tires to make the toy tractor and combines look like real ones,” Moore says. After successfully selling his products at toy shows for several years, Moore obtained a spin-casting machine in order to make his own patterns and molds. In 1996, he formed Moore’s Farm Toys. Significance: Not only is Moore’s company one of the nation’s few farm toy manufacturers, but its products also are 100% made in the U.S. “We cast our metal products and some of the plastic ones in Dresden and also try to source everything that we possibly can from Ohio,” says Moore. “Even the blister cards we use for packaging are made in Ohio.” Currently: Moore’s Farm Toys specializes in S scale (1:64) models, offers detailing parts and kits, and has an inventory of more than 1,000 items. With assistance from his family, Moore operates the business in a pole barn that does triple duty as a manufacturing facility, showroom, and retail store. His bestselling products include threepoint hitches for tractors as well as front and rear dozer blades. Moore prides himself on making unique and innovative farm toys. Quality is also a top priority. “Customers tell us that we do a great job, but that’s because we’re very picky,” says Moore. “We don’t send out something unless we’re completely satisfied with it.” It’s a little-known fact that: Moore, a member of The Frontier Power Company, plans to release a new rotary cutter this year in time for Christmas. Moore’s Farm Toys, 3695 Raiders Road, Dresden, OH 43821. For additional information, call 740-754-6248 or visit www.mooresfarmtoys.com.

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019

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NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   9


CO-OP PEOPLE

CUTLERY CRAFTSMAN

Despite limitations, this sculptor has carved out his niche working in a unique medium. BY MARGIE WUEBKER

Artist Gary Hovey, his wife, Tonnie, and assistant Jim Perrine display a heron sculpted entirely of flatware. The tabletop on which the heron sits was made with more than 200 spoons.

G

ary Hovey has had to make some adjustments to his life because of Parkinson’s disease. He can no longer drive a car or work a full-time job. But he has a passion and a purpose that transcends the progressive disease — Hovey sculpts intricately detailed animals and delicately petaled flowers using what many people consider an unusual medium: stainless steel eating utensils.

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019


Hovey, who grew up in a military family, traces his interest in art to his grade school days, when a teacher introduced him to working with clay. He later acquired welding and bronze-casting skills while in the workforce. When his wife, Tonnie, enrolled in commercial art school in Oklahoma, Hovey went to work at a foundry that does fine art casting for sculptors. Employees were permitted to use equipment and materials for their own projects; it was at that point that his medium began to change from clay to metal. He credits artist John Kearney, who crafts animal sculptures from car bumpers, as inspiration. Hovey created his first piece, a running dog, in January 2004 and sold it for $200, establishing his Hoveyware brand. A shed at the home of a friend, Midwest Electric member Jim Perrine, served as his workshop for nearly eight years. The two men have become a team as Hovey deals with Parkinson’s. Each piece Hovey creates is unique. He works on only one project at a time and does so without the aid of molds. He lays out a new idea on his shop floor and then carefully welds the desired form. His works range from whimsical chicks that fetch $50 to a towering bear standing on its hind legs. The bear’s nearly $10,000 price tag is equally impressive. “I like to capture an animal’s personality and attitude,” Hovey says. “Sense of movement is also important. For fish and frogs, I include their habitat, such as lily pads.” Though he goes through copious amounts of flatware, he says it’s never been a problem finding enough. His father discovered flea markets, garage sales, and auctions to be treasure troves, and friends and acquaintances also keep the workshop well-stocked with nearly a ton of supplies on site. People often ask whether Hovey can make something using their heirloom silver or silverplate. He explains that it’s not possible because silver melts at a lower temperature and would be destroyed by the high heat from the welder.

Customers come from near and far after seeing the sculptures on the Hoveyware website and at sculpture tours throughout the country. He hopes to have a celebrity purchase some of his handiwork one day, but so far, the closest he has come is selling five Hoveyware animals to the Toothsome Chocolate Emporium at Universal Studios in Orlando. Herons are his top seller, but he also enjoys creating eagles, dogs, deer, gorillas, squirrels, raccoons, turkeys, lions, owls, and even giraffes. He shies away from creatures like octopuses and snakes, pointing out that some animals are more challenging than others. Hovey has made some concessions because of Parkinson’s disease. Moving the workshop to just steps from his back door has helped. He no longer works long hours at a time, but he has no intention of pulling the plug on his welder. “Producing and showing my work is both challenging and therapeutic,” he says. “It helps to maintain my skills and functionality and gives me a purpose. I want my story to inspire others to look for what they can do despite what has happened to them.” See Gary Hovey’s gallery and purchase works at www.hoveyware.com.

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

WOLVERINES What’s up with those weasels that Buckeyes everywhere love to hate? STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019


L

ater this month, when Ohio State University plays the University of Michigan in their annual football rivalry, the contest will be the 116th meeting of the two teams, with those pesky Wolverines holding the edge in wins: 58 to 51, with 6 ties. But what exactly is a wolverine, and are they really as fearsome as their reputation? A true wilderness animal of the high-mountain West, Alaska, and Canada’s far north, no wolverines live in Ohio. More surprisingly, their existence in Michigan — the Wolverine State — is questionable, even in the rugged, remote Upper Peninsula. “Actually, there is no reliable evidence that wolverines are even native to Michigan,” says Adam Bump, a furbearer biologist with the Michigan DNR, Wildlife Division. “There is debate about their historical presence, but likely they were, or are, only accidental visitors to Michigan.” Bump added that the last known and perhaps the only instance of a wolverine in the wild in Michigan was the one spotted in the northern portion of the “Thumb” region in 2004. “A necropsy showed that the animal later died of congestive heart failure, basically old age, and was potentially a captive escape or a release, although we have not determined its origins.” As in Ohio, the Michigan woods these days are covered with trail cameras placed on trees by deer hunters. Could a trail camera have possibly recorded a wolverine somewhere in the state recently? “Again,” insisted Bump, “there are no wolverines known to be in Michigan at the present time. We have not verified any trail-camera photos of wolverines other than the one animal previously mentioned.”

That’s not to say a wolverine couldn’t show up at any time in either Michigan or Ohio, as males in particular can travel hundreds of miles in search of new territory. For instance, in 2009, a wolverine captured near Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming was tracked by wildlife biologists using radio-telemetry equipment. The critter covered an astounding 550 miles during just two months, April and May, successfully crossing highways and scaling mountain ranges to become the first wolverine seen in Colorado since 1919. The largest member of the weasel family, wolverines weigh from 65 pounds for a large, adult male to about half that size for an adult female — either sex a formidable animal. However, their size belies their tremendous strength and aggressiveness. A wolverine won’t hesitate fighting wolves or a bear over a kill, and given the right deep-snow conditions, are even capable of taking down a moose, a feat wolverine researchers liken to “a house cat bringing down a deer.” Some fans humorously describe the annual OSU versus U of M football game as a battle of poorly chosen mascots: Buckeyes (a worthless nut) versus Wolverines (an overgrown weasel with an attitude). One more thing: Like all members of the weasel family, wolverines have a strong, rank odor — but if you’re a Buckeye fan, you already knew that. W.H. “Chip” Gross (whchipgross@gmail.com) is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor, a member of Consolidated Cooperative, and an OSU alumnus.

Wolverines are so secretive and inhabit such remote areas that even catching a glimpse of one in the wild is next to impossible. That said, if you’d like to see a live wolverine or two, try the North America exhibit at the Columbus Zoo, where Chip Gross took the photos for this story.

