Page 1

The Frontier Power Company

OďŹƒcial publication | www.frontier-power.com

JANUARY AUGUST 2018

Beacon on the lake The Marblehead Lighthouse watches over Sandusky Bay Also inside Communicating with members in modern times Built on trust: Self-pay farm stands Tecumseh at 250


Be E Smart 3

ENERGY•EFFICIENCY•EDUCATION

• 7 years in Ohio classrooms • 100 teachers given FREE energy curriculum • 35,000 children given FREE energy efficiency items for home • 1 program: Be E3 Smart

ohioec.org/purpose


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018

INSIDE 12

ON A MISSION Coshocton-based MMS Aviation prepares both people and airplanes for missionary service across the globe.

24 A MATTER OF TRUST For selling fresh produce, such as strawberries, the honor system works just fine for farmers at stands across the state.

30 TECUMSEH AT 250 We take a look at the life of the Ohio-born diplomat-warrior who bent the arc of American history.

Cover image on most issues: The iconic Marblehead Lighthouse stands watch at the entrance to Sandusky Bay. Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor, W.H. “Chip” Gross, photographed the oldest lighthouse in continuous service anywhere on the Great Lakes, and profiles the attraction on Page 34.

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 1


UP FRONT

THE

Cooperative DIFFERENCE

T

here’s plenty that separates an electric cooperative from a typical electric utility. Though we provide essentially the same service to our members that other utilities provide to their customers, the Cooperative Difference lies in the “how” rather than the “what.” Your co-op is more accountable to you as a member than a typical utility is to its customers. Electric cooperatives are owned by their members, which means that co-ops focus on members’ needs, as well as on local priorities. Your co-op’s board is made up of members, like yourself, who pay monthly bills. Co-op employees live and work in your community. A cooperative’s commitment to continually improving its service quality, balanced against the cost of providing that service, is an entirely different mindset from big utilities that deliver electricity to their customers while seeking to maximize profits for their shareholders. Co-ops are an integral part of the communities we serve. Each co-op looks and acts a little differently, but a co-op is ultimately a reflection of the values and priorities of the communities it serves. Butler Rural Electric Cooperative, in southwest Ohio, is different from Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, in northeastern Ohio. North Western Electric Cooperative, a smaller co-op in one corner of the state, doesn’t look or act the same as South Central Power, which provides service across parts of 23 counties on the other side of Ohio. They have similar goals, but each co-op is focused on what’s best for its own unique circumstances. Electric cooperatives continue to be more innovative than other utilities, particularly when it comes to making service more reliable or more convenient for our members. Co-ops lead the industry in adopting new technologies and sharing resources and experiences to continually improve results. What the Cooperative Difference means to you is more reliable service; faster, friendlier response; a bill that covers the cost of service, with any profits returned to you over time; roots, presence, and investment in your local community; and people who care about making a difference. That’s the essence of the Cooperative Difference. Thanks for the opportunity to serve you.

2

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Each co-op looks and acts a little differently, but a co-op is ultimately a reflection of the values and priorities of the communities it serves.


AUGUST 2018 • Volume 60, No. 11

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Pat Keegan, Craig Lovelace, Catherine Murray, James Proffitt, Damaine Vonada, and Margie Wuebker. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. It is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES KEEPING THE CONNECTION: Ohio electric cooperatives are

always looking for new ways to communicate with members.

6 OHIO ICON FORT RECOVERY: The historic museum memorializes the

battles that helped determine control of the Northwest Territory.

8 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE PRAIRIE PEDDLER: One of the nation’s leading naturalists works to promote and protect Ohio’s last vestiges of prairie land.

10 CO-OP PEOPLE BEAUTIFUL BELGIANS: Draft horses have been a part of life for

one Fort Loramie family for more than 75 years.

15 GOOD EATS SUMMER MENU: Four courses’ worth of seasonal specialties make

a perfect meal plan for one of those long, hot days.

19 LOCAL PAGES News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO FALCON RESCUE: After workers at the Cardinal Power Plant saved an injured falcon, it was treated, then released back to the wild.

38 CALENDAR The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

WHAT’S HAPPENING: August events and other things to do.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE LET’S GO TO THE FAIR: Co-op members share some special

moments riding rides, showing animals, and having fair fun.

IN THIS ISSUE

Piqua (p.4) Lancaster (p.4) Marysville (p.4) Oxford (p.4) Fort Recovery (p.6) Fredericktown (p.8) Fort Loramie (p.12)

Brilliant (p.23) Ottawa County (p.24,26,34) Huron (p.26) Wapakoneta (p.28) Xenia (p.30)

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 3


POWER LINES

Keeping the Connection

Ohio electric cooperatives are always on the lookout for new ways to communicate with their members

S

omewhere among the archives belonging to Pioneer Electric Cooperative in Piqua is buried a postcard from a member notifying the cooperative that the power was out at his home. “… So, the next time that you are out here, please check it out,” says Nanci McMaken, paraphrasing the document. McMaken, vice president and chief communications officer at Pioneer Electric, has seen lots of changes during her 31 years at the co-op, which serves 16,700 customers in Champaign, Shelby, and Miami counties — but methods of communication has been a big one.

4

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018

BY CRAIG LOVELACE


Exactly how long ago the postcard was written is not known, but there doesn’t seem to be any real sense of urgency to it — just a request to look into the power outage. Postcards were a common way for members to communicate with their cooperatives for a lot of years, and it’s safe to assume that outages were — as they still are — a topic customers chime in on when they occur. Was that Pioneer customer happy, mad, or indifferent about the co-op’s service? There’s no way to tell. In today’s digital age, however, members generally view their dealings positively and are happy that co-ops reach out to interact with them through multiple venues, keeping them tuned in to what’s happening — outages included. The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI), which scientifically measures the satisfaction of U.S. household consumers with the quality of services they use, has rated Ohio cooperatives consistently strongly — well higher than both investor-owned utilities and municipal electric providers. The key drivers of that satisfaction, according to the ACSI surveys, are the

“communications keeping members informed” and having members’ “best interests at heart.” Butler Rural Electric Cooperative in Oxford has earned high satisfaction ratings in recent years, in large part because of its member communications. “We work on communicating with our membership constantly, and technology makes it much easier,” says Lisa Staggs Hermann, Butler Rural Electric’s director of member and community relations.

Even with all the changes over the years, electric cooperatives remain places where consumers can walk in the front door and talk to an employee in person. Mark Owen, communications manager at Lancasterbased South Central Power Company, cites an Easter morning power outage to illustrate the effectiveness of digital platforms in creating conversations with consumermembers. “Our friends in the media weren’t at work, but we were able to use social media and text messaging to give our members an idea of what was going on,” Owen says. “That didn’t exist in the past.” SmartHub and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) are other tools that have significantly increased interaction between cooperative and consumer, giving people ways to track their energy use and pay bills electronically, and to help detect power outages before they happen, among other benefits. “We take advantage of all the latest technology — email, SmartHub, outage texting — and, of course, social media,” says Sue Gibson, communications director for Union Rural Electric Cooperative in Marysville. “We get good feedback, and the participation of our members is huge.” Of course, even with all the changes in communication over the years, electric cooperatives remain places where consumers can walk in the front door and talk to an employee in person — likely even the CEO. Consumers also have access to the board of directors, because those directors are fellow members, often neighbors. While technology has spurred greater engagement, traditional ways of communicating — publications, direct contact, community/philanthropic events — still play an important role as part of the larger effort to keep consumers happy. “Young families are busier than ever, but they need to know they’re members of an electric cooperative that serves them,” Gibson says. “We want to engage our members where they are and in the way that best suits their lifestyle, and we’ll use everything at our disposal to make that happen.”

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

5


OHIO ICON

Fort Recovery STATE MUSEUM Fort Recovery STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: In the village of Fort Recovery, the site near the Wabash River where General “Mad” Anthony Wayne ordered the construction of Fort Recovery in 1793. Provenance: Fort Recovery State Museum exists because of two battles fought to decide whether Native Americans or the United States would control the Northwest Territory. During the Battle of the Wabash in 1791, an Indian coalition commanded by Blue Jacket of the Shawnee and Little Turtle of the Miami trounced the forces of Gen. Arthur St. Clair. Gen. Wayne purposely built Fort Recovery on the very battlefield where the Indians had crushed St. Clair — Wayne’s message to the natives and their British supporters that the United States intended to recover from that humiliation. Led by Blue Jacket and Little Turtle, more than 2,000 warriors stormed the fort in 1794, but thanks largely to Wayne’s expert riflemen, its 250 American defenders prevailed at the Battle of Fort Recovery. The victory weakened Native American resistance, and, the following year, Wayne negotiated the Treaty of Greenville with several tribes, ending years of carnage on Ohio’s frontier and establishing a boundary between Indian and U.S. lands that opened the Northwest Territory for settlement. Significance: The museum pays tribute to both the defeat that spurred the development of America’s military and the victory that helped to define the young United States as a viable player on the world stage. In addition, the museum anchors a cluster of related attractions that includes Fort Recovery Monument Park, where a granite obelisk marks the graves of those killed while serving under St. Clair and Wayne. Dedicated in 1913, Monument Park also features a statue of a frontiersman symbolically facing west. Currently: An Ohio History Connection property operated by the Fort Recovery Historical Society, the museum is celebrating its 80th anniversary this year. The museum, a gorgeous stone building, was a Works Progress Administration project that opened in 1938. It’s a little-known fact that: The museum’s birthday observances include an open house in September and presentations such as “The Forts of Anthony Wayne” by historian David Simmons on Aug. 19.

6

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018

Fort Recovery State Museum, 1 Fort Site St., Fort Recovery, OH 45846. Admission fee. Guided tours by appointment. For information, call 419-375-4649 or 800-283-8920 or visit www. fortrecoverymuseum.com.


Inspiring

OHIOANS FOR MORE THAN

YEARS

ohiohistory.org

AUGUST 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   7


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

OHIO’S

PRAIRIE PEDDLER STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

N

orth America’s prairies once stretched from the foothills of the Rocky Mountains east into western Ohio, a staggering 1 million square miles or more of native grasslands that covered a third to nearly half of our country.

