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The Frontier Power Company

Official publication | www.frontier-power.com

JANUARY MAY 2018

SPECIAL ISSUE:

Being Healthy:

keeping fit in body and mind

Also inside Bringing power to remote Guatemala

Drive-thru wildlife watching

Member interactive: Scenic Ohio


Giving back to the COMMUNITY

Living our values

At your electric cooperative, concern for community is one of the seven cooperative principles that guide us all year long. We’re here to provide safe, affordable, reliable, and clean electricity, but we also work hard to take care of our neighbors. After all, this is our home too.

ohioec.org

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018

INSIDE SPECIAL REPORT:

PROJECT OHIO 4

TURNING ON THE LIGHTS A team of volunteers from Ohio electric cooperatives brings light and more to two remote Guatemalan villages.

SPECIAL ISSUE: HEALTH 24 MANY FACES OF MENTAL HEALTH A Logan county couple crusades to help us take care of the brain the same way we take care of the body.

32 DIY PROBIOTICS We offer some tasty ways to keep the gut healthy, which keeps the body running smoothly.

34 WALKING FOR THE HEALTH OF IT Step by step, keeping ambulatory has lots of healthful benefits.

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 1


UP FRONT

EXERCISING YOUR PRIVILEGE TO VOTE

O

n Tuesday, May 8, Ohio opens the polls for registered voters to exercise the privilege of free selection in party primaries; to make your voice heard on statewide issues; and to cast your ballot regarding local matters. In 2016, rural America played a historic part in our national election — 500,000 more rural voters went to the polls than in 2012. This year, we hope to accelerate that momentum by encouraging each of you to join 42 million electric cooperative members across the nation to remind our elected officials that rural issues matter. In May, Ohioans have the opportunity to decide: • State Issue 1 — an amendment to the Ohio Constitution that will determine a process for redistricting Ohio’s congressional regions. • Candidates for each party for the state offices of governor, attorney general, treasurer, secretary of state, and auditor. • Candidates for two open seats on the Ohio Supreme Court. • Republican and Democratic candidates for an open seat in the United States Senate. • Candidates for each seat in the U.S. House of Representatives • Local issues and state representatives Please do your part by reviewing the issues, familiarizing yourself with the candidates, and preparing to represent yourself, your family, your community, and your cooperative in this year’s election process.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

We encourage each of you to join 42 million other electric cooperative members across the nation to remind our elected officials that rural issues matter.


MAY 2018 • Volume 60, No. 8

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Samantha Kuhn Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Brian Albright, Brian E. Barr, Megan Carlotta, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Pat Keegan, Jeffry Konczal, Catherine Murray, Craig Springer, Damaine Vonada, and Diane Yoakam. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. It is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.40 to $6.72 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 8 OHIO ICON WEST SIDE MARKET: The Cleveland Institution houses nearly

100 vendors and draws 12 million visitors per year.

10 CO-OP PEOPLE SHARP FAMILY DAIRY: A switch to organic proved just what was

needed to revive this old family farm.

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE DRIVE-THRU BIRDING: The Ottawa wildlife refuge opens its gates

once a year for the public to come in and take a look.

15 GOOD EATS MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH: These delightful dishes for Mom are a

step up from the ordinary pancakes and scrambled eggs.

19 LOCAL PAGES News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO A CHANGE AT THE CARDINAL PLANT: The state’s electric

cooperative network has taken over operations at its power plant on the Ohio River.

38 CALENDAR WHAT’S HAPPENING: May events and other things to do.

The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE SCENIC OHIO: Members share stunning photographic vistas that they’ve captured around the state.

IN THIS ISSUE

Cleveland (p.8) Stoutsville (p.10) Oak Harbor (p.12) Brilliant (p.23) Logan County (p.24)

Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 3


TURNING ON THE Co-ops’ humanitarian trip provides electricity to two remote Guatemalan villages for the first time

A team of 17 linemen from Ohio electric cooperatives traveled to Guatemala in March to bring electricity to two remote villages there.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY BRIAN E. BARR

I

n a way, the scene was reminiscent of 1930s and ’40s rural America: two out-of-the-way villages getting electricity for the first time. This past March, however, the setting was a remote area of Central America, where a team of 17 linemen from Ohio electric cooperatives traveled to the villages of Las Tortugas and San Jorge, in northern Guatemala, on a humanitarian mission to supply electricity for the first time to the small villages.

The linemen, who hailed from 11 of Ohio’s co-ops, worked through sweltering heat on a 17-day journey to build lines, hang transformers, and wire homes for service

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018

alongside linemen from Empressa Municipal Rural de Electricidad (EMRE), the local electric distribution company, and several students from a local electrical trade school. About 20 men from the villages also assisted nearly every day. “The scope of the project was large and the adversity our guys faced on the project was unbelievable, but they overcame the odds and got it done,” says Dwight Miller, director of safety and loss control at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide association that provides services to the 25 electric cooperatives in the state. Miller was the on-site manager of the project. “The team was simply amazing. Seeing the lights come on in those two villages allowed us to experience the same thing our

L


E

LIGHTS co-ops felt when they turned lights on in the 1930s and 1940s in rural America. It was incredible to witness.” At the end of the project, 142 homes and businesses lit up for the first time in an emotional ceremony that was followed by celebratory fireworks. “These villagers have almost nothing, yet they’re so thankful for what little they do have,” Miller says. “They’ve desired electricity for many years, so to be able to have such an impact on these 900 lives, as well as future generations, by offering such a small fraction of the things we’ve been so blessed with is humbling.” Donations totaling more than $20,000, mostly from co-op employees and trustees from around Ohio, were used to stimulate a better quality of life — contributions paid for water filtration systems for homes where electricity was installed, so residents Continued on Page 6

Jobs ranged from setting poles and installing distribution line (left), to placing switches and bulbs in the homes. The group also delivered shoes, computer equipment, and water purification systems to the villagers, who were friendly and hospitable.

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

5


Members of the Project Ohio team reported hot temperatures, which made for some difficult working conditions. They also found warm hospitality, and had help from employees of the local distribution company and from local trade-school students. Continued from Page 5

will no longer have to boil water before consuming it; provided shoes for nearly 500 children in the villages; and bought laptop computers, projectors, printers, and other supplies for two schools. Most of the purchases were made in nearby Ixcan in an effort to make an even more positive impact on the local economy.

Over the last 50 years, programs designed by NRECA International have provided more than 126 million people in 43 countries with access to safe, affordable, and reliable electricity. Still, the International Energy Agency says more than 3 billion people lack proper access to electricity. The work continues. BRIAN E. BARR is assistant director of communications and marketing at Lorain-Medina Rural Electric and North Central Electric cooperatives and was the documentarian on the Project Ohio team.

Project Ohio Volunteers worked approximately 2,431 hours to install: 90 poles (set before our arrival) 70 anchors 6-25KVA transformers (19.9KV / 120/240V) 1.2 miles of 1/0 ACSR conductor for distribution overhead primary mains 3.8 miles of No.2 overhead triplex conductor for distribution secondary mains 3.3 miles of No.6 overhead duplex conductor for 120V services 4 miles of 12/2 Romex conductor for residences and schools 117 masts installed on meter poles 117 meters installed on meter poles

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  MAY 2018


MAY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   7


OHIO ICON

Location: Lorain Avenue and West 25th Street in Cleveland’s historic Ohio City neighborhood.

WEST SIDE MARKET Cleveland BY DAMAINE VONADA

Provenance: The last of three public markets that catered to Cleveland’s immigrant communities in the early 1900s, the West Side Market was one of several municipal improvement projects initiated by erstwhile Cleveland mayor and political reformer Tom Johnson. Prominent local architects W. Dominick Benes and Benjamin Hubbell, who also designed the magnificent Cleveland Museum of Art, planned the West Side Market to be both beautiful and practical. A combination of Neoclassical and Beaux Arts architecture, the market opened in 1912 and featured a 44-foot vaulted ceiling; a 137foot tower with a clock made by the Seth Thomas company; durable building materials such as brick, granite, and glazed tile; and natural light and ventilation. Although the 106-yearold building and its systems have been renovated and updated periodically, the market’s signature structural and design elements remain largely unchanged.

Significance: The West Side Market is not only Cleveland’s oldest continuously operated, municipally owned market, but also a beloved local landmark that serves as the cornerstone of Ohio City’s business district. In 1973, the West Side Market was added to the National Register of Historic Places, and in 2008, the American Planning Association declared it one of its 10 Great Public Places in America.

The West Side Market, 1979 W. 25th St., Cleveland, OH 44113. For more information about the Market’s hours, vendors, group tours, or parking, call 216-664-3387 or visit www.westsidemarket.org.

