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FEBRUARY JANUARY 2018 2019

The Frontier Power Company Official publication | www.frontier-power.com

Winter wonders

ALSO INSIDE Old and new on Kelleys Island When ice was big business Rural supply: Short line trains


HANDS ON, YEAR ROUND Our linemen are trained with safety and leading best practices in mind. Thanks to a new state-of-the-art indoor training center, apprentices can learn hands-on, year-round, no matter how snowy or stormy the Ohio weather.

ohioec.org/purpose


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2019

INSIDE HIGHLIGHT 40 BUILD A SNOWMAN

February is snowman season, and our readers share photos of some of their best work.

FEATURES 24 FREEZE BUSINESS

Once upon a time, cutting ice from Ohio’s rivers and ponds was important and lucrative work.

30 MOVERS AND SHAKERS Short line railroads are a lifeline for the rural economy, delivering goods to hard-to-reach areas of the state. Cover image on most issues: After her kids, Jacob, Mary, Thomas, and Arlie, spent an afternoon making a snowman, Kim Wysong, a member of Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative, snapped this photo as the sun was setting on a good day’s work.

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

LOOKING AHEAD O

hio’s electric cooperatives had a busy and successful 2018. As we look ahead to 2019, we’re excited about the opportunities to work safer, to work smarter, and to inspire greater impact on the communities we serve. We’ve forged the foundation for each initiative, and we’ll “check and adjust” our efforts, as warranted. Management and employees at cooperatives across Ohio have made a commitment to work safer than ever. The hazards inherent to producing and distributing electricity are real. Safe job performance requires a commitment to our consumer-members, of course, but also to ourselves, our co-workers, and our families. We’ll prepare for each and every task, no matter how routine, using an organized and thoughtful approach to the safe and effective completion of our endeavors. Nothing is more important in our work lives than safely returning to our homes and loved ones every day. Working smarter and working safer go hand in hand. Last year, we navigated through historic changes in the operation of our power plants. We have learned much over the past year, and this year will see changes that better fit our new team. Many people are in new and changed roles. We will systematically check our results and adjust our efforts to work safely and meet operational goals. Electric cooperatives’ commitment to their local communities is a founding principle that has endured for decades. Today, we continue to look for new and innovative ways to make a positive impact on both the character and the business climate of the communities we serve. Because every area’s needs are specific to that place, we constantly seek out new ways to partner with local organizations so that we can make a real difference. Ohio’s electric cooperatives look forward to making 2019 a safe, productive year that will enhance our service, promote reliability, and generate affordable power for your homes and businesses. Depend on it.

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Electric cooperatives’ commitment to their local communities is a founding principle that has endured for decades.


February 2019 • Volume 61, No. 5

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Rebecca Seum Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, Victoria Ellwood, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Craig Springer, Damaine Vonada, and Kevin Williams. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES

ISLAND FOLK: Kelleys Island, one of the state’s top tourist

destinations, relies on the local electric co-op and its people. 6 KEEP THE LIGHTS ON: It’s a huge task to ensure a reliable supply of electricity to the largest American island on Lake Erie. 8

OHIO ICON BOYD AND WURTHMANN: One of the oldest restaurants in Ohio’s Amish Country is popular with locals and tourists alike.

10 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

KIDS AND CAMERAS: Want to get your young people outdoors? Give them a camera and send them on a scavenger hunt.

15 GOOD EATS  THE RICE STUFF: With some imagination, this common grain can

become an extraordinary meal.

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO STATEHOUSE: Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative For all advertising inquiries, contact American MainStreet Publications 800-626-1181 info@amp.coop The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes.

trustee Brian Hill has been appointed to the Ohio Senate.

36 CALENDAR

WHAT’S HAPPENING: February events and other things to do.

IN THIS ISSUE Kelleys Island (p.4) Berlin (p.8) Zanesville (p.23) Sarahsville (p.23) Butler County (p.30)

Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


POWER LINES

Kelleys Island

OLD AND NEW BY VICTORIA ELLWOOD

H

op on a huge ferry boat, and after a 20-minute ride through the choppy Lake Erie waters, you’ll arrive at the idyllic Kelleys Island, about 4 miles north of Marblehead, Ohio, and the largest American island on the lake. The island is home to about 140 year-round residents, though the population swells to well over 400 residents and 5,000 tourists during the busy summer months.

An island is a place where folks can never take their electricity for granted, but Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative has been up to the task since it merged with Lake Erie Electric Cooperative in 1967. Now is a time of change on Kelleys Island — at least in regard to its co-op. The first change is an equipment upgrade: A new electric cable run from the mainland in December will ensure better reliability of electric service to the island’s members. But there are more personal changes as well, as the folks members recognized as the faces of the coop have passed the torch to new representatives.

from Germany, Lahrs has been coming to Kelleys Island for 40 years and has been a full-time resident there for the last 20. “The role of a trustee is looking out for members and to keep the members on Kelleys Island happy,” Lahrs says. “Being so far away from the rest of Hancock-Wood’s members, we have to pay particular attention to how the board’s decisions affect us. “I’m always looking out for my island.” Lahrs, 88, ran his own business in Cleveland for 50 years before he moved to Kelleys Island, where he operated a transfer station for the village. He now has a waterdelivery service that he calls a “little business on the side.” New trustee Brian Terry, elected last June, has been part of island life since he was a child and also lives there year-round. He’s one of the youngest trustees among all of Ohio’s co-ops and sees his role as a balancing act.

Because Hancock-Wood’s geographic situation is unique among Ohio electric cooperatives, it has a unique staffing setup as well. The island itself is one district, represented by a trustee on Hancock-Wood’s board of directors. One full-time co-op staff member lives on the island to handle issues that come up day to day.

“The island is so small that community relations is one of the most important parts of the job,” says Terry, who manages Portside Marina and Dockers Restaurant. “I feel like my biggest job is to find a balance between the business of the co-op and maintaining good relationships with the members. I find myself bridging the gap.”

Former trustee Knut Lahrs served on Hancock-Wood’s board for 12 years — his service came to an end at the last elections due to regulated term limits. Originally

The co-op’s other bridge to its island members is the on-site staff, which also has seen a recent transition. David Ervin was assigned as the full-time lineman on

4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


The faces of Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative on Kelleys Island: David Ervin (left photo, left side) and Knute Lahrs (right side), Brian Terry (below), and Kevin VanDePerre (not shown), say a big part of their respective jobs is simply to help keep co-op members happy. Ervin is the only full-time HWEC employee stationed on the island, while Lahrs was the island’s representative on the HWEC board of trustees for 12 years. All four helped oversee the project to install a new submarine cable from the mainland to ensure reliable delivery of electricity to the island’s consumer-members.

Kelleys Island last September, taking over for Kevin VanDePerre, who was the sole lineman on the island from 2015 to 2018 and still lends a hand part-time. The lineman’s primary responsibility, of course, is to keep the lights on — but it’s not the only job. On call 24/7, Ervin says he has to be a jack of all trades, from running outages to being a handyman to assisting with logistics for the new 4-mile cable being installed. “I’m the only one here all the time, so I take care of everything, any issue that comes up,” he says. VanDePerre elaborates on the responsibilities of the job: “The role really involves a lot of community involvement and public relations,” he says. “What you do to help our members is very important. I once overheard a member say that I had done more for co-op relations on Kelleys than had ever been done. That was a real honor.” Ervin says the co-op is still evolving on Kelleys Island. “When the quarry shut down, the co-op lost a big part of its load, but they’ve gained back most of that through new residential service. The (service) is changing over from a commercial load to residential.” However, he doesn’t see evolution coming quickly to the relaxed island. “They like to keep it slow here,” he says, adding that the best thing about being assigned to the island is the friendliness of the people. “The people — they’re the best thing.”

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


ISLAND POWER

S

upplying electricity to an island is no small feat. Supplying reliable electricity to the largest American island on Lake Erie is a monumental task. Kelleys Island, one of the most popular tourist destinations anywhere in Ohio, is entirely served by Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative, which has been charged with that job since its 1967 consolidation with the former Lake Erie Electric Cooperative. “The power that energizes Kelleys Island comes via two 4-mile-long underwater cables from Marblehead on the mainland,” says Bill Barnhart, vice president of engineering and operations at Hancock-Wood Electric. “That redundancy helps ensure that the power stays on even if one cable is damaged or otherwise becomes incapable of its supply duties.”