But what took millennia to develop disappeared in only half a century. The transformation began in 1833, when John Lane Sr. created the polished-steel, selfscouring plow, which could penetrate heavy prairie soils. A fellow blacksmith then improved upon Lane’s original design and marketed the new plow aggressively. That second blacksmith was John Deere. By 1852, John Deere’s factories were producing more than 10,000 plows per year. By the beginning of the 20th century, the vast stretches of America’s original virgin tallgrass prairie were essentially gone, converted to cropland.

Bringing back Ohio’s ecological past Guy Denny, a member of Consolidated Cooperative in north-central Ohio, has been actively involved for decades in preserving and promoting the small vestiges of prairie remaining in the Buckeye State. Denny, former director of the Ohio Biological Survey; retired chief of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Natural Areas and Preserves; and current president of the Ohio Natural Areas and Preserves Association, is considered one of the Midwest’s leading naturalists and prairie experts. He has gone well beyond simply advocating for the protection of prairies, though; he’s created his own — a 24-acre stretch on his property near Fredericktown, in rural Knox County. “It’s taken me about 20 years to develop, and I’m still working at it,” Denny says. “To get started, I brought in seeds and plants from prairies across Ohio.” Now growing in profusion on Denny’s prairie are prairie dock, gray-headed coneflower, and numerous varieties of grass and forbs, some reaching heights of 8 to 10 feet. The plants, in turn, attract wildlife — particularly various species of butterflies, bees and other pollinators. “I also regularly see raccoons, deer, coyotes, foxes, and an occasional mink. Prairies are a real mecca for wildlife,” he says.

Making way for new beginnings One of the essential management practices required for maintaining a tallgrass prairie is periodic burning. “Fire burns back the woody vegetation that’s constantly trying to invade the prairie and eventually take it over through natural succession,” he says. He burns his prairie annually during early spring. It’s truly spectacular, with orange flames leaping 30 feet high as they roar across the previous year’s growth of highly combustible dead grasses and other prairie plants. “Fire recycles the smothering blanket of dead plant stems and turns them into useful nutrients,” Denny says. “The fire also stimulates greater growth and seed production in the new prairie plants once they begin growing again in spring.”

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2018


W.H. “CHIP” GROSS is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor. To learn more about prairies in Ohio and across the Midwest, check out Guy Denny’s new book, The Prairie Peninsula, co-authored by Gary Meszaros of Cleveland and published by Kent State University Press. More than 140 of Meszaros’s stunning color photographs illustrate the book.

Discovery and Renewal on Huffman Prairie Where Aviation Took Wing David Nolin The natural history of a resurgent ecosystem and the incubator of human flight Paper, $39.95 ISBN 978-1-60635-346-2

The Prairie Peninsula Gary Meszaros and Guy L. Denny The story of a once vast North American ecosystem Paper, $24.95 ISBN 978-1-60635-320-2

Also available in eBook formats at www.KentStateUniversityPress.com 800-247-6553 Follow us online: @KentStateUPress kentstateuniversitypress

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 9


CO-OP PEOPLE

show

JUST FOR

Draft horses have been a part of one Fort Loramie family’s life for more than 75 years BY MARGIE WUEBKER; PHOTOS COURTEST BARHORST BELGIANS

B

elgians — those big draft horses with gentle dispositions — are beautiful. Just ask brothers George and Ted Barhorst of Fort Loramie. The Barhorst family was honored at the 2017 Ohio State Fair for 75 years of showing Belgian horses. Their grandfather, Bernard Barhorst, started the tradition, which continues today. “I don’t ever remember a time when we didn’t raise, breed, and show Belgians,” Ted says. “We have 12 of them right now.” The brothers grew up on a 240-acre farm in the heart of Pioneer Electric Cooperative territory. Their father, Urban Barhorst, preferred to work with a tractor, but Urban’s brother, Joe, favored horsepower and never set foot on a tractor. George recalls his first trip to the state fairgrounds back in 1948. There were no fancy horse trailers in those days, nor roomy pickup trucks with two rows of seats. He and a young cousin traveled to and from Columbus in a stock truck with the horses. “In those days, the trip took three hours one-way,” he says. “The ride wasn’t bad, but you really had to hang on for fear of falling off your horse.” The Barhorsts never feared working with the horses that are affectionately called “gentle giants” due to their size and disposition — a full-grown Belgian

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018

Top photo: George Barhorst adjusts tack on one of his family’s award-winning Belgians. Above, just a few of the ribbons Barhorst Belgians have won over the years.


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Preparing the draft horses for competitions and parades is no easy task. The routine begins the day before a scheduled event with washing and grooming. The animals seem to enjoy the water, as long as it isn’t sprayed in their faces or ears.

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Braiding the freshly trimmed manes and tails requires a team approach. George stands on a bench to do the manes, using a practice he learned from a crew member of the Budweiser Clydesdales. Ted focuses on the tails.

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Four horses form the hitch for the gleaming wagon, with each sporting up to 150 pounds of harness. The spacious horse trailer features four individual stalls for comfort and safety. Loading and unloading the huge animals is not a problem for the Barhorsts and their legion of helpers (mostly nieces, nephews, and grandchildren). “The horses seem to know when we bring them out that this is their time to shine,” Ted says. “You can hear them start to nicker as we get close to home.”

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The Barhorsts hit 10 to 15 horse shows throughout the summer , though they have cut back on the parade schedule, which once included 10 dates. The family has amassed many awards over the years. Hundreds of trophies line the walls of Ted’s basement, while more than 3,800 colorful ribbons decorate the wagon room in one barn. The amazing display comes as a result of winning accolades at horse shows and exhibitions as close as the Shelby County Fair and as far away as Toronto, Canada. Horses bearing the family’s Bar B moniker have been sold to new owners in 35 states, as well as in Canada, Mexico, Argentina, and Japan. “Raising and showing Belgians involves a lot of hours and a lot of hard work,” Ted says. “But we’ve made a lot of good friends along the way.”

**This trip will not be handicap accessible. Historic and antiquated rail passenger equipment, like that used on this excursion, is exempt from ADA regulations under U.S. Code: Title 42: Section 12184. The passenger cars and station facilities used on this excursion were constructed before disability accessibility laws were adopted. Platforms, boarding areas, stairs, step-stools, seating, and especially doorways, passageways, aisles, and onboard restrooms may not accommodate all passengers. We will make all reasonable efforts to 4:27 PMdifferently Page 1 passengers who desire to ride this train.** accommodate abled

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AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 11


ON A MISSION

MMS Aviation, headquartered at Richard Downing Airport in Coshocton, prepares both people and planes for worldwide missionary service. BY MARGIE WUEBKER

The staff at MMS Aviation, from CEO Phil Maddux (above) on down, is fully funded by donations from hundreds of congregations, individuals, and businesses around the world.

I

n the Christian mission field, it can be difficult, to say the least, to reach remote regions of faraway places such as Honduras, Haiti, Zambia, Papua New Guinea, or Mozambique. Aircraft play a vital role as missionaries deliver food, supplies, and the Word of God in a matter of hours or days to areas that used to require weeks to reach on foot. With such difficult duties, of course, those aircraft require a good deal of repair, overhaul, and routine maintenance. That’s where Missionary Maintenance Services comes in — not just to repair those planes, but to train mechanics who often take that training with them when they fly on missions of their own. “Aircraft play a life-and-death role in the mission field,” says CEO Phil Maddux. “Our goal is to keep those planes flying for people in need.” The operation started more than four decades ago at a rural property near Newcomerstown, Ohio. Jim Miller and his wife, Maxine, family members, and several friends saw that need and established a hands-on apprenticeship program to train people in the trade of airplane repair and maintenance. Back in 1975, the operation included a machine shop in the garage and basement, while a former chicken coop served as the first paint booth. Steady growth led to expansion to the Richard Downing Airport in Coshocton, and MMS now has 16,000 square feet of hangar space and easy runway access. The crew has grown to 25 staff families.

12

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018


“God put together a good group of people in this green metal building,” Maddux says. “We have no payroll, from the newest apprentice to the CEO, as we are supported by hundreds of congregations, individuals, and businesses here in the United States and beyond.” Apprentices embark on a 30-month training program under the supervision of licensed and qualified staff. They learn by doing in a program that supplies aircraft repair, overhaul, and modification free of labor charges to Christian missionary organizations. Those successfully completing the rigorous testing earn Federal Aviation Administration mechanic licenses. Some continue with flight training at other locations, while others head to the mission field, where their services are sorely needed. MMS Aviation also sends rapid response teams into the field for periods ranging from a week to a month or more. Maddux recalls one such trip when team members went to Honduras to assess damage to a Cessna 206 caused by a midair collision with a vulture. While there, they pitched in to diagnose and repair a generator that supplied power to the mission hospital, allowing the surgical schedule to proceed, instead of waiting days or weeks for repair. Maddux figures MMS Aviation has saved missions $1.5 million in labor costs alone, but they also can realize a savings on parts through the program — thanks to benefactors who might donate damaged or unwanted planes as a source for needed parts, and to skilled MMS mechanics, who frequently create parts in the machine shop. The parts list alone for one damaged plane was estimated at $80,000, but MMS personnel put the aircraft together for only around $10,000, according to Maddux. The internet also serves as a source of parts for vintage aircraft, like a recently overhauled 1945 Piper Cub that the mission group Columbia for Christ plans to use for training purposes. Once repairs to an aircraft are complete, team members gather outside before each plane leaves the facility. Well-wishes and prayers precede takeoff — a fitting goodbye for the aircraft that will improve living conditions in the mission field. For additional information, click on www.mmsaviation.org. Tours of the facility, located at 24387 Airport Road, Coshocton, can be arranged by calling 740-622-6848.