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


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NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   15


GOOD EATS

Make-ahead

breakfasts A little advance work lets you start your day with a hearty meal, even when those morning minutes slip away. RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY CATHERINE MURRAY

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019


TURKEY AND SWISS SCONES Prep: 20 minutes; Cook: 20 minutes; Servings: 8 2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup shredded Swiss cheese 1 tablespoon sugar 1½ cups finely shredded or 1 tablespoon baking chopped turkey powder 3/ 4 to 1 cup buttermilk 1 tablespoon thyme 1 tablespoon coarse salt 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into thin slices

pepper jelly (optional)

Preheat oven to 425 F. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, thyme, and ½ teaspoon salt. Add cold butter, using your fingers to work the butter into the dry ingredients until it resembles coarse crumbs. Quickly mix in cheese and turkey. Stir in 3/4 cup buttermilk and mix with hands until a soft dough forms. If the dough isn’t coming together, add more buttermilk a tablespoon at a time. Working on a floured surface, pat dough down until it’s a 1-inch-tall circle. (For softer, thicker scones, pat down into a 2-inch-tall circle and bake a little longer.) Cut circle into 8 wedges, like pizza slices. Space scones at least an inch apart on an ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with coarse salt. Pop in the refrigerator while the oven preheats, so the butter doesn’t begin to melt. Bake 18 to 20 minutes or until firm to the touch and lightly browned. Allow to cool completely, then freeze in freezer-safe containers. Remove one or more and thaw overnight in fridge. Warm in the microwave for 30 seconds. Serve with pepper jelly, if desired.

BREAKFAST BURRITOS Prep: 20 minutes; Cook: 15 minutes; Servings: 6 12 pieces bacon 1 tablespoon butter 12 eggs 2 scallions, chopped 1/2 cup milk 1 red bell pepper, finely diced 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup shredded colby jack cheese In a large skillet, cook bacon over medium heat until it has reached desired crispness. Set bacon aside on paper towels to catch excess grease. In a large bowl, whisk eggs with milk and salt. Over medium heat, melt butter. Add scallions and bell pepper and sauté for 2 minutes. Lower heat to medium low and add egg mixture to skillet. Let eggs begin to set on the bottom, then stir every few minutes until eggs are no longer runny but slightly glossy. Remove skillet from stovetop. Have a tray handy to place wrapped burritos on. Scoop 3 large spoonfuls of egg mixture onto the bottom third of each tortilla.

8 10-inch flour tortillas salsa, optional

Top eggs with a generous sprinkling of cheese and two slices of bacon. Tightly roll the tortilla starting with the filled end, folding sides in toward the middle halfway through, then continuing to roll tightly. Place each burrito seam-side down on the tray. When all burritos are assembled, wrap them individually in pieces of aluminum foil, covering completely. Transfer burritos to freezer bags. Store for up to a month. To reheat, remove foil and microwave seam-side up for 1 minute, then flip over and microwave for another minute. Let stand 1 minute before eating. Top with salsa, if desired. NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


OVERNIGHT PUMPKIN SPICE OATMEAL Prep: 5 minutes; Servings: 5 2 cups steel-cut oats 2 cups milk 1 cup canned pumpkin 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1/8 teaspoon salt additional milk, as needed

Mix together all ingredients in a large container. Cover with a lid and store in the refrigerator overnight. In the morning, add more milk for desired thickness. When ready to eat, keep oatmeal cold or warm it up in microwave for 1 minute per serving. Suggested toppings: banana slices, dried cranberries, and pepitas.

CHERRY ALMOND CHIA SEED PARFAIT Prep: 10 minutes; Chill: 1 hour; Servings: 8 12 ounces (1½ cups) cherries, frozen or fresh 3 cups almond milk 1/2 teaspoon almond extract 3/4 cup chia seeds 1 tablespoon honey 4 tablespoons slivered or sliced almonds Blend 1 cup of the cherries, 2 cups of the almond milk, and the almond extract in a blender. In a container with a lid, combine blended cherries with 1/2 cup of the chia seeds and place in the refrigerator for 1 hour to set (the chia seeds will soften and absorb the liquid). In a separate container with a lid, mix 1/4 cup chia seeds, 1 cup almond milk, and honey. Place in refrigerator for 1 hour to set. Remove both chia mixtures from refrigerator and stir well. Layer cherry chia and vanilla chia in parfait glasses or Mason jars. Top with remaining cherries and slivered almonds, if desired. Eat immediately or cover and keep in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

HAND HEWN BY SHELLY THOMPSON

L

ocated in western Tuscarawas County, Hand Hewn Farm is a unique, small family farm focusing on ecologically sound farming practices. Five friends — Andy and Katie Lane, Doug and Molly Wharton, and Kathy Neal — combined efforts in 2015 and moved to the Patterson family property, where Andy’s grandparents, Bob and Frieda Patterson, had established a dairy farm in 1950. The Pattersons had purchased 160 acres of rolling hills in the western valleys of Tuscarawas County, where they raised their family while running a dairy operation. After 30 years of milking cows, the Pattersons retired and the farm sat somewhat unused for the next 30 years. The opportunity arose for Andy and his family, along with a few friends, to access the property and have use of the land. The Whartons and the Lanes had been homesteading and helping each other in Knox County prior to moving to the Patterson property. Both families knew they could do so much more and help each other better by combining their efforts. After talking with many people while planning the farm, their friend, Kathy Neal, joined the group. Although they had all planned on building their own houses on the property, they spent some time in temporary quarters and even all lived in one big house for a while. Eventually, things fell into place with each having their own household in existing structures on the farm, alleviating the need for any new construction.

FARM

Homesteading and sustainability are main goals of Hand Hewn Farm. While rebuilding and repairing the farm from years of it being idle, the group began maintaining small herds of pigs, chickens, and rabbits — livestock they were familiar with raising. They are practicing methods such as permaculture, which builds soil and captures water by creating swales in the land, aiding in providing water for new perennial tree crops that will provide a source of food for them as well as the animals. They also use a cistern to collect rainwater from the barns and apply farming practices to store carbon and harness solar energy. Hand Hewn Farm defaults to nature and strives to maintain as much of a natural environment for its animals as possible. Their 15 to 20 mixed-heritage breed pigs thrive on living in the woods, eating a diverse diet, as well as a corn and soybean mix that provides proper nutrition. The pastured chickens are raised outdoors on grass in mobile coops, allowing them to get fresh air, sunshine, and to forage through the pastures for grass, bugs, and grit, which adds to their diet of non-GMO feed. Hand Hewn Farm currently has about 150 ISA Brown laying hens and raises about 500 broilers each year. The small group of rabbits are raised in colonies so that they have room to roam until they are weaned. The rabbits are then put in groups in a mobile cage to be on pasture when the season allows. They are also fed other fodder from the farm to round out their diet. Some of the ecological reasons this method works well Continued on page 21

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

Appliance Rebates for Cooperative Members

Frontier Power is offering rebates to residential cooperative members who replace their existing refrigerators, stand-alone freezers, or central This rebate is available only to residential members. Members must purchase and install a new ENERGY STAR-

100

$

and June 30, 2020.

REFRIGERATOR & FREEZER

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS: Members are required to provide documentation, such as a purchase receipt, showing that the product was purchased and installed in a home served by the cooperative. Members must also include proof of

REBATE

stand-alone freezers (10-30 cubic feet) can qualify for a $100 rebate* from Frontier Power when purchased and installed at a location served by the cooperative.

150

$

copy of the yellow Energy Guide label or owner’s manual (must include ENERGY STAR logo or statement of ENERGY STAR All rebates are issued in the form of a credit to the member’s electric account. A maximum of two rebates per appliance type (two refrigerators, two freezers, or two air conditioning units), totaling $700, may be paid per residential member home during the current program year from July 1, 2019, and June 30, 2020.

AIR CONDITIONER

REBATE

(a maximum of two) with a minimum 16 SEER rating and a cap of six tons can qualify for up to a $150 rebate per unit from Frontier Power when purchased and installed at a location served by the cooperative.

