Page 1

JANUARY JULY 2018

The Frontier Power Company

Official publication | www.frontier-power.com

Aaahhhhh!

Summertime means sprinkler fun Also inside Co-ops: Partners in economic development

Refreshing drinks cool you down on the hottest days

A cruise-in’s coming to a town near you


I AM THE CO-OP And that’s why the co-op is here for you. Your local, not-for-profit electric co-op will always have the information you can trust to make the best decisions for your family on safety, efficiency, and new technology. Visit ohioec.org/purpose to discover the power of your co-op.

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER AND INFORMATION.

ohioec.org/purpose


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2018

INSIDE 26 CRUISE-IN! Unless it’s the dead of winter, chances are that there’s a classic car show coming to an Ohio town near you.

34 THROUGH HIS EYES Artist Robert Griffing uses pre-pioneer Ohio as the setting for many of his most popular paintings of Native Americans.

40 SPRINKLER FUN

Ohio Cooperative Living readers deal with summer’s heat in some cute and creative ways.

Cover image on most issues: For this month’s Member Interactive feature, Pioneer Electric Cooperative member Jake Coverstone submitted his wife’s picture of their son, Luke, cooling off after a long, hot day of playing in the sun. See Page 40 for more.

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

INDEPENDENTLY

WORKING TOGETHER

W

ithout exception, electric cooperatives throughout the state of Ohio are proud, ingrained resources for the communities they serve. Of course, co-ops provide electricity to area homes, churches, and businesses, but that’s not all that they do for their communities. Co-op employees live in those small towns; shop at the local supermarket; coach Little League teams; champion civic projects; and lend a hand when their neighbors need one. Ohio co-op staffs have a vested interest in doing what’s right for both the cooperative and their fellow citizens. Electric cooperatives are independent, locally owned and governed businesses that are dedicated to building, maintaining, and fostering the economic vitality of their respective regions. Co-ops partner with Buckeye Power and the Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives statewide association to pool resources to work smarter, better, faster, less expensively, and more efficiently than each could on its own. Co-ops make it their business to help other businesses. Co-op member companies range in size and complexity from family-owned farms to large industrial manufacturing facilities, and from local retailers to multi-national chain operators. Every business has its own interests and challenges, but those organizations that we serve rely on their cooperative for essential electric service that’s clean, safe, reliable, and affordable. Providing power is a vital part of establishing a business and helping it to flourish. Beyond that, co-ops work with community leaders to find prospective businesses and to develop locations that advance growth. Putting organizations in touch with community resources promotes rural prosperity. Helping businesses is just one more way that cooperatives are committed to community. I hope that you and your family enjoy Independence Day. God bless America!

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Ohio co-op staffs have a vested interest in doing what’s right for both the cooperative and their fellow citizens.


JULY 2018 • Volume 60, No. 10

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Contributors: Mary Beasecker , Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Jeff Muller, Catherine Murray, Laura Newpoff, Damaine Vonada, Kris Wetherbee, Rick Wetherbee, and Margie Wuebker. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.40 to $6.72 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES

ECONOMIC PARTNERS: Ohio electric cooperatives are vital cogs that spur business growth in their communities.

8 CO-OP PEOPLE

FREEDOM TRAIN: A Midwest Electric member’s creation

has become a common sight at area fairs and festivals.

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

HIKE, BIKE, OR RIDE: A visit to the Cuyahoga National Park

changes with the visitor’s mode of transportation.

15 GOOD EATS

COOL AND REFRESHING: These refreshing summer

beverages really hit the spot on those hot summer days.

18 OHIO ICON

THE RITZ THEATRE: Tiffin’s dazzling play and movie house

celebrates its 90th birthday with a host of popular programs.

19 LOCAL PAGES News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO

CARDINAL MANAGER: Bethany Schunn takes over as

manager of Buckeye Power’s workhorse power plant.

24 IN THE GARDEN The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member

SENSATIONAL SUNFLOWERS: These garden delights

come in all shapes, sizes, and colors.