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 13


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6/25/18 3:19 PM


SUMMER Specialties Four courses’ worth of seasonal specialties make a meal perfectly fit for a hot summer day. RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY CATHERINE MURRAY

TURKEY BURGERS WITH PICKLED VEGETABLE SLAW Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 20 minutes | Servings: 4 1 tsp. ground coriander ½ cup green cabbage, thinly sliced ½ tsp. garlic powder ½ cup shaved carrot 4 hamburger buns ½ cup shaved cucumber Sauce ½ cup shaved daikon radish 1 Tbsp. rice vinegar 4 Tbsp. cilantro, finely chopped 4 Tbsp. low-fat mayonnaise  ½ cup rice vinegar 1 Tbsp. sriracha chili sauce  1 lb. ground turkey 

To make slaw, combine vegetables, cilantro, and ½ cup rice vinegar in a small bowl. Mix well and set aside. In a separate bowl, combine sauce ingredients and set aside. Divide meat into 4 patties and sprinkle each with coriander and garlic powder. In a medium saucepan, sear two patties at a time over medium heat. Cook thoroughly, approximately 5 minutes each side, until core temperature reaches 165OF. Place burgers on buns and top with vegetable slaw. Spread top buns with sriracha-mayo mixture, place over burgers, and serve. Slaw can be kept for up to 2 weeks in refrigerator.  Per serving: 420 cal.; 19 g total fat (3 g sat. fat); 26 g total carbs; 2 g fiber; 35 g protein.

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 15

3:19 PM


SUMMER HARVEST SALAD Prep: 10 minutes | Servings: 4 4 ears corn 3 cups blueberries 1½ cups roughly chopped basil 1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

¼ cup olive oil 12 oz. fresh spinach 16 oz. grilled chicken breast, diced

Shuck corn, removing any stringy pieces. On a cutting board, slice corn kernels off cob with a large knife. In a medium bowl, mix together corn kernels, 2 cups blueberries, and ½ cup basil. For salad dressing, combine remaining blueberries, remaining basil, white balsamic vinegar, and olive oil. Blend (in blender or food processor) until very smooth, about 2 minutes. Distribute spinach across 4 plates. Top each with blueberry/corn mixture and 4 oz. chicken breast. Drizzle dressing over salads and serve. Per serving: 457 cal.; 18 g total fat (2 g sat. fat); 48 g total carbs; 9 g fiber; 33 g protein.

GOLDEN GARDEN CAKE Prep: 15 minutes | Cook: 40 minutes | Servings: 15 2 Tbsp. lemon zest 2½ cups all-purpose flour 4 eggs 2 cups sugar ½ cup golden raisins, 2 tsp. cinnamon rolled in flour 1 tsp. salt ½ tsp. baking powder Caramel frosting ½ tsp. baking soda 1 cup packed light brown sugar 1½ cups grated yellow squash ½ cup unsalted butter  ½ cup grated carrots ¼ cup milk (or milk substitute) ¾ cup vegetable oil 1 tsp. vanilla ¼ cup water 1½ cups confectioners’ sugar Tip: Use food processor to grate squash and carrots. In a large bowl, mix together dry ingredients. In a medium bowl, mix remaining ingredients except raisins. Pour wet ingredients into dry ingredients and stir until well incorporated. Add raisins and stir. Pour into greased 9-by13-inch pan. Bake at 350OF for 35 to 40 minutes. Test middle of cake with toothpick; cake is done when toothpick comes out clean. Let cool in pan.  To make frosting, combine brown sugar, butter, and milk in saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Stir for 2 minutes and remove from heat. Stir in vanilla. Cool to lukewarm. Gradually whisk in confectioners’ sugar. Pour over cooled cake, spreading evenly. Cut into 15 squares and decorate with edible flowers such as violas and pansies.   Per serving: 414 cal.; 18.5 g total fat (6.5 g sat. fat); 60 g total carbs; 1 g fiber; 4 g protein.

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2018


RUSTIC TOMATO SOUP WITH GARLIC CROUTONS Prep: 20 minutes | Cook: 45 minutes | Servings: 6 Croutons 1 tsp. garlic powder 3 cups day-old cubed bread ½ tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted ¼ tsp. pepper Soup 3 lbs. fresh tomatoes (approx. 6 tomatoes) 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 medium yellow onion, diced 3 carrots, sliced 3 stalks celery, diced 6 cloves garlic, minced

¼ cup sun-dried tomatoes,  chopped 3 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves ½ tsp. pepper 1½ cups chopped fresh   basil leaves

Per serving: 188 cal.; 8 g total fat (3 g sat. fat); 24 g total carbs; 4.5 g fiber; 7 g protein.

Note: Collect bread ends and other leftover pieces of bread in the freezer to make croutons anytime. Preheat oven to 425OF. To make croutons, spread cubed bread onto cookie sheet. Drizzle with melted butter; sprinkle with garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Toss to coat and spread cubes evenly in a single layer. Bake 8 to 10 minutes, or until bread is lightly toasted. Set aside to cool. Store in container with lid propped open on counter for up to 5 days. In a small pot, boil water. Cut a small x shape in bottom of each tomato and gently place in boiling water for 1 minute each. Carefully remove with tongs or large slotted spoon, draining water. Let cool, then peel and discard tomato skin starting at the x. Remove tomato stems and seeds. Roughly chop tomatoes and set aside. In large stockpot, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onion, carrot, and celery, stirring occasionally for 5 to 7 minutes until softened. Add garlic and cook an additional 3 minutes. Add tomatoes, sundried tomatoes, vegetable broth, bay leaves, and pepper. Simmer until vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes. Add basil and stir. Ladle into individual bowls, top with croutons, and serve. 

AUGUST 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


THE EFFICIENCY EXPERT

UNDERSTANDING APPLIANCE ENERGY USE

BY PAT KEEGAN

Inevitably, the appliances in your home are eventually going to need to be replaced. It’s a good time to think about the energy those appliances use, so you can keep that in mind when deciding on a new purchase. It’s best to view cost over the lifetime of the equipment — considering both the upfront and lifetime energy cost. In a recent Consumer Reports test, the most efficient refrigerator used $68 per year less electricity than the least efficient model. Multiply that difference over a decade or two, and the lifetime energy savings could be greater than the upfront cost. All it takes to get the best appliance for your needs is some initial research.

models having the refrigerator stacked on top of the freezer. All 36 of the most efficient clothes washers of 2018 were front-loading models. Also, remember that the more you use an appliance, the greater your savings will be from choosing a more efficient model. If you use the appliance less or have a small household, you may get by with a smaller refrigerator or freezer, which will save you money. Pat Keegan writes on efficiency issues for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

Appliance energy use usually costs less, on average, than home heating and cooling bills, but can be several hundred dollars each year. That use depends on factors like the model, frequency of use, the settings you use, and even the time of day it is most used. Over the last few decades, new appliances became more energy efficient, driven partly by minimum government standards. These standards, created by the U.S. Department of Energy, save consumers over $60 billion each year. Appliances are required to include an Energy Guide label that shows estimated annual energy use and operating cost. These labels help you compare different models and calculate the initial cost against the longterm savings. Some appliances will also have an Energy Star label, which indicates the appliance is substantially more efficient than the minimum standard. The greatest energy savings opportunities can come from replacing an old appliance with an Energy Star-rated appliance. Removing a refrigerator that’s 20 years old and replacing it with a new Energy Star model can lower your monthly refrigeration electricity cost by 75 percent, from $16.50 to less than $4. In some cases, the configuration of the appliance can also make a substantial difference. For example, a side-byside refrigerator/freezer uses about 70 percent more energy than other configurations, with the most efficient 18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2018

All the most efficient 2018 models of washers and dryers were front-loading. Refrigerators are more efficient with the freezer on the bottom.


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

TEXAS LONGHORNS BY SHELLY THOMPSON

exas Longhorn cattle are becoming a distinguished choice for many cattle farms raising beef. Two such breeders are located in Coshocton County. Both Amber and Andy Dunmire of Bonnie Glen Farm, located on Twp. Rd. 50, and Andrew and Abby Morris and their children from Morris Cattle Company, located in the western end of the county on St. Rte. 541, enjoy the benefits and wonderful breed traits that the Texas Longhorns have to offer.

T

at a livestock auction, Andrew noticed a nice-looking Texas Longhorn cow was being sold. The price was right and he purchased it. After doing some research learning about the ideal traits of the breed, he and his family acquired more and began breeding them to where they currently maintain a herd of 100 registered stock. Several of their Longhorns are from different breeders around the country, with many, as well as all their bulls, being from Dickinson Cattle Company in Barnesville, Ohio.

Bonnie Glen Farm has been raising registered Texas Longhorns for about seven years. Once owned by Andy’s grandparents, the farm has always had Shorthorn cattle, and it made sense for the Dunmires to run cattle as well. The love of Longhorns was not intentional. After visiting one of Amber’s friends in Holmes County who raised Texas Longhorns, Andy fell in love with the breed. Their first bull was then purchased from her. To build the herd and begin their own line of Texas Longhorns, the Dunmires purchased calves from a second breeder, and a young cow from a third breeder. Amber stated that over time, they have acquired stock from almost every breeder in Ohio in order to improve their own herd, and have recently purchased a steer from Texas. Andy and Amber currently manage about 25 to 30 head of Texas Longhorns, with all being registered and branded.

The Texas Longhorn is a breed that has many impressive traits. Grass-fed Texas Longhorn beef is typically lower in calories, fat, and cholesterol. Most Texas Longhorn breeders do not add growth hormones, antibiotics, steroids, or artificial or synthetic additives. These cattle are usually easy to breed and rarely require a calf to be pulled. Texas Longhorn cows are known to be good mothers, even first-time heifers. The breed is also known for its calm, docile temperament — so much so that Longhorn shows usually offer non-haltered classes. Another enticing trait of the Longhorns is their heartiness and disease resistance. They should be wormed as needed and vaccinated on a regular basis, but very little else has to be done to maintain a healthy herd. “Keeping good grass, minerals, and water for them reduces a lot of the extra maintenance,” said Andrew.