The cable to the west was laid in 2003, and it is fully capable of supplying all the island’s needs well into the future. The east cable, however, had been most recently replaced in 1970, when the island’s operating voltage was less than half of what it is today. If something were to happen to the west cable, that east cable would no longer have been able to power the island on its own. “The cable is specifically located by GPS and is charted for boaters to be aware of its position,” Barnhart says. “It also has some protective insulation built into it to avoid potential damage. But things happen, and we need to be prepared if they do.” So workers cut up and removed the old east cable — finding no less than seven boat anchors that had been caught on the cable and abandoned — and laid a new one on the floor of Lake Erie. It was tested and fully energized right before Christmas. Barring damage from a severe ice incident or entanglement with a super-sized anchor, Barnhart says the new cable should last a minimum of 50 years, thanks to improved technology in the electrical insulation and other cable protection. —JEFF MCCALLISTER

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


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FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   7


OHIO ICON

BOYD AND WURTHMANN

Restaurant Berlin

BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: Main Street (U.S. 62/State Route 39) in Berlin, a Holmes County village in the heart of northeast Ohio’s Amish Country. Provenance: Boyd and Wurthmann began as a grocery store opened by Paul and Mary Hummel in 1938. Dale Boyd and Herman Wurthmann purchased the store in 1940 and installed a small lunch counter, where they served sandwiches. Expanded to offer breakfast and dinner in the 1950s, the restaurant soon became a local favorite for Amish-style meals and homemade pies. In the 1980s, tables and booths were added to increase seating capacity for Amish Country visitors, who appreciated the restaurant’s good food and homey atmosphere. After four decades in business, Boyd and Wurthmann sold the restaurant, which subsequently had a series of owners until Dennis Mullet purchased it in 2004. Significance: One of the oldest continuously operated restaurants in Amish Country, Boyd and Wurthmann is a Berlin institution — a popular destination for residents and tourists alike. Currently: Members of the Mullett family operate Boyd and Wurthmann Restaurant and recruit its employees from the region’s Amish-Mennonite community. Locals

regularly meet and eat at the round table in the front of the restaurant, and visitors enjoy sipping a cup of coffee — which still costs 75 cents — at its original 1940s lunch counter. “One of our draws is that people want to get a sense of the local culture,” says Manager Benson Beachy. “We try to befriend visitors and make them feel welcome.” Boyd and Wurthmann’s menu of comfort foods ranges from homemade cinnamon rolls to liver and onions, but two of its signature dishes are the BW Breakfast, which features house-made home fries and sausage gravy, and the Hot Sandwich, which is the restaurant’s version of a Manhattan: “A perfect blend of hot roast beef and homemade bread, mashed potatoes, and gravy,” says Beachy. Boyd and Wurthman also offers about 20 different kinds of pie every day. Brown Bag Apple and peanut butter are on the menu year-round, while flavors such as peach cream and red raspberry cream are available seasonally. It’s a little-known fact that: On Feb. 16, 2019, Boyd and Wurthmann will serve candlelight suppers featuring entrees such as prime rib and chicken alfredo. “We’ll make it a special night for enjoying a nice meal with your valentine,” says Beachy. Boyd and Wurthmann Restaurant, 4819 E. Main St., Berlin, OH 44610. Open 5:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday. 330-893-4000 or www.boydandwurthmann.com.

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


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WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Kids and CAMERAS Want to get your young people outdoors? Start them in outdoor photography BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

W

hen I was a kid, my mother couldn’t keep me indoors. I was constantly roaming the woods and fields near our home, dragging back sick and injured wildlife — probably to the animal’s detriment. But the day Mom drew the line (“No more critters!”) was the day she saw me coming down the road with a live great blue heron under my arm. The 4-foot bird with the dagger-like beak was nearly as tall as I was. Parents and grandparents today often struggle to get kids outdoors and connected to the natural world. Electronics play a large part in that battle, as computers, video games, and other such devices have a strong pull for young people. So why not use that same attraction to your advantage by handing kids a camera before sending them outside? One of Ohio’s best professional outdoor photographers, David FitzSimmons of Bellville, first learned photography as a child. “My love of photography began when I was traveling with my parents on summer vacations, watching my father take photos,” says FitzSimmons. “My grandfather was a photographer, too, so at a very early age I started picking up a camera and taking my own pictures. I bought my first singlelens reflex camera in high school, won first place in a statewide photography contest, and things took off from there.” Today, FitzSimmons is the creator of the Curious Critters series of wildlife picture books for children. His first book, published in 2010, won six national book awards, and the series has since sold nearly 250,000 copies. “Any type of imaging device — cellphone, iPad, small camera — that parents or grandparents can get into kids’ hands is a great way of helping them begin to explore nature,” says FitzSimmons. “Because kids are so visually oriented, it’s an easy fit; young people feel very comfortable using such devices.” FitzSimmons also says that still photography and videography go hand in hand. “Many kids today are more attracted to making video images than

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


taking still shots, so my advice is to let them start with either medium, whichever one excites them,” he says. “For instance, our three daughters — ages 14, 8, and 5 — all prefer taking video, but our oldest daughter quickly racked up more than 1,000 still photos of seabirds along the Florida coast on one of our recent vacations.” Kids will naturally want to share the images they create with friends and family. “That’s the really exciting part,” FitzSimmons says. “Because their friends will want to get outside and start taking pictures, too. Online sharing builds enthusiasm for both outdoor photography and exploring nature.” If today’s ever-evolving photo technology seems a bit daunting to you, keep in mind that many schools have photography clubs where young people can get started. “I would encourage parents and grandparents to find an inexpensive or slightly used imaging device that they can give to a child so that they don’t have to worry about the kid breaking it or pushing the wrong buttons,” FitzSimmons says. “Most young people are pretty tech-savvy, and photography and videography are ways for kids to become the teachers, to show their parents or grandparents something new. It’s also a way for kids to feel empowered, while at the same time experiencing the natural world.”

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019

One final suggestion: If at first your young person doesn’t know what to take pictures of outdoors, give him or her a list. Kids love a photo scavenger hunt. W. H. “Chip” Gross (whchipgross@gmail.com) is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor and a member of Consolidated Cooperative. Copies of David FitzSimmons’ various books can be ordered online at www.wildirispublishing.com.


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GOOD EATS

The

RICE stuff

JAMBALAYA Prep: 15 minutes | Cook: 50 minutes | Servings: 8 1 teaspoon thyme 1 tablespoon olive oil   1 teaspoon oregano 1 jalapeño, seeded and finely chopped 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 large yellow onion, diced 1 bay leaf 2 ribs celery, diced 1 pound chicken breast, cut into small pieces 1 green pepper, cored, seeded, and diced 1 pound Andouille sausage, sliced into 14-ounce can crushed tomatoes 1/4-inch rounds 4 cups chicken broth  1/2 pound okra, diced  11/2 cups uncooked long-grain white rice 1 pound cooked shrimp 1 teaspoon garlic powder salt and pepper 1 teaspoon paprika 

With some imagination, the common grain can become an extraordinary meal.

In a Dutch oven or stockpot, add oil, jalapeño, onion, celery, and green pepper. Cook until soft, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, chicken broth, rice, and seasonings; bring to a simmer and reduce heat to medium-low. In a separate skillet, saute chicken and sausage until chicken is cooked through, about 7 minutes. Transfer meat to Dutch oven and stir. Cover and simmer 30 minutes, stirring every 5–7 minutes. Add shrimp and okra; cook 10 more minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove bay leaf before serving. Per serving: 529 calories; 20 grams fat (6 grams saturated fat); 40 grams total carbs; 4 grams fiber, 43 grams protein. 

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   15


COCONUT CHICKEN CURRY Prep: 20 minutes | Cook: 30 minutes | Servings: 6 14-ounce can light coconut milk 1 head cauliflower, broken into medium pieces 1 cup shredded carrots 1 large sweet potato, diced small 28-ounce can diced tomatoes  2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 cup water 2 pounds chicken breast, diced  3 teaspoons salt  1 medium yellow onion, 1 teaspoon black pepper chopped fine 2 cups diced green beans 3 tablespoons curry powder 6 cups cooked basmati rice 8 garlic cloves, minced Preheat oven to 425 F. Place cauliflower and sweet potato pieces on separate cookie sheets; toss with olive oil and 1 teaspoon salt and spread evenly. Bake 20 minutes or until browned and slightly crispy on edges. Set aside. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large saucepan on medium heat. Add chicken and cook through, about 7 minutes. Remove from pan onto a plate. When slightly cooled, cut into small pieces. Add remaining oil, onion, and curry powder to pan. Cook, stirring frequently, until onion is very soft, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook about 1 minute. Add coconut milk, carrots, tomatoes (with juice), water, remaining salt, and pepper. Cover and cook 4 minutes. Add green beans and continue cooking until beans are tender, about 5 minutes. Mix in chicken, cauliflower, and sweet potatoes. Serve hot over rice. Per serving: 1,057 calories; 14 grams fat (4.5 grams saturated fat); 177 grams total carbs; 11 grams fiber; 50 grams protein.

TROPICAL RICE SUNDAE Prep: 5 minutes | Cook: 25 minutes | Servings: 5 1 lemon, juice and zest 1 cup arborio rice 1/2 cup sugar 31/2 cups water 2 tablespoons cornstarch  15-ounce can diced mango in light syrup 1/4 cup shredded coconut 15-ounce can grapefruit slices in light syrup In a medium pot, combine rice and water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium. Cook uncovered 20–30 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. Rice should absorb most of the water and have a sticky texture when done. Set aside. Open cans of mango and grapefruit. Separate fruit from juice, reserving both. In a small saucepan over medium heat, whisk together lemon zest, sugar, and cornstarch. Slowly add lemon, mango, and grapefruit juice, whisking constantly so cornstarch doesn’t create lumps. Bring to a boil. Whisk constantly for 3–4 minutes until sauce has thickened. In a shallow pan, toast coconut over high heat, being careful not to burn. In serving bowls, scoop rice and top with mango and grapefruit slices. Drizzle with sauce; top with coconut. Serve warm. Per serving: 472 calories; 1.5 grams fat (1 gram saturated fat); 99 grams total carbohydrates; 8 grams fiber; 6 grams protein. 