38 CALENDAR WHAT’S HAPPENING: July events and other things to do.

IN THIS ISSUE

Maria Stein (p.4) Cuyahoga Valley National Park (p.12) Tiffin (p.18) Brilliant (p.23) Dublin (p.27) Cambridge (p.27)

Sandusky (p.28) Milan (p.28) Dayton (p.30) Delaware (p.30) Akron (p.31) Canton (p.31)

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


POWER LINES

ECONOMIC PA R T N E R S Ohio electric cooperatives are vital cogs that spur business growth in their communities BY LAURA NEWPOFF AND JEFF McCALLISTER

D

ave Buschur saw the opportunity for his business; he just wasn’t sure he could take advantage of it. Buschur is president of Buschur’s Custom Farm Service in Maria Stein, which, among other services, hauls poultry, swine, manure, and grain for area farmers. “We saw a need for a bio-secure automatic washing facility for trucks and trailers,” Buschur says. “It’s not a requirement, it’s just good practice to decontaminate after every run — you sure don’t want to be the reason anyone’s birds get sick — and there’s nothing else like this around for 500 miles.” Adding a washing facility at Buschur’s location in the Marion Industrial Park would allow him to hire as many as 10 new employees. He knew the local electric cooperative, Midwest Electric, of which both he and his business are members, administers a loan fund that can help out with exactly that kind of opportunity.

So, along with his own equity and that of his business partner in Pennsylvania, Buschur was able to secure much of the financing for the $1 million facility from a local bank, a bit more from the Mercer County Economic Development Office, and the rest from the Midwest Electric Revolving Loan Fund, which has provided nearly $2 million in low-interest financing to spur economic development since its first loan to the Village of St. Henry 10 years ago. “There are so many examples where Midwest Electric has been a key partner for us making development happen,” says Jared Ebbing, Mercer County’s economic development director. “Without the co-op as a key collaborator, for example, this whole industrial park would still be a cornfield in the middle of nowhere.”

Attraction and retention The way Midwest Electric is improving the quality of life for businesses, residents, and workers around it is emblematic

Dave Buschur and his wife, Danielle, had financing help from Midwest Electric when they decided to expand their business in the Marion Industrial Park in Mercer County.

4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018


of the partnerships that the state’s electric co-ops have with economic development officials across Ohio. One of the most significant components of this relationship is how the electric co-ops work in conjunction with JobsOhio and its regional partners: Columbus 2020, Regional Growth Partnership, Appalachian Partnership for Economic Growth, Dayton Development Coalition, and Team NEO. The electric coops have created a program to further relationships with their local economic development partners by providing grants for site assistance and community development. Katy Farber, vice president of the Appalachian Partnership for Economic Growth, says the co-op grant money is invaluable for business investment and job creation. “Many of our rural communities don’t have the money to perform the studies or assessments that are needed as part of the due diligence for these sites,” Farber says. “Having a ready site, with everything documented, gives us a good shot at siting a project.” The grants have helped the Appalachian Partnership with two recent locations: Buckeye Rural Electric supported the Dan Evans Industrial Park in Gallia County, and South Central Power Company assisted the Leesburg Industrial Park in Highland County. “Those sites will go for attraction projects, but I’m also working with one landlocked company that wants to expand significantly,” Farber says. “They may look at putting an additional facility at one of these locations that’s nearby. We think about the grants for attracting new businesses, but they could be for attracting new investment and job growth from our existing businesses, too.”

Community commitment Dennis Mingyar, director of economic development at Buckeye Power, the generation company that provides electricity to Ohio’s electric cooperatives, says the co-ops will soon begin awarding smaller grants for other programs that will help business and community development in electric cooperative-served areas. “It’s easy for a community to find money for infrastructure development, but much harder to find that softer money, for example, to create a marketing plan,” Mingyar says. “We’re trying to fill a niche. Communities can take advantage of programs to

Powered by co-ops Buckeye Power’s business consumer-members range in size and complexity from mom-andpop storefronts to Fortune 500 industrial giants. A few Ohio businesses and facilities proudly served by electric cooperatives in Ohio: • Honda of America manufacturing plants: the Marysville Auto Plant, Anna Engine Plant, and Honda Transmission. • The Kroger Great Lakes Distribution Center, which employs 800 associates and annually distributes 1.3 million tons of grocery product to 260 stores. • The Iams Pet Food Company’s Leipsic manufacturing plant for dry pet food, one of only four U.S. plants. • The Avon Products, Inc., distribution center, which handles more than 50 percent of Avon’s U.S. distribution. • Ohio Fresh Eggs, which houses 2.2 million laying hens and helps Ohio rank second nationally in egg production.

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


Electric co-ops have the ability and knowhow to help businesses find new sites to develop or expand — co-op grants, for example, helped develop the Dan Evans Industrial Park in Bidwell, Ohio (top photo), and co-op assistance allowed LSI, Inc., to expand its factory and headquarters in Mt. Gilead (bottom three photos).

perform an environmental cleanup, but our funds will help pay for the study itself. This program helps to satisfy unmet needs in the community.” Beyond the grant money and the services co-ops offer businesses, there’s a deeper connection that’s measured by the value of relationships. The co-ops are locally owned, locally controlled, and locally operated — meaning they know the challenges that their members face and are able to work more closely with them to find fixes. “If you’re trying to start or expand a business, you’re important,” Mingyar says. “You can get to a person at the co-op and say, ‘I’m trying to start a brewery, a restaurant, or other business,’ and because we understand our communities, we’re going to work with you closer because we view you as a partner.”