Andrew and Abby Morris from Morris Cattle Company began raising Texas Longhorns about 18 years ago. While

For Bonnie Glen Farm, one bull is used for about three years. After keeping heifers from the bull, a new one is needed to breed with the young heifers. The Dunmires AUGUST 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

Both Bonnie Glen Farm and Morris Cattle Company show their Texas Longhorns in Ohio and Indiana, as well as a few other states where national shows may be taking place. The Longhorns need to be six months old before they can be shown, and there are many age categories for heifers, cows, bulls, and steers for both haltered and non-haltered classes. The judges are looking for conformation of the animal as well as measurement of the horns from tip to tip. Both the Morris family and the Dunmires belong to the International Texas Longhorn Association as well as the Ohio River Valley Texas Longhorn Association (ORVTLA). Currently, Andrew Morris is serving as president for the ORVTLA. Amber from Bonnie Glen reported that the annual ORVTLA show was held July 21, 2018, at the Wayne County Fairgrounds, with many breeders from Ohio and surrounding states attending.

like to outcross to improve specific traits in the Longhorns. Although the horns may be “king,” Andy and Amber are very conscientious about improving the conformation of their cattle as well. They also keep in mind the color of the animal while maintaining the quality, as they like to have many different colors in their herd.

The owners of these local Texas Longhorn farms extoll the ease of raising this historic breed and their heartiness too. Amber from Bonnie Glen stated, “One of the really nice aspects of raising Texas Longhorns is all the amazing breeders who are willing to help each other.” Many lasting friendships have been made throughout the country for the Morrises and the Dunmires by raising and showing Texas Longhorns.

Morris Cattle Company focuses on conformation as well, with a special emphasis on beef quality. Andrew stated that the Texas Longhorns are misunderstood by many beef producers today. “They are a beef breed and many breeders today are focusing on breeding for a meatier beef type animal. This is different than the thin type cattle of yesterday that many picture. Some of the bulls in the industry today weigh over a ton. This and the other desirable traits that the Texas Longhorns possess give them a place in the beef industry today.”

F

rontier Power has been pleased to help bring this event to Coshocton for the past 12 years. The Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival is one of the longest-running balloon festivals in the state, with 2018 being the 37th year. The event is free and takes place at the Coshocton County Fairgrounds each year. This year’s event began on Thursday with newly crowned queen Keirstan Hall initiating the tethered balloon rides. We are thankful to the entire balloon committee and pilot Bob Scobee and the Touchstone Energy® balloon for making this event happen. Proceeds are donated to Continued on Page 21

20   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2018

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PATTY CRAMER, JULIE CRAMER, SHELLY THOMPSON

2018 Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival, June 7–9

To learn more about Texas Longhorns, go to Andy and Amber Dunmire’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ bonnieglenfarm/, or call 419-651-1711. Andrew and Abby Morris’s Facebook page is www.facebook.com/MorrisCattle-Company-232780936830751/, and their website is www.morriscattlecompany.com.


Students represent Frontier Power on annual Youth Tour This year’s Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour winners representing Frontier Power were Emma Anderson, daughter of Tim and Beth Anderson from Frazeysburg, and Andrew Martin, son of Steve and Jackie Martin from Warsaw. The students attended the trip to Washington, D.C., on June 8–14. The Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour is an annual youth leadership experience for high school sophomores and juniors from families served by electric cooperatives. On the trip, students visit the nation’s capital and its many famous and historic sites. They also meet members of Ohio’s congressional delegation on Capitol Hill, and learn about public service and the cooperative business model. Emma and Andrew were two of 39 students from the state of Ohio — and 1,888 students from electric co-ops across the country — who participated in this year’s Youth Tour. Sites on this year’s tour included the United States Capitol; the Vietnam and Korean War memorials; the Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson, and Martin Luther King Jr. memorials; the Smithsonian Museums of Natural History and American History; the Udvar-Hazy Air and Space Center; and the Gettysburg battlefield. Frontier Power, a Touchstone Energy® Cooperative, serves approximately 7,000 members in Coshocton, Tuscarawas, and surrounding counties.

Continued from Page 20

the Frontier Power Community Connections Fund, benefiting our local communities. Four balloons took flight Friday morning to kick off the festival. Although the weather did not permit any more balloon flights or the Night Glow, many spectators enjoyed the Moonlyterz Band, which performed many traditional favorites. Safety Saturday took place at the event from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. First responders from local fire departments, Coshocton County EMS, and the Coshocton County Sheriff’s canine unit attended for all to visit and tour their equipment. MedFlight had their unique “Mudcare” unit displayed, which is like a rough terrain ambulance. Frontier Power did live line demonstrations and Coshocton Library had a display as well. COSI on Wheels once again was available at the

event. Almost half of the participating balloons were able to take a short flight on Saturday evening before approaching bad weather arrived. Many balloons were able to inflate on the field at the fairgrounds for the crowd to enjoy. Due to the weather, the fireworks got off to a late start but did not fail to please with a spectacular show. An antique flea market, carnival rides, displays, and vendor booths were open during the entire festival as well. In addition to Frontier Power being the main sponsor, Frontier Propane donates all the propane to balloonists attending the event. We will once again look forward to a fabulous festival the first part of June 2019. Keep up with current information about the Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival by liking their Facebook page at www. facebook.com/coshoctonhotairballoonfestival.

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  21


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

Co-op

2018 Cardinal Plant Tour

Connections Card

Frontier Power’s annual Cardinal Plant Tour will be Wednesday, Sept. 12. You must be in relatively good health, as lots of walking and stair-climbing is required, and wear comfortable, flat shoes. Due to the limited number of participants able to go, we ask that you allow others to attend if you have already participated in the tour. You may contact Kelly at the Frontier Power office at 740-622-6755 or 800-624-8050 to reserve your spot on the tour.

Because you are a Frontier Power Company member, your Co-op Connections Card provides you with special discounts online and at participating local retailers. Be sure to visit this month’s highlighted business and check out offers online by clicking the Co-op Connections Card on our website at www.frontier-power.com.

JEFF DRENNEN DEALERSHIPS 10% off parts and labor. All new vehicles can be purchased at factory invoice less all rebates.

Cox spends summer interning at Frontier Power Bryar Cox is interning for his third summer here at Frontier Power. He is helping our right-of-way spray crew and completing miscellaneous tasks as needed until he goes back to school at Zane State College to study Mechanical Engineering. Bryar resides near Warsaw and attends Perry Chapel Church. He is a 2016 graduate of River View High School.

THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY

Kyle Corder hired Kyle Corder was recently hired in Frontier Power’s right-of-way department. His duties include trimming trees, chipping brush, and working with the spray crew. Kyle is a 2013 graduate of Coshocton High School and attended power lineman classes at Mid-East Career Center. Kyle resides in Coshocton and enjoys golfing and lifting weights in his spare time. We wish Kyle all the best in his new position.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Robert Wise President

CONTACT 800-624-8050 | 740-622-6755 www.frontier-power.com OFFICE 770 S. Second St. P.O. Box 280 Coshocton, OH 43812 OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Larry Blair Vice President

David P. Mizer Secretary-Treasurer

Tim Anderson Jim Buxton Bill Daugherty Ann Gano-McCleary Trustees

CEO/GENERAL MANAGER Steven K. Nelson ATTORNEY Michael D. Manning

22

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018

PERSONNEL Dakota Albertson Kyle Corder Kyle Cramblett Phil Crowdy Jason Dolick F. Scott Dunn Mark Fabian Michelle Fischer Tyler Frazer Rick Haines Robert Haines Josh Haumschild Ken Hunter Tim Keirns Kelly Kendall Lucas Landaker Chad Lecraft Matthew Limburg Mark Lindsey

Francis “J.R.” McCoy Jr. Mike McCoy Blake McKee Melvin McVay Chad Miller Corey Miller Bill Mizer Kimberly Pepping Marty Shroyer Bornwell Sianjina Nate Smith Gene Swigert Shelly Thompson Jonathon Tolliver Robin Totten Andrew Vickers Vickie Warnock Jim Williams Sybil Wright


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

Falcon rescued at Cardinal plant released into the wild Cardinal Power Plant employees found an injured falcon on plant property this past spring and took the bird to a rehabilitation center for treatment. Fortunately, its injuries were not severe, and, after a short stay, the raptor was brought back to the plant by the Ohio Department of Wildlife to be released and reunited with its feathered friends.

Central Local receives $32,000 from NWEC for efficiency projects North Western Electric Cooperative, located in Bryan, recently presented Central Local Schools with a check for $32,000, representing rebates for two energy-efficiency projects completed at the schools. The Commercial and Industrial Lighting Program encourages co-op members who qualify to upgrade their lighting to more energyefficient options. Central Local Schools received the maximum rebate of $15,000 for the lighting upgrades installed in each of their buildings. They also received a $2,000 rebate for their HVAC project after they installed air-source heat pumps at their high school facility.

HWEC member wins second place in ‘Who Powers You’ contest The Lord’s Pantry of West Salem — a member of Millersburgbased Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative — received a $2,000 donation from Touchstone Energy this spring after earning second place in Touchstone’s “Who Powers You” contest. The Lord’s Pantry coordinators Mike and Stacey Simmons were among 124 nominations from 46 rural electric cooperatives across the United States, which were reviewed by an independent panel of judges. The Lord’s Pantry opened in March 2017 with four volunteers and has grown to more than 50. With the goal of showing love and compassion while preserving dignity, the pantry has distributed over 120,000 pounds of food to families who do not have enough income to meet their needs.

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 23


A matter of

TRUST STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES PROFFITT

24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2018

A

card table laden with amber honey, a small cart burdened with shiny rhubarb and lush green asparagus, a picnic table flush with tomatoes or peaches. Sweet! Your eyes settle on fresh picks but see there’s no one around — and there it is: a coffee can, a cigar box, or a little door with a slot and a sign reading “Money” or “Pay here.” Welcome to Ohio: the land of honest food and plenty of it. From commercial refrigerators to iced coolers of just-laid eggs to picnic tables burdened with justpicked produce, the honor system works all over Ohio, supporting farmers and their families and placing wholesome nutrition on tables. John Tracey, 91, has been farming the Marblehead Peninsula since 1957. He says self-pay stands have been around just about forever. “Since I was a little kid, 6 years old, we’ve had it,” he explains. “I’ve got extra money from people. A lot of them have told me they always leave extra.” While Tracey’s stand is often staffed, it often isn’t. Self-service customers, depending on the month, may find peppers, zucchini, acorn and butternut squashes, green peppers, sweet corn, strawberries, peaches, tomatoes, and other fresh-grown treats.