Currently: Because of its history, architecture, and focus on food, the West Side Market attracts an average of 1.2 million visitors from around the world every year. Cleveland is famous for its wide assortment of ethnic groups, and the Market has some 100 vendors whose products reflect the city’s diverse cultural and culinary heritage. Among its cornucopia of local flavors are Hungarian sausages at Dohar/ Lovaszy Meats; pita bread at Judy’s Oasis; ravioli, lasagna, and manicotti at Ohio City Pasta; stuffed cabbage and potato pancakes at Pierogi Palace; sticky rice in a banana leaf wrapper at Kim Se Cambodian Cuisine; and liquid nitrogen ice creams at Piccadilly Artisan. “People are fascinated with the building itself and all the different kinds of cuisines that it offers,” says Felicia Hall, the West Side Market’s manager. It’s a little-known fact that: The West Side Market’s oldest vendor is Kauffman Poultry, which has been a purveyor of chicken, turkey, rabbit, and game birds since 1932.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018

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MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 9

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CO-OP PEOPLE

the dairy

LIFE Switch to organic keeps family farm in business

STORY AND PHOTOS BY BRIAN ALBRIGHT (KYLE SHARP PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS KICK/FARM AND DAIRY, SALEM, OHIO)

D

airy farming is not an easy life — the hours are long, milk prices are volatile, and smaller farms are rapidly disappearing as the industry consolidates. Kyle Sharp, the owner of Stoutsville-based Sharp Family Dairy, knows this all too well. His day starts at 4 a.m., and it’s often past 8 at night by the time he’s finished milking his herd of just over 70 cows. The farm isn’t just his job, but part of a long family tradition. The Sharp family has been farming in Fairfield County since the 1840s, and Kyle’s grandfather first bought the dairy back in 1947. Until a few years ago, however, the dairy was in jeopardy of shutting down for good. With its aging facilities, there was no way the farm could remain economically viable without costly updates or a significant expansion. That was when Kyle and his father, the late Don Sharp, decided to convert to an organic operation. While the move required some operational changes, it provided the financial boost required to make the needed updates while still staying small.

Journal, and taught agriculture and writing at Ohio State and Ohio Christian University. Kyle’s oldest brother, Scott Sharp, teaches agriculture at their alma mater, Amanda-Clearcreek High School, and another brother, Adam, is the executive vice president of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation. Scott and Adam also run the nondairy part of the Sharp family farm, where they grow corn, soybeans, hay, wheat, and other crops. Sharp first learned about the ins and outs of organic dairy farming as a reporter. “I found out there wasn’t a whole lot different than what we were already doing,” he says. “We already did pasture rotation, and our cows were out on grass, which was the biggest part of it.”

Back to the basics According to Kyle, the hardest part was just getting his father to sign off on going organic. “It was a change, and for older farm guys, change isn’t always a good thing,” Sharp says. “But for the most part, we didn’t have to change much of anything.”

Familiar voice

In that regard, the old-school approach already in use at the dairy was an inherent advantage. The organic certification requires that the cows be kept on pasture; be fed grasses and organic feed; and not be exposed to herbicides, pesticides, or antibiotics. Since the Sharps grow most of their own feed, the only major change was switching some of the crops over to organic farming.

If you’re at all involved in agriculture in central Ohio, you are likely familiar with the Sharps. Before he took over the dairy, Kyle was an editor at Ohio’s Country

The farm, which is served by Lancaster-based South Central Power Company, was certified organic in 2006, and markets its milk through Wisconsin-based Organic Valley.

“If we hadn’t made the switch to organic, I don’t think there’s any way we could have kept the dairy going,” Sharp says. “We didn’t have good facilities, and almost nothing was functioning well. It’s a struggle even with the higher organic milk price.”

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  MAY 2018


Economics were the biggest benefit to the farm. Organic milk prices are substantially higher — and less volatile. While milk production is lower, overhead is also lower. The cows, he says, also tend to produce longer because they have a better diet, aren’t over-milked, and get more exercise. The switch to organic also helped bring about some needed improvements. Kyle returned fulltime to the dairy when his father’s health began to fail (Don Sharp died in 2014), and he upgraded and expanded the milking parlor, barns, and other equipment, which cut milking times in half.

Looking forward The Sharps have also made other eco-friendly improvements. Because the dairy farm sits on a hill, there was the potential for manure runoff into the local water table. With help from the Natural Resources Conservation Service District, the family created a waterway to redirect the runoff in a way that safely deposits nutrients and sediment into the ground. In 2013, the farm received the Ohio Environmental Stewardship Award. With a more efficient and profitable dairy, Sharp has been able to use some of his free time to further continue his family’s service legacy. In 2017 he became the third generation of Sharps elected to the local school board. He says being organic will help ensure the survival of the dairy in the future. “We get a better and more stable price for milk, and that allowed us to continue to be the size we are,” Sharp says. “We can stay small and still be financially viable.”

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 11


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge and neighboring parks offer spectacular opportunities for wildlife-watching this spring STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

S

ome of the best birding in all of North America takes place in the marshes, seasonal wetlands, and swamp forests bordering western Lake Erie. At the heart of that region sits Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge (ONWR), home to everything from huge trumpeter swans with 8-foot wingspans to tiny, colorful wood warblers weighing mere ounces. Located just off State Route 2 east of Toledo, most of the federal refuge is off-limits to visitors for much of the year. For a few short weeks each spring, however, Ottawa opens its gates to give nature lovers an up-close, behindthe-scenes look at the refuge and its teeming wildlife.

The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge boasts a boardwalk to guide visitors through its natural areas.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018

“Visitors drive their own vehicle at their own pace,” says Rebecca Lewis, visitor services specialist at the refuge, “and are free to stop wherever and whenever they like. You are also welcome to get out of your car at the designated parking areas to watch or photograph wildlife. Best of all, it’s free.”


My wife and I made the Ottawa driving tour last spring for the first time — it won’t be our last — and invited our oldest grandson along, a 13-year-old who is absolutely nuts about birds and birding. We took our time, driving slowly and stopping frequently, taking four hours to make the 7-mile drive on a perfect spring day. Among the three of us, we identified about 50 of the nearly 300 bird species listed as frequent visitors to the refuge. In addition, we saw muskrats feeding and turtles and snakes sunning, and heard bullfrogs jug-o-rumming. Adjoining ONWR is state-owned Magee Marsh Wildlife Area; the two areas combine to preserve some 7,000 acres of prime Ohio coastal wetlands. The highlight of Magee during spring is the mile-long boardwalk through a wet woodlands, where migrating warblers gather to rest and feed before continuing their journey north across Lake Erie to Canada. If you visit Magee Marsh in May, be prepared for a little friendly “combat birding,” as on most days there can be nearly as many birders as birds. The human visitors flock from all over North America, the parking lot sporting vehicle license plates from as far away as California, Oregon, Arizona, Florida, and the New England states. But having so many birders concentrated in a relatively small area doesn’t seem to bother the birds, and can even help with identification: Not sure what kind of bird you’re seeing through your binoculars? Just ask the guy standing beside you. Using that approach, we were able to add several species of warblers to our list when we went. The highlight of the morning was a bald eagle flying in and perching on an overhead tree limb, seemingly aloof to all the human activity below.

Those wanting an Ottawa/Magee overnight excursion could consider staying at nearby Maumee Bay State Park, where a full-service lodge, cabins, and camping are available. There’s yet another birding location nearby at the extensive boardwalk at the park along the shore of Maumee Bay. The open-house drive at ONWR coincides with “The Biggest Week in American Birding” (www.bwiab.com), held annually in early May — a celebration of all things birds and birding in northwest Ohio — and International Migratory Bird Day, scheduled for Saturday, May 12. This spring, the Ottawa driving tour will be open a total of 20 days: May 4–20 and over the three-day Memorial Day weekend, May 26–28. In addition, the refuge will be open every weekend in June. If it’s your first time visiting the refuge, stop by the visitor center for a free map, driving directions, and other information — and don’t forget your camera, binoculars, and a bird field guide or two. You’ll definitely have many opportunities to put them all to good use. W.H. “CHIP” GROSS is outdoors editor for Ohio Cooperative Living. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, 14000 W. St. Rte. 2, Oak Harbor, OH 43449. www.fws.gov/midwest/ottawa. Magee Marsh Wildlife Area, 13229 W. St. Rte. 2, Oak Harbor, OH 43449. http:// wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/mageemarsh. Maumee Bay State Park, 1400 State Park Rd., Oregon, Ohio 43616. http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/maumeebay.