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SPECIAL ISSUE:

Exploring Ohio

Endless opportunit ies for summer adve nture

Also inside Internships give a head start to co-op careers

Kids’ recipe contest winner celebrates ‘Gotcha Day’

Bicentennial Barns artist is still on the job

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**This trip will not be handicap accessible. Historic and antiquated rail passenger equipment, like that used on this excursion, is exempt from ADA regulations under U.S. Code: Title 42: Section 12184. The passenger cars and station facilities used on this excursion were constructed before disability accessibility laws were adopted. Platforms, boarding areas, stairs, step-stools, seating, and especially doorways, passageways, aisles, and onboard restrooms may not accommodate all passengers. We will make all reasonable efforts to accommodate differently abled passengers who desire to ride this train.**

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CO-OP PEOPLE

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F

olks throughout western Ohio — in and around the area served by Midwest Electric — have become accustomed to seeing the Freedom Train chugging around area fairs and festivals. With a vintage Coca-Cola bell clanging and small American flags flapping in the summer breeze, the train transports youngsters and adults along midways, across parking areas, and even through livestock barns. New Knoxville-area resident and longtime co-op member Gary Katterheinrich created the 65-foot train 10 years ago after he retired as manager of Neil Armstrong Airport. “I like to tell folks I was retired but not tired, and I needed something to do,” he says. “My wife (Sylvia) and I thought it would be fun to build a train that youngsters could ride on at fairs and festivals throughout the area.” The couple initially considered a barrel train, but quickly dismissed that idea because parents and children could not ride together. However, the idea ultimately evolved into a vehicle that could not only accommodate all age groups, but also be accessible. The construction phase took nearly 11/2 years with the assistance of Milo Keith, a neighbor and retired tooland-die maker. The industrial gas-powered engine once towed luggage carts around the Greater Cincinnati Airport, while the three cars had been used to haul dumpsters around a Cincinnati waste facility. In addition to an engine overhaul, the train got some sturdy wooden bench seats capable of accommodating

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018

30 riders, and a back area for wheelchairs, strollers, and the conductor. A protective canopy was added later, in the interest of passenger comfort. The train proved to be a popular attraction at festivals and county fairs in the area, with the schedule growing to nearly three dozen events ranging from the Buckeye Antique Machinery Show in May to the Wapakoneta holiday parade in December.

“The hours are long, but the greatest satisfaction comes from a smile or a heartfelt ‘thank you.’ ”

Katterheinrich sold the train to Botkins-area resident Tom Schlueter two years ago in the wake of health problems. The men share the same philosophy when it comes to operation: Senior citizens and veterans get priority seating; good behavior is expected of all passengers, regardless of age; no one pays to ride, but there is a tip jar for those wishing to donate toward maintenance and insurance costs. “There is a lot more work involved than most people realize,” Schlueter says. “It ranges from transporting the engine and cars to regular maintenance, but you get plenty of satisfaction seeing folks enjoy their rides.”


PHOTOS BY JEFF MULLER/CLOUSTUDIO.COM

It takes at least two people to operate the train: The engineer remains in the cab, negotiating busy festival grounds; the conductor constantly watches from the rear car, making sure that all passengers — children and adults — remain seated with their arms and legs inside. Some rides have been more memorable than others. Freedom Train once fulfilled a special wish for a sick girl, taking her and family members for a trip between Botkins and Anna. Katterheinrich still remembers the smile that lit her pale face. Schlueter picked up an 85-year-old man at the Mercer County Fair and learned it had been 40 years since his last visit. The man apparently enjoyed the ride so much he came back every day and spent considerable time on board. Another time a bunch of senior citizens longed to see some livestock, but could not handle the walking. Stunned looks crossed their faces when the train traveled through the steer barn. “The hours are long, but the greatest satisfaction comes from a smile or a heartfelt ‘thank you,’” Katterheinrich says. “There is no better pay in the world.”

Carol and Tom Schlueter bring the Freedom Train to fairs, festivals, and other events around western Ohio. The couple purchased the former airport baggage train from its original creator, Gary Katterheinrick, about two years ago.

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   9


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JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

HIKE, BIKE, or RIDE? At Cuyahoga Valley National Park, the experience changes with your mode of transportation STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

O

hio is privileged to have a national park within its borders: Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Lying between Cleveland and Akron, CVNP sprawls over 33,000 acres and is considered an urban/suburban national park — and unlike many national parks, there is no entrance fee. Most visitors view the park’s scenery and wildlife from their cars as they leisurely pass through. But if you’re looking for more than just a quick casual drive-by, there are ways to immerse yourself in all that CVNP has to offer. For instance, take a hike, ride a bike, or climb aboard the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad.