(Top left) Constant variety is one great thing about DeChant Farms, which boasts more than 20 crops and other delectables throughout the season. (Top right) Like most self-pay stands, John Tracey’s features a “Free” section for about-to-expire items.

Lora Harbison frequents Tracey’s when she visits the area with friends and family. “This particular stand has the best corn around,” she explains. Harbison describes a visit when Tracey was shy on corn: “There were only four small ears left in the baskets and when I went to pay, I only had a $20,” she says with a warm smile. “So I looked around, picked up two tomatoes, an onion, two zucchini, and a small basket of peaches, and called it good.” Harbison says her bill would’ve been $5 or $6, but that she didn’t hesitate sliding the $20 through the slot. “I was glad to have a few extra items I hadn’t planned on eating that evening — plus, I know they’re as fresh as it gets.” Near Port Clinton, Chris Galvin’s Lockwood Honey is an off-the-beaten-path site, sort of self-pay. Her operation is a cooler sitting in the front yard with a small sign. When they want fresh, local honey, customers call, text, email, or chat Galvin up on Facebook. She leaves the sweetness in the cooler; folks stop by and leave the greenness in a

At 91, John Tracey still knows his way around a field.

AUGUST 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


“No one’s ever stolen any money,” says Chris Galvin of Lockwood Beekeeping, “and no one’s ever stolen any honey, either.” have it any other way. “The honesty system is great,” assures DeChant. But as satisfying as cash and checks are, notes from customers are tops for her. “I have many ‘thank you’ notes pushed into the slot. I really love it,” she admits. “They usually say how great stuff is, how much they appreciate the hard work.” DeChant utilizes Facebook, where customers send their orders, and hanging signs to let folks know what crops are in. The system is pretty honest, too — about 95 percent, her stats say. Like Tracey, she sometimes receives extra. The best thing about self-pay, DeChant assures, is that she can spend more time playing in the dirt. “That’s the main reason I do it. If I made enough money, I’d just sit over there all the time visiting with customers I love so much.” Continued on Page 28

No fancy signs are required for self-pay stands.

Tupperware container. “No one’s ever stolen any money,” she says, “and no one’s ever stolen any honey, either.” Bergman Orchards has been a steady operation in Ottawa County for decades, farming hundreds of acres on numerous tracts. While Bergman’s is fully staffed during most of the season, it’s often a self-serve stand, with offerings of squashes, feed corn, firewood, freshsqueezed apple cider, and other tasty treats. President Barack Obama stopped by unannounced in 2012, purchasing peaches and a dozen ears of corn (of course, it was fully staffed with smiling folks when he arrived). The commander-in-chief paid personally — and left a hefty tip with the cashier, too. Love of farming is the driving force behind DeChant Farms in Huron. The first sprout nearly two decades ago was a small table offering strawberries. In full bloom now, explains Mary Jo DeChant, is a full-service self-service site with all things wholesome — including baked goods made by her brother, Daniel. Mary Jo spends seven days a week in her fields — and wouldn’t Mary Jo DeChant attends to cucumber vines in the hothouse. In a few weeks they will climb to the ceiling, squeeze between the plastic and beam, and begin heading back down.

26   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2018


KEEP IN MIND Crops change frequently From asparagus and rhubarb early on to late-season tomatoes, squash, and pumpkins, many Ohio farm stands offer new foods almost every week.

Nothing could be more farm-to-table With no middleman, produce is often purchased the same day it’s harvested — sometimes within minutes. It’s a veritable beeline from the dirt to the table.

A darned good feeling Farmers get paid, and folks, especially nowadays, love the idea of being trusted. Self-pay stands create friendships between Ohioans who may never meet or speak.

AUGUST 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   27


Checking out at Tracey’s Fruit Farm is as simple as choosing your goodies and sliding money through the door.

Bergman Orchards’ many fields offer up entire pallets of fresh produce.

Chris Galvin’s bees make sweet treats for her area residents and visitors. Continued from Page 26

Tom Brown’s family has operated Hilltop Harvest Farm near Wapakoneta for nearly two decades, beginning with a tiny cart and a 5-gallon cash bucket. Now it’s a 10-by20-foot canopy with commercial coolers, May through October. “Honest food” has double meaning for Hilltop, Brown says. “The best part is we’re growing food that people are going to take home and eat,” he says, “and from time to

28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2018

time we get letters in the cash box saying how much they appreciate our stand.” The notes, according to Brown, make it all worthwhile. The relationship between the land, farmers, and Ohioans is closest at self-pay stands, and there’s likely one nearby. Find one, then pick up some hyper-local fruits, vegetables, eggs, or other yummy wares, and maybe leave a note. The farmers love that.


AUGUST 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   29


Legacy OF A LEGEND Remembering Tecumseh 250 years after his birth in the Ohio Territory STORY AND GALLOWAY CABIN PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA; ILLUSTRATION AND TOMAHAWK PIPE PHOTO COURTESY OHIO HISTORY CONNECTION

ith its tattered seat and uneven slats, the ladderback chair looks rather uncomfortable, but it was pioneer James Galloway’s best chair. “Since this was the ‘guest chair,’ it’s where Tecumseh sat whenever he visited,” says Catherine Wilson, director of the Greene County Ohio Historical Society in Xenia.

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boy “two arrow flights” away from Chalahgawtha. Since their son’s arrival coincided with the appearance of a bright meteor, they named him “Tecumseh,” meaning “The Panther Passing Across.” A historical marker in Old Town Reserve now indicates Tecumseh’s birthplace.

Galloway’s chair is one of the world’s few remaining relics of Tecumseh, the great Shawnee leader who desperately tried to save Indian homelands and culture from the tide of white settlement west of the Alleghenies. Though currently on the Historical Society’s campus, the Galloway Log House originally stood near Chalahgawtha (or Chillicothe, one of several villages by that name), the Shawnee tribal capital located by the Little Miami River just north of present-day Xenia. This was the home of the principal chief, Blackfish, when he convened a grand council in 1768 to deal with the problem of whites encroaching on the Shawnees’ Kentucky hunting ground.

Tecumseh was born into terror and turmoil. From the French and Indian War through the War of 1812, epic power struggles involving France, Britain, the American colonies, and the young United States spilled into the frontier, where the hunger for land and a clash of cultures provoked vicious cycles of violence and vengeful atrocities.

As the Kispoko clan chief Pucksinwah and his wife, Methotasa, journeyed to the council, she gave birth to a 30

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018

When Tecumseh was 6, he became Blackfish’s ward after Pucksinwah was killed battling Virginia militia at Point Pleasant. Tecumseh was 10 when the Shawnee held Daniel Boone captive at Chalahgawtha. Although Boone escaped, Kentucky militiamen retaliated by raiding Chalahgawtha. They mortally wounded Blackfish, but the Shawnee caught frontiersman Simon Kenton, who was tortured and almost killed. The next year, Kentuckians looted Chalahgawtha, and when Tecumseh was 12, they destroyed it.


At 26, Tecumseh was among the warriors Anthony Wayne defeated at Fallen Timbers, but he rejected the ensuing 1795 Treaty of Greenville that ceded most of Ohio to the United States. Instead, Tecumseh tried to unite the tribes into a confederacy capable of defending their collective lands. “A single twig breaks,” explained Tecumseh, “but the bundle of twigs is strong.” By September 1807, Ohio was an up-and-coming state, and Tecumseh had a village at Greenville, where his brother, a religious fanatic known as “The Prophet,” was attracting Indian followers and raising concerns. In Ohio’s first capital of Chillicothe (an erstwhile Shawnee village location), Tecumseh made a speech dispelling whites’ fears of warfare. Afterward, Thomas Worthington, the wealthy “Father of Ohio Statehood,” honored Tecumseh with a banquet at his Chillicothe estate, modern-day Adena Mansion & Gardens. As he had done while visiting Galloway, Tecumseh gave Worthington a tomahawk pipe as a token of peace. There would be no peace for Tecumseh. He spent years pleading his case for a confederacy to far-flung tribes, acting as both warrior and diplomat to impede U.S. expansion, and earning admiration for his courage, intelligence, and humanity. By 1811, Tecumseh’s multi-tribal stronghold at Tippecanoe Village in Indiana Territory threatened Gov. William Henry Harrison’s land-grabbing ambitions. After The Prophet provoked an attack, Harrison’s army burned Tippecanoe. Tecumseh, of course, sided with the British in the War of 1812, and Harrison’s troops killed 45-year-old Tecumseh in the Battle of the Thames. Today, towns named for Tecumseh dot the map from Canada to Oklahoma; books, poems, and stories about Tecumseh fill library shelves; museums display Tecumseh sculptures, paintings, and memorabilia; and the U.S. Capitol frieze illustrating significant events in American history features Tecumseh’s

death. Only Ohio, however, has Tecumseh!, an outdoor drama performed near Chillicothe, and two historic homes where visitors can retrace Tecumseh’s footsteps. Indeed, the Galloway Log House still has the limestone fireplace rocks that Tecumseh saw, and original Worthington furnishings have been at Adena since Tecumseh dined there. Equally extraordinary are the Ohio artifacts that Tecumseh himself touched. The tomahawk pipe he gave Worthington is now one of the Adena museum’s most popular exhibits; his Galloway peace pipe graces Fort Ancient’s museum; and in Xenia, the Galloway chair remains a venerable reminder of the legendary native son who bent the arc of American history.

At left and above, the Galloway log house, now in Xenia, where Tecumseh was a frequent visitor; inset: the tomahawk peace pipe Tecumseh gave to Thomas Worthington in 1807.

AUGUST 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 31


Ohio Cooperative Living magazine is looking for photos from Ohio and West Virginia electric cooperative members to use in its 2019 cooperative calendar. We’re interested in seasonal scenes from each month of the year – images that really “pop” and convey a sense of time and place. Photo subjects must be interesting and the shot well planned and framed.

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If their images are chosen for publication, amateur co-op photographers could earn $100 or more.