*Frontier Power’s appliance rebate on refrigerators, freezers, and air conditioners is limited. The offer expires when funds are Rebate offered in partnership with

20  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2019


THE THE FRONTIER FRONTIER POWER POWER COMPANY COMPANY LOCAL LOCAL PAGES PAGES Continued from page 19

when raising small livestock is to control some of the insect population and to easily distribute the manure, helping the pastures to regenerate. Most of the animals are fenced via solar-powered, movable, electric fencing, making it easy to move the animals. It is with purpose that Hand Hewn Farm processes their own animals. They strive and maintain humane practices with little to no waste of the animal. Andy had been familiar with dressing deer and Doug and Molly raised pigs for many years. Together, they researched old methods of using the whole hog. They now have many years of experience slaughtering, butchering, and curing their own pork and offer workshops to guide and teach other farmers, homesteaders, chefs, and home cooks through the process. They appreciate every part of the hog and use as much as possible, taking “nose-to-tail” to the furthest extent. Their farm is a living, working, growing, educating example of 21st century integrated sustainable agriculture. They hold weekly meetings in the butcher shop, the central location at the farm, to discuss aspects of operating the farm. Each person on the farm has a unique talent that benefits all. Some love to go to

the farmers markets, some keep the finances in order, some are great at managing the animals, and some are knowledgeable at land management, keeping the farm in its best condition while growing a product. All of them together are what make the farm successful. Check their website, www.handhewnfarm.com, under “Events” or their Facebook page for workshop information. The farm holds special dinners on occasion, which are open to the public and feature Hand Hewn Farm’s harvested products along with other locally produced foods. In addition to ordering rabbit, chicken, and pork products from their website, Hand Hewn Farm attends the Canton Farmers Market and Tuscarawas Valley Farmers Market to bring their home-raised meats to customers in the surrounding areas.

In September, Frontier Power Company welcomed Taylor McCullough as a billing representative. She will be assisting the billing supervisor with processing payments, waiting on customers, and general office duties. Taylor is a graduate of Strasburg-Franklin High School and Kent State, Tuscarawas. Taylor and her husband, Tyler, are newlyweds and reside in Coshocton. In her spare time, she enjoys riding four-wheelers, going to concerts, being outdoors, and spending time with her husband and their dogs.

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   21


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES Electricity theft and meter tampering are CRIMES

Co-op Connections Card Because you are a Frontier Power Company member, your Co-op Connections Card provides you with special discounts online and at participating local retailers. Be sure to visit this month’s highlighted business and check out offers on the internet by clicking the Co-op Connections Card on our website at www.frontier-power.com.

Aueer Ace Hardware

10% off YETI coolers. Not good with other offers from vendor or national ads.

Coshocton

Stealing electricity or tampering with a meter is serious business. And it’s against the law! The law defines theft of utility service as a first-degree misdemeanor if the value of the stolen electricity, plus any utility equipment repair, is less than $150. It’s a fourth-degree felony if more than $150. Tampering crimes carry similar penalties. Tampering is defined as “to interfere with, damage, or bypass a utility meter, conduit, or attachment with intent to impede the correct registration of a meter or the proper function of a conduit or attachment.”  Conviction of tampering can mean from six months in jail and a $1,000 fine to up to five years and a $2,500 fine. Meter tampering costs all of us, and it’s downright dangerous. If you witness someone tampering with an electric meter, please contact The Frontier Power Company at 740-622-6755 or 800-624-8050.

Happy Thanksgiving

Veterans Day is Monday, Nov. 11. Frontier Power Company expresses our gratitude to the country’s veterans for their service!

THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY CONTACT 800-624-8050 | 740-622-6755 www.frontier-power.com OFFICE 770 S. Second St. P.O. Box 280 Coshocton, OH 43812 OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Robert E. Wise President

James Buxton II Vice President

David P. Mizer Secretary-Treasurer

Tim Anderson Bill Daugherty Tim Dickerson Ann M. Gano Trustees

CEO/GENERAL MANAGER Steven K. Nelson ATTORNEY Michael D. Manning

22  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019

Frontier Power Company will be closed Thursday, Nov. 28, and Friday, Nov. 29, to observe the Thanksgiving holiday.

PERSONNEL Kimberly Bethel Kyle Cramblett Phil Crowdy Logan Desender Jason Dolick F. Scott Dunn Mark Fabian Michelle Fischer Tyler Frazer Rick Haines Matt Hartley Josh Haumschild Ethan Helmick

Ken Hunter Tim Keirns Kelly Kendall Austin Klein Chad Lecraft Matthew Limburg Francis “J.R.” McCoy Jr. Mike McCoy Taylor McCullough Blake McKee Melvin McVay Chad Miller

Corey Miller Bill Mizer Tanner Shaw Marty Shroyer Bornwell Sianjina Nate Smith James Stewart Shelly Thompson Jonathon Tolliver Robin Totten Andrew Vickers Vickie Warnock


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NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   23


ohio cooperative living’s

2019 Holiday Who needs cheeks like roses or a nose like a cherry? Fill your sleigh with made-in-Ohio gifts that will not only delight your friends and family but also support local artisans, craftspeople, and entrepreneurs.

Heartland Heirloom Woodworks

Erick’s Wood-n-Barrel, Hamilton

Specializing in “handmade gifts with history,” Dave Brooker makes mantle and shelf clocks using beams and other wood he reclaimed from Ohio barns that date to the 1830s. His finely crafted clocks are available in old-growth black cherry or rare American chestnut and have quartz mechanisms and authentic characteristics such as wormholes and saw marks. dave@heartlandheirloomwoodworks.com; www.heartlandheirloomwoodworks.com

Veteran woodworker Erick Combs transforms bourbon barrels from Kentucky into handsome home furnishings with distinctive textures, colors, and patinas. While his bestsellers include barrel ring wine bottle holders and bistro sets featuring a barrel lid table and barrel stave folding chairs, he also constructs barrel stave Christmas trees and card holders for the holidays. erickswoodnbarrel@gmail.com; www.facebook.com/Ericks-Wood-n-Barrel-957957827696860

Kozy Mittens by Vicki, Sullivan

Branch Line Leather Co., Worthington

Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member Vicki Rickett upcycles old wool sweaters into cuteas-a-button mittens that come in every conceivable color and fit everyone from infants to oldsters. Her wide-ranging repertoire includes fleece-lined mittens, fingerless mittens, driving mittens with leather palms, hunting mittens with trigger fingers, specialty mittens for hard-to-fit hands, and smittens, an ingenious mitten made for two that lets sweethearts hold hands while keeping warm. 616-836-7991; www.kozymittens.com

Nothing is more personal than designing a gift for someone, and Branch Line Leather studio excels at customization. Owner Elaine Coifman handcrafts gorgeous leather totes and bags but lets you select the color, style, strap, hardware, and pocket configuration. Also available are leather journals and wallets, Ohio-themed coasters and keychains, clever Mason jar mugs, and unique beer holsters. 614-547-3398; www.branchlineleather.com

24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019


Gift Guide BY DAMAINE VONADA

Get Hosed Apparel, Helena

C McDonough Designs, Rutland

Using retired turnout gear obtained from fire departments, former firefighter Jay Ernsberger and his wife, Staci, design and make everything from toiletry bags to backpacks. Although the couple operates Get Hosed out of their garage, boutiques as far away as Australia and Chile carry customer favorites such as their rugged Chief’s Tote and Jet Setter carry-on bag. 419-552-1006; www.gethosedapparel.com

Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member Carol McDonough is an award-winning ceramist who creates nature-inspired pottery and sculpture at her farm-based studio. Although her leafy Greenman and Greenwoman are her signature garden items, she also does darling wood sprites, colorful owls and turtles, a fanciful frog that doubles as a key hider, and innovative EZ Clean bird feeders that resemble Victorian houses. 740-742-2546; www.cmcddesigns.com

Hemisphere Coffee Roasters, Mechanicsburg

Doscher’s Candy Co., Newtown

For Paul and Grace Kurtz, Hemisphere Coffee Roasters is both a business and a way to help coffeegrowing communities throughout the world. They import beans directly from farmers, and Paul, a certified Coffee Quality Institute grader, oversees roasting at their Mechanicsburg facility. In addition to Hemisphere’s flagship Nicaragua and Thailand coffees, the company makes flavorful Jamaican Me Crazy and Pumpkin Pie Spice. 937-834-3230; www.hemispherecoffeeroasters.com

Started in 1871 by a fellow with the fitting first name Claus, Doscher’s is the nation’s oldest candy cane manufacturer, rolling, kneading, and striping candy canes that still are handmade and cooked in copper kettles according to Claus’ original recipe. Doscher’s peppermint candy canes are a Christmas classic, but the company also makes merry-and-bright-looking canes in assorted fruit flavors. 513-381-8656; www.doscherscandies.com