Hiking “The park has over 100 miles of hiking trails, and a section of the 1,200-mile Buckeye Trail passes through it as well,” says Pam Barnes, a spokesperson for the park. “There are a variety of hiking opportunities, from a leisurely stroll along the level towpath trail, to trails with a moderate roll, to rocky and rugged trails. In other words, there are trails for every skill and ability level.” The Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail stretches the length of the park north to south — more than 20 miles — and is the main hiking, biking, running, and walking path through the park. The wide, packed-limestone trail is the original towpath

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018


walked by mules and their drivers as they pulled canal boats up and down the Ohio & Erie Canal more than a century ago. For wildlife watchers, the Towpath Trail crosses the Beaver Marsh just north of the Ira Trailhead. A boardwalk spanning the marsh is a great place for wildlife viewing, especially birds.

Biking “Connecting to the Towpath Trail is the Bike & Hike Trail, nearly 16 miles of asphalt trail bordering the park, ideal for family bike rides,” Barnes says. “If you don’t happen to own a bike, we’ll rent you one.” For a bit more of a challenge, try the East Rim MountainBike Trail, a rugged 2.5-mile single track that alternates the direction of travel every other day to give riders a varied experience. The trail is closed during wet weather, so check its availability by going to the Twitter account: @CVNPmpb. Free ranger-led activities are also available for those who would feel more comfortable in a group, rather than striking out on their own. “One of our most popular is the ParkAfter-Dark night hikes held each Friday evening during the summer,” Barnes says. “Night hikes give visitors an entirely different experience of the park.”

Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad If you’d rather sit back, relax, and let someone else do all the work, there are several train excursions. “We also have an all-day pass that allows you to get on and off the train as often as you’d like at various stops along the way,” Barnes says. You can also do a Bike-Aboard experience, where for just $3 you put your bike on board the train — staff members load the bike on and off for you — and you ride one direction on the train, then bike back to your car on the Towpath Trail, or vice versa. “The train runs year-round, but the Bike-Aboard option is only available spring through fall,” Barnes says. Hike, bike, or ride? Of course, you don’t necessarily have to choose; make a full day of it and experience all three ways to visit Ohio’s National Park. To begin planning your visit or for more information, go to www.nps.gov/cuva. W.H. “CHIP” GROSS (whchipgross@gmail.com) is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor and is a member of Consolidated Cooperative.

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


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FRESH GINGER ALE Prep: 10 minutes; Cook: 10 minutes; Chill: overnight; Servings: 6 3 cups water 1/2 c up freshly squeezed lime juice (approx. 4 limes) 3-inch knob fresh ginger root, thinly sliced 2 liters club soda 1/2 cup sugar ice 10 sprigs fresh mint, washed Place water, ginger slices, and sugar in medium-sized pot and bring to boil over high heat. Remove from heat, cover, and steep for 2 hours. Place in an airtight container and chill overnight. When ready to serve, remove ginger pieces, reserving liquid. In a small bowl, add mint leaves (reserving tops for garnish) and lime juice. Muddle with a spoon or pestle to incorporate mint’s flavor into lime juice. Combine lime mixture and ginger mixture. In serving glasses filled with ice, combine one part ginger/mint mixture with 2 parts club soda. Garnish with mint tops and serve.  Per serving: 83 cal.; 0.3 g fat; 21 g total carbs; 1 g fiber; 0.5 g protein.

BLACKBERRY-THYME FIZZ Prep: 5 minutes; Cook: 15 minutes; Chill: 1 hour; Servings: 4 2 cups (12 oz.) blackberries 1 lemon, juiced 10 sprigs fresh thyme 1 liter club soda 3/4 cup sugar (plus extra for rim) ice 11/2 cups water  Set aside 8 blackberries and 4 thyme sprigs for garnish. Combine remaining blackberries, thyme, sugar, and water in a small pot over high heat. Let cook 15 minutes at full boil until berries are broken down and lighter in color, stirring frequently. Remove thyme sprigs and discard. Let mixture cool, add lemon juice, and refrigerate for 1 hour. Rub the rims of 4 cocktail glasses with a damp towel. Dip rim in sugar. In glasses, combine one part blackberry mixture (scooping some of the blackberry puree settling at the bottom) with 2 parts club soda. Garnish with thyme sprigs, blackberries, and a few ice cubes. Serve immediately. Note: To make into a non-carbonated punch, replace club soda with water.   Per serving: 200 cal.; 1 g fat; 50 g total carbs; 7 g fiber; 2 g protein.