For two weeks a year, the Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge opens its gates for visitors to get an inside look at the refuge and its birds and other wildlife.

MAY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


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GOOD EATS

Mother’s Day BRUNCH

Take a few steps up from plain old pancakes or scrambled eggs when you bring Mom her breakfast in bed this year; these delightful dishes will make her day!

FRIED EGG AND BLACK BEAN CAKES Prep: 5 minutes; Cook: 25 minutes; Servings: 4 1 clove garlic 5 eggs 1⁄4 cup plain breadcrumbs 3 green onions, roots removed 1 tsp. cumin 1⁄2 cup fresh cilantro 1⁄2 tsp. salt 1 14.5-oz. can black beans, rinsed and drained 1⁄2 tsp. pepper 1 jalapeño, seeded 1 Tbsp. olive oil and chopped 2 large tomatoes, 1 cup corn sliced Place one of the eggs, green onions and cilantro (reserving some for garnish), black beans, jalapeño, corn, garlic, breadcrumbs, cumin, salt, and pepper into a food processor and pulse until ingredients are chopped and incorporated, leaving some black beans whole. Form 8 patties. In skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add black bean cakes, leaving an inch of space around each, and cover with lid. Fry 3 to 4 minutes on each side or until cooked through and lightly crispy on the outside. Set aside. In a clean skillet, fry 4 eggs using nonstick cooking spray. Place 2 black bean cakes and 2 slices of tomato on serving plates and top with 1 fried egg. Garnish with chopped green onion or cilantro. Serve immediately. Per serving: 577 calories; 15 g fat (3 g saturated fat); 20 g fiber; 82 g total carbs; 32 g protein.

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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EGG CHORIZO SCRAMBLE Prep: 10 minutes; Cook: 20 minutes; Servings: 4 8 eggs 4 cups kale, torn into pieces 6 tsp. water 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1⁄2 cup shredded cheddar 1 clove garlic, chopped 1⁄4 lb. ground chorizo sausage In a large skillet over medium-high heat, sauté kale and garlic in olive oil until kale is wilted and a little crispy on the edges. Set kale aside. Over medium heat, fry chorizo in skillet until browned and cooked through, 6 to 8 minutes. Remove sausage from skillet, leaving excess fat in skillet. In a bowl, beat eggs and water until yolks and whites are fully incorporated. Add eggs to skillet with fat and cook on low, stirring until eggs are set. Mix in kale, top with cheddar, and cook until hot. Serve immediately. Per serving: 343 calories; 24 g fat (8 g saturated fat); 1 g fiber; 9 g total carbs; 23 g protein.

HAM AND SWISS BISCUIT SLIDERS WITH PINEAPPLE JAM Prep: 25 minutes; Cook: 90 minutes; Servings: 12 sliders 1⁄4 tsp. baking soda 2 cups fresh pineapple 1 Tbsp. aluminum-free baking powder 1 cup sugar 11⁄2 Tbsp. poppy seeds 1⁄4 cup lime juice 1 tsp. salt 12 thin slices deli ham 6 Tbsp. unsalted butter, very cold, 6 slices Swiss cheese cut into thin slices 2 cups unbleached all1 cup milk plus 1 Tbsp. white purpose flour, plus more vinegar OR 1 cup buttermilk for handling dough Place pineapple in food processor and pulse until finely grated. Transfer pineapple to small saucepan with lid and cook over medium-low heat until pineapple is soft, about 30 minutes. Add sugar and lime juice; stir to combine. Uncover and cook until thickened, about 60 minutes. Set aside to cool. If making buttermilk, combine milk and white vinegar. Let sit 5 minutes until milk begins to curdle. If curdling doesn’t begin, add more vinegar. Set aside. Combine dry ingredients in large bowl. With your hands, cut butter chunks into dry ingredients until it resembles coarse meal. Handle dough as little as possible from this point on. Add buttermilk and mix until just combined. Dough should be wet. Turn dough onto floured surface. With your hands, lightly pat dough until about 1⁄2 inch thick. Fold dough over 5 times, gently pressing down to 1 inch thick. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Use a 2-inch round cutter (or an overturned drinking glass) to cut dough into rounds. Knead scraps together and make a few more. Place biscuits on ungreased cookie sheet, 1 inch apart. Bake 10 to 12 minutes, or until light golden brown. Let biscuits cool. Turn oven to broil. Cut biscuits in half and place open-faced on cookie sheet. Top with ham and Swiss. Place biscuits in oven for 2 to 3 minutes or until cheese melts. Remove from oven. Spread jam on one side, place biscuit tops onto bottoms, and serve. Per serving: 322 calories; 11 g fat (6 g saturated fat); 1 g fiber; 41 g total carbs; 16 g protein.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018


GRILLED CHOCOLATE BANANA BREAD Prep: 15 minutes; Cook: 1 hour; Servings: 8 1 Tbsp. unsweetened 1⁄2 cup butter, softened cocoa powder 1 cup white sugar 1⁄2 cup light sour cream 1 egg 1⁄2 cup semisweet 2 very ripe bananas, mashed chocolate chips 1 tsp. vanilla extract 3 Tbsp. spreadable butter 1⁄2 cup all-purpose flour 3 fresh bananas, sliced 1 tsp. baking soda 1⁄2 cup whipped cream Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease one 9-by-5inch loaf pan. Cream together butter, sugar, and egg. Mix in ripe bananas and vanilla extract. Sift in flour, baking soda, and cocoa; mix well. Fold in sour cream and chocolate chips until sour cream is incorporated and no white ingredients are visible. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake for 60 minutes, or until toothpick inserted into center of loaf comes out clean. Allow bread to cool. Slice loaf into 8 pieces. Lightly butter one side of each slice and grill in a skillet over medium high until lightly toasted. Top with sliced fresh bananas and whipped cream. Serve. Per serving: 503 calories; 23 g fat (14 g saturated fat); 4 g fiber; 74 g total carbs; 5.5 g protein.

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 17


EFFICIENCY EXPERT

cool PLAY IT

Tips to help you stay comfortable this summer

A

s summer approaches, it’s time to think about ways to make your home more comfortable when the sun beats down. Some of the solutions are low-cost, while others require a bigger investment, but in the end, you can be more comfortable and have lower energy bills.

The first step is to reduce your home’s solar gains — the heat energy it collects from the sun. Since most solar gains originate through your home’s windows, awnings are an effective solution. They can reduce solar heat gain by as much as 65 percent on south-facing windows and 77 percent on west-facing windows. Two areas that can be major sources of heat gain are skylights and attics. Reflective film or specially designed window coverings are potential solutions for skylights. Attics can become extremely hot and radiate heat through the ceiling into your living space. Abundant venting through the roof, gable, or eaves is one solution, but you also need adequate attic insulation. Another important step is to seal air leaks around windows, doors, plumbing, and wiring penetrations to keep warm air out and cool air in. Excess heat can also be generated inside your home — and at your expense. Here’s a quick list of simple steps you can take to avoid the problem:

• Make it a habit to turn off lights and TVs in rooms that aren’t in use. • Replace incandescent lightbulbs with LEDs. • Unplug devices you aren’t using, like chargers, computers, monitors, and consumer electronics. Many of these use power even when they’re not in use, which generates heat.

18

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018

• Maintain appliances for peak efficiency. For example, clean your refrigerator coils. • Lower your water heater temperature to no higher than 120 degrees and your refrigerator to no lower than 38 degrees. • Minimize use of your oven, and don’t run the dishwasher or washing machine until they are full.

Now that you’ve worked on keeping heat out of your home and minimizing the waste heat generated inside, let’s look at how to make the inside air cooler. That starts by assessing your air-conditioning (AC) system. If you have central AC, make sure it’s working efficiently. Replace the filters regularly, and check to see if your supply registers are open. If you do not have central AC, window units can be an efficient solution if they are Energy Star-certified and only used to cool part of the home, part of the time. The least expensive way to cool yourself is air movement. A ceiling fan or portable fan can make a room feel up to 10 degrees cooler. If you live in an area where the night air is cool and not too humid, you can exchange your hot air for cool outdoor air by opening the windows and turning on your kitchen and bath fans. Or you can place a fan in one window and open another window at the opposite end of the house to allow the cooler night air inside. The permanent (but more expensive) option is to install a whole-house fan. Remember, there are several ways to keep cool and increase comfort. I hope these tips will make your summer more enjoyable than the last. PAT KEEGAN writes for www.collaborativeefficiency.com.