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


ohio cooperative living’s

2019 Holiday

Hunky Dory Studio, Cincinnati

Peaceful Acres Lavender Farm, Martinsville

Add a warm glow to a long winter’s night with a fused glass night light from the hands of artist Amy Flesher. Pretty as well as practical, the night lights are adorned with images ranging from Alice in Wonderland to zoo animals, and Amy also makes custom night lights based on photos of family members, pets, and even entertainers. 513-288-1477; www.hunkydorystudio.com

In addition to organic and natural ingredients, the bath and body items made by reflexologist Kym Prell contain lavender that’s grown on her family’s farm. Her product line includes Pain Relief Salve, Calming Headache Relief Ointment, Soothing Lavender Natural Body Lotion, and a wonderfully aromatic Lavender Eye Pillow to encourage long winter’s naps. 513-322-2415; www.peacefulacreslavenderfarm.com

Lake Erie Candle Company, Port Clinton

Cliff Original, Columbus

Tamara Buczkowski and her family proudly make 100%-soy-wax candles that are sourced from grownin-the-USA soybeans and sold in recyclable tins and glass jars. Fragrances include year-round favorites such as musky Lake Erie Sunset and fruity Catawba Breeze, but for something that smells a lot like Christmas, get pine-like Christmas at the Lake or snickerdoodle-scented ’Tis the Season. 419-635-7575; www.lakeeriecandle.com

Inspired by his Grandpa Cliff, Jared Friesner founded a company that uses local beeswax, goat’s milk, and other natural ingredients to make beard care, hair care, and skincare products. Its popular Wax Pomade gives hair a healthy shine; vitamin-rich Shave Oil conditions skin; and the Utility Wash Brick is a hand-poured and cured soap splendidly scented with mint, cedar musk, or bay rum. info@clifforiginal.com; www.clifforiginal.com

26   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019


Gift Guide

Joe Schmo’s Kitchen, Austintown

Honey Sweetie Acres Artisan Skincare, Goshen

Amanda and Barry Franks rely on locally sourced ingredients and a shared-use commercial kitchen in Youngstown to produce flavorful sausage mixes, rubs, seasonings, and hot pepper jellies. Their specialty is Donofrio’s Hot Peppers in Oil, an Italian dish that maintains the traditional taste and crisp peppers of the version that Barry’s grandfather — Joseph Donofrio — has always made. 330-506-2146; www.joeschmoskitchen.com

Who knew that Nigerian Dwarf goats have the highest butterfat milk of any breed? Regina and Steve Bauscher knew because they raise Nigerian Dwarfs and turn the milk into premium soaps and lotions in a dedicated facility on their farm. The creamy lotions make great stocking stuffers, and the skinfriendly soaps come in luscious scents like cherry almond and hot buttered rum. 513-313-1110; www.honeysweetieacres.com

The Jam and Jelly Lady, Lebanon

Brownwood Farms, Athens

Looking for a culinary gift par excellence? You can’t go wrong with the jams and preserves that Sonya Staffan makes in the country cannery where she has taught canning classes for years. Her berry-filled Christmas Jam is bliss in a jar, but spread even more joy with a Christmas trio consisting of Christmas Jam, spicy St. Nick’s Kick, and cranberry-cinnamon Winterberry Jam. 513-932-8246; www.jamandjellylady.com

Brownwood Farms prides itself on premium products made with ingredients sourced primarily from Ohio and other Great Lakes states. Tried-and-true favorites include Cherry BBQ Sauce (a flavorful fusion of heat and sweet); mouthwatering blueberry preserves; and a trio of tantalizing mustards — Famous Kream, Kickin’ Kream, and Golden Ale — that also make great dips and glazes. 866-589-6456; www.brownwoodfarms.com

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   27


28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019


NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   29


ALAKAZAM! BY MARGO BARTLETT

W

ho travels for a living? Truck drivers, certainly. Commercial airline pilots. The people who fix office copy machines. Also, magicians. Yes, magicians. Ohio is home to many magicians who take their shows on the road — to fairs, festivals, corporate retreats, birthday parties, business meetings, libraries, college campuses, camps, restaurants — any place they’re invited to perform. These four Ohio magicians share a peek behind the curtain.

Traveling magicians put a little piece of themselves into every show, every bit of magic, that they perform.

David Anthony, Broadview Heights www.danthonymagic.com “As kids, we have a sense of wonder,” says Cleveland-area magician David Anthony. “As adults, we start to lose that wonder.” To renew that wonder, if only for a while, is one reason Anthony performs magic — close magic, stage shows, and comedy hypnosis. Styling himself as an elegant, updated, Rat Pack spin-off (radio station WKYC called him “the Sinatra of magic”), Anthony’s hallmark is casual sophistication, even when he dresses down for college audiences. Developing his own ideas — working up a three-minute trick, perfecting it, and then adding music, choreography, and “rehearsal, rehearsal, rehearsal” — usually requires months, Anthony says. Anthony often gives onstage credit to his parents, who have supported him since he was 12. “I always wanted to be a doctor, but my parents begged me to be a magician,” he jokes to audiences. Anthony performs often at Cleveland’s Alex Theater — his last eight shows there have sold out — as well as at corporate events, banquets, school assemblies, casinos, and summer camps. While he’s proud of Cleveland and its support of the arts, Anthony hopes to become a known name far beyond Cuyahoga County. The ultimate goal? “To be a household name,” Anthony says, and his wife, Alicia, echoes him: “To be a national name.”

30   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019


Carroll Baker, Columbus www.carrollbaker.net As a child, Carroll Baker won a contest at vacation Bible school. The prize: a Susan B. Anthony silver dollar and lunch with Harry Blackstone Jr. — which led to a one-off as a magician’s assistant when Blackstone visited Columbus’ Children’s Hospital, now Nationwide Children’s Hospital. It certainly set things in motion. These days, at Gahanna’s Old Bag of Nails restaurant, Baker moves from table to table, joking, teasing, and performing tricks — though magicians prefer not to talk about doing tricks: “Dogs do tricks,” Baker says. “Magicians perform magic.” “What grade are you in? Seventh? For the first time? Good for you! What’s your favorite subject?” he asks a young girl out with her family. “Oh, boy,” says the middle schooler, pausing to think. Baker pounces. “Oh, boys!” he says. He admits to having “a head full of one-liners,” thanks to 28 years in bars and restaurants. While he jokes, he asks customers to think of an invisible card, then pulls that card from his own very real deck. He has people autograph playing cards that somehow, some way, wind up on the ceiling of the restaurant. As for what 6-year-old Baker did to win an afternoon with Blackstone: He memorized Bible verses — 23 verses to the second-place winner’s four. “I try to have fun with everything I do,” he says.

“Magic Nate” LeGros, Delaware TheMagicNate@gmail.com Here’s the thing about Magic Nate: He’s funny, he’s friendly, and he performs to music without speaking a word. LeGros says a show for deaf students was his first experience doing magic to music — realizing he had to figure out a way to perform without talking. The show was a hit, and Magic Nate made wordless magic his thing. He chooses the music carefully and times even small movements to the notes, to good effect. During a show at the Delaware Country District Library, he incorporates every child and several adults in the audience into his wordless performance. “That’s crazy good!” a child exclaims as Magic Nate makes a series of small balls appear and disappear. He closes the program with his signature act: the balloon swallow. He blows up a long, skinny balloon, the end of which ultimately winds up in his mouth. Slowly and ceremoniously, with much working of his jaws, he consumes the whole thing. The kicker, LeGros points out, is that he doesn’t produce the balloon from behind somebody’s ear or under a chair. It’s G-O-N-E gone. Magic is endlessly variable, LeGros says. “Once you know the basics of magic,” he says, “you can pretty much do anything.”