LEMON SAGE SWEET TEA Cook: 10 minutes; Chill: overnight; Servings: 6 6 cups water 1/4 cup honey 40 lemon verbena leaves ice  30 sage leaves In a medium saucepan, heat water to just before boiling. Remove from heat. Add lemon verbena, sage, and honey. Stir until honey has melted and combined. Cover pot and steep for 10 minutes. Chill overnight. When ready to serve, fill pitcher or glasses with ice cubes and pour tea over top. (Leaves can be removed or left in when serving.)  Per serving: 44 cal.; 0 fat; 12 g total carbs; 0 g fiber; 0 g protein.

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018


FROSTED CREAMSICLE SMOOTHIE Prep: 10 minutes; Servings: 8 3 large oranges, chilled in refrigerator 20-oz. can crushed pineapple, chilled in refrigerator

OOPS! Our Mothers Day Brunch recipes (Good Eats, May 2018) inadvertently left out part of an ingredient for Grilled Banana Bread. That recipe should include 1½ cups of flour, rather than the ½ cup that was listed. Thanks to the several readers who advised us of the error.

11/2 quarts frozen vanilla yogurt 1 frozen banana

Slice 1 orange and set aside for garnish. Zest and juice 2 oranges; discard remaining pulp. Place zest, orange juice, and pineapple with juice, frozen vanilla yogurt, and peeled banana in blender. Pulse until fully blended. Immediately pour into glasses, garnish with orange slices, and serve. Store leftovers in freezer.   Per serving: 257 cal.; 6 g fat (3.5 g sat. fat); 49 g total carbs; 3 g fiber; 5.5 g protein.

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


OHIO ICON

Ritz THEATRE

THE Tiffin

BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: Downtown Tiffin, south of the Sandusky River. Provenance: Opened on December 20, 1928, by owners Dan Kerwin and Adam Ritzler, The Ritz Theatre was known as “Tiffin’s quarter-million-dollar movie palace.” Its architect was Peter M. Hulsken of Lima, who created numerous atmospheric and thematic movie houses for the Schine theater chain. Hulsken’s ornate Italian Renaissance design included a lobby evoking an Italian villa; enormous frescoes depicting garden scenes; and a dazzling, 1,200-pound crystal chandelier mounted in a sky-like dome. The nonprofit Tiffin Theatre Inc. purchased The Ritz in the 1980s, and in 1998, an ambitious restoration project returned the historic structure to its almost-original appearance. Besides the Corinthian columns and terra cotta mask of the Greek muse Melpomene that grace The Ritz’s exterior, the renovation preserved elegant interior features, such as marble staircases and the chandelier. Significance: Celebrating its 90th anniversary in 2018, The Ritz is not only a treasured local landmark and popular performing arts center, but also an impressive reminder of the dawn of Hollywood’s Golden Age, when motion picture venues lured customers by making

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018

average folks feel like royalty. “Going to a movie palace was as much of an attraction as seeing the picture,” says The Ritz’s executive director, Michael Strong. “The theaters were grand and provided a fantasy experience.” Currently: The Ritz hosts a variety of programs and performances. During 2018, The Ritz Players, its resident theater company, is staging the musical The Addams Family; guest artists include the Cowsills singers, pianist Teresa Walters, and the Glenn Miller Orchestra; and the monthly Friday Night Live series spotlights local and regional talent. The Ritz also offers a Summer Theatre Camp, and its Discovery Series introduces live theater to students in grades K–12. It’s a little-known fact that: Two keys to The Ritz’s ongoing success are its donor base and large number of volunteers. “We have about 300 active volunteers, and they do everything from helping backstage to working as ushers to selling concessions,” says Strong. The Ritz Theatre, 30 S. Washington St., Tiffin, OH 44883. For additional information about the Ritz, upcoming performances, tickets, and scheduling tours, call 419-448-8544 or visit www.ritztheatre.org.


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

ANNUAL MEETING

OFFICIAL NOTICE OF THE ANNUAL MEETING OF MEMBERS OF THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY 770 SOUTH SECOND STREET ● COSHOCTON, OH 43812 The Annual Meeting of the Members of the above cooperative will be held at the River View High School auditorium between Coshocton and Warsaw on State Route 60 North on Friday, July 27, 2018, at 7 p.m. to take action upon the following: 1. Reports of officials, trustees, and committees 2. Announce elected trustees 3. All other business which may properly come before the meeting

Secretary-Treasurer Dated: July 1, 2018

The Frontier Power Company 82nd Annual Meeting July 27, 2018 River View High School Auditorium • Warsaw, OH

5 p.m.