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

ANNUAL MEETING

Notice of

Frontier Power and Frontier Propane will be holding their annual meetings on Friday, July 27, 2018, at River View High School. The election will be conducted by mail again this year. There will be NO voting at the annual meeting. Watch for more details in coming issues of Ohio Cooperative Living.

FRONTIER POWER COMPANY 2018 SCHOLARSHIP and YOUTH TOUR WINNERS Frontier Power Company scholarship winners

Youth Tour winners to Washington, D.C.

First-place winners: Allie McCoy, River View HS, daughter of Kevin and Amy McCoy

Emma Anderson, River View HS, daughter of Tim and Beth Anderson

Christian Stark, Indian Valley HS, son of Duke and Polly Stark

Andrew Martin, River View HS, son of Steve and Jackie Martin

Second-place winners: Amber Mourer, Ridgewood HS, daughter of Charles and Amy Mourer Caden Sauerbrey, Tri-Valley HS, son of Wade and Letitia Sauerbrey

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

19


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES SAFETY

Use caution near co-op equipment As you find yourself spending more time outdoors this summer, Frontier Power reminds you to exercise caution near electrical equipment maintained by the co-op.

Substations and power lines carry extremely high voltages, and if contact is accidentally made, the results can be dangerous — or even deadly. Never climb trees near power lines. If you make contact with a tree that is touching a power line, your body could become the path of electricity from the line to the ground. If you encounter an animal trapped in a tree near power lines or inside a substation, do not attempt to remove it — no matter how furry and cute it is! Call Frontier Power or 911 for assistance. These days, we are seeing more remote-controlled toys, like drones and airplanes, which can be a great way to have fun outdoors. But these gadgets also bring new safety concerns. Remote-controlled toys should never be flown near power lines, substations, or other electrical equipment. Remember these safety tips when flying a remotecontrolled toy: • Keep a safe distance from electrical equipment when you fly. If contact is accidentally made with a power line or a transformer inside a substation, many members of your community could be left without electricity. • Keep the remote-controlled toy in sight at all times. • Avoid flying if weather conditions are unfavorable. High winds could cause you to lose control of the remote-controlled toy. Here at Frontier Power, your safety is important to us. We hope you will share the message of electrical safety so that you and others can enjoy plenty of summer days filled with fun! Visit www.frontier-power.com for more electrical safety tips.

20   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  MAY 2018


BILL PAY

SIGN UP FOR BUDGET BILLING

Plan your monthly electric payments to help your family budget If you would like to pay the same amount each month year-round, we encourage you to call Frontier Power and ask to participate in our Budget Billing Plan. This plan is available to all members who have had our service in their name for at least one year. The Budget Billing Plan averages your yearly consumption so that your payments are evenly distributed over an 11-month period. Budget payments must be paid by the tenth of the month to avoid being removed from the program. May’s billing is budget “catch-up” — any credit or balance due on your account for the budget year ending May 2018 is reflected on this month’s bill. Credit balances are indicated by a minus (-) preceding the gross and net amount due on your bill statement. All other balances are displayed as the net amount due. Payments are to be

made in full by June 10, 2018, in order to remain a budget customer for the next year. Current budget customers who anticipate a change in their electric use are encouraged to contact Frontier Power so your budget may be adjusted accordingly (and a larger than normal catch-up bill can be avoided). If you have questions or are interested in the program, please contact our office before June 1 at 740-622-6755 or 800-624-8050. Budget Billing is also available to members with Frontier Propane. If you’re interested in budget billing for your propane bill, please contact Michelle or Shelly in the propane department before June 1 at 740-622-6755 or 800-624-8050. Accounts must be in good standing to be eligible for the propane budget.

Co-op

Connections Card

The office will be closed on

Monday, May 28, in observance of Memorial Day. We remember all those who made the ultimate sacrifice serving our country.

Because you are a Frontier Power cooperative member, your Co-op Connections® Card provides you with special discounts online and at participating local retailers. Be sure to visit this month’s highlighted business and check out offers on the internet by clicking the Co-op Connections Card icon on our website, www.frontier-power.com.

5% off retail products (stocked)

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MAY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   21


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival

Just a reminder that our

Customer Appreciation Day is May 4 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Please plan to stop by for our annual cookout. Attendance gifts will be given to everyone. Don’t forget to sign up for special door prizes.

June 7–9, 2018 The 37th Annual Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival, sponsored by Frontier Power, will be held June 7 to 9 at the Coshocton County Fairgrounds. Events and activities include musical entertainment, carnival rides, craft booths, fireworks, food vendors, a night glow, hot air balloon launches (weather permitting), and other family-oriented activities. For more information on this free event, visit www. visitcoshocton.com/hot-air-balloonfestival or see the Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival Facebook page.

TRUST

740-622-6755 800-624-8050 www.frontier-power.com

Frontier Power has been your trusted source of safe, affordable, and reliable electricity since 1936. When other organizations come calling to offer energy advice or “savings programs,” remember that you can’t always be certain they represent your best interest. However, Frontier Power answers directly to YOU — not to investors or regulatory agencies. As a member of an electric cooperative, YOU own the company. YOU elect the co-op leaders to make decisions and offer programs that are in YOUR best interest. Contact us to learn more about energy savings and renewable energy programs available to you — on the farm, at the office, or at home.

THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Robert Wise President

CONTACT 800-624-8050 | 740-622-6755 www.frontier-power.com OFFICE 770 S. Second St. P.O. Box 280 Coshocton, OH 43812 OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Larry Blair Vice President

David P. Mizer Secretary-Treasurer

Tim Anderson Jim Buxton Bill Daugherty Ann Gano-McCleary Trustees

CEO/GENERAL MANAGER Steven K. Nelson ATTORNEY Michael D. Manning

22

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018

PERSONNEL Dakota Albertson Kyle Cramblett Phil Crowdy Jason Dolick F. Scott Dunn Mark Fabian Michelle Fischer Tyler Frazer Rick Haines Robert Haines Josh Haumschild Ken Hunter Tim Keirns Kelly Kendall Lucas Landaker Chad Lecraft Matthew Limburg Mark Lindsey

Francis “J.R.” McCoy Jr. Mike McCoy Blake McKee Melvin McVay Chad Miller Corey Miller Bill Mizer Marty Shroyer Bornwell Sianjina Nate Smith Gene Swigert Shelly Thompson Jonathon Tolliver Robin Totten Andrew Vickers Vickie Warnock Jim Williams Sybil Wright


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

OEC takes on new responsibilities at Cardinal Buckeye Power — the power generation arm of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives — has taken on operational responsibilities at its flagship power plant. Electric cooperatives in the state jointly own generating units 2 and 3 at Cardinal Power Plant in Brilliant, about 7 miles south of Steubenville. In a partnership stemming from the plant’s beginning in the late 1960s, American Electric Power, which still owns unit 1, had been the plant’s operator until a new agreement took effect in March. “We’re excited for the opportunity this transition is giving us,” says Pat O’Loughlin, president and CEO of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. “While our consumermembers should not see any difference, we’ll be able to identify opportunities for cost savings and improving processes in the daily operation of the plant.”

Consolidated brings fiber internet to members The newly named Consolidated Cooperative, headquartered in Mt. Gilead, recently launched a fiber-to-the-home project to improve its members’ lives by adding reliable internet service to the umbrella of services the co-op currently offers.

FIRST CUSTOMERS TO RECEIVE SERVICE IN MAY

We are excited to announce that construction of Consolidated’s fiber-optic network will begin this month, with the first customers receiving service in May. Select residents located in western Delaware County will be the first residential locations to receive access to Consolidated Fiber internet in what we refer to as the pilot area. The fiber-optic network Consolidated Cooperative builds will introduce speeds up to 1 gigabit per second, which is 100 times faster than the national average of 10 megabits per second. Expansion of the fiber network will continue for multiple years, eventually expanding throughout Consolidated’s electric service area. “We are eager to introduce fiber internet to the communities we serve,” said Phil Caskey, President/CEO of Consolidated Cooperative.

“The continued prosperity of our members and communities hinges on them having the same access to high-speed internet that people in America’s largest cities enjoy. Consolidated is excited to improve our members’ lives by offering internet service with the reliability and excellence they’ve come to expect from us.” The pilot area was chosen because of its size, the level of interest shown by the people who live there, and the lack of internet service availability in that area. Future expansion areas will be determined in part by interest among residents. For more information or to sign up to indicate interest in bringing fiber internet to your address, visit fiber.consolidated.coop.

fiber.consolidated.coop

Construction of Consolidated’s fiber-optic network began in April, and the first customers in the Delaware County pilot area will receive service this month. The network will expand over multiple years until fully deployed throughout the co-op’s electric service area.