RULES • One (1) photo entry per member. • High-resolution, color, digital images only. • No prints, slides, or proof sheets–no snail mail! Send submissions by e-mail attachment only to photo@ohioec.org • Photo format must be horizontal and capable of filling an 8 x 11-inch image area. • Include explanation of photo the (where, what, when) and who took the shot. • Include name, address, phone number, and co-op membership. • Shots featuring people who can be identified within the photo must be accompanied by a signed publication release.

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Who is responsible for a line fence?

When can I legally burn brush?

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JOIN US ON THE JOURNEY AT OFBF.ORG 32

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018

8 | OHIO LANDOWN ER TOOL KIT

LINE FEN CE

Line fen ce confusion law became a ma jor source landowner and contention of for muddied s, as court decisio many rural the meani ns The line ng of mu and customs fen Sept. 30, ce laws were upd ch of the law. 200 attempting 8. The result is ated, effective a set to balanc of law all types of farmers e the considerati s ons of and landow ners.

When the

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fence law The line applies fence law applies to an estate any own for life, an er of land easemen the own in fee simp t, or er as a farm le, outlet. 1 The a right of way whil Departm ent of Natu e law also applies to used by ral Reso and polit urces, cons ical the Ohio erva recreation subdivisions with al trails, a real prop ncy districts, wheneve control land erty inter r they own est in that neighbor , law does s a landown lease, manage, or not othe rwise appl er with lives The line y to the state tock 2 fence law or state agen . The within mun does not apply to icipal corp cies. the enclo propertie orations, sure of s laid out the enclo into lots sure of adjo lots or fences outs required ining to be cons ide of municipal 4959. 3 The corporati tructed by line fenc ons, railroads e law will landown under ORC also not ers enter apply if the into a if the fenc adjoining evidenci e is not actu written agreeme ng the fenc nt under includes ally a parti e and its built will ORC 971.0 thos tion fenc 4 location. 9 then proc 4, or e. A “par been cons e on a division line, Any repla eed as if removed. tition fenc idere or those the origi cement fenc Landown e” that have survey show d to be the divis nal fenc ers e removing historical ion line, s the fenc a partition should consult with e had never been even e is not direc if a subseque ly intends to fence, whe neighbor tly on the nt land repla s before ther or not Existing Fenc line. 5 the land “Equitabl ce it. es owner e” maintena For thos the follo e partition nce is to wing six fences that be enactmen dete factors: 10 rmined by 1. The topo t of the new were in exist consideri graphy of be main law (Sep ence prio ng 2. The pres tained in the t. r 30, prop to the 2008 erty; equitable ence of bodi landown shares betw ), the fence mus 3. The pres ers, es t een ence of trees of water; been rece regardless of the 4. The level fence’s cond the adjoining ntly 7 remo /vines/veg of risk of ved and Sept. 30, etation; ition. 6 If the own trespasser 2009, the to populatio er had filed a fence had s on eithe maintena proceed n density an affidavit nce r property as if it had propertie or recreation due by never been of any replacement s; shares in al use of 5. The impo maintena removed, fence will adjoining nce. 8 requiring to remove 6. The num rtance of marking equitable a fence and Going forward, divis ber if applicati a not imm ion landown and type on of the containe ediately of livestock lines; equi replace it, er wishes d by the affidavit owned by fenc but retai within one table shares rule, Prev e. either own iously, the n the they mus year of its er law had 1 ORC landown t file an removal required 971.01(D)(1) ers. The with the 2 ORC equa use l maintena 971.01(D)(2) county reco of the term not nece 3 ORC ssari nce betw rder “equitabl 971.03(A)-(C een e,” means a fence. “Equ ly result in 50/50 4 ORC 971.01(E) ) maintena shares may itable” inste 5 ORC nce or cost determin 971.01(E) ad will use 6 ORC e the shar the six facto sharing of 971.06 es of the individua 7 Within rs above maintena l situation. 2 years prior to nce and 8 ORC This coul responsib 971.05, 971.06 to filing of affida cost base d mean one le for the vit. d (C)(1)-(3) on the entire cost landown er is of building or maintaini solely 9 ORC ng a fenc 971.06(C)(1)e. 10 ORC (3) 971.09(E)

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MARBLEHEAD LIGHTHOUSE:

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W

hat is it that attracts us to lighthouses? Could it be their immovable stability in an ever-changing world? Mute guides to somehow show us the way, much as they do for wayward sailors? Whatever the reason, people have been visiting the Marblehead Lighthouse on Lake Erie at the mouth of Sandusky Bay for nearly two centuries, ever since its construction in 1821. It’s the oldest lighthouse in continuous service anywhere on the Great Lakes. Today part of Marblehead Lighthouse State Park, the lighthouse is owned and operated by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. One of the Buckeye State’s smallest state parks — only a few acres — it’s also one of Ohio’s most popular, offering spectacular views and photo opportunities of Lake Erie, the Bass Islands, and Kelleys Island, which is served by Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative.

34

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018


America’s ORIGINAL

Unlike most Great Lakes lighthouses, Marblehead is open to the public, and visitors are welcome to climb to the top of the 65-foot structure on its interior spiral staircase (it’s $3 — cash only — per climber over 6 years old). The lighthouse is open from noon to 4 p.m. daily, beginning the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day. It’s also open during the annual community Lighthouse Festival, the second Saturday of October. The Marblehead Lighthouse had 15 keepers during the many years before its light was automated in 1958 — including two women, distinguishing Marblehead as the only Ohio lighthouse to ever have two female keepers.

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6/27/18 10:32 AM


AUGUST 2018 CALENDAR NORTHWEST

800-590-9755 (Dawn Hauter), dawn.hauter@saudervillage.org, or www.saudervillage.org. AUG. 4–5 – 90 Shucking Years at Shafer’s Produce, 16524 St. Rte. 568, Findlay, Sat. 9 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Celebrating 90 “ear”resistible years of delicious homegrown and local produce. Door prizes, dunk tank, food truck, homegrown popcorn, embroidered T-shirts, and more. 419-423-0232 or find us on Facebook. AUG. 4, 11, 18, 25 – The Great Sidney Farmer’s Market, 109 S. Ohio Ave., 8 a.m.–noon. Farmers bring their freshest produce, and crafters offer a large variety of homemade items. Fresh baked goods, jams and jellies, plants, and flowers. 937-658-6945 or www. sidneyalive.org.

AUG. 2–5 – Northwest Ohio Antique Machinery Association Show, Hancock Co. Fgds., 1017 E. Sandusky St., Findlay. $5, under 16 free. Featuring Crawler Tractors. 419-722-4698 or www. nwohioantiquemachinery.com. AUG. 3 – First Fridays Downtown, downtown Sidney. Participating shops and restaurants stay open later and offer a First Friday discount. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. AUG. 4 – Defiance County Hot Air Balloon Festival, 20399 Airport Rd., Defiance, 6:30–9:30 a.m., 4–9:30 p.m. $10 per car. Tethered hot air balloon rides, $5–$15. 419-782-3510 or http:// defianceballoonfest.com. AUG. 4 – Jon Amundson Crossroads of America Memorial Antique Tractor Ride, Van Wert. 419-605-6002 or www.vanwert. com/museum. AUG. 4–5 – Annual Doll and Teddy Bear Show and Sale, Sauder Village Founders Hall, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $8, C. $7. Features antique dolls and teddy bears, modern collectibles, accessories, and supplies.

NORTHEAST

AUG. 5 – Stryker Sportsman Club 3-D Archery Shoot, 02638 Co. Rd. 20, Bryan (1/2 mile north of St. Rte. 6 on the right), 9 a.m.–noon. $10, under 18 free. Thirty targets. 419-636-4987 or find us on Facebook. AUG. 7 – National Night Out, downtown Sidney, 5:30–10 p.m. Join forces with over 37 million people in 16,000 communities to promote police-community partnerships. Activities, food, and a movie at dusk. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. AUG. 9–11 – Lincoln Highway “Buy-Way” Yard Sale, U.S. 30/ Main St., Van Wert. www.historicbyway.com. AUG. 16–18 – Bucyrus Bratwurst Festival, downtown Bucyrus. Grilled brats and many other festival foods, plus parades, fun contests, and free entertainment. 419-562-2728 or www. bucyrusbratwurstfestival.com.

AUG. 19 – Grand Rapids Arts Council’s Sunset Jazz and Art Festival, Towpath Trail, Grand Rapids, 2 p.m. to dusk. A fun-filled evening with live jazz music, artists’ booths, brew, wine, and food from local eateries. Bring lawn chairs, no coolers. For more information or to volunteer, contact 419-832-ARTS. AUG. 24–26 – German-American Festival, Oak Shade Grove, 3624 Seaman Rd., Oregon. $8. Multi-day tickets available. Authentic German food, beer, and entertainment. www. germanamericanfestival.net.

tribute at the Tomb of the Unknown Patriot. 330-874-2059 or www.fortlaurens.org.

AUG. 2–4 – Olmsted Heritage Days: Rockin’ the Falls, downtown Olmstead Falls, Thur. 5–10 p.m., Fri./Sat. 11 a.m.– 10 p.m. Parade Thur. night, entertainment, concerts, historical shows, and more. www.downtownolmstedfalls.com or www. facebook.com/olmstedheritagedays.

AUG. 11–12 – Civil War Reenactment, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $10, C. (3–12) $5, under 3 free. Reenacted battle, speeches by “President Lincoln,” cavalry mounted drills, artillery demos, and Camp Chase Fife and Drum Corps performances. www.wrhs.org/events/civil-warreenactment-2017-3-copy.

JUL. 30–AUG. 5 – Columbiana County Fair, 225 Lee Ave., Libson, Harness racing, demo derby, combine derby, truck and tractor pulls, delicious food, and much more! http:// columbianacountyfair.org.

AUG. 5 – Chardon Arts Festival, Chardon Square (intersection of Rtes. 4 and 66), 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission. Juried show hosts over 100 artists, both local and out of state, featuring works in a variety of mediums. http://chardonsquareassociation.org.

JUL. 30–AUG. 5 – Medina County Fair, 720 W. Smith Rd., Medina. $6, Srs./C. (2–11) $3, under 2 free. Entertainment for the whole family. 330-723-9633 or www.medina-fair.com.