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   31


Cinde Wolf, Cincinnati magic@amazingcindini.com “The Amazing Cindini” performs on a Sunday evening at Mac’s Pizza Pub in Mason. The moment she pulls out three lengths of rope and asks a child to sprinkle them with magic dust, a crowd gathers around her. Cindini gives each child the chance to sprinkle magic. Female magicians may be somewhat rare, but they do exist, says Wolf. “Being a female magician really helped me get started,” she says. “I get a lot of calls specifically because I am a female.” Cindini picked up her wand 25 years ago. Two of her cousins were professional magicians, and she’d always been intrigued. Her cousins, though, were never willing to teach her the secrets of the trade. “They just wanted me to enjoy it,” she says. She has a different approach: encourage children who are interested in the craft. To that end, she teaches magic at workshops and summer camps. One of her favorite stories has to do with teaching a child a magic trick. The child performed the trick, then said, “But when are we going to do magic?” The magical part of magic isn’t just the trick itself, Cindini says. A good magician hones her act, gives it personality, and makes it her own. “Just because you know the secret and you know the trick doesn’t mean you’re going to be a good performer.” When magic is performed well, she says, “it’s things that change right before your eyes. That’s why I love it so much.”

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32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019

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THE TOLEDO WAR A quirky bit of American history set the stage for one of the nation’s best rivalries. BY CRAIG SPRINGER

hen the Ohio State Buckeyes and Michigan Wolverines take to the field in Michigan Stadium this month, battling for territory up and down the gridiron, they will, in essence, reenact an event that is among the oddest in American history.

W

Lake Erie is only a few miles wide; it includes towns such as Pioneer and Fayette that were claimed by Michigan in its pre-statehood era. “Toledo, Michigan” just doesn’t have a proper sound to it, but that city, too, was claimed by the neighbor up north to be its own.

The so-called Toledo War was a quirky chapter in the story of Ohio that likely laid the groundwork for one of the nation’s most fierce sporting rivalries; the event certainly still lived in the memories of some of the states’ oldest residents by the time the Bucks and Wolverines met on the football field for the first time in 1897.

The land dispute reached a crescendo in March 1835 when the governor of the Michigan Territory called out the militia, approximately 900 armed men. Ohio’s governor, Robert Lucas, did the same, and 600 Ohio militiamen trekked to the Maumee Valley.

The Team Up North holds a 58-51-6 advantage against Ohio State in what is known simply as “The Game.” In the realm of state boundary disputes, however, it’s Ohio 1, Michigan 0. Ohio won the Toledo War, securing several hundred square miles of prime farmland. The long, thin rectangle of territory between Indiana and

The militias stood against one another along the Maumee River, but while the Michigan militia fired a few warning shots that punched musketball holes in the sky, no one was injured. In fact, one could argue there’s been more blood shed by warriors in the 113 games on the gridiron than in the Toledo War — which was, in reality, more political posturing than gun play.

n a g i h c i M , Toledo

o i h O

34   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019

The land dispute originated in poorly understood baseline maps of the day. Stream banks and lake shore waterlines make horrible political boundaries. It’s because moving water is a powerfully corrosive force that moves land masses you might otherwise think to be stable and permanent. A lake point or river bend might be there one season and moved appreciably the next.


The Ohio-Michigan state line was for a time anchored on a line jutting into Lake Erie, which spanned westward to the north-south meridian laid by Israel Ludlow (who had surveyed the Symmes Purchase and laid out the towns of Cincinnati and Dayton many years before) that started near the northern bend in the Ohio River, west of Cincinnati. Where the two imaginary lines intersect would make the tri-corner of Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana. It was the eastern point of the line in Lake Erie that was in dispute. It may seem like a paltry piece of property to exert so much force to hold, especially between neighboring states, but whichever possessed Toledo and more Lake Erie waterfront held an economic advantage. Michigan wanted it. Ohio got it. President Andrew Jackson intervened, and Congress eventually rectified the boundary dispute and settled upon the current state boundary. However, while Michigan may have lost that long strip of checkerboard, loamy soil, it turned out that Wisconsin may have been the biggest loser in the Toledo War. In the compromise that gave that disputed yardage to Ohio, Michigan was granted from the Wisconsin Territory what is today the Upper Peninsula — rich in timber and ore and destinations desired by tourists. Former Ohio resident Craig Springer lives in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, former province of Comanche Indians, and formerly claimed by Spain, Mexico, and Texas.

The border dispute between Ohio and pre-statehood Michigan may well be the basis for what is one of the nation’s best football rivalries, despite the jovial truce proclaimed by governors Woodbridge Ferris of Michigan and Frank Willis of Ohio over state line markers erected in 1915.

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   35


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2019

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

CALENDAR CENTRAL

NOV. 12, DEC. 10 – Inventors Network Meetings, Rev1 Ventures for Columbus, 1275 Kinnear Rd., Columbus, 7 p.m. Educational presentations and discussion about the invention process. Meetings held the 2nd Tuesday of each month. 614-470-0144 or www.inventorscolumbus.com. NOV. 16 – Holiday Artfest, Welcome Center, 205 N. 5th St., Zanesville, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Art for display and sale includes glass, sculpture, paintings, photography, mixed media, collage, wood, felt, fabric, and other handmade art items. 919-621-9732 (Jessica McKee), studiome. artsupplystore@gmail.com (Liz Darby), or www.artcoz.org. NOV. 16 – “UFOS Are Real,” Wagnalls Memorial, 150 E. Columbus St., Lithopolis, 1–3 p.m. Free. A discussion on the UFO phenomenon both past and present, looking at the best evidence and most amazing encounters. Hosted by Cameron Jones. 614-837-4765 or www.wagnalls.org. NOV. 30–DEC. 1 – Scott Antique Markets, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker and Celeste Bldgs., Columbus, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free; $5 parking. 800–1,200 exhibit booths. www.scottantiquemarkets.com. DEC. 4–JAN. 1 – “A Storybook Christmas,” Zanesville and Muskingum Co. locations. Over 100 participating businesses. Drive or walk by to view the decorations or to visit. Nightly light and music show at the courthouse, Sun.–Thur. 6–9 p.m., Fri./Sat. 6–10 p.m. 740-455-8282, 800-743-2303, or www.visitzanesville.com. DEC. 4– JAN. 2 – State Auto’s Christmas Corner, 518 E. Broad St., Columbus. Free. Historic life-sized Nativity display. Official lighting is Dec. 4 at 5:30 p.m., with performance by Columbus Children’s Choir. Hours and schedule of events at www.stateauto.com/Christmas.

WEST VIRGINIA

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Winter Festival of Lights, Oglebay Resort, Wheeling. View 300 acres of twinkling lights over a 6-mile drive. 3D holographic eyewear transforms every

DEC. 5 – Southeastern Ohio Symphony Orchestra Holiday Concert, Secrest Auditorium, 334 Shinnick St., Zanesville, 7 p.m. www.secrestauditorium.com. DEC. 6 – Festival of Trees Auction, Zanesville– Muskingum County Welcome Ctr., 205 N. 5th St., Zanesville, 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Over 200 trees. Join us all day long for networking, bidding, and holiday cheer! “Happy Hour,” 3:30–6 p.m. Listen to WHIZ AM 1240 and call 740-450-1990 to bid. Auction schedule posted at www. zmchamber.com. Call 740-455-8282 for more info. DEC. 6 – Pickerington Holiday Gathering, Columbus and Center Streets, Pickerington, 5–8 p.m. City tree lighting at 7 p.m. Family-friendly activities all around the Olde Village: horse-drawn wagon rides, ice carving, reindeer petting, circulating trolley, cookie decorating, games and stories for kids, mini train rides, strolling carolers, Holiday Gift Market, and more. 614-321-8221 or www.pickeringtonvillage.com. DEC. 6–8 – Christmas at the Palace: “Ring in the Season,” Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Adult $19–$23; child under 13, $12. Join us on a journey to the North Pole where Santa, Mrs. Claus, and a whole host of elves stand ready to greet you. Then travel back in celebration of that Holy Night that changed the lives of humanity. 740-3832101 or www.marionpalace.org. DEC. 6–7 – Lancaster Camp Ground Christmas Walk, 2151 W. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 4–8 p.m. Tiny house and historical buildings, Nativity drama, holiday shopping, Santa’s workshop, and more. Featuring our candlelight dinner with live music: adult $15, child $8. Prepaid reservations requested; cost is higher at the door. 740653-2119 or www.lancastercampground.com. DEC. 7 – Worthington Chorus: “Christmas Around the World,” McConnell Arts Ctr., 777 Evening St., Worthington, 1:30 and 4 p.m. $10, under 13 free with a paying adult. Tickets available online or at the door. www.worthingtonchorus.org, www.facebook.com/ worthingtonchorus, or info@worthingtonchorus.org. DEC. 7, 14 – Christmas Candlelighting Ceremony, Roscoe Village, Main Stage, 600 N. Whitewoman St., Coshocton, 6 p.m. Free. Share in the evening’s tradition of lighting the 30-foot Christmas tree. A Christmas of Yesteryear lantern tour follows at 7 p.m. (admission fee); reservations must be made in advance. 740-622-7644, 800-877-1830, or www.roscoevillage.com.