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


VEGGIE BURGERS Prep: 5 minutes | Cook: 20 minutes | Servings: 8 1/2 teaspoon coriander 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1 medium yellow onion, diced fine 1/2 teaspoon cayenne 4 cloves garlic, minced 2 teaspoons salt 3 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 teaspoon pepper 2 tablespoons water 2 cups cooked brown rice 2 15.25-ounce cans black beans (no salt added) 1 15-ounce can shoestring chopped beets, drained and chopped small 2 teaspoons smoked paprika 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon cumin 

1 tablespoon molasses 1/2 cup rolled oats, finely ground 1 tablespoon olive oil 8 hamburger buns Your favorite hamburger toppings (Dijon mustard, lettuce, onion, and tomato shown)

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add onions, cooking until slightly charred, 7 minutes. Add garlic, vinegar, and water. Cook 3 minutes, or until vinegar smells sweet. Transfer mixture to a large mixing bowl. Drain and rinse black beans. Add half the beans to onions and mash. Add the other half of beans and leave whole. In small bowl, combine dry spices. Add remaining ingredients (except oil, buns, and toppings) to black bean mixture, stirring well to combine. Shape into 8 patties. In large skillet over medium heat, add oil. Cook patties 2 minutes, then flip (if they don’t lift easily with a spatula, cook a little longer). Cook another 6 minutes until warmed through. Place burgers on buns and top with your favorite hamburger toppings. Per serving: 628 calories; 7 grams fat (1 gram saturated fat); 115 grams total carbohydrates; 20 grams fiber; 28 grams protein.

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY 770 S. Second St., P.O. Box 280, Coshocton, OH 43812 740-622-6755   800-624-8050 Hours: Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

HELP FIND THESE PEOPLE FOR CAPITAL CREDITS REFUNDS The Frontier Power Company is trying to locate the following former patrons of The Frontier Power Company. These patrons received service during the year 1983. If you know of any of these people or their next of kin, please call or mail the address to our office. In compliance with the Code of Regulations of The Frontier Power Company, Article 8, Section 2, if any former patron fails to claim any cash retirement of patronage capital credits for the year 1983 before April 30, 2019, any such payment due shall constitute an irrevocable assignment of those credits to the Cooperative. Adams, Mrs. Archie Adkins, Orville W. Adkins, William A. Alexander, Thorald Allebaugh, Earl Anderson, Hilda A. Anderson, John J. Anderson, Richard Armstrong, Owen Bailey, Lowell R. Bailey, Timothy A. Bair, Robert D. Baker, Louise Barche, Thomas F. Bardill, Katherine Barnes, Stanley E. Beagle, Tom O. Bechtol, Paul T. Jr. Beekman, Oliver Bender, Alice M. Bercot, Ralph E. Bergoon, Dillon E. Bernard, Ervin Boyes, Gilbert W. Bradfield, Judith Bray, Daniel B. Bregenzer, Karl F. Brillhart, Geneva F. Brooks, Marie M. Brooks, Mark Brosius, Lucy M. Bryant, John Burkey, Daniel Burns, Margret Butler, Donald G. Butt, Earl D. Calai, Pete D. Call, Raymond Camp, Lawrence Cantrell, Gary Carl, E. Lucille Carlisle, Margaret J. Carnes, Frank K. Carney, James L. Carpenter, George E.

Carpenter, Robert B. Carter, Alberta B. Cartney, Larry Cathey, Terry L. Caudill, Terry W. Chaney, Linda S. Chrysler, Richard T. Clark, Betty Clark, Tammy Clarke, Maude M. Conkle, Fern O. Cook, Ray F. Coon, Franklin Cooper, Elmer Copenhaver, Clinton Cox, Terry L. Crawford, Lisa Croll, Yvonne M. Cutshall, Donald R. Dailey, Carolyn Dallas, Maurice Darling, Corwin Darr, Gary L. Dawson, Joseph E. Dayton, Constance Deshong, Walter E. Dillon, James W. Dilorenzo, Paul Doney, Jack R. Dooley, Kenneth S. Dorrance, Cassie Dorsey, James W. Dorsey, Prudence K. Drexler, Joseph M. Duncan, Edgar Dunlap, Robert S. Eagle, Wilson C. Eagon, James J. Earley, John Eaton, William C. Sr. Eckfield, Gerald P. Edgerton, Wayne W. Edwards, Paul A. Eichel, James R. Elsasser, Robert R.

Emler, Cheryl Lynn Erow, Robert Ertle, Edward S. Esselburn, A.c. Faulhaber, Richard J. Fisher, Gene Flynn, Daniel R. Foy, Christopher K. Frame, Besmond France, Rollin C. Freetage, Allen M. Garrett, David L. Gibbs, Edward L. Gilley, Jack D. Jr. Gladstone, Jennie Gnagy, Laverne Godwin, Bill Gonder, Dorothy M. Graves, Patricia Grewell, Steven Grooms, Harold S. Guilliams, William Guyer, Sherman A. Hadinger, Ronald D. Hagans, Larry L. Hagen, David G. Haney, Dannie E. Harr, Mike Harrington, Terry L. Hartman, George E. Hawley, Dan Heale, William J. Jr. Heaton, Thomas Hedrick, Becky Henderson, Robert B. Herberholz, Nancy Herman, Thomas B. Hershberger, Henry R. Hill, Merle Hindel, Gary L. Hockenberry, David L. Hocter, Joshua A. Hoffman, Bonnie I. Holcomb, Lillian Holdsworth, Steven K.

Holm, Raymond J. Holp, Daniel W. Homman, Jack J. Hopkins, James A. Hothem, Lewis Howell, Terry J. Huff, Harry A. Huffman, Rodney L. Hughes, Charles A. Hunt, Arthur D. Hupp, Donald G. Sr. Hursey, Mabel R. Isaacs, Rice Jacobs, Fred Jacobs, Rick E. James, Glenn G. Jochem, Richard G. Johnson, Donald W. Johnson, Edward Johnson, James M. Johnson, Robert L. Jones, George W. Kalt, Loren W. Kaple, Stephen J. Kedigh, Richard F. Keegan, Vernon N. Kelley, Caris R. Kelley, L.a. Kibler, Linda D. Kincaid, Milo C. King, Thomas E. Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth Kiser, Daryl W. Klingler, Richard E. Knight, Kenneth L. Jr. Kohler, Ruth Kouns, Wanda Kramer, John T. Krothe, William Kuhn, Jack R. Lang, Kathryn E. Lanham, Leroy B. Lauer, Richard M. Lautenschlege, Ethel S. Lawrence, Carl

Lawrence, Susan Lawton, Timothy W. Layman, Thomas Leas, Ronald R. Lee, Robert R. Lemmon, Warner Lenzo, Anthony J. Levering, Wayne Lewis, Jerry A. Lewis, Nora Limbaugh, Michael J. Linard, Donald L. Linn, Michael Little, John D. Long, Kenneth Lorenz, Thomas W. Sr. Lowe, Helen Lowe, James R. Jr. Lowe, Larry Lyon, Chancey D. Mahoney, Donald H. Marteny, Henry Jr. Martin, Richard L. Matthews, Leroy Mattison, Jon Maurer, Georgia Maurer, William F. McCombs, W.D. McCoy, Helen M. McCumbers, Beverly McDonald, John McDonald, Lois McDonald, Stephen McDorman, Douglas L. McGarry, Richard McGibney, William R. McKenzie, Robert W. McLarnan, Thomas C. McLaughlin, William McMillen, Ralph W. McVey, Fred C. McVey, Terry Medford, Arthur N. Medlock, Larry J. Meese, Sylvia J.

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

Metz, Rex E. Meyer, Richard C. Miller, Carl S. Miller, Clara M. Miller, Daniel W. Miller, Eli A. Miller, Gary G. Miller, Harry D. Miller, Thomas L. Miller, William I. Mitchell Roy D. Moore, David A. Moore, James F. Moore, Max Jr. Moore, Robert A. Moore, William Morton, Frank Moss, Carlton B. Muncy, Bobbie Murphy, Bertha Nelson, Virgil F. Noland, Tony R. Norman, Mrs. Thelma O’brien, Michael S. Ohliger, Jay E. Orisek, C.m. Osborne, Anita S. Owen, William A. Palmer, Linda L. Paraniuk, John R. Parks, Jerry W. Patterson, John R. Pazderski, Walter Perko, Allen Peterson, Charles Phillips, Herbert Phillips, Mark A. Phillips, Robert F. Plumb, Charles W. Plympton, Edna Porter, Loyd Preston, William R.