7 p.m.

Light supper served Business meeting Announcement of elected trustees Door prizes for adults and children to follow (must be present to win)

Each member attending will receive a $10 credit on their electric bill and a gift. Please bring your registration card to the meeting (sent separately in mail).

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

2018 Trustees Nominated The 2018 Nominating Committee met in May to nominate candidates for three positions up for election. Members of the nominating committee were Gerald Hothem, Larry Leindecker, and Alan Miller.

For District A, Coshocton County, James Buxton II, Jack Allen Close, Robert W. Doughty, and William “Bill” Hostetler will be running. David P. Mizer and Kenny Shaw will be vying for the District C, Tuscarawas County, position. District D, Coshocton County, has Tim Anderson, Chuck Hothem, and Alan M. Miller running.

District A – Coshocton County Candidates James Buxton II (Incumbent) resides in Jefferson Township, Coshocton County, north of Warsaw. He and his wife, Kecia, have three children: Laurel, Celia, and Henry. He is employed by the Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Research Operations, as Special Projects Coordinator at Wooster. Jim and his family raise beef cattle and hay on their farm. He is a member of the FFA Alumni and attends Perry Chapel. He has also achieved his Credentialed Cooperative Director Certificate from the NRECA.

Jack Allen Close has been married to Beulah Close for 57 years. They have a son, Jeff Close, and a daughter, Sheila Close, as well as three granddaughters and a greatgrandson. Jack is the owner of Close Trucking LTD and has worked there for 56-plus years. He has dedicated his life providing employment and services in the transportation industry to AK Steel, Pretty Products, St. Regis Paper Mill, Stone Container, and successors in Coshocton and surrounding counties. Jack likes to spend time with his family and on the farm in Coshocton County his family has owned for 20 years. As a potential board member of Frontier Power, Jack wants to help make energy available to customers more reliable and efficient at the lowest cost consistent with sound economy and judgment.

20   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018

Robert W. Doughty lives in Keene Township in Coshocton County with his wife, Kathy. They have two daughters, Michelle and MacKenzie. Robert has worked at the Coshocton Grain Company for the last eight years. He is a member of Roscoe United Methodist Church. He is a 20 plus-year school board member of the Muskingum Valley Education Service Center. He is a past graduate of Leadership Coshocton and a past 4-H advisor. Robert enjoys raising market lambs. He has been a proud user of Frontier Power his whole life.

William “Bill” Hostetler of the Bakersville area is a retired dairy and hog finishing farmer. For 50 years, he has co-owned with his father, Howard Hostetler, Hostetler Farm Supplies. He is a past advisory board member for Farm Credit Association and attends church in Sugarcreek at Sugarcreek Church of the Brethren. He has been married for 47 years to Myrna and they have two children, Ben and Michele. He also has five grandchildren and a great-grandchild.


District C – Tuscarawas County Candidates David P. Mizer (Incumbent) lives on a dairy farm 2 miles north of Bakersville in Bucks Township, Tuscarawas County. He has a daughter, Amy Yoder, and a son, Terry (Pam) Mizer, as well as two grandchildren, Austin Yoder and Cameron Mizer. David belongs to the Evans Creek Lutheran Church, Tuscarawas County Farm Bureau, and Baltic Conservation Club. He is currently the secretary-treasurer of The Frontier Power Company and thanks you for your support.

Kenny Shaw is a life-long member of The Frontier Power Company residing near Newcomerstown in Salem Township, Tuscarawas County. He and wife Tiffany (Whitehawk) have two children: Lincoln, who will be a senior at The Ohio State University, and daughter Alexis, who is a junior at Newcomerstown High, Kenny’s alma mater. Kenny is the owner of Shaw-Wilbert Vaults in Newcomerstown and the former owner of Shaw Custom Pallets. He and his family are members of the St. Paul Lutheran Church. Kenny is also a member of Farm Bureau, the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Newcomerstown Elks, and Port Washington Masonic Lodge. He is an advisor for the Buckhorn Tribe 4-H Club as well. Kenny has formerly served on the Newcomerstown Board of Education and the Tuscarawas County Market Livestock Committee. In his spare time, he enjoys boating and camping with his family and bowling.

District D – Coshocton County Candidates Tim Anderson (Incumbent) resides in Coshocton County, Pike Township, with wife Beth and their four children: Emma, Noah, Wesley, and Carson. Tim farms with his father and uncle (Anders Bros.), and contracts feed hogs for Gerber and Sons of Baltic and WenMar farms of West Lafayette. He and Beth also run

a medium-size herd of Red and Black Angus beef cattle. Tim and his family attend Coshocton Christian Tabernacle where they are active members. Tim is a member of the National Rifle Association and Farm Bureau. He is also supported by Ohio Pork Producer’s Council as a producer of pork for Ohio and is certified in their PQA (Pork Quality Assurance) program. Tim would like to thank all of the co-op members for their support in the past. He truly appreciates being given the opportunity to serve our community in this position and would greatly appreciate your continued support.