point of light into a magical display. Per-car donation requested; valid for the entire festival season. 877-4361797 or https://oglebay.com/events/festival-of-lights. NOV. 22–DEC. 28 – Celebration of Lights, Morris Park, Fairmont, Fri.–Sun., 6–10 p.m. Suggested donation of $10 per car. See over 475 holiday light displays in this drive-through tour. 304-366-4550 or www. celebrationoflightswv.com. DEC. 6–7 – Elizabethtown Festival, Moundsville, Fri. 4–8 p.m. ($2), Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. (free). Celebrate the traditions and customs of the past with bread-making, quilt displays, weaving, craft items, demos of historic trades, food, musical entertainment, cooking and baking contests, and more! 304-845-6200 or https://wvpentours. com/events/special-events/elizabethtown-festival.

DEC. 7–8, 14–15 – Dickens of a Christmas, Ohio Village, 800 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 5:30–9 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $12–$16. See Charles Dickens’ festive and enduring vision of Christmas come to life. 800-686-1541 or www.ohiohistory.org. DEC. 7–8 – Santa Visit and Christmas Open House, Nelson T. Gant Home, 1845 W. Main St., Zanesville. 740868-8680 or www.nelsontgantfoundation.org. DEC. 8 – Lancaster Community Band: “Christmas Is Coming,” Faith Memorial Church, 2610 W. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 2 p.m. Free. 740-756-4430. DEC. 14 – Care Train Benefit Concert, Marysville High School Auditorium, 800 Amrine Mill Rd., Marysville, 7:30 p.m. Proceeds go toward the purchase of food vouchers for families, seniors, and disabled adults in Union County who are in need at Christmastime. 937-303-9453 or www.caretrain.org. DEC. 14 – Care Train Live and Online Auction, McAuliffe’s Ace Hardware, 1299 W. Fifth St., Marysville, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Proceeds go toward the purchase of food vouchers for families, seniors, and disabled adults in Union County who are in need at Christmastime. 937303-9453 or www.caretrain.org. DEC. 14 – Annual Holiday Cookie Walk, Fairfield County Genealogical Research Library, 503 Lenwood Dr., Lancaster, 12–4 p.m. Stock up for the holidays. Great variety! 740-653-2573. DEC. 14 – Christmas Open House, Wagnalls Memorial, 150 E. Columbus St., Lithopolis, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Free. Meet Santa and participate in family-friendly holiday activities. 614-837-4765 or www.wagnalls.org. DEC. 14 – Simply Christmas in Lithopolis, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Enjoy a variety of holiday events throughout the village, including the Wagnalls Memorial Open House (see above) and Holly-Day Shop Hop on Columbus Street, featuring specials, door prizes, treats, gazebo lighting, and more. 614-837-4705 or on Facebook (search for Simply Christmas). DEC. 15 – Lisa Rock: “A Carpenters Christmas,” Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 4 p.m. Adult $20–$28, student $12. Based on the music from the famous duo’s holiday albums and Christmas variety shows. A local children’s choir will accompany the band. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy, but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or send an email to events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.

Continued on page 38

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


2019 CALENDAR

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER

NORTHEAST

NOV. 15–16 – Madrigal Feaste, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Wayne County, 3186 Burbank Rd., Wooster. $35/person; multiple tickets $30 each. Doors open Fri. at 6:30 p.m., dinner at 7; Sat. at 5:30 p.m., dinner at 6. Tickets must be ordered in advance. 330-262-9194 or www.uufwc.com. NOV. 15–16 – Season’s Splendor Arts and Crafts Show, Fisher Auditorium, Shisler Conference Ctr., 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. 140 local artists and crafters. 330-682-2926 or www. facebook.com/events/2486634764900230. NOV. 16–DEC. 31 – Holidays at the Mansion: “Old Fashioned Christmas,” The Victorian House Museum, 484 Wooster Rd., Millersburg, Sun.–Thur. 1–4 p.m., Fri./Sat. 1–8 p.m. $10; seniors and veterans/active military, $9; under 12 free. Tour the 28-room mansion, transformed into a holiday wonderland. Open house is Nov. 16, 4–8 p.m.; $5. “Santa and Friend — Celebrate the Season!” is Dec. 7. 330-674-0022 or www. victorianhousemuseum.org. NOV. 16 – Thanksgiving Dinner with Abraham Lincoln, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, 3:30–6 p.m. $20–$45. Thanksgiving feast with President Lincoln and costumed interpreters. 330-666-3711 ext. 1720, halereservations@wrhs.org, or www.wrhs.org/events. NOV. 22 – Window Wonderland, downtown Wooster,

SOUTHEAST

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Dickens Victorian Village, downtown Cambridge. Stroll the streets to view scenes depicting life in 1850s England, featuring life-sized, handmade mannequins wearing real vintage clothing. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. THROUGH JAN. 1 – Guernsey County Courthouse Holiday Light Show, Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. nightly. Four different light and music shows performed each evening. 800-933-5480 or www. dickensvictorianvillage.com. THROUGH JAN. 5 – “Space: A Journey to Our Future,” Bossard Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis. Free. Presented in cooperation with NASA and as seen at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. www.bossardlibrary.org.

Continued from page 37

7 p.m. Free. Horse-drawn carriage rides, decorated storefront windows, Santa descending from the rooftop, hot chocolate, live reindeer, lights, and holiday activities. 330-262-6222 or www.mainstreetwooster.org. NOV. 23 – Christmas Ales and Ciders, Greater Cleveland Aquarium, 2000 Sycamore St., Cleveland, 7–10 p.m. $40. Includes 20 tasting tickets, souvenir tasting glass, and light hors d’oeuvres. $20 non-drinking “designated driver” option also available. 216-862-8803 or www. greaterclevelandaquarium.com. NOV. 29–JAN. 4 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, Historic Fort Steuben, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Free. Over 150 unique, life-size nutcrackers in an outdoor display with lights and music. 740-283-1787 or www.steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. NOV. 29–JAN. 4 – Christmas Wonderland and Gift Shop, Historic Fort Steuben, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, Mon.–Thur. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Christmas gifts, nutcrackers, Nutcracker Village memorabilia, and Christmas décor. 740-283-1787 or www.steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. NOV. 30 – The Handmade Market, Historic Painesville Railroad Museum, 475 Railroad St., Painesville, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Art and craft show, bake sale, and auction. 440-655-4455, PRRMevent@att.net, or www. painesvillerailroadmuseum.org. NOV. 30, DEC. 7 – Christmas in the Alpaca Barn, 16800 Cowley Rd., Grafton, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Enjoy an up-close and personal look at these peaceful creatures. Shop for unique gifts at the Farm Store. 440-477-4300 or www. ourlittleworldalpacas.com. DEC. 6–7, 13–14; DEC. 8, 15 – Candlelight Holiday Tours of Malabar Farm, 4050 Bromfield Rd., Lucas, Fri./ Sat. 5–9 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $5, C. (6–17) $3, under 6 free. Tour Louis Bromfield’s Big House, all decked out for the holidays. Enjoy freshly baked cookies and hot cider. You might even see Santa! 419-892-2784 or www. malabarfarm.org/events.