Price, Frank Price, James E. Pringle, Kenneth W. Quattrocchi, John J. Quinn, Leroy Raber, Leroy A. Ramey, Kenneth Raney, Virginia A. Reese, Rick C. Reeves, Lester V. Reichman, Vernon Jr. Reiss, Mary L. Rentsch, Daniel E. Repak, John Reynolds, Charles Reynolds, David Rhoads, John E. Rice, Robert D. Rice, Robert F. Rich, John Rider, Alan Rider, Don L. Riley, Debora M. Roark, Kathleen Robison, Jeffrey L. Robison, Virginia Rogan, Donald J. Rollins, Margaret Roof, Charles Roth, Rob Russell, Robert J. Russell, Ronald R. Ryle, Gerald A. Sadler, Josephine A. Salmons, Clarence E. Sanders, William S. Jr. Schlegel, Randy L. Schlemmer, Michael D. Schmidt, C.W. Schumaker, Douglas W. Schwarm, William Jr. Scott Becket Joint V

Sensabaugh, Jeffery W. Share, Michael Shimer, Harry Jr. Shryock, Roger W. Shull, Daniel Slusser, Ira J. Smith, John W. Smith, Mrs. Thomas Snyder, Joan A. Spring, David L. Standiford, Lawrence Stewart, Samuel S. Stickdorn, Paul R. Stillions, Ronald C. Stotts, Richard C. Sulin, Michael E. Tharp, Harold Tielke, H.H. Tracy, Charles O. Tracy, William J. Truman, Chester E. Jr. Tumblin, Irene J. Turner, Herbert D. Underwood, Stanley Vierheller, David Vistins, Maris Vitantonio, Terrance A. Wachtel, Mark Wagoner, S. Van Walker, Rick A. Walters, Kenneth L. Watson, James A. Watson, Michael A. Watterson, David G. Waybright, Arthur J. Weisen, Larry A. Welling, Marcus Werber, Maxine Wertz, William R. Wesson, Frank D. West, Carrie West, Larry L.

Wheeler, David W. Wheeler, Thomas E. Whitmer, Floyd S. Wiggins, James Williams, Randy G. Williamson, Cleveland Williamson, Mary A. Wills, Douglas.s Wilson, George T. Wilson, Mary K. Wilson, Robert E. Wolfe, Jonnie A. Wolford, Ralph L. Wolford, Richard D. Wood, C.R. Wood, Richard D. Wood, Steven D. Woods, Betty L. Wright, Jack L. Wright, James A. Wright, James A. Yoder, Andrew M. Yoder, Henry A. Yoder, John M. Yoder, Kevin D. Young, Robert C. Yutzy, Donald A. Sr. Zeigler, Rick Zepp, Charles P. Zickefoose, Floyd W. Zukowski, Katherine T.

STUDENTS! Don’t forget to turn in scholarship applications and Youth Tour applications to our office by Feb. 6, 2019! Applications and instructions can be found at www.frontier-power.com, then click on the “Youth Opportunities” button.

20  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2019


THE THE FRONTIER FRONTIER POWER POWER COMPANY COMPANY LOCAL LOCAL PAGES PAGES

2018 Highlights 2018 highlights and happenings at The Frontier Power Company Each year, Frontier Power strives to serve its members with reliable, affordable, and safe electric service by keeping equipment and rights-of-way upgraded and maintained, as well as educating employees and installing new technology. Our communities are supported through many programs, and our members are kept informed and educated through Ohio Cooperative Living, bill notices, and the annual meeting. Frontier Power, your Touchstone Energy cooperative, strives to maintain Touchstone’s four core values: integrity, accountability, innovation, and community. These values represent the cooperative difference and define how Frontier Power delivers its members a high standard of service. Here are some highlights of our year: • Scholarship winners were: first place – Allie McCoy, River View High School, and Christian Stark, Indian Valley School; second place – Amber Mourer, Ridgewood High School, and Caden Sauerbrey, Tri-Valley High School. Allie McCoy also earned additional scholarship funds by competing and placing seventh in the statewide competition. • Youth Tour to Washington, D.C., winners were Emma Anderson and Andrew Martin, both from River View High School. • Hosted the 17th annual Customer Appreciation Day on May 4 in the new Frontier Propane parking carport with about 700 people in attendance. • Sponsored the 37th annual Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival held in June, with employees serving on the balloon committee, working the T-shirt booth, working on balloon crews, and delivering propane. • Helped River View Junior High celebrate the last day of school by providing a cookout for students and staff, who were served by Steve Nelson, Kelly Kendall, Melvin McVay, and Tim Keirns. • Bryar Cox, graduate of River View High School, once again helped our spray crews and propane department as summer help. Bryar is continuing his studies in mechanical engineering at Zane State. • Hired new employees: Kimberly Bethel as an accounting representative and Ethan Helmick, Tanner Shaw, and James Stewart into the right-of-way department.

representing District A, Coshocton County — James Buxton; representing District C, Tuscarawas County — David Mizer, representing District D, Coshocton County — Tim Anderson. • James Buehler was re-elected to the Frontier Propane board representing District A, and Virginia Steiner was newly elected, representing District B. • Steven K. Nelson, general manager, was re-elected as chairman of the Buckeye Power Inc. Board of Trustees for his 23rd term. • Scott Dunn was part of Project Ohio, a group of linemen who traveled to Central America in March to bring power to remote villages in Guatemala. • Sent a crew to North Carolina to help restore power after Hurricane Florence and again to help restore power after Hurricane Michael. • Purchased several animals at the Tuscarawas and Coshocton county fairs, supporting our local youth who are completing FFA and 4-H projects. • Kelly Kendall volunteered at the annual Coshocton Junior Fair auction. • Returned approximately $50,375 in credits on December electric bills for members who have a water heater control switch to help beat the peak. • Returned approximately $3,056 in credits on June, July, August, and September electric bills for members who participate in the Cool Returns program. • Issued grants totaling $23,984.85 to community organizations with funds generated from the Frontier Power Community Connections Fund. • Set up a display and participated in the open house at the Coshocton County Career Center in February and also set up displays at the Tuscarawas and Coshocton county fairs in the fall. • Returned approximately $299,917 in general retirement capital credits to current and former members; $231,290 was paid to estates. • Service progress included 104 new connections, 45 individual upgrades, 96 pole changes, and 14 new security lights installed. • Upgraded the Bakersville substation from 34 kV to 69 kV. • Replaced and rebuilt approximately 15.6 miles of line.

• About 900 members and guests attended the annual meeting held on July 27 at River View High School. • Board members were elected by mail and announced at annual meeting. All three incumbents were re-elected:

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   21


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES 2018 SERVICE AWARDS

2017 SAFETY AWARDS

Tim Keirns, 5 years Blake McKee, 5 years Melvin McVay, 15 years Kelly Kendall, 25 years Marty Shroyer, 25 years Mike Manning, 35 years

Gene Swigert, 140 Points Mark Lindsey, 150 Points Corey Miller, 150 Points Nate Smith, 150 Points Chad Lecraft, 550 Points Tyler Frazer, 560 Points Mark Fabian, 2,360 Points

Co-op

Connections Card Because you are a Frontier Power Company member, your Co-op Connections Card provides you with special discounts online and at participating local retailers. Be sure to visit this month’s highlighted business and check out offers on the internet by clicking the Co-op Connections Card on our website at www.frontier-power.com.

The Pines of Dresden Bed & Breakfast Dresden 15% discount off room charge

THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY CONTACT 800-624-8050 | 740-622-6755 www.frontier-power.com OFFICE 770 S. Second St. P.O. Box 280 Coshocton, OH 43812 OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Robert Wise President

Larry Blair Vice President

David P. Mizer Secretary-Treasurer

Tim Anderson Jim Buxton Bill Daugherty Ann Gano Trustees

CEO/GENERAL MANAGER Steven K. Nelson ATTORNEY Michael D. Manning

22  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019

Frontier Power and Frontier Propane will be closed on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019, in observance of Presidents Day. For emergency service, please call 740-622-6755 or 800-624-8050. PERSONNEL Kimberly Bethel Kyle Cramblett Phil Crowdy Jason Dolick F. Scott Dunn Mark Fabian Michelle Fischer Tyler Frazer Rick Haines Robert Haines Josh Haumschild Ethan Helmick Ken Hunter Tim Keirns

Kelly Kendall Lucas Landaker Chad Lecraft Matthew Limburg Mark Lindsey Francis “J.R.” McCoy Jr. Mike McCoy Blake McKee Melvin McVay Chad Miller Corey Miller Bill Mizer Tanner Shaw

Marty Shroyer Bornwell Sianjina Nate Smith James Stewart Gene Swigert Shelly Thompson Jonathon Tolliver Robin Totten Andrew Vickers Vickie Warnock Jim Williams Sybil Wright


O-OP OHIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHI O  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO O-OP O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP O O  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP C O  CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

  Guernsey-Muskingum’s Hill appointed to Ohio Senate Brian Hill, R-Zanesville, was sworn in as state senator for the 20th district, representing Fairfield, Guernsey, Hocking, Morgan, and Muskingum counties and portions of Athens and Pickaway counties. Hill, who has served in the Ohio House of Representatives since 2011, was appointed to fill the seat vacated by Troy Balderson, R-Zanesville, who was recently elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. Sen. Hill serves as a trustee on the Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative board.