Charles “Chuck” E. Hothem and his wife, Marcia Marlatt Hothem, married 27 years, reside in Oxford Township, Coshocton County. They have one son, Nathan Ekleberry, and two grandchildren, Lucy and Gage, who also reside in Coshocton County. Chuck is a mine superintendent for the Westmoreland Coal Company (formerly Oxford Mining). He’s been a Farm Bureau member for over 30 years and a member of the Elks. Chuck is a farmer who says he thoroughly enjoys raising beef cattle and grain farming.

Alan M. Miller, a 41-year Frontier Power customer, would be honored to represent you as a member of the Frontier Power Board of Directors. Residing in Lafayette Township, Coshocton County, he’s been married to Irene Crouso Miller for 45 years. They have a son, Zac (Breann) Miller, and two grandchildren, Rylee and Greyson. Alan is retired from AEP Conesville Coal Plant, worked at AK Steel, and taught welding at the Coshocton County Career Center. He is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and Ohio Army National Guard. A member of the West Lafayette United Methodist Church, he has served as chairman of the trustees and parsonage committees. Alan has served as president of the Lions Club, director of Ridgewood Recreation, and board member for Ridgewood and Coshocton County Career Center. After graduation from Ridgewood in 1971, he attended Hobart Welding School and Kent State University.

JULY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  21


THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

17th Annual Customer Appreciation Day brings 700 guests

Co-op

Connections Card Because you are a Frontier Power cooperative member, your Co-op Connections® Card provides you with special discounts online and at participating local retailers. Be sure to visit this month’s highlighted business and check out offers on the internet by clicking the Co-op Connections Card icon on our website, www.frontier-power.com.

Zanesville $55.99 + tax nightly rate. $45.99 + tax weekly rate, (four or more nights a week).

BY WYNDHAM

Our offices will be closed July 4. Have a wonderful and safe holiday!

THE FRONTIER POWER COMPANY

On May 4, the weather held off so that our many guests could enjoy the annual Customer Appreciation Day hosted by Frontier Power, Frontier Propane, and Frontier Supply. Hamburgers and hot dogs, as well as treats from Whit’s and Coshocton Coffee Connection, were served for lunch. Special door prize winners were: Debbie Moody, Jean Kittle, and David Mullett – $25 Frontier value certificates; Max Hughes, Jean Mills, and Mark Leindecker – $10 Whit’s gift cards; Jean Ames, Dian Hutchison, and Shirley Johnson – $10 Coffee Connection gift cards; and Kelly Karr, Travis Leigh, Sandra Bradford, and Bobbi Hughes– stuffed totes. Frontier Power, Frontier Propane, Frontier Supply, and Progressive Water staff members manned displays and answered visitors’ questions. In addition, Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival committee members provided information about this year’s festival, held June 7–9 at the fairgrounds. Sponsored by Frontier Power for 12 years, the Coshocton Hot Air Balloon Festival included hot air balloons, a queen competition, entertainment, carnival rides, Safety Saturday, and lots of vendors. There was something for everyone! We hope all who attended had a good time and learned more about your cooperative. Thanks for joining us in celebrating you, our members!

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Robert Wise President

CONTACT 800-624-8050 | 740-622-6755 www.frontier-power.com OFFICE 770 S. Second St. P.O. Box 280 Coshocton, OH 43812 OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Larry Blair Vice President

David P. Mizer Secretary-Treasurer

Tim Anderson Jim Buxton Bill Daugherty Ann Gano-McCleary Trustees

CEO/GENERAL MANAGER Steven K. Nelson ATTORNEY Michael D. Manning

22   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018

PERSONNEL Dakota Albertson Kyle Cramblett Phil Crowdy Jason Dolick F. Scott Dunn Mark Fabian Michelle Fischer Tyler Frazer Rick Haines Robert Haines Josh Haumschild Ken Hunter Tim Keirns Kelly Kendall Lucas Landaker Chad Lecraft Matthew Limburg Mark Lindsey Francis “J.R.” McCoy Jr.