WEC helps match students with career resources Students interested in pursuing careers in engineering gathered at the second annual Discover Engineering Day at Marietta’s Washington State Community College, sponsored by Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) and Burgess and Niple Inc. Organized by Building Bridges to Careers, a Marietta-based partnership that connects education with real-life experiences, the event allowed students to explore job shadowing and internship opportunities. WEC educated students from local high schools about engineering positions available within the electric utility industry, as well as about the cooperative difference.

MS Welding receives economic development grant from Midwest Electric MS Welding is building a 20,000-square-foot facility in the Marion Township Industrial Park, aided by an economic development grant from The Midwest Electric Revolving Loan Fund (RLF). The company’s primary business is metal fabrication of swine gates for the livestock industry, with customers mostly local to the Auglaize-Mercer county area. MS Welding currently employs 15 at its Maria Stein location, and will add 5 jobs with this expansion. The Midwest Electric RLF was established in 2005 with a $300,000 grant from USDA Rural Development. RLF has provided $1.53 million in loans to 11 local projects, supporting 139 area jobs.

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 23


health issue

First aid for the mind

24

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018


Couple’s tragedy spurs action to help others become aware of mental health issues and find ways anyone can help BY MEGAN CARLOTTA PHOTOS BY JEFFRY KONCZAL

T

here’s an idealistic nature about rural and smalltown Ohio. People know their neighbors, they support their community, and they take care of each other when families face tough times. On its surface, it’s like Mayberry — but better, because it’s real. With all of the wonderful aspects of small-town life in Ohio, however, there are challenges, and right now, one of the toughest of those is a growing struggle with mental health problems. “Our rural communities are experiencing a crisis with drug addiction, suicide, and many other issues associated with mental health,” says Steve Terrill, founder of Mindful Minds, a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) volunteer organization dedicated to advocating for public mental health education. A 2015 report from the National Council of Behavioral Health said that more than half a million Ohio residents suffer from serious mental illness, while a study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration says that less than half of those who need treatment receive it — whether because no one recognizes the problem, or they simply can’t find services. It’s part of the reason that the suicide rate in rural America has increased by 40 percent in the last 20 years. “Rural folks have always been known for both their independence and for looking out for one another,” Terrill says. “Unfortunately, few of us have had any kind of basic mental health education to teach us both how to take care of our own minds and help others in need. Very few people are able to recognize when or why something might be wrong — or have any idea of what to do about it.” Terrill and his wife, Debbie, know firsthand the potentially devastating effects of that lack of knowledge. They had returned to their childhood stomping grounds near Bellefontaine in Logan County when their son Kevin, on active duty in the U.S. Army, took his own life on base at Fort Polk, Louisiana.

“Very few people are able to recognize when or why something might be wrong — or have any idea of what to do about it.” “Life is real, and there are times where you cannot just look away and hope and pray that it won’t happen to any family or friends,” Terrill says. He believes that many tragedies could be prevented if more people were knowledgeable about mental health and the factors that can lead to addiction or suicide. The couple took a course called Mental Health First Aid, and decided it was imperative they bring it to their community. Continued on Page 26

MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 25


Continued from Page 25

That was when they founded Mindful Minds, to bring the training into the community. Mental Health First Aid teaches about types of mental issues, how to watch for warning signs, and when and how to seek help. It focuses on prevention and providing early intervention instead of waiting for a crisis.

“Life is real, and there are times where you cannot just look away and hope and pray that it won’t happen to any family or friends.” “What we are doing is similar to the first aid everyone knows about, where you are the first contact, the first bridge before professional care can take over,” Debbie Terrill says. “Instead of CPR, though, you might learn to help someone get through a panic attack. It’s not as though people don’t want to help; they simply don’t know how, and that’s where Mental Health First Aid comes in.” Mindful Minds offers the Mental Health First Aid course on a regular basis, and also makes it available to local organizations and businesses. To contact Steve and Debbie Terrill, call 919-623-0952, e-mail MindfulMindsHealth@gmail.com, or visit www.mindful-minds.net.

Chances are, someone you know suffers from some sort of mental health issue, which could range from drug or alcohol addiction to anxiety or depression. On the following pages, a few brave folks share their stories in an effort to show that these issues are more common than you might think, and that you never know just who might need a little help.

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018


Jayne Houchin Sister’s schizophrenia is an issue for the entire family

“I don’t exactly remember why or how she got that bad. But one day Dad called me and my younger brother, and he asked us to come over — that he and Mom needed help dealing with my sister and her baby. So we got there, and that’s when my sister was barricaded in the back bedroom. She was hearing voices and usually when she hears voices, to her it’s the devil. And the devil tells her to do things she knows she shouldn’t do. So she’s fighting with the devil while at the same time trying to do what the devil tells her to do because that’s the only way she knows how to get rid of him. Dad wanted one of us to get in the room — our whole thinking process was, ‘We gotta get the baby out of there before she does something to the baby,’ because you don’t know what the devil is going to have her do. She turned her back for just a second and my brother scooped up the baby, and I was waiting on the other side of the door. She was madder than a hornet. She wouldn’t come out of the room. But we had to get through the night; there was nowhere to call for help. I think Dad tried, but we knew the answer — you have to wait until morning. We had to wait, and it was a long night.”

Tony Furst Parent of a child with bipolar disorder searches for answers

“My wife’s sister’s kids came to live with us. As the little one got older, we started seeing some issues, and the doctors said she’s got some ADHD issues. Then we started noticing other issues — some days she was a happy-go-lucky sixth-grader, and other days she was dark, depressed, and moody. One night she came to us and said, ‘I’m hearing voices. I don’t know what they’re saying, it sounds like they’re in Spanish.’ We started reaching out trying to find mental health professionals who could deal with kids. What we found was that even in Columbus, getting in to see mental health professionals for kids almost took an act of Congress. It took us four months. We finally figured out she suffers from depression. Then, as we were going down that pathway, she came to us, still having the voices in her head, and the problem now was she was starting to understand what the voices were saying, and they were telling her to hurt herself. The doctor has now told us that she is bipolar. We’ll keep trying.” MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

27


Rob Underwood School administrator, looks for ways to address issues he sees every day

“My wife is a guidance counselor at another local school and she’d say, ‘I dealt with this student issue today,’ or ‘I have this student who is really struggling,’ and I’m coming back to her, ‘Well, we have this similar problem.’ We’re in different districts and we are facing the same issues. I know out in the rural areas sometimes it may be tough to find resources, especially as a farmer, where you are almost like an independent business owner — you don’t have that network of people to support you. As an educator and a community member, I always ask: Are we doing enough to maintain our students’ mental well-being? I also hope our staff can be reflective and think about their own personal mental health. We’re teaching our staff Mental Health First Aid. Hopefully, we can set an example for our community.”

Warren Taylor Farmer, electric cooperative trustee reflects on his past

“I come from a family where my dad never worried much about anything his entire life, and I think I took after my father. But I have had times where the stress, the emotions in my life ... well, there was a time when I would’ve been quite willing to commit suicide. For people to think that I could even say those words, they must wonder, ‘What did he have, that he would think about that?’ That’s a long story, but I just really didn’t care to live. I got over it, but it went on about a year. At the time, we had a very excellent minister, and he was fantastic on counseling; and yes, he did help me a great deal. I look back on it — I was a mess.”

28

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018


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MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 31


health issue

GIVE YOUR

GUT A TUNEUP BY DIANE YOAKAM, RD, LD

T

he gastrointestinal tract is one of the more important parts of your body to keep healthy, yet it’s one of the easiest to ignore.

A condition known as “leaky gut,” where the lining of the small intestine becomes damaged, is becoming more common. The condition allows undigested food particles and bacteria to “leak” into other areas of the body, causing symptoms ranging from digestive upset and nutritional deficiencies to anxiety and autoimmune conditions. While there are many areas that need to be addressed to combat leaky gut, probiotics are a must in healing the gut and improving overall health. Probiotic supplements are widely available, but a DIY approach can give you a variety of probiotic strains in a delicious alternative to swallowing a pill. Sauerkraut is one of the easiest probiotic foods to make, as it requires minimal prep time and does most of the work on its own. The trick is in weighing ingredients so that the proportion of salt to cabbage is exact. As the salt pulls water out of the cabbage, good bacteria grow and thrive while the bad bacteria die off. In 1 to 4 weeks, the kraut is ready to eat or can be

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A close relative to yogurt, kefir is a tangy, creamy probiotic beverage made from milk and kefir grains, which are live, active cultures consisting of yeast and bacteria. Within 24 hours of combining them, the result is comparable to drinkable yogurt with a bit of “fizz.”