DEC. 7 – Christmas Down on the Farm, Tis the Season and Schrock’s Amish Farm, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Berlin, noon–5 p.m. Bring the family out for sleigh rides, gingerbread house decorating, Christmas cookies, and more. 330-893-3604 or www.schrocksvillage.com. DEC. 7–8 – Christmas in Zoar, Sat. 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10:30 a.m.–4 p.m. $10, under 13 free. Live music, a juried craft show, horse-drawn wagon rides, museum tours, private home tours, and visits with Belsnickle, Santa, and Kristkind! Candlelight church service at the Historic Zoar Meeting House on Saturday, followed by a tree lighting ceremony in the Historic Zoar Garden. 330-874-3011 or www.historiczoarvillage.com/events. DEC. 8 – Massillon Train and Toy Show, Massillon Knights of Columbus Hall, 988 Cherry Rd. NW, Massillon, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Free parking. Trains of all gauges, parts, running layouts, farm and vintage toys, diecast models, NASCAR items, and more. Food and drink available. 330-262-7488 or http://cjtrains.com/shows.

NOV. 8–DEC. 13 – Gingerbread House Contest and Display, Guernsey County Senior Citizens Ctr., Cambridge. Free. Winners announced on Dec. 13. 740439-6681 or www.guernseysenior.org. NOV. 16 – Gingerbread House Workshop, The Castle, 418 Fourth St., Marietta, 10 a.m.–noon. $20 per kit, $5 helper fee. For ages 8 and up. Reservations required by Nov. 12. 740-373-4180 or http://mariettacastle.org. NOV. 22–24 – Jingle Bell Weekend, 126 W. Second St., Waverly. Luminary parade, quilt and craft shows, beef and noodle dinners, 5K run. www.piketravel.com/JingleBell. NOV. 23 – Grand Holiday Ball, Eagles Club, 1930 E. Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, 7 p.m. $25/single, $45/couple. Groups of 5 or more: $20 per person. 740-435-0400 or 740-432-4550. NOV. 23 – Salt Fork Gospel Jubilee, Salt Fork Lodge and Conference Ctr., 14755 Cadiz Rd., Lore City, 6 p.m. Free. Call 740-432-3787 or 740-439-2751 for room rates. NOV. 23–24 – Holiday Open House, National Museum of Cambridge Glass, 136 S. 9th St., Cambridge, 12–4 p.m. Free. 740-432-4245 or www.cambridgeglass.org. NOV. 25 – Christmas Open House, John and Annie Glenn Historic Site, 72 W. Main St., New Concord, 5:30–8 p.m. Hot chocolate and cookies will be served on the front porch. 740-826-3305 or www.johnglennhome.org. NOV. 29–30 – Salt Fork Holiday Craft Show, Salt Fork Lodge and Conference Ctr., 14755 Cadiz Rd., Lore City, Fri.

10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. 740-439-2751, www.saltforkstateparklodge.com. NOV. 29–30 – Deerassic Fall Craft and Home Show, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge, Fri. 8 a.m.–1 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.–noon. Free. 740-435-3335 or https://deerassic.com. NOV. 30 – Holiday Parade, Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, 5 p.m. The theme is “Candy Canes and Christmas Carols.” 740-439-2238 or www.downtowncambridge.com. NOV. 30–DEC. 22 – Santa Train, Hocking Valley Scenic Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 W. Canal St., Nelsonville, every Sat. and Sun., 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., and every Fri. at 6 p.m. beginning Nov. 30. $16–$21, under 3 free. www. hvsry.org/trainlist/#santa. DEC. 1 – National Road and Zane Grey Museum Holiday Open House, 8850 East Pike, Norwich, 1–4 p.m. 740-872-3143 or www.ohiohistory.org. DEC. 7 – Cookies with Santa/Little Dickens Day, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge, 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Make a $5 donation to Secret Santa or bring a toy in exchange for a dozen sugar cookies that you can decorate on site! 740-435-3335 or www.deerassic.com. DEC. 7 – Logan Santa Parade, Main Street, Logan, 2–7 p.m. Watch for Santa at the end of the parade, and visit with him afterward in Worthington Park. 740-385-6836 or http://explorehockinghills.com.

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DEC. 11 – Lolley the Trolley Lights Tour, 255 Park Ave., Amherst, 6–8 p.m. $5 per person per ride; tickets must be pre-purchased. Hop aboard the trolley and ride through Amherst to see the city’s most beautiful light displays. 440-984-6709 or http://mainstreetamherst.org/trolley. DEC. 14 – Sights and Sounds of Christmas: Nutcracker Magic Parade, downtown Steubenville, noon–1 p.m. ​ Many floats and dancers will feature nutcracker-themed decorations and characters, and some of our life-size Village Nutcrackers will be making special appearances! www.facebook.com/SteubenvilleChristmasParade. DEC. 15 – Christmas Train and Toy Show, Lakeland Community College (AFC) Main Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Adults $6, Family $15, C. (6–12) $3, under 6 free. Active military free. Model trains of all gauges, antique toys, and diecast toys. Operating train layouts in many different scales and dioramas. Free face painting. Meet Santa Claus, 12:30–2 p.m. 216-470-5780, cleveshows@att.net, or www.christmastrainshow.com.


NOV. 30 – Blaze of Lights Festival, N. Main Street, Bluffton, 5–8 p.m. Free. Kick off the Christmas season with a parade, beautiful lights, food and shopping, entertainment, and horse-drawn wagon rides. Parade starts at 5 p.m. 419-369-2985 or www. explorebluffton.com/event. NOV. 30 – Shop Small Saturday, downtown Sidney. Support downtown merchants. Giveaways while supplies last. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. NOV. 30–DEC. 1 – “Crafts for Christmas” Craft Show, Lucas Co. Recreation Ctr., 2901 Key St., Maumee, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission NOV. 6–9 – “Angels in the Attic” Crafts Show, Ross and parking. Our winter spectacular! Fine handmade Historical Ctr., 201 N. Main Ave., Sidney, Wed.–Fri. 10 crafts, gifts, and holiday decorations. Also collecting a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. $2. Handmade crafts by donations for Toys for Tots. 419-842-1925 or www. local artists. Reasonable prices, free refreshments, door toledocraftsmansguild.org. prizes. Gifts to the first 25 shoppers each day. 937-658DEC. 1–26 – Lake of Lights, Saulisbery Park, 13344 St. 1819 (Darla Cabe) or 937-498- 1653 (Historical Ctr.). Rte. 67 W., Kenton, 6–9 p.m. $5 per car. Special events on NOV. 17 – Toledo Doll, Bear, and Toy Show, Lucas Sat. and Sun. evenings. 419-675-2547 or www.facebook. Co. Fgds., Maumee Rec. Ctr., 2901 Key St., Maumee, 10 com/LakeOfLights. a.m.–4 p.m., early admission 8:30 a.m. $6; early bird $20. Free parking. Door prizes, raffles, appraisals, and on-site DEC. 4 – Celtic Woman: The Best of Christmas Tour, Marathon Center for the Performing Arts, 200 W. doll stringing. 734-282-0152, sandy4085@hotmail.com, Main Cross St., Findlay, 7:30 p.m. Starting at $54. The or www.toledodollshow.com. most successful all-female group in Irish history joins NOV. 22–DEC. 31 – Lights Before Christmas, Toledo with the Lima Symphony Orchestra for a memorable Zoo, 2 Hippo Way, Toledo, Sun.–Thur. 3–8 p.m., Fri./Sat. Christmas celebration. 330-595-4650 or www. 3–9 p.m. $16–$19, under 2 free. Over 1 million lights, the marathoncenterarts.org. award-winning Big Tree, and more than 200 illuminated DEC. 6–7 – “Yuletides of Yesteryear” Holiday Lantern animal images. 419-385-5721 or www.toledozoo.org. Tour, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, tours NOV. 29–JAN. 5 – North Pole Express, 12505 Co. Rd. leave every half hour from 4 to 8:30 p.m. Adult $13, child 99, Findlay, Fri./Sat. 5:30–9:30 p.m., Sun. 5:30–8:30 $7, free for 5 and under. Reservations required. 800-590p.m. Adult $4, child $3. Hop on board our quarter-scale 9755 or www.saudervillage.org. locomotive for a trip through a winter wonderland of DEC. 7 – Findlay Altrusa Holiday Vendor and Craft sparkling lights and festive decorations. See operating model trains and hundreds of decorated trees, plus a visit Fair, Findlay Moose Lodge, 1028 W. Main Cross, Findlay, with Santa and Mrs. Claus (on select days). 419-423-2995 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. 25 vendors indoors, under one roof! Lunch and 50/50 available. Proceeds benefit or www.nworrp.org.