  Washington Electric awards lighting rebate to Noble Local Schools Washington Electric Cooperative awarded the Noble Local School District a $1,485 rebate through the Commercial and Industrial Lighting program. The district’s project focused on interior lighting at Shenandoah High School and the Shenandoah Middle School gymnasium in Sarahsville. Earlier this year, the cooperative awarded the school district a $1,825 rebate for upgrades performed on the campus’s exterior lighting. Trenda Rice, Noble Locals Schools’ treasurer/CFO, says, “While improving the educational experience of our students, the cost savings further validate that we take our fiscal and environmental responsibilities very seriously.”

  Buckeye Power appeals valuation Buckeye Power Inc. is appealing the tax rate at Cardinal Power Plant, the primary generation resource for the 25 electric cooperatives serving the state of Ohio. The move could lessen Buckeye Power’s tax burden at Cardinal by as much as $3.5 million annually. The measure was taken in order to properly align Cardinal’s tax responsibility with its actual value and with similar power plants remaining in Ohio, as well as to fortify its foundation and future as a viable, competitive power generation resource for its member cooperatives.

  USDA aims to improve internet connectivity in rural America Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is offering up to $600 million in loans and grants to help build broadband infrastructure in rural America. Telecommunications companies, rural electric cooperatives and utilities, internet service providers, and municipalities may apply for funding through USDA’s new ReConnect Program to connect rural areas that currently have insufficient broadband service. USDA will make available $200 million for grants, as well as $200 million for loan and grant combinations, and $200 million for low-interest loans. Projects funded through this initiative must serve communities with fewer than 2,0 people and with no or slow broadband service.

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   23


24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


It’s gone the way of the milkman, but ice delivery used to be big business.

BY CRAIG SPRINGER

L

et’s look to the future: It’s mid-July and incredibly hot, just as it’s been every summer. On one of those 80-80 days — in the ballpark of 80 degrees accompanied by 80 percent humidity — the condensation pools on the table around the base of your glass of iced tea. Conveniently, ice is but a few steps away. Open the freezer, twist a white rectangular tray, and cubes fall out; push a button on the door and crescent-shaped ice chips cascade into your glass. It’s the epitome of convenience on a hot summer day that, frankly, right now seems far distant as the cold, dark days of February peel slowly off the calendar. Now let’s look to the past: It used to be that weather in February had great bearing on our households and industries, from the breweries of Cincinnati to the meatpacking houses of Cleveland and from the hog farm outside Marietta to the households at Defiance.

Photos from around the 1890s show an ice harvest (top) and the summer ice storage house (right) at Riverside Park in Findlay, as well as a delivery wagon from the People’s Ice and Coal Company. (Images courtesy Hancock Historical Museum, Findlay)

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


ice from the Blanchard River. “Each ice house could hold about 10,000 tons of ice,” says Bennett. The competition was so stiff, an “ice war” erupted between the competitors. “To keep the peace, the city council had to divide the river into sections between the two companies.” But that pace of business would not last; the market for ice would eventually thaw. The clomp of horse hooves pulling a snow plow and the rasp of a deeply serrated saw were sounds heard through the winters well into the early 1900s. Sawyers cut cubes of ice as large as 2 feet on a side — not too large to handle — then conveyed them to a storehouse where they were packed with insulating sawdust. The whole affair was labor-intensive and dangerous; the threat of hypothermia or being crushed by ice was ever-present. Modernization streamlined operations as hand-powered tools yielded to gas-powered implements. In the countryside, farmers cut and stored their own ice. But in the urban areas, a horse-drawn cart with a bed full of ice, ice picks, and large iron tongs covered by a patina of use were a common sight.

February was, and still is, the last month when the weather lends itself to reliably freeze ponds and streams across the state. That was once critical to businesses and home economies. Ice production and harvest was an important industry across Ohio until the advent of modern refrigeration. In all corners of Ohio, homes and industries relied on the cold winter weather and commercial ice harvesters to deliver cakes of frozen water that would make it through the hottest parts of the year. February’s ice chilled stored meats and vegetables all the way through to autumn. Doctors cautioned that iced water caused gum and tooth disease and stomach ailments, but brewers and meatpackers relied on commercial ice houses to keep the wheels of business rolling year-round. Brewers used ice to regulate fermentation, and packers needed ice to store and deliver meats, keeping spoilage at bay. The commercial ice industry started circa 1830 in New England and spread through the upper Midwest. Commercial ice houses were well-established in Ohio by the mid- to late 19th century. According to Joy Bennett, curator and archivist at the Hancock Historical Museum in Findlay, two ice houses in Findlay kept up rigorous businesses and competed for customers, both harvesting An ice harvesting operation on the Blanchard River near Findlay, just before prime season. (Courtesy Hancock Historical Museum, Findlay); Top: a deliveryman preparing for a weekly stop. (Library of Congress)

26   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


Among our more senior set, there are those of us who still remember home delivery of milk — the glass jugs with circular stiff paper lids set out on the porch in metal crates — a method of distribution from dairies that lasted up to the 1960s. Much in the same fashion, the ice man would come throughout the year, delivering cakes of ice to homes for domestic consumption. Folks inside the house would put a card in the window, indicating what size block of ice to leave, from 25 to 100 pounds. Because chilled air sinks, the ice cakes were placed in the top of a cabinet to chill the food items below. Today, the “ice box” is still often found on the top of the refrigerator to maximize efficiency. The press of a button now delivers in an instant what took many men many months and much material and space to deliver to the consumer. Modernization would ring the death knell for ice harvesting; refrigeration as we know it today killed the entire industry. Modern refrigerators were mass produced by the 1920s, turning ice ponds and storehouses into artifacts.

A turn-of-the-century ice harvest (top) and Ohio workers manufacturing the iceboxes that would use those “crops” all summer long. (Courtesy Ohio History Connection)

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   27


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MOVERS AND SHAKERS Short line railroads fill a vital economic role in rural areas STORY AND PHOTOS BY KEVIN WILLIAMS

30   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


Engine 5255, a 100-ton locomotive christened in 1979, is Indiana Eastern Railroad’s “work-horse” that pulls cargo to and from New Haven, Ohio.

L

ayhigh Road is a little-traveled ribbon of asphalt in rural western Butler County. Occasionally, however, a traveler might encounter a sleek, black locomotive emerging from the woods and thundering down the track that crosses Layhigh behind an X-shaped crossbuck. As quickly as the locomotive appears, it fades away, a phantom train in broad daylight. “Some people who live along this line say they have never seen a train here,” says Jason Bynum, the engineer who drives the Indiana Eastern Railroad (IERR) train on its twice-weekly runs. Most people living along the tracks are away at work when it passes. Grain, solvents, acids, cardboard, and coal are just some of the cargo hauled by what are more formally called Class III (short line) rails. The short lines are the scrappy, nimble rails that do what the big ones (Class I) — think CSX or Norfolk Southern — don’t or can’t. Indiana Eastern has a sister line, Ohio South Central Railroad, that honeycombs through the hardscrabble hills of Appalachia in Jackson County, where the rails serve businesses as diverse as Austin Powder, an almost twocentury-old maker of explosives, and Totino’s Pizza Rolls, which are made in Jackson. The headquarters of Ohio South Central is in the Vinton County town of Hamden. The nerve center of the IERR is a converted former farmhouse just across the state line from Butler County. On an overcast December morning, Bynum, officially IERR’s operations manager, and conductor Tony Pickens go over paperwork and plan their day, which will include a 26-mile trip to two chemical plants in New Haven, Ohio.

Tony Pickens activates a derail switch, which provides an added level of safety when transporting materials.

Before the locomotive and five chemical cars can set off, though, there is work to be done. They can’t grab just any chemical car. You can’t, for example, put sulfuric acid in a tanker that once held liquid nitrogen. So, they have to make sure to pull the correct car out of storage on a siding track, “which is like shuffling a deck of cards,” Bynum says.

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   31


In this case, the “cards” are 250,000-pound chunks of steel. On this morning, the tank car they want is 11 deep in a line, so Pickens has to pull 10 cars off the siding onto the main track. Bynum backs them far enough to get them out of the way, throws the train into reverse and hooks to the needed car, pulls it onto the track, and then hooks back to the 11 unneeded cars and deposits them back onto the siding. The entire process of plucking cars out of storage with all the associated maneuvering takes almost 90 minutes. Once the lineup is set, the 261,000-pound locomotive begins chugging southwestward at a peak speed of 25 mph through farm fields harvested bare for the winter. The train thunders through the town of Bath, Indiana, and then crosses the border into Ohio. Farm fields gradually give way to

The short line chugs across a span that crosses the confluence of Buck Creek and Dry Fork Creek, providing some of the most stunning vistas of the journey. Engineer Jason Bynum (left) dutifully keeps the trains moving and on schedule.