$

Kombucha is a nondairy fermented beverage made from water, tea, sugar, and SCOBY (an acronym for “symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast”). When placed in a jar to ferment for 7 to 10 days, the SCOBY metabolizes most of the sugar to produce gas, resulting in a fermented, slightly sweet, sparkling probiotic beverage. For a variety of flavors, fruit juices can be added to basic kombucha.

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Making probiotic foods and beverages need not be intimidating. After all, most of the work is taking place without any real effort. The main requirement is patience until it’s time to take that first taste.

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At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

4/3/18 3:38 PM


HEALTH ISSUE

Walking BY CRAIG SPRINGER

You descend from a long line of walkers. Walking was a way of life for virtually all of your ancestors. Other forms of conveyance, from bicycles to jet propulsion, are, in the scheme of things, quite new to us. This primal form of getting from one place to another is an elixir: it burns some calories, improves your heart’s health — and takes the wrinkle out of your brow. Henry David Thoreau, the man who sheltered himself along a pond in Massachusetts and pondered his own existence, suggested the mental health benefits to the exercise, writing, “Me thinks that the moment my legs begin to move, my thoughts begin to flow.” Of course, there are measurable and meaningful benefits to an exercise that most any able-bodied person can do, says Edward S. Potkanowicz, associate professor of exercise physiology at Ohio Northern University.

“Walking just 30 minutes per day, five days a week, can cut your risk for heart disease in half,” Potkanowicz says. “Walking will also reduce a person’s stress and cholesterol levels as well as their blood pressure.” It also lowers one’s risk of stroke, Type 2 diabetes, dementia, and bone loss; reduces body fat and strengthens muscle; and even improves coordination. A brisk walk is an aerobic endeavor, after all, and it isn’t done just by the legs. This is quite interesting: your entire body is engaged; from your neck to your ankles, your body works in rhythm. Your joints lubricate themselves. Muscles in your calves, belly, buttocks, and abdomen squeeze and push as you walk, expanding and contracting, helping push along the oxygen-rich blood in spite of gravity’s pull. Best of all, you can do the exercise with great freedom, anytime and anywhere, even literally right out your front door. You can enliven your walks with birdsong and scenery, take in local trails at a state park or nature area, and breathe air that’s never been breathed before. Walking is not the perfect exercise; it is, after all, rather (ahem) pedestrian. It won’t strengthen your torso, and don’t expect to lose weight strictly on a walking regimen. But it will help you to stay conditioned for other endeavors in work and in pleasure. All it takes is a pair of shoes and the gumption to go. CRAIG SPRINGER’s ancestors walked over their Muskingum County farm before heading west circa 1840. He now walks in Santa Fe County, New Mexico.

34

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MAY 2018

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MAY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 37


MAY 2018 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST

entertainment, kids’ activities, and demos. 419-436-1457 or http:// cloudshows.biz/event-calendar. MAY 6 – Fort Recovery State Museum 2018 Opening, 1 Fort Site St., Fort Recovery. Free and open to the public. Featured presentations are “Battleground Wayside Exhibits and Traveling Interactive Story Maps” by archaeologist Chris Thompson (12–3 p.m.), “Area Church Histories and Artifacts” (1–2:45 p.m.), “The Land of the Cross-Tipped Churches” by historian and Old World researcher Mary Ann Olding (3–4 p.m.) 419-375-4384, www.fortrecoverymuseum.com, or on Facebook.

MAY 19 – Antique Car Gathering, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Nearly 100 antique cars on display in the Historic Village. 800-590-9755 or https://saudervillage.org. MAY 19–20 – The Fantastic Tiffin Flea Market, Seneca Co. Fgds., 100 Hopewell Ave., Tiffin, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free admission. Up to 400 dealers per show. Merchandise includes antiques, collectibles, furniture, crafts, produce, tools, glass, and more. 419-447-9613 or www.tiffinfleamarket.com.

MAY 20 – 60th Shelby County Coin Club Coin Show, VFW Post 4239, 2841 Wapakoneta Ave., Sidney, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. 937-339-5437. MAY 6 – Stryker Sportsman Club 3-D Archery Shoot, 02638 Co. MAY 24 – Bike Week Dice Run: Bag the Moon, 109 W. Rd. 20, Bryan (1/2 mile north of St. Rte. 6 on the right), 9 a.m.–noon. Lakeshore Dr., Kelleys Island. $10 per person. Take a ferry ride to $10, under 18 free. 419-636-4987. Kelleys Island, where registration begins at 10 a.m. Tour the island, MAY 12 – Lilac Festival, downtown Defiance. Celebrate the making various stops to roll the dice. Drawing at 5 p.m. 419-746MAY 1–25 – “Jacob Riis: How the Other Half Lives,” Rutherofficial flower of Defiance with the community’s largest arts and 2360 or www.kelleysislandchamber.com. ford B. Hayes Museum, Spiegel Grove, Fremont, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Spe- crafts fair. Free lilacs to the first 500 attendees. 5K race, parade, MAY 24–28 – Main Street Port Clinton Walleye Festival, cial exhibition featuring Riis’s life-size photographs and personal live music, arts and craft vendors, food vendors, and kids’ activiartifacts. A social reformer and early muckraker in the tradition of ties. 419-782-0739 or http://visitdefianceohio.com/annual-events. Waterworks Park, Port Clinton. One of Ohio’s premier outdoor weekend celebrations. Free live concerts, Kids’ Fishing Derby, paUpton Sinclair and Ida Tarbell, Riis documented the day-to-day rade, educational programs and activities, 5K run & walk, carnival lives of New York City’s many poor immigrants and laborers at the MAY 12 – Spring on the Farm, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Exhibits on Ohio rural life of 100 years rides, and more than 130 vendors. 419-734-5503, www.facebook. turn of the 20th century. 419-332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org. ago. 800-590-9755 or https://saudervillage.org. com/WalleyeFest, or www.walleyefestival.com. MAY 4–13 – Biggest Week in American Birding, Maumee Bay MAY 18–19 – Hamler Country Fest, St. Rte. 109, Hamler. Fri. $15, MAY 25–27 – Buckeye Farm Antiques Tractor and Engines Lodge and Conference Ctr., 1750 State Park Rd., Oregon. Free. Sat. $20. Two exciting days of great country music and fun, feaShow, Shelby Co. Fgds., 655 S. Highland Ave, Sidney. International Enjoy the spectacular birding in northwest Ohio, the “Warbler turing Jerrod Niemann, Bucky Covington, Nashville Crush, Brent tractors and engines, truck and tractor pulls, large flea market, and Capital of the World.” Activities include guided walks through Lowry, and more, plus cornhole tournament and autographed free entertainment. Car, truck, and motorcycle show on Sun. 10 Magee Marsh, bird ID workshops, birding by canoe, American memorabilia auction. Open seating under roof; bring lawn chairs. a.m.–4 p.m. 937-596-6812 or www.buckeyefarmantiques.com. Woodcock field trips, keynote presentations, a Birder’s Marketplace, and evening socials with free food and music. 419-898-4070 Primitive on-site camping available. 419-748-7459, hamlercountry- MAY 26 – Opening of the Great Sidney Farmers Market, 109 fest@gmail.com, or www.hamlercountryfest.com. or www.biggestweekinamericanbirding.com. S. Ohio Ave., Sidney, 8 a.m.–noon. On the court square in downMAY 5–6 – “Springtime in Ohio” Art and Craft Show, Hancock MAY 19 – CMP Monthly Air Rifle and Air Pistol Matches, 1000 town Sidney. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. Lawrence Dr., Port Clinton. Free admission and parking. CompeCo. Fgds., 1017 E. Sandusky St., Findlay, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. MAY 28 – Salute the Troops, Perry’s Victory and International Peace titions include junior air rifle, air rifle standing, air pistol, and a 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $5 for unlimited entry both days; under 12 free. Memorial, 93 Delaware Ave., Put-in-Bay, 11 a.m. Free. Pay tribute to all beginner’s match. Rental equipment is available. 419-635-2141 ext. Around 280 quality exhibitors. Crafts and art displays, food, servicemen and women who have lost their lives in conflicts through707, lsherman@thecmp.org, or www.thecmp.org. out U.S. history. 419-285-2184 or www.nps.gov/pevi/index.htm.