AUG. 6–7 – Kelly Miller Circus, Kelleys Island Ball Field, 121 Addison St., Kelleys Island, Mon. 4 and 7 p.m., Tues. 4 p.m. Advance tickets $10, Srs./C. $7. 419-746-2360, www.kellymillercircus.com, or www.kelleysislandchamber.com.

WEST VIRGINIA

AUG. 18–19 – The Fantastic Tiffin Flea Market, Seneca Co. Fgds., 100 Hopewell Ave., Tiffin, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free admission. 300 to 450 dealers per show. Featuring antiques, collectibles, furniture, crafts, produce, tools, glass, and more. 419-447-9613 or www.tiffinfleamarket.com.

Dover, Thur. 3–8 p.m. ($5 admission), Fri. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.–noon. 740-922-6761 or 330-343-7605.

AUG. 4–5 – Home and Garden Tour, 342 Union St., Mount Pleasant, Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 1–5 p.m. $15, Stds. $7. Visit the unique homes and gardens in this historic village. 800-752-2631.

AUG. 2–4 – Community Hospice Giant Garage Sale Fundraiser, Tuscarawas Co. Fgds., 259 S. Tuscarawas Ave.,

AUG. 17–19 – Fort Fest: A Salute to Our Military, 364 St. Rte. 190, Fort Jennings. 9/11 “Never Forget” exhibit, live re-enactments, Huey helicopter flights, kids’ camp. 419-286-2257 or www. fortjenningspark.com.

AUG. 25–26 – Revolution on the Ohio Frontier, Fort Meigs, 29100 W. River Rd., Perrysburg, 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. $10, Srs. $8, Stds. $5, under 6 free. Learn what life was like in Ohio during the Revolutionary War. Re-enactments, weapon demos, and more. 419-874-4121 or www.fortmeigs.org.

AUG. 3–5 – Twins Day Festival, 9825 Ravenna Rd., Twinsburg. The world’s largest annual gathering of twins. 330-425-3652 or www.twinsdays.org.

AUG. 2 – Fort Steuben Summer Concert Series: “Celtic Tradition,” Berkman Amphitheater, Fort Steuben Park, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, 6:30–9 p.m. Free. Featuring The Stapletons and Tannerhill Weavers. Bring a blanket and picnic basket. 740-2831787 or www.oldfortsteuben.com.

AUG. 17–19 – Bremenfest, Crown Pavilion, 2 W. Plum St., New Bremen. Food, games, 5K and 1-mile Fun Run, car and motorcycle show, pageants and competitions, live music, and more. New this year, a talent show! http://bremenfest.com.

AUG. 16–18 – National Tractor Pulling Championships, 13800 W. Poe Rd., Bowling Green. Advance tickets $20–$40, kids 10 and under free. 419-354-1434 or www.pulltown.com.

AUG. 3–4 – Ohio Mennonite Relief Sale, Wayne Co. Fgds., 199 Vanover St., Wooster. 330-682-4843 or www.ohiomccreliefsale.org.

AUG. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 – Gervasis Vineyard Car Show, 1700 55th St. NE, Canton, 5–8 p.m. All makes, models, and years of cars and trucks. Door prizes, 50/50 drawing, and live music. www.gervasivineyard.com/Cruise-In.

AUG. 17 – The Amazing Downtown Race, downtown Sidney, 5:30 p.m. Teams race through downtown for a chance to win great prizes. Clue sheets are passed out at 5:55 p.m. Registration required; teams of 4, must be 21. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

AUG. 7, 14, 21, 28 – Cruisin’ on the Square, 3 N. Main St., Milan, 5–8 p.m. 419-499-9929 or https://m.facebook.com/ Cruisin-on-the-Square-1568396136718665. AUG. 9–11 – Lincoln Highway “Buy-Way” Yard Sales, along the historic Lincoln Highway all across the state, including through Columbiana, Stark, Wayne, Ashland, and Richland counties. www.historicbyway.com. AUG. 11 – Sons of the American Revolution Changing of the Guard, Fort Laurens, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, 9 a.m.–7 p.m. Free. SAR chapters from around the country pay

AUG. 2–4 – West Virginia Blackberry Festival, Clarksburg City Park, Nutter Fort, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Blackberry dishes and other foods, arts and crafts, pet parade, 5K run, free entertainment, and fireworks. www.wvblackberry.com. AUG. 11 – Intro. to Adventure: Quest Classes, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. Park rangers and guides provide instruction on belaying and rappelling (10 a.m., $65), mountain biking (1 p.m., $35), and kayaking (6 p.m., $35). Register by calling 304-643-2931. AUG. 17–19 – Parkersburg Homecoming Festival, Second St., Parkersburg. Free. Parade, half-marathon, live music, fireworks, arts and crafts, food concessions, and sternwheelers. www. parkersburg-homecoming.com.

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AUG. 11–12 – National Hamburger Festival, Lock 3 Park, 200 S. Main St., Akron, Sat. noon–11 p.m., Sun. noon–7 p.m. $5, under 9 free. Enjoy food, entertainment, and competitions for all ages. Sample beers from Ohio breweries on Sun. at the Buckeye ww. www.hamburgerfestival.com. AUG. 18 – Northern Ohio Doll and Bear Show and Sale, Holiday Inn, 15471 Royalton Rd., Strongsville, 10 a.m.–3 p.m., early bird 9 a.m. $5, C. $1, early bird $15. 440-283-5839 (Eileen Green), phdofdolls@yahoo.com, or www.dollshowUSA.com. AUG. 25–26 – Great Trail Arts and Crafts Festival, Great Trail Festival Grounds, St. Rte. 43, between Malvern and Carrollton, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. A celebration of American folk art, with distinctive arts and crafts, living history, and period music. 330-794-9100 or www.greattrailfestival.com. AUG. 26 – Railroad Memorabilia Show, Painesville Railroad Museum, Painesville Depot, 475 Railroad St., Painesville, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $5, C. (3–12) $3, Family $7. Come see artifacts of railroads’ glory days. 216-470-5780 (Tom Pescha), prrm@att.net, or www.painesvillerailroadmuseum.org. AUG. 31, SEPT. 1–2 – Made in Ohio Arts and Crafts Festival, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, Fri. noon–5 p.m., Sat./Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Shop from 160 vendors selling Ohiomade products including jewelry, pottery, glass, soap, quilts, and a variety of unique fine arts. Also Handcrafted at Hale items and historic craft and trade demos. www.wrhs.org/events/made-inohio-arts-crafts-festival-2-copy.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

hours in advance. Children’s menu also available. 800-743-2303 or www.facebook.com/LorenaSternwheeler.

AUG. 1–31 – Tecumseh!, Sugarloaf Mountain Amphitheatre, 5968 Marietta Rd., Chillicothe, Mon.–Sat., 8 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. $14–$43. Witness the epic life story of the legendary Shawnee leader. 740-775-4100 or www.tecumsehdrama.com.

CENTRAL

AUG. 9–11 – All Ohio Balloon Fest, Union Co. Airport, 760 Clymer Rd., Marysville. Thur. pass, $30; includes ZZ Top concert. Fri./Sat. pass, $10. Bring your own chairs. 937-243-5833 or www.allohioballoonfest.com.

AUG. 2–4 – Circleville Goodtime Quilters Show, Ohio Christian University, Maxwell Center, 1476 Lancaster Pike (St. Rte. 22 E.), Circleville, Thur./Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $6 per day, $10 for 3-day pass. 740-332-6344 or www. goodtimequilters.org.

AUG. 9–12 – Dan Emmett Music and Arts Festival, downtown Mount Vernon. Featuring Lorrie Morgan and Phil Dirt & The Dozers; arts and crafts, contests, car and motorcycle shows, and food. www.danemmettfestival.org.

AUG. 3–4 – Y-Bridge Arts Festival, Zane’s Landing Park, W. Market St., Zanesville, Fri. 2 p.m. till dark, Sat. 11 a.m. till dark. Arts and crafts, live entertainment, food and drink, and kids’ activities. http://ybridgeartsfestival.com. AUG. 3–5 – Dublin Irish Festival, Coffman Park, 5600 Post Rd., Dublin, Fri. 4 p.m.–midnight, Sat. 11 a.m.–midnight, Sun. 11 a.m.–9 p.m. $10–$15, under 13 free; $25 for 3-day pass. The best of Irish dance, music, art, and culture at the world’s largest three-day Irish festival. www.dublinirishfestival.org.

THROUGH SEPTEMBER – “Blooms and Butterflies,” Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Hundreds of colorful butterflies fly freely in the Pacific Island Water Garden. Daily butterfly releases at 1 and 3 p.m. 614-715-8000 or www.fpconservatory.org.

AUG. 11 – Summerail, Marion Palace Theatre and May Pavilion, 276 W. Center St., Marion. Annual railroad-themed multimedia exhibition, within walking distance of the Marion Union Station and its restored AC interlocking tower. Railroad show and sale, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 740-383-2101 or www.summerail.com.

AUG. 4 – Car, Truck, Bicycle, and Motorcycle Show, Ashley Wesleyan Church, 305 E. High St., Ashley, 5–9 p.m. Registration 4–5 p.m., registration fee $10. Dash plaques, trophies, door prizes, bake sale, raffle, on-site DJ. Enjoy our famous ham and bean dinner benefiting church mission trip. 740-815-7238, 740815-7640, or www.ashleywesleyan.org.

THROUGH OCTOBER – “Topiaries at the Conservatory,” Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. More than 90 topiaries are on display throughout the Conservatory. 614-715-8000 or www.fpconservatory.org.

AUG. 17–18 – Carroll Community Festival, downtown Carroll. Free admission. Ox roast sandwiches, pageant, car show, kiddie tractor pull, silent auction, and more. Parade Sat. at 10 a.m. Outdoor concerts at 7 p.m. both evenings; bring a lawn chair. www.carrollareahistoricalsociety.weebly.com.

AUG. 4–18 – Trumpet in the Land, Schoenbrunn Amphitheatre, 1600 Trumpet Dr. NE, New Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m. $10–$20. The tragic but inspiring story of David Zeisberger and his Christian Indian followers during the Revolutionary War. 330-339-1132 or www.trumpetintheland.com.