32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


Tony Pickens watches for anything amiss or unsafe during the typically uneventful journey through Butler County. The train here is stopped at Nutrien, a phosphate company in New Haven.

a bucolic countryside of hamlets and hills. The track crosses Buck Creek over a dramatic trestle bridge and then ambles alongside Paddy’s Run Creek near Shandon, an area that once attracted Welsh settlers who were drawn to the area by its resemblance to their home country. “It’s all personal. It’s not just a job,” Pickens says. Pickens spent nine years working for CSX, one of the largest railroads in the country. He’s now spent 13 years at the “wheel” at IERR because he likes the variety that a short line offers. The entire operation is run by Pickens, Bynum, and Scott Vance, IERR’s track inspector, who can also step seamlessly into the role of conductor or engineer, if needed. They replace railroad ties, fix retaining walls, cut back brush from the tracks, install and maintain crossing equipment, and help drum up business for their line. They keep a chainsaw on board the train in case they happen upon a fallen tree on the tracks. “The reason we are successful is that we have maintained a low administrative overhead,” says George Andres, who owns both railroads. “We have good, dedicated people who are cross-trained. That gives us flexibility in how we operate, it keeps costs down, and it lets us maintain a personal relationship with all of our customers.” The short lines serve as a vital economic lifeline for rural Ohio. “The train is pretty much the lifeblood of our process,” says Jeff Baker, production manager at Nutrien, one of the plants Bynum’s train services in New Haven. Nutrien has food-grade phosphate brought in by train, Baker says, because getting the needed volume by truck wouldn’t be cost-effective. The Ohio Rail Association (ORA), an advocacy group for the state’s short lines, takes any opportunity to highlight the economic-vitality aspect. “Short lines are critical in so many ways,” says Art Arnold, president of the ORA. “They are local employers and economic-development lifelines, whether they are bringing in materials or hauling out product.”

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   33


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FEBRUARY 2019 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST

FEB. 9 – Lima Symphony: “A Heart’s Longing,” Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $15–$30. An evening devoted to the vividly emotional masterworks of Tchaikovsky, featuring violinist Tai Murray. 419-224-1552 or www. limaciviccenter.com. FEB. 7–10 – Greater Toledo Auto Show, Seagate Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave., Toledo, Thur. 3–9 p.m., Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $8, Srs./Stds. $6, under 10 free. Displays of the latest and greatest models and automotive technologies from 26 different manufacturers. 419-255-3300 or http://toledoautoshow.org.

FEB. 2 – Ice-A-Fair, 685 Main St., Vermilion, 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Free daylong event for the entire family, featuring glittering ice sculptures and ice carving demos throughout the day. Ends with a towering Fire and Ice display. 440-963-0772 or www.mainstreetvermilion.org. FEB. 2–3 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima (2 miles east of Lima on St. Rte. 309), Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, free for members, under 18 free. Over 400 tables of modern and antique guns, knives, hunting equipment, and associated collectibles for purchase. 419-647-0067 or www. tristategunshow.org.

CENTRAL

FEB. 2 – Advanced Grafting the Right Way, Dawes Arboretum Greenhouse Classroom, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 8:30–11:30 a.m, $30/$40 non-members. Continue on your path of learning and developing skill in plant grafting at this hands-on workshop to increase the survivability of grafts. Rootstock and scion wood are provided; attendees may bring their own scion wood, if appropriate rootstock is available (call to verify). Participants take home the material they graft to nurture. Intended for those who participated in previous grafting workshops. Register by Jan. 31 at 800-443-2937 or www.dawesarb.org. FEB. 2 – Lancaster Antique Show, Fairfield Co. Fgds., Farm Bureau Bldg., 157 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $6.

WEST VIRGINIA

FEB. 16–18 – Horse-Drawn Sleigh Rides, Spiegel Grove, Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library and Museums, Fremont. $3, under 3 free. Celebrate Presidents Day weekend by riding in a horse-drawn sleigh through the Hayes estate. A horse-drawn trolley may be used instead, depending on demand and staffing levels. 800998-7737 or www.rbhayes.org.

FEB. 17 – Bedazzle Bridal Expo, Wyandot Co. Fgds., Masters Bldg., 10171 St. Hwy. 53 N., Upper Sandusky, 12–2:30 p.m. $7. Over 40 exhibitors showcase their products and services that create and FEB. 8–9 – Winterfest BG Chillabration, Bowling Green, Fri. 10 enhance that special day for the bride. Includes photography, event a.m.–9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–11 p.m. Free. Featuring the Frozen Swamp Tent, winter market, entertainment, craft beer and wine, ice garden, planning, tuxedo rental, dresses, catering, and more. Resources for ice sculpting demos, and horse-drawn carriage rides. 419-353-9445 or other special events as well. 419-294-3349 or http://wyandotchamber. com/events-calendar/bridal-expo. www.gobgohio.com. FEB. 13 – Rock of Ages: Tenth Anniversary Tour, Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. Starting at $44. A rock/jukebox musical built around classic rock songs from the 1980s, especially from the famous glam metal bands of that decade. Nominated for five Tony Awards, including Best Musical. 419-224-1552 or www.limaciviccenter.com. FEB. 15–17 – HBA House and Home Show, SeaGate Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave., Toledo, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $10 at door, $5 in advance, under 12 free. Talk directly to the experts about your dreams of updating the inside

FEB. 17 – Peg + Cat Live!, Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 2 p.m. $19–$54. Based on the Emmywinning PBS Kids show, this musical features wild comedy, countless favorite songs from the show, and Peg’s super coolest pal Ramone. 419-224-1552 or www.limaciviccenter.com. FEB. 24 – Candid Camera: 8 Decades of Smiles with Peter Funt, Niswonger Performing Arts Ctr., 10700 St. Rte. 118 S., Van Wert, 3 p.m. $20–$30. The fast-paced comedy show combines the funniest clips from Candid Camera’s library with onstage surprises and hilarious audience participation. 419-238-6722 or www.npacvw.org.

Reception and early buying on Friday, Feb. 1, 6–8 p.m.; $10 admission includes Saturday’s show. More than 35 dealers specializing in country and period antiques, stoneware, decorative arts, and more. 614-325-8873, 614-989-5811, or www.facebook. com/lancasterantiqueshow.

FEB. 15 – Improv in the May, Marion Palace Theatre May Pavilion, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7:30 p.m. $5. Members of the audience suggest ideas for the games and skits that seasoned stage actors perform. It’s a night of hilarious and unpredictable fun. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

FEB. 2 – Movie Night at the Majestic: Steel Magnolias, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7 p.m. $5. www. majesticchillicothe.net.

FEB. 16–24 – Columbus Dispatch Home and Garden Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker Bldg. and Celeste Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun.–Thur. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., closed Tues., Fri. 11–8 p.m. Expertise from local gurus and craftsmen, how-to sessions and demos, fun for the kids, giveaways, celebrity appearances, and much more. www.dispatchshows.com/springhome-and-garden-show.

FEB. 8–10 – AAA Great Vacations Travel Expo, Ohio Expo Ctr., Kasich Hall, 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. 12–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $8, under 17 free; $4 for AAA members. Talk one-on-one with travel experts and find vacation packages to fit every budget and interest. Fun activities for the whole family. www.aaagreatvacations.com. THROUGH MAR. 3 – “Orchids,” Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus, daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $11–$18, under 3 free. The annual orchid display reaches new heights as these unique flowers take to hanging baskets and suspended sculptural displays. 614-715-8000 or www.fpconservatory.org.

of your home, sprucing up your curb appeal, or building a brandnew home … all under one roof! www.toledohba.com or www. toledohomeshow.com.

FEB. 8–10 – Columbus Fishing Expo, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. noon–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $12, Srs. $10, under 18 free. Military/first responders with ID, $10. Three days of sport fishing education and fun, with educational seminars, speakers, and activities to expand your knowledge of fishing. 614-361-5548 or www. columbusfishingexpo.com. FEB. 8–10 – The Tale of Snow White, Palace Productions, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $18 adults, $12 children. Performed by local youth, this fresh and funny stage adaptation is loaded with bright new faces and comedic twists. 740-383-2101 or www. marionpalace.org. FEB. 9 – Sweethearts Hike, Hocking Hills, 19852 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan, 5–7 p.m. Free. Take your sweetheart for a romantic stroll to Ash Cave in the soft light of dusk. Afterward, enjoy a cozy fire and refreshments. 740-385-6842 or http://parks. ohiodnr.gov/hockinghills

THROUGH MAR. 31 – Honeymoon and Anniversary Packages, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. $80–$120. 800-CALL-WVA or www.northbendsp.com. FEB. 10 – Hodgesville Lions Club Spaghetti Dinner, Warren District Community Ctr., 70 Hackers Creek Rd., Hodgesville, 12–5 p.m. Homemade spaghetti sauce! Brooms for sale. Please bring old eyeglasses for recycling. 304-472-3455.