NORTHWEST

SOUTHWEST

NOV. 21–24 – West Milton Holiday Open House, Thur. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 12–4 p.m. Visit the Shoppes of West Milton and enter to win daily door prizes. www.homegrowngreat.com/event/westmilton-holiday-open-house. NOV. 22–24 – Christkindlmarkt, Germania Park, 3529 West Kemper Rd., Cincinnati, Fri. 5–10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $3, under 13 free. The oldest and most authentic German Christmas market in the region. http://germaniasociety.com/ christkindlmarkt. NOV. 23 – Hometown Holiday Horse Parade, S. Broadway, Greenville, 7 p.m. The lighted parade includes horse-drawn carriages, wagons, riders, and buggies. 937548-4998 or www.downtowngreenville.org. NOV. 24 – Farm Toy Show, Champaign Co. Fgds., 384 Park Ave., Urbana, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $2, under 12 free. 125

tables. Door prizes. Parts dealer will be present. Contact Lowell Morningstar at 937-826-4201. NOV. 29–DEC. 24 – Christmas in the Greenhouse, Milford Garden Center (in the Milford Shopping Center), 1025 Lila Ave., Milford. Free. The greenhouse turns into a Christmas store, with cut and live trees for sale, crafts and goods made by local vendors, wreath-making classes, a large train display, and trains for purchase. Santa visits on Saturdays! Check website or call for updated hours. 513-248-4531 or www.grantsgreenhouses.com. NOV. 29 – Hometown Holiday and Grand Illumination, downtown Troy. Visits with Santa in the Santa House, carriage rides, holiday music, hot cocoa and refreshments, shopping at our local merchants, and the lighting of the Christmas tree. www.troymainstreet.org. NOV. 30 – Hometown HoliDazzle Illuminated Parade and Festival, downtown Wilmington, 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Parade begins at 7 p.m. www.hometownholidazzle.com. DEC. 6 – Christmas on the Green, downtown Piqua, 6–9 p.m. Community caroling, horse-drawn carriage rides, children’s activities, and live entertainment. 937-773-9355 or www.mainstreetpiqua.com. DEC. 6 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Butler County Bluegrass Association, 5113 Huston Rd., Collinsville, 7 p.m. Free. An evening of lively bluegrass music with lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Food available on site. 513-410-3625 or www.fotmc.com.

Findlay Altrusa community projects. For info, email FindlayAltrusa@yahoo.com. DEC. 7 – Christmas of Yesteryear and Winter Wonderland Parade, downtown Sidney. See our downtown all dressed up for the holidays! Enjoy shopping, horse and carriage rides, and a wonderful evening parade, complete with Santa and Mrs. Claus. The Reason for the Season lighting ceremony begins at 6:30 p.m., with the parade at 7:30 p.m. 937-658-6945 or www. sidneyalive.org. DEC. 7–8, 14–15 – Christmas at the Logan County History Center, 521 E. Columbus Ave., Bellefontaine, 1–4 p.m. Free; donations accepted. The 1906 neoclassical Orr Mansion is beautifully decorated for the holidays, and the Museum’s hallways are lined with approx. 35 decorated Christmas trees. Musical entertainment and kids’ crafts. 937-593-7557, www.loganhistory.org, or www.facebook. com/logancountyhistorycenter. DEC. 12 – Celtic Angels Christmas, 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $29–$49. A celebration of Christmas in Ireland, featuring vocal and instrumental performances of seasonal and Irish favorites along with spectacular worldclass champion Irish dancing. 419-222-5701 or www. limasymphony.com. DEC. 12–15, 19–22 – Winter Wonderland Light Display, Sandusky Co. Fgds., 901 Rawson Ave., Fremont. Drive-through Thur./Sun. 6–8 p.m.; walk-through Fri./ Sat. 6–9 p.m. $1, under 12 free. Craft show, games, horse rides, train rides, music, popcorn, cookies, hot chocolate, and Santa! Food items accepted for donation to food pantry. 419-332-5604 or www.sanduskycountyfair.com. DEC. 14 – Christmas Carousel Ride-A-Thon, MerryGo-Round Museum, 301 Jackson St., Sandusky, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $1 carousel rides. Kids’ crafts, visits from Santa, and much more! 419-626-6111 or www. merrygoroundmuseum.org.

DEC. 6–8 – Christmas in the Village, downtown Waynesville. Shopping, dining, horse-drawn carriage rides, carolers and choirs, costumed characters, a heated entertainment tent, and daily visits from Santa Claus. 513897-8855 or www.waynesvilleohio.com. DEC. 7 – Lebanon Horse-Drawn Carriage Parade and Festival, downtown Lebanon. Parades at 1 and 7 p.m. Festival 10 a.m.–8 p.m. www.lebanonchamber.org/ carriage-parade. DEC. 7 – Piqua Holiday Parade, downtown Piqua, 2 p.m. Kids can visit with Santa after the parade in the lobby of the Fort Piqua Plaza. www.mainstreetpiqua.com. DEC. 7 – Oxford Holiday Festival, Oxford Community Arts Ctr., 10 S. College Ave., Oxford, 9 a.m.–9 p.m. Free. Events take place all through uptown Oxford. Visits with Santa, carriage rides, live reindeer. www.gettothebc.com. DEC. 7 – Christmas Tour of Homes, Williamsburg, 12–5 p.m. $10. Self-guided tour of six homes and the Harmony Hill Historic Museum, highlighting the history of Clermont County and Major General William Lytle, the “Father of Clermont County.” Light refreshments and snacks and raffle drawings at each home. Purchase tickets at Rustic Rose or Wrinkles in Time in Williamsburg, from William Garden Club members, or by calling 513-305-0607. DEC. 14–15 – Dayton Christkindlmarkt, 1400 E. Fifth St., Dayton, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 12–4 p.m. Celebrate the centuries-old Christmas market tradition that originated in Germany. 937-223-9013 or www.daytongermanclub.org.

NOVEMBER 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

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1. Wilma J. Woltz (my grandmother), her dog Jaz, and my son Maddix David. I’m thankful for all the memories my son has been able to make with my best friend. Kristin Hinkle South Central Power Company member

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2. Our son (Sgt. Bishop Chamberlin) in the Ohio National Guard being promoted to Sergeant by his father (Spc. Jason Chamberlin), who was in the same unit 20 years ago. Jason Chamberlin South Central Power Company member

3. I am thankful for nature’s beauty in the land of the free. Susan Green Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member

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4. Thankful for good health, grandkids, and family! Precancer surgery and one year later. Nana, Lane, Luke, Lily, and Owen. Life is full of blessings during the ugliness of a disease. Kathy DeHass Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative member

5. Thankful for the faith of a child. On this Sunday morning, our little Mason, who isn’t actually reading yet, sure is convincing with his nose in the Bible. Tabatha Mack Adams Rural Electric Cooperative member

Send us your picture! For February, send “Coming Up Roses” by Nov. 15; for March, send “Tip of the Hat” by Dec. 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/ memberinteractive — and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in the photos.

40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2019

6.  My family at Thanksgiving — so much to be thankful for! Margo Rowen Consolidated Cooperative member

7. Harvest display in Berlin, Ohio. Rachel Blevins Consolidated Cooperative member


WHO

Two Ohio electric cooperative nominees have been named winners in a national contest sponsored by Touchstone Energy Cooperatives, the nationwide alliance of more than 730 consumer-owned electric cooperatives. Touchstone Energy sponsors the #WhoPowersYou contest to honor co-op members for demonstrating their concern for their communities, which is one of Touchstone Energy’s core values. The awards come with cash prizes to help the winners continue their valuable work.

POWERS

YOU 3rd Ronnie Kahle Sr. of Kalida, Ohio, is a member of Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative.

1st

Midge and Bob Custer of Woodstock, Ohio, are members of Pioneer Electric Cooperative.

ohioec.org/purpose


Profile for Ohio Cooperative Living

Ohio Cooperative Living - November 2019 - Frontier  

Ohio Cooperative Living - November 2019 - Frontier