JUL. 25–AUG. 5 – Ohio State Fair, Ohio State Fgds., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, daily 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Advance ticket $6. At gate: $10, Srs./C. (5–12) $8, under 5 free. $5 parking. 888-6463976 or www.ohiostatefair.com. AUG. 1–5 – CAPA Summer Movie Series, Ohio Theatre, 39 E. State St., Columbus, Wed.–Sun. 7:30 p.m., Sun. matinee 2 p.m. $5, Srs. $4. America’s longest-running classic film series. 614-469-0939 or www.capa.com.

SOUTHEAST

AUG. 10–11 – Buckeye Classic Power of the Paint, Marion Co. Fgds., 220 E. Fairground St., Marion. Antique tractor show, tractor pull, figure 8 racing, consignment auction, flea market, tractor parade, and other entertainment. 740-386-2980 or www.ohiobuckeyeclassic.com.

AUG. 17–19 – Fairfield County Antique Tractor Club Tractor and Truck Show, Fairfield Co. Fgds., 157 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster. All makes of tractors (featured tractor is John Deere), steam engines, and trucks. Flea market, toy show, craft show, and entertainment. Tractor pulls Saturday, garden tractor pulls Sunday. Camping available. 740-304-4170 or 740-407-2347.

AUG. 8, 25, 31 – Lorena Sternwheeler Dinner Cruise, Zanesville, 6–8 p.m. $35. Board at Zane’s Landing Park located on the west end of Market St. Reservations required at least 48

AUG. 11 – Crucifixed Youth/Family Rally, Living Word Amphitheater, 6010 College Hill Rd., Cambridge, 2–6 p.m. $25 at the door. 740-439-2761 or www.livingworddrama.org.

AUG. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 – Rise and Shine Cambridge Farmers Market, Tractor Supply on Rte. 209/Southgate Pkwy., Cambridge, 8 a.m.–noon. 740-439-2238 or www. downtowncambridge.com. AUG. 4 – Movie Night at the Majestic: Risky Business, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7 p.m. $5. www.majesticchillicothe.net. AUG. 4–11 – Ross County Fair, Ross Co. Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe. This year’s fair promises to thrill the children, entertain the adults, and feed the masses. www.rosscountyfair.com. AUG. 5 – Barton Polkafest, 52176 Center St., Barton, 12–8 p.m., rain or shine. Sponsored by the Barton Vol. Fire Dept. Free admission. Three polka bands, Polish foods, chicken, ribs, raffles, kids’ games, cash bar, and more. Outdoor pavilions. 740-695-3029.

AUG. 2–4 – Antrim Community Fire Department Festival, Antrim, begins 5 p.m. daily. Free admission. 740-498-6923. AUG. 3–4 – Deerassic Classic Giveaway and Expo, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd./U.S. 22, Cambridge, gates open at noon. See website for ticket information. Outdoor exhibitors, stage shows, raffles, big prizes, food, and entertainment. 740-435-9500 or www.deerassic.com. AUG. 3–4 – Family and Friends Jubilee, Cambridge City Park, Big Pavilion, Cambridge, Sat. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. church service 11 a.m.–1 p.m. 740-432-7590 or 740-255-5280.

SOUTHWEST

AUG. 9–12 – Rivers, Trails, and Ales Fest, 310 Front St. (East Muskingum Park), Marietta. A full weekend of paddling, road and mountain biking, hiking, and enjoying fine local ales in Ohio’s number 1 destination for outdoor adventure: Marietta! www. facebook.com/RTAfest. AUG. 10–12 – Salt Fork Arts and Crafts Festival, Cambridge City Park, Cambridge, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. A juried festival that showcases high-quality art in a variety of mediums. Also programs for adults and children, plus musical performances and tasty concessions. 740-705-6866 or www.saltforkfestival.org. AUG. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 – Oxford Summer Concert Series, Martin Luther King Jr. Park, 2 W. High St., Oxford, 7–9:30 p.m. Free. 513-524-5200 or www.gettothebc.com. AUG. 4 – Bloomin’ Prairie Hike, Chaparral Prairie State Nature Preserve, 209 Hawk Hill Rd., West Union, 10 a.m. Join naturalists John Jaeger and Dave Kuehner on a free guided hike to view the prairie’s breathtaking Blazing Star showcases. Space is limited. Pre-register at 937-365-1935 or http://arcofappalachia.org/ chaparral-prairie-hike. AUG. 4 – “Down the River, Down a Beer!,” Great Miami Riverway, Piqua, 3–9 p.m. Craft beer tastings, river activities, and a silent auction of beer memorabilia. Food available for purchase. www.mainstreetpiqua.com.

AUG. 10–16 – Miami County Fair, Miami Co. Fgds., 650 N. County Rd. 25A, Troy. $5 day pass; under 9 free. Competitions, entertainment, harness racing, tractor pulls, great food, and AUG. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, more. 937-335-7492 or www.miamicountyohiofair.com. Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m. AUG. 11 – Astronomy Day with the Cincinnati Observatory, Free admission. Dinner and an evening of lively bluegrass at a Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles. Free admission; $8 parking working winery and fine restaurant with a spectacular view. 513fee. Daytime lectures and nighttime telescope viewing of the 385-9309 or www.vinokletwines.com. celestials. http://arcofappalachia.org. AUG. 2–5 – World’s Longest Yard Sale, along U.S. 127 through AUG. 11 – Evening on the Canal, Johnston Farm and Indian Greenville. www.127yardsale.com. Agency, 9845 North Hardin Rd., Piqua, 6:30 p.m. $25–$35. Reservations only. Enjoy dinner overlooking the Miami & Erie Canal, followed by a twilight journey on the General Harrison of Piqua. 937-773-2522 or www.johnstonfarmohio.com.

AUG. 11 – Summer Social, Sardis Community Ctr., Mound St., Sardis, 6–9 p.m. Hosted by Sardis Cares and Dally Memorial Library. Ice cream, homemade pie, homemade noodles and other food, live music, and more. www.facebook.com/sardisohcc. AUG. 11–12 – Eastern Ohio Traditional Archery Rendezvous, hosted by Guernsey County Sportsmen for Conservation, 2961 Meadow Rd., Cambridge. Archery shoot for recurves, longbows, and selfbows; 40-target course with novelties and raffles. Awards for all classes. Free primitive camping and vendor setup. 740-2970798, 740-674-5058, or www.gcsfc.org. AUG. 18 – Cambridge Classic Cruise-In, Historic Downtown Cambridge, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. Over 200 cars and trucks ranging from the early 1900s through today. 740-439-2238 or www.downtowncambridge.com. AUG. 25 – Forgotten Places and Spaces Walking Tour, through Historic Downtown Cambridge, 3–4:30 p.m. 740-7051873 or www.ohiomadegetaways.com.

AUG. 17 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, McCoy’s Colerain, 6008 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, 7–9 p.m. Free admission. Enjoy dinner as you listen to bluegrass on the patio. The show is subject to weather — call Sherrie at 513-385-8222 on the day of the show to verify. www.facebook.com/profile. php?id=100010118115223. AUG. 17–25 – The Great Darke County Fair, Darke Co. Fgds., 800 Sweltzer St., Greenville. $7, under 12 free. $20 for 9-day pass. http://darkecountyfair.com. AUG. 19, 25 – Music at the Mound with Steve Free, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 1 p.m. Free admission; $8 parking. http://arcofappalachia.org/steve-free. AUG. 25 – Archaeology Day, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission; $8 parking. Displays of artifact collections, demonstrations of American Indian skills, lectures, and more. http://arcofappalachia.org/archaeology-day. AUG. 25 – Tractor Pull, hosted by Southwestern Ohio Antique Tractor and Power Association, 3967 Oxford Reily Rd.(Schwab Family Farm Market), 11 a.m. Weigh-in begins at 10 a.m. 513-2663882, 513-233-5469, or SOATPA Facebook page. AUG. 25–26 – Fulton Farm’s Sweet Corn Festival, 2393 St. Rte. 202, between Troy and Tipp City, Sat. 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Free admission. Fun, food, games, and live music all weekend, with local vendors selling food and handmade crafts. 937-479-8105 or www.fultonfarms.com.

AUGUST 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Let’s go to the fair! 1. Our son, Kenny Jr., enjoying fair rides — they are his favorite! Rebekah Caddell Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member

2. Our thrill-seeking 3-year old daughter, Allie, rode every ride she could at the Delaware County Fair. Angie Langanke Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative member

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3. This is our granddaughter, Madison Summers, with her pig, DD, at the 2017 Gallia County Junior Fair. Marcia Summers Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member

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4. My son, Conner, and his 19-year-old mare, Drygingerdell, during the opening ceremony of the Gallia County Junior Fair. Katie Caudill Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member

5. My three children, Seth, Sofia, and Gabriel, at the Carroll County fair last summer. We always have a memorable day. Therese Hall Carroll Electric Cooperative member

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6. My nephew, Trent Berkenstock, after winning third place with his market show pig in the Showmanship class at the 2017 Mercer County Fair. Penny Rauch Midwest Electric member

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7. Our son, Ryan, went to the fair with a “Fair Family” for the week (we have no pets). He fell in love with the show animals and was even able to show one himself in the Pee Wee show. You can tell by that smile he loved every second of that week! Anita Aldrich Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative member

Send us your picture! Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive, and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in your photos. For November, send “We love our veterans” by August 15; for December, send “Santa loves pets” by September 15.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2018


ENTER TO WIN* A $100 ELECTRIC BILL CREDIT! Bring your completed entry form to the Ohio Cooperative Living booth in our Education Center on Wheat Street at the 2018 Farm Science Review.

Name Electric co-op name: E-mail address:

*Must be an Ohio electric cooperative member to enter and win.

FARM SCIENCE REVIEW September 18-20, 2018

This major agricultural show sponsored by The Ohio State University draws more than 130,000 people every year. It’s a fun, educational event for farmers and non-farmers alike. STOP BY OUR BUILDING Using energy wisely is important on the farm and at home. You’ll find exhibits and information on ways you can save energy and money in the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Education Center.

ohioec.org/purpose


Ohio Cooperative Living - August 2018 - Frontier  
Ohio Cooperative Living - August 2018 - Frontier