NORTHEAST

MAY 4–6, 11–13 – Annie Get Your Gun, Geauga Lyric Theater Guild, 101 Water St., Chardon, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $18, Stds./Srs. $15, C. (12 and under) $10. 440-286-2255 or www. geaugatheater.org. MAY 5 – Fairlawn Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, ​​ St. George’s Fellowship Ctr., 3204 Ridgewood Rd., Fairlawn, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Artists and crafters selling original handmade items. 440-227-8794 or www.avantgardeshows.com. MAY 5 – PSA Train Collectors Association, Lake Erie Chapter, Spring Train Show, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, under 12 free. Free parking. All-gauge show with over 150 tables. Watch trains run on operating layouts. New and old trains to buy, sell, or trade, plus parts, repair manuals, price guides, and more. 440-845-2700 or tcalakeerie@earthlink.net.

APRIL 24–MAY 24 – National Whiskey Painting Exhibition and Art Sale, Cuyahoga Valley Art Ctr., 2131 Front St., Cuyahoga Falls. Public reception in main gallery on May 11, 4:30–7:30 p.m. A whiskey painting is painted with watercolor by dipping your brush in some form of alcoholic spirits. Sale prices generally start at $75. 330-928-8092 or http://cvartcenter.org/exhibits. APRIL 28–MAY 12 – Annual Spring Art Show and Sale, Eastern Gateway Community College, 4000 Sunset Blvd, Steubenville. 740-264-2959. MAY 4–5 – Dandelion May Fest, Breitenbach Wine Cellars, 5934 Old Rte. 39 NW, Dover, Fri. noon–7 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–7 p.m. Dandelion food tastings, dandelion sangria, dandelion picking contest, entertainment. 330-343-3603 or www.breitenbachwine. com/events/dandelion-festival.

WEST VIRGINIA

MAY 5–6 – Model Train Days, Painesville Railroad Museum, 475 Railroad St., Painesville, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $5, C. (3–12) $3, Family $7. See operating layouts in ‘N’, ‘HO’, and ‘S’ scale, and ‘O’ and ‘G’ gauge. Model train flea market on grounds. 440-417-6746 (Len) or www.painesvillerailroadmuseum.org. MAY 5–6 – Ohio Civil War Show and Artillery Show, Richland Co. Fgds., 750 N Home Rd., Mansfield, Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $7, under 12 free. Seven buildings with 750 tables, military items, relics, and memorabilia to buy, sell, or trade. Six-gun battery firing demos, 30-gun artillery show, Civil War hospital scenario and battleground encampments, and fife and drum corp presentation. www.ohiocivilwarshow.com. MAY 6 – Doll Show and Sale, presented by the Chagrin Valley & Strongsville Doll Association, Federated Family Life Ctr.,16349 Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Falls, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $4; under 13, $1. Early bird admission 9 a.m., $10. Free parking. Handicap acces-

MAY 5 – Engines and Wheels Festival, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. Free. Learn about old-fashioned engines and turn-of-the-century industrial, oil field, and farm machinery. Live demos, craft vendors, food, and more. 304-628-3587 or or www.northbendsp.com. MAY 5–6 – Antique Gas and Engine Show, West Virginia State Farm Museum, 458 Fairgrounds Rd., Point Pleasant, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Exhibits of a working sawmill, displays of small engines and antique tractors, over 30 historic buildings, and numerous other exhibits. Tractor pull Sat. 1 p.m. Church services Sun. 9 a.m.. with gospel sing at 1:30 p.m. 304-675-5737. MAY 11–12 – 24th Annual Bluegrass Festival, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. Bluegrass musicians from around the state and the region, plus local artisans. 304-643-2931, e-mail Kenneth.T.Zebo@wv.gov, or www. northbendsp.com.

38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  MAY 2018

sible. 440-283-5839 (Eileen Green), phdofdolls@yahoo.com, or www.dollshowusa.com. MAY 6 – Harrison Career Center FFA Tractor, Truck, Engine, and Car Show, Harrison Co. Fgds., 550 Grant St., Cadiz, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Donation for admission. Food, music, and family fun. 330-440-5578, HCCFFA@yahoo.com. MAY 12 – German Maifest, Historic Zoar Village, 198 Main St., Zoar, 10 a.m – 5 p.m. Free. German food and drink, games, make-and-take art projects, and spring tours of the village. 800262-6195 or www.historiczoarvillage.com. MAY 19 – “200 Years of Fashion Tea,” Historical Society of Mt. Pleasant, Elizabeth House Tea Room, 479 Union St., Mt. Pleasant, 1 p.m. $9.50; under 12, $5. Register at 740-633-1809. MAY 19 – Doll Show and Sale, presented by the Heirloom Doll Society, Williamsfield Community Ctr., 5920 U.S. Rte. 322, Williamsfield, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $4; under 13, $2. Handicap accessible. Featuring antique, vintage, modern, reproduction, and art dolls; also bears, toys, miniatures, accessories, parts and supplies, and more. Door prizes, ID and valuation, re-stringing. 440-344-7747, or circlemranch25@gmail.com. MAY 26–27 – Great Lakes Fiber Show, Wayne Co. Fgds., Wooster. Free admission. Workshops on spinning and weaving, competitions, wool show and sale, knitting and crocheting items. Also Angora rabbits, a sheep show, kids’ activities. 740686-2172 or www.greatlakesfibershow.com. MAY 28 – Opening of Fort Steuben Summer Concert Series, Berkman Amphitheater, Fort Steuben Park, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, 6:30–9 p.m. Bring a blanket and picnic basket and enjoy a free concert at this site overlooking the Ohio River. 740-283-1787 or www.oldfortsteuben.com.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

and over 40 musicians’ workshops. Headliner concert Fri. 7 p.m.: Tom Rush ($20). 614-470-3963 or www.cfms-inc.org.

CENTRAL

MAY 5–6, 12–13, 19–20, 26–27 – Rock Mill Weekend, Stebelton Park at Rock Mill, 1429 Rockmill Place NW, Lancaster, Sat./Sun. 12–4 p.m. Free. Tour the restored 1824 gristmill, walk on the iconic Rock Mill Covered Bridge, and enjoy Hocking River Falls. 740-681-7249 or www.fairfieldcountyparks.org. MAY 10–12 – Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens Spring Plant Sale and Auction Fundraiser, 2201 Fred Taylor Dr., Columbus, Thur. 5:30–8:30 p.m., Fri. 8 a.m.–7 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.–3 p.m. Free admission and parking. Perennials, annuals, vegetables, herbs, trees, shrubs, and more for sale, plus local artwork. http://chadwickarboretum.osu.edu.

THROUGH AUG. 26 – “A Very Private Collection of Vintage Glass, 1875–1920,” Ohio Glass Museum’s Gallery, 124 W. Main St., Lancaster, Tues.–Sun. 1–4 p.m. and by appointment. Seldom seen, quite rare pieces of glass. 740-687-0101 or www. ohioglassmuseum.org. MAY 4 – One Night in Memphis, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 8 p.m. $20–$30. This show takes audiences back to a time when four of the biggest names in early rock ’n’ roll —Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Johnny Cash — gathered for an impromptu jam session. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. MAY 5–6 – Central Ohio Folk Festival, Highbanks Metro Park, 9466 Columbus Pike, Lewis Center. Continuous concerts

SOUTHEAST

MAY 11–13 – Community Days Festival, Fairfield Co. Fgds., 157 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster, Fri. 4–10 p.m., Sat. noon–10:30 p.m., Sun. noon–6 p.m. Free. Rides, food, games, craft show, car show, and entertainment. www.communitydaysfestival.org.

MAY 4–6 – “Spring into Spring” Arts and Crafts Fair, Gallery 32 Antiques, 2586 Burnt Cabin Rd., Seaman, 9 a.m. till dark. Vendors from the surrounding area will be sharing their arts, crafts, and repurposed antiques. 513-767-1974 or find Gallery 32 Antiques on Facebook.

MAY 26–28 – Utica Sertoma Ice Cream Festival, Ye Olde Mill and Velvet Ice Cream Co., 11339 Mt. Vernon Rd., Utica. $5 per car. Fun-filled weekend for the entire family. Parade, live music, car show, games, eating contests, arts and crafts, great food, and ice cream, of course! www.sertomaicecreamfestival.com.

MAY 12 – Pickerington Community Chorus Spring Concert: “Get Happy,” Peace United Methodist Church, 235 Diley Rd., Pickerington, 3 p.m. $10, Srs./C. $8. 614-805-9487 or www. pickeringtoncommunitychorus.com.

MAY 30–JUNE 2 – Deercreek Dam Days, Williamsport, Wed./Thur. 4–10 p.m., Fri. 4–11 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Free. Music, food, games, and rides for all ages. ​740-500-9845 or www.deercreekdamdays.com.