36   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019

FEB. 17 – Fairfield County Antique Tractor Club Toy and Tractor Show, Fairfield Co. Fgds., AAA Building, 157 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Featuring Allis Chalmers. 740-407-2347 (Doug Shaw) or www.fairfieldcountytractorclub.com. FEB. 22 – America, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 8 p.m. $34–$58. One of the top-selling acts of the 1970s, folk-rock band America hits the stage to perform their biggest hits. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. FEB. 22 – Maple Syrup Family Night, Dawes Arboretum, Main Shelter House, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 6–7:30 p.m. Join Arboretum staff for this sweet night hike through the Deep Woods. We’ll explore the history of maple syrup production, and then stop at the Log Cabin to warm up next to a roaring fire with snacks and maple syrup tastings. 740-323-2355 or www.dawesarb.org. FEB. 23 – Motown Sounds of Touch, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7:30–9 p.m. $18–$20. The Midwest’s number one “Motown sound” vocal group performs all your favorite Motown hits. www.majesticchillicothe.net.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/ website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

NORTHEAST

FEB. 8 – Adult Swim: Wine and Chocolate, Greater Cleveland Aquarium, 2000 Sycamore St., Cleveland, 7–10 p.m. The perfect date night leading up to Valentine’s Day! Sample a variety of wines that pair well with chocolate. Also enjoy full after-hours access to the Aquarium. http://greaterclevelandaquarium.com/discover/ events/adult-swim-tasting-series. FEB. 10 – Mansfield Train Show, hosted by Denny’s Trains, Richland Co. Fgds., 750 N. Home Rd., Mansfield, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 12 free. Free parking. Over 150 tables of train-related items. Several operating layouts, operating G scale Thomas train, and kids’ area with a small riding Thomas train. Contact Dennis Breese at 419-606-7934.

FEB. 1–10 – The Great Big Home and Garden Show, IX Center, 1 I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Mon.–Fri. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun.10 a.m.–5 p.m. (till 6 p.m. on final day). $10–$15, C. (6–12) $5, under 6 free. Explore more than 600 exhibits, engage with more than 1,000 experts, and tour featured homes and the garden showcase. 440-248-5729 or www.greatbighomeandgarden.com. FEB. 2 – Mid-Winter Stamp and Coin Show, Mozelle Hall, Ashland Co. Fgds., 2042 Claremont Ave., Ashland, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Free admission and parking. pastortom1323@gmail.com. FEB. 3 – Model Railroad and Toy Show, Medina Co. Fgds. Community Ctr., 735 Lafayette Rd. (St. Rte. 42), Medina. $6. 330948-4400 or www.conraddowdell.com.

SOUTHEAST

FEB. 15–16 – Great Backyard Bird Count, The West Woods Nature Center, 9465 Kinsman Rd. (Rte. 87), Russell and Newbury Twps., Russell, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Become an official citizen scientist and participate in this worldwide bird count coordinated by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society. Stop by the nature center to help compile a list of birds seen at the big windows. www.geaugaparkdistrict.org. FEB. 16 – Sweetheart Hike, Mohican State Park, 3116 St. Rte. 3, Loudonville, 7–8 p.m. Bring your sweetheart for a romantic stroll through the Mohican Forest. The Gazebo Trail leads through beautiful old-growth trees to the gazebo, which has a beautiful view of Pleasant Hill Lake. Enjoy a cozy fire at the lodge after the hike. 419-994-5125 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/Mohican. FEB. 18 – Presidents Day Celebration, McKinley Museum, 800 McKinley Monument Dr. N., Canton, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Activities scheduled throughout the day. Gallery tours at 11 and 1 p.m., meet-

around the Ohio Valley as well as several other craftsmen who work in the manner of the 18th and 19th centuries. Also featured will be horn makers, hunting bag makers, leather workers, tinsmithing, cabinet making, and other allied trades. 740-373-3750 or www. campusmartiusmuseum.org. FEB. 9 – Crystal Gayle, Peoples Bank Theatre, 222 Putnam St., Marietta, 8 p.m. Starting at $44. www.peoplesbanktheatre.com.

FEB. 9 – Contemporary Gun Makers and Allied Artists, Campus Martius Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta, 9:30 a.m.– 4 p.m. Features the work of several dozen traditional gunmakers from

SOUTHWEST

FEB. 6, 13, 20, 27 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Free admission. Enjoy dinner and an evening of lively bluegrass music. Reservations recommended. 513-385-9309 or www. vinokletwines.com. FEB. 8, MAR. 1 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Butler County Coon Hunters Club, 200 Warwick Rd., Hamilton, 7–9 p.m. Donations accepted. Enjoy an evening of lively bluegrass music with

and-greet with President McKinley at 12 and 2 p.m. 330-455-7043 or http://mckinleymuseum.org. FEB. 22–23 – Lake Erie Folk Fest, Shore Cultural Centre, 291 E. 222nd St., Euclid. Kids’ school program (grades 2–6) and community dance on Friday. Free music workshops, community jams, dances, and performances on Saturday, followed by an evening concert. 216-289-8578, lakeeriefolkfest@gmail.com, or www.lakeeriefolkfest.com. FEB. 22–23 – Spring Arts and Crafts Show, Fisher Auditorium, Shisler Conference Ctr., 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission and parking. Sponsored by the Wayne County Arts and Crafts Guild. 120 vendors. Floral designs, bunnies, jewelry, wooden and fabric items, glass block and wine bottle lights, candies, stained glass, handwoven baskets and rugs, candles, soaps, and seasonal and garden décor will be among the handcrafted merchandise for sale. Lunch available on site. 330-682-2926. FEB. 22–MAR. 3 – Cleveland Auto Show, IX Center, One I-X Dr., Cleveland. $13, Srs./C. (7–12) $11, under 7 free. Indoor test drives, vehicle giveaway, classic car competition, and other special features. See website for hours and schedule of events. www. clevelandautoshow.com. FEB. 23–24– Brite Winter, West Bank of the Flats, Cleveland, Sat. 3 p.m.–Sun. 1 a.m. Free and open to the public; VIP packages available. Enjoy diverse musical acts, artwork, and fun outdoor activities. www.britewinter.com.

FEB. 12 – Jim Brickman, Vern Riffe Ctr., 940 Second St., Portsmouth, 7:30 p.m. $15–$45. 740-351-3600 or https://vrcfa.com. FEB. 15–17, 22–24 – Mamma Mia!, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge. $8–$10. ABBA’s hits tell the hilarious story of a teen’s search for her birth father on a Greek island paradise. Featuring local talent. 740-439-7009 or www. pritchardlaughlin.com.

FEB. 9 – Jammin’ for Johnson, Cambridge Eagles Club, 1930 FEB. 16–17 – Heritage Arms Gun Show, Pritchard Laughlin Civic E. Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, 8 p.m. $10 per person, $15 per Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge, Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 couple. Annual fundraiser in memory of the late “Bunk” Johnson. a.m.–4 p.m. 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com. 740-432-4550. FEB. 21 – Chamber of Commerce Annual Dinner, Pritchard FEB. 9 – Winter Hike, Burr Oak State Park, 10220 Burr Oak Lodge Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge. 740-439Rd., Glouster, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. Join fellow outdoors enthusiasts 6688 or http://cambridgeohiochamber.com. for a great day of hiking! Hike lengths are 3, 5, and 8 miles. Enjoy free bean soup and corn bread after the hike at the lodge. 740-7673570 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/burroak.

lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Good food available on site. 513-607-1874 or www. fotmc.com/calendar.

p.m. Free. Enjoy an evening of lively banjo, fiddle, and guitar with Vernon and Kitty McIntyre and guest Robert Campbell. 937-435-3700.

FEB. 9–10 – Jungle Jim’s Big Cheese Festival, Oscar Event Ctr., Jungle Jim’s International Market, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 12–5 p.m. $15 adults, $2 kids; VIP tickets available. Sample amazing cheeses plus a variety of meats, olives, and other appetizers, as well as fabulous beers and wines. 513-674-6055 or www.junglejims.com/ bigcheesefest.

FEB. 23 – Guided Winter Hike at Fort Hill, 13614 Fort Hill Rd., Hillsboro. Join botanists/naturalists Ann Geise and Marjie Becus on a free 5-mile guided hike, where you will observe the winter landscape and wildlife, identify trees and plants in their winter form, and look for early signs of spring. Space is limited and registration is required. http://arcofappalachia.org/winter-hike.

FEB. 16–24 – Disney’s The Jungle Book KIDS, Taft Theater, 317 E. 5th St., Cincinnati, 2 p.m. $10–$35. Specially adapted from the classic Disney animated film, this musical features a host of colorful characters and your favorite songs from the animated movie. 800745-3000 or www.thechildrenstheatre.com.

FEB. 23–24 – Dayton Off-Road Expo, Roberts Centre, 123 Gano Rd., Wilmington, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Vendors, Jeeps, monster trucks, and more! Fun for the whole family. 877-428-4748 or www.daytonoffroadexpo.com.

FEB. 17 – Dayton’s Premier Bridal Showcase, Marriott at the University of Dayton, 1414 South Patterson Blvd., Dayton, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. $8 at door, under 13 free. 949-830-2952 or http:// ohiobridalexpos.com. FEB. 17 – Springfield Swap Meet and Car Show (formerly VCAA Show), 4401 S. Charleston Pike, Springfield, 8 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, free parking. 937-376-0111, info@ohioswapmeet.com, or http:// ohioswapmeet.com. FEB. 18 – Monday Music Festival: McIntyre Bluegrass Trio, Woodbourne Library, 6060 Far Hills Ave., Centerville, 6:30–8:30

FEB. 23–24 – 20th Century Cincinnati, Sharonville Convention Ctr., 11355 Chester Rd., Cincinnati, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Preview starts Saturday at 9 a.m. $8 adult admission covers both days. Vintage art, furnishings, lighting, jewelry, and apparel from the art deco, midcentury modern, and op/pop eras. Over 70 vendors. 513-7387256 or www.20thcenturycincinnati.com. MAR. 2 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Sterling Bluegrass Jamboree, 26 E. Main St., Mt. Sterling, 5:30 p.m., following house band at 5 p.m. Enjoy an evening of lively bluegrass music with lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. 614-323-6938, sterlingbluegrassjamboree@gmail. com, or www.sterlingbluegrassjamboree.com/upcoming-events.

FEBRUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


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38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019

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SUPER COUPON

1,000+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com

BLUE

cu. in. of storage SUPER COUPON •• 15,000 700 lb. capacity

30", 5 DRAWER MECHANIC'S CARTS

ITEM 64031

• Weighs 139 lbs.

BLACK RED

ITEM 64059 64061 64060 shown

GREEN

21999

YOUR CHOICE

*19122313 * 19122313

NOW IN

COMPARE TO

SAVE $610

$

Snap-on

BLUE-POINT

Customer Rating

• 5 mil thickness

$5 99

COMPARE TO

VENOM $ 97

14

TAPE MEASURE • Thumb Lock • Rubber Wrapped Case

ITEM 56239 64720 shown

7

ITEM 97581, 97582, 37051, 37052, 64417, 64418, 61363, 68497, 61360, 61359, 68498, 68496 shown

ITEM*

KOMELON $ 98

6

MODEL: L4825HV

*27446240 * 27446240

ITEM 69030/69080/69031 shown

*19120063 * 19120063 Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/25/19 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.

SUPER Customer Rating COUPON

18" WORKING PLATFORM RAPID PUMP 1.5 TON STEP STOOL LIGHTWEIGHT ALUMINUM Customer Rating FLOOR JACK • 350 lb. capacity

29

NOW

99 $

COMPARE TO

GPL

ITEM 64527

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trencher/backhoe, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/25/19.

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

SAVE 33%

20% OFF ANY SINGLE

COMPARE TO

YELLOW

800

FIXED SHADE WELDING HELMET NOW

$

$ 99

MODEL: VEN4145

ANY PURCHASE

$1 999

NOW

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ORANGE

ITEM 56238 64722 shown

MODEL: KRBC10TBPES

SUPER COUPON

POWDER-FREE NITRILE GLOVES PACK OF 100

ITEM 56237 64721 shown

FANTASTIC 9 $1 899 6 COLORS

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

WITH

Customer Rating ITEM 64032 1" x 25 FT. 64030 64033 shown

$

FREE

SUPER COUPON

$1 9

5145 SAVE

99

61% $2999

MODEL: H-21

ITEM 62515/66911 shown

®

• 3-1/2 pumps lifts most vehicles • Lifts from 3-1/2" to 14-1/8" • Weighs 34 lbs.

NOW

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9 $599

COMPARE TO

K TOOL $ 68

125

$

MODEL: KTI63094

7999

ITEM 64545/64552/64832 68053/62160/62496/62516/60569 shown

*19176767 * 19176767

*19181711 * 19181711

*19190204 * 19190204

*19199244 * 19199244

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

SUPER COUPON

20 TON SHOP PRESS

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

• Extreme heavy duty steel construction

$139

COMPARE TO

STRONGWAY $ 99

309

MODEL: 46260

$

4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER 10" SLIDING COMPOUND MITER SAW • Powerful 15 amp motor Customer Rating NOW

$9999

NOW

99

SAVE 65%

184

99

$

COMPARE TO

PERFORMAX $ 99

$

28

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MODEL: 2411-1

ITEM 32879/60603 shown

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

NOW

$999

14

99

ITEM 69645/95578/60625 shown

124

99

COMPARE TO

KOBALT $

199

SOLAR ROPE LIGHT

$

1299NOW

$8 99

SAVE $ 99

29

MODEL: SM2507LW

Blade sold separately.

ITEM 61972/61971 shown

Customer Rating

• Great outdoor accent lighting • Super bright light

$ 97 COMPARE TO HAMPTON BAY MODEL: 82056-055SR

SAVE 70%

ITEM 62533/63941/64625/68353 shown

*19214380 * 19214380

*19228949 * 19228949

*19230903 * 19230903

*19240660 * 19240660

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

72" x 80" 40 VOLT LITHIUM CORDLESS MOVING BRUSHLESS CHAIN SAW BLANKET 14" Customer Rating

BLUE HAWK $ 99

19

MODEL: 77280

DRIVE 1/4" 3/8" 1/2"

NOW

SAVE 70%

ITEM 69505/62418/66537 shown

$5

99 SAVE $ 25

8

$ 99

$

NOW

17999 $154

99

ITEM 64715/64478/63287 shown

ITEM 61277/63881/2696 61276/63880/807 62431/63882/239

COMPARE TO

HUSKY $ 97

84

MODEL: H2DTWA

SUPER Customer Rating COUPON

CLICK-TYPE 4 CHANNEL WIRELESS TORQUE WRENCHES SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM WITH 2 CAMERAS • Reversible

Customer Rating

COMPARE TO

SUPER COUPON

Item 239 shown

E YOUR CHOIC

SAVE $ 99 88% 19

$9

99

• Night vision

NOW

99 $229 $

24999

SAVE $ 120

349

$ 99 ITEM COMPARE TO MODEL: ALC-AWS3266 63842 ALC

*19244757 * 19244757

*19250954 * 19250954

*19263010 * 19263010

*19267591 * 19267591

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

2/10/50 AMP, 12 VOLT 16 OZ. HAMMERS BATTERY CHARGER AND WITH FIBERGLASS ENGINE STARTER HANDLE Customer Rating

SAVE 50% $5299

COMPARE TO

59

NOW

9 $299

99 SCHUMACHER $ ITEM 60581 MODEL: SE-1250 ELECTRIC 66783/60653 shown

SAVE 70%

Item 47873 shown

COMPARE TO

KOBALT $ 98

9

MODEL: 62742

TYPE CLAW RIP

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

1 TON CAPACITY 3-POINT FOLDABLE QUICK SHOP CRANE HITCH • Boom extends from

Customer Rating 36-1/4" to 50-1/4" • Crane height adjusts from 82" to 94" • 2000 lb. capacity NOW • 27-3/16" clearance

YOUR CHOICE

$299

4

$ 99

ITEM 69006/60715/60714/47872 69005/61262/47873

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

99 $129

199 SAVE $ IRONTON 70 $ ITEM 61858/69512/69445 shown COMPARE TO

$

99

MODEL: 46218

179

99

COMPARE TO

DOUBLE HH

$

NOW

9 $799 $

9999

15999 SAVE $80

MODEL: 10712

*19269889 * 19269889

*19280476 * 19280476

*19287776 * 19287776

*19309260 * 19309260

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/25/19*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 5/25/19.

ITEM 97214

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

D 1

u w o y ant to o 2

d l i bu

w o m n s an a

3

?

1.  Our beautiful baby snowman, Katherine Diane. David and Tiffany Heidell South Central Power Company members

2.  Grandma Lois, granddaughter Macie, and Farmer Fred, the snowman, in the front yard of our home. Tom and Lois Hobart

4

Frontier Power Company members

5

3.  My brother-in-law and brothers, Brian, Jared, and Joel, made a snowman to put a smile on our brother-in-law Rob’s face after his father’s funeral. Michelle and Matt Seger Pioneer Electric Cooperative members

6

4.  Our sweet grandchildren, Jaime and Jeffrey, building a snowman. Patty and Larry Quaglia South Central Power Company members

5.  My grandkids, Camden and Alizah, made a snowman of their baby sister, Jazmin. Camden Winans

7

South Central Power Company member

6.  My 2-year-old grandson, John Henry Schaffner, with his first snowman. Deb Schaffner Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative member

8

7.  We all had a great time building this one on a cold but sunny day. Judy Wells Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative member

8.  We came across the biggest snowman ever. Katie Grubba South Central Power Company member

Send us your picture! For May, send “Sensory Overload” (use your imagination!) by Feb. 14; for June, send “Creature Comfort” (animals, but not pets) by March 15. Upload your photos at www. ohioec.org/memberinteractive and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in your photos.

40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2019


5

We earn the trust of members quick tips to save every day through these

four core values:

1

energy during winter Seal air leaks and COMMITMENT insulate well to prevent heat from TO COMMUNITY escaping and cold air from entering your home.

4

INTEGRITY

2 3

Lower your water heater temperature. The Dept. of Energy recommends using the warm setting (120 degrees) during fall and winter months.

ACCOUNTABILITY

INNOVATION

Open blinds and curtains during the day to allow sunlight in to warm your home.

5

Close blinds and curtains at night to keep cold, drafty air out.

68

Set your thermostat to 68 degrees during cold weather.

ohioec.org/purpose ohioec.org/purpose


Profile for Ohio Cooperative Living

Ohio Cooperative Living - February 2019 - Frontier  

Ohio Cooperative Living - February 2019 - Frontier