MAY 5 – Battle from the Saddle, Scioto Trails State Park and Forest, 3567 Stoney Creek Rd., Chillicothe. 17th annual trail ride fundraiser for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life, Ohio. Ride out at noon; cookout and door prizes provided. Donations accepted. 740-703-8176.

SOUTHWEST

MAY 26–27 – Asian Festival, Franklin Park, 1755 E. Broad St., Columbus, Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Free. A celebration of Asian culture, including dance, music, martial arts, food, and much more. A unique opportunity to see performers from Asia and all over the U.S. http://asian-festival.org.

MAY 28 – Memorial Day Celebration, Veterans Memorial Park, 154 Commerce St., Lockbourne. Parade starts at noon, followed by a service honoring the 75th anniversary of Lockbourne Air Force Base and all veterans. All LAFB veterans are invited. 614-491-3161.

MAY 4, 11, 18, 25 – Rise and Shine Cambridge Farmers Market, Tractor Supply on Rte. 209/Southgate Pkwy., Cambridge, 8 a.m.–noon. 740-439-2238 or www.downtowncambridge.com.

MAY 4–6 – Cambridge Singers Spring Show, Scottish Rite Auditorium, 941 Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. $10 in advance, $12 at the door; under 12, $5. 740-432-3956.

MAY 20 – Dragonboat Race, Westbank Park, 181 S. Washington Blvd., Columbus, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Also see the dragon dance, lion dance, Asian kites, and lanterns. https:// asianfestivaldragonboat.org.

MAY 12 – Gardens at Gantz Farm Herb, Perennial, and Landscape Plant Sale, Gantz Park, 2255 Home Rd., Grove City, 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. Featuring culinary and landscape herbs and perennials, rain-garden plants, native perennials, and more. 614-277-3058, 614-871-6323, or www.grovecityohio.gov/venue/ gardens-at-gantz-farm.

MAY 4–6 – Spring Women’s Retreat, Highlands Nature Sanctuary, 7660 Cave Rd., Bainbridge. Enjoy the company of other like-minded women and get back to nature in the way that suits you best. Space is limited. Register at http://arcofappalachia.org/ womens-retreat/ or 937-365-1935.

THROUGH DEC. – Athens Farmers Market, 1000 E. State St., Athens, Wed. 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Sat., 9 a.m.–noon. Showcases farmers, orchardists, specialty food producers, bakers, horticulturalists, cheese makers, and other food-based entrepreneurs.740-593-6763 or www.athensfarmersmarket.org.

MAY 20 – Dave Kosmyna’s Original Downhome Jazz Band, Clintonville Women’s Club, 3951 N. High St., Columbus, 2–5 p.m. Admission fee. 614-558-2212, www.cohjs.org, or www.facebook. com/COHJS.

MAY 5 – Pickaway-Ross CTC Community Expo and Car Show, 895 Crouse Chapel Rd., Chillicothe, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Car registration 9 a.m.–12 p.m. $10 registration fee. Other events include a craft show, plant sale, auction, and live music. 740-642-1301. MAY 5 – Spring Fest, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. 740-435-3335 or www. deerassic.com. MAY 6 – Music at the Mound with Steve Free, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 1 p.m. $8 vehicle/parking fee. Steve’s catchy music covers the gamut of folk, rock, and country, and tips a hat to his Native American roots. http://arcofappalachia.org.

MAY 11–12 – Salt Fork Gospel Jubilee, Salt Fork Lodge and Conference Ctr., Lore City, 6–11 p.m. Free. 740-432-3787. MAY 18–19 – Southern Ohio Forest Rally, spectator locations/times TBA. Round 3 of the 2018 Rally America National Championship: Zaleski Forest Rally on Friday; Scioto Trails Rally and Tar Hollow on Saturday. Over 115 miles of unique stage roads. www.southernohioforestrally.com or www.facebook. com/SouthernOhioForestRally. MAY 24–27 – Feast of the Flowering Moon Festival, Yoctangee Park, Chillicothe, Thur. 5–10 p.m., Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Free. A family-oriented event featuring Native American music, dancing, traders and exhibits, a mountain men encampment, an extensive arts and crafts show, and commercial exhibits. Entertainment plus food, fun, games, and contests for the whole family. www.feastofthefloweringmoon.org. MAY 25–27 – Muskingum Valley Trade Days, St. Rte. 78, Reinersville. Large flea market. 740-558-2740. MAY 30–JUN. 3 – National Road Yard Sale, throughout Guernsey and Belmont counties. Find bargains, antiques, fresh produce, furniture, and more as you shop the sales along Historic U.S. 40. http://nationalroadyardsale.com.

MAY 11 – Miami Valley S Gaugers: Spring S Spree, Crossroads Expo Ctr., IBEW Building, 6550 Poe Ave., Dayton. Lots of “S” dealers at over 100 tables. Door prizes, raffles, and clinics. wschnee@woh.rr.com (Walt Schnee) or www.sspree.info.

MAY 12 – Hug the Earth Festival, Stillwater Prairie Reserve, 9750 St. Rte. 185, Covington, 12–5 p.m. Free. Archery, geocaching, canoeing, rock pile dig, animal safari, tree climbing, and more. 937-335-6273 or www.miamicountyparks.com.

MAY 11 – Taste of the Arts, Main and Ash Sts., Piqua. Shop, enjoy live music, and sample food from various local restaurants and caterers. Your appetizer, meal, and dessert all in one place. Items range from $1 to $4. 937-773-9355 or www. mainstreetpiqua.com.

MAY 18–20 – Arcanum Old-Fashioned Days, George St., Arcanum. Free admission and parking. Family-oriented festival includes kiddie tractor pulls, antique tractor pulls, big wheel races, carnival games and rides, arts and crafts, parade, car show, entertainment, fireworks, and more. The Arcanum Fire Company’s annual pancake breakfast is Saturday. 937-692-5139.

MAY 11–13 – Appalachian Festival, Coney Island, 6201 Kellogg Ave., Cincinnati, Fri. 9 a.m.–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. $10, Srs. $5, C. (2–12) $2, under 2 free. Handmade crafts, down-home food, Living History Village and educational exhibits, old-time dance, storytelling, and music. www.appalachianfestivalcincinnati.org. MAY 12 – Farm Babies Fest, Aullwood Audobon Center and Farm, 9101 Frederick Pike, Dayton, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $10 per car. Live shows and demos, draft horse and tractor wagon rides, children’s activities, old-fashioned games and crafts, delicious food, and much more! 937-890-7360 or http://aullwood.audubon.org.

MAY 19 – Food Truck Competition and Rally, Miami Co. Fgds., North County Rd. 25A, Troy, 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Free. Teams of food trucks gather to show off their best dishes. 937-335-7492. MAY 19 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Bluegrass Opry Barn, 9461 St. Rte. 66, Oakwood, 7 p.m. $10. Enjoy an evening of lively bluegrass music with lighting-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Bring a lawnchair. 419-594-2816 or find Bluegrass Opry Barn on Facebook.

MAY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Scenic OHIO

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1. There was a bed-and-breakfast in Berlin, Ohio, that had the most beautiful tulip beds. The B&B has since changed hands and no longer has the tulip beds. Kathy DeHass Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative member

2. Lake Erie waves crash at sunset at Beulah Beach. Scott Falkenberg Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative member

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3. A stunning sunset over the rolling hills of Carroll County farmland. S.J. Grim Carroll Electric Cooperative member

4. Built in 1887, this 85-foot covered bridge is on Brubaker Road just outside of Gratis, Ohio, in Preble County. John F. Hunter Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member

5. My husband, Steve Kellar, kayaking in Seneca Lake, Noble County, Ohio. Toni Kellar Washington Electric Cooperative member

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6. Along the River Trail that winds through Ohio Riverfront Park in Marietta. Jane Snipes South Central Power Company member

7. Walking through the woods along the creek on our property in Vinton County, with our dog, Shadow. Janet Tyler Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member

8. “The Old Swimming Hole,” taken in rural Carroll County in June 2017. Donald Weyrick Carroll Electric Cooperative member

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9. My husband, Ray, and I visited Clear Creek Park, south of Lancaster, where we discovered this cabin in the woods. Jill Ann Ladrick South Central Power Company member

10. Twin fawns in our bean field in Casstown, Ohio. Julie Puckett Pioneer Electric Cooperative member

Send us your pictures! Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/ memberinteractive.

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40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  MAY 2018

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For August, send “Let’s go to the fair!” by May 14; for September, send “Sweater Weather” by June 14. Include your name and contact info, the name of your electric co-op, and an explanation of the photo.


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6/16/17 10:26 AM


Ohio Cooperative Living - May 2018 - Frontier  
Ohio Cooperative Living - May 2018 - Frontier