Mike McCoy Blake McKee Melvin McVay Chad Miller Corey Miller Bill Mizer Kimberly Pepping Marty Shroyer Bornwell Sianjina Nate Smith Gene Swigert Shelly Thompson Jonathon Tolliver Robin Totten Andrew Vickers Vickie Warnock Jim Williams Sybil Wright


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

Schunn is new Cardinal plant manager Bethany Schunn has been promoted to plant manager at Cardinal Power Plant, Buckeye Power’s workhorse generating facility in Brilliant, Ohio. Schunn is the first woman to hold the plant’s top spot in its 50 years of operation. Schunn, a chemist by trade with degrees from West Virginia Wesleyan and Wheeling Jesuit University, worked at the AEP Conesville Plant for 12 years before coming to Cardinal in 2017, first as transition manager to oversee the changeover of operations responsibility from AEP to the Cardinal Operating Company, and then as assistant plant manager. She takes over for Chuck George, who retired after 34 years in the power industry.

Pioneer linemen visit Graham Elementary A group of Graham Elementary third- through fifth-grade students sat down with Piqua-based Pioneer Electric Cooperative linemen for interviews earlier this year. The students created videos by interviewing members of the community on characteristics necessary for life success. Lineman Trainee Brad Harrison, First-Class Lineman Matt Donley, Leader Lineman Terry Linger, and Operations Supervisor and Assistant Safety Manager Jeremy Nash were asked questions on the topics of teamwork and honesty. Afterward, students asked the linemen about their tools and safety gear, including rubber gloves, sleeves, boots, a tool belt, and various other pieces of equipment. A few students even tried on the gear.

Four Ohio co-ops receive Spotlight on Excellence awards Four communications teams from Ohio electric cooperatives received Spotlight on Excellence awards from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. Spotlight on Excellence recognizes outstanding work produced by electric co-op communications and marketing professionals across the country. Ohio co-ops received the following awards: • Best Internal News Publication, Silver: The Energy Cooperative (Newark), Employee Newsletter. • Best Small Special Publication, Silver: Consolidated Cooperative (Mt. Gilead), Understanding Your Statement. • Best Large Special Publication, Silver: Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative (North Baltimore), Economic Development Marketing and Energy Solutions.

Brian Barr, Karen Farago, and Terry Mazzone of North Central Electric Cooperative and Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative accept their Gold Spotlight on Excellence Award.

• Best Total Communications Program, Gold: Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative (Wellington) and North Central Electric Cooperative (Attica), OurSolar Campaign. JULY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 23


GARDENING

SENSATIONAL

Sunflowers With dazzling blooms that come in an ever-changing palette of sun-drenched colors, the once-towering native plant of the Americas is turning heads in a big, bold, and colorful new way BY KRIS WETHERBEE; PHOTOS BY RICK WETHERBEE

G

iant sunflowers like “Mammoth Russian” with their sunny yellow blooms and massive seed-producing heads may have reigned in Ohio gardens in the past. The beloved annual has evolved, however, and sensational sunflowers now come in more sizes, types, and colors than ever before. These days, gardeners can grow varieties in single- and bicolor shades of yellow, orange, rosy pink, ruby red, purple, bronze, and even white. Height varies as well, with compact varieties growing 1 to 3 feet tall. As such, they are a great option for container gardens or as border or edging plants in the flower garden. Taller, multi-

24

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2018

branching types grow 4 to 6 feet tall and produce multiple flower heads for mass appeal. Some varieties are bred to produce especially large seeds, while pollen-free types such as “Bashful” and “Cherry Rose” clean up as the cream of the crop for cut flowers with a longer shelf life. Of course, the towering giants with massive heads still have their place in the garden as an attractive, living bird-feeding station, a fast-growing hedgerow, or a barrier to disguise an unsightly view. With so many options to choose from, why not go beyond the standard and dial up the attraction with one of these out-of-the-box varieties.


Autumn Beauty

Music Box

Floristan

Ring of Fire

This multi-branching plant grows to 5 feet tall, with single- and bicolor blooms up to 8 inches across in shades of yellow, bronze, and purple-red. One plant can have up to two dozen flowers all open at the same time, making it a cutting favorite, despite the pollen. (1,2)

A delightful dwarf plant, growing 24 to 28 inches tall, resounds with 4- to 5-inch blooms in solid and bicolor shades of cream to yellow to mahogany-red. Its multi-branched habit produces plenty of flowers. (2)

Another cut flower favorite, this multi-branching plant grows 3 to 4 feet tall. Dark chocolate disks are surrounded by bicolor blooms of reddishbrown rays tipped in light yellow to orange hues. (3)

A visually striking variety that really lights up the landscape with bicolored petals of deep red-burgundy toward the center that transition to golden yellow at the tips. This multi-branching variety grows to 4 feet tall, with a profusion of 5- to 6-inch flowers. (2,3)

SEED SOURCES 1. Burpee: www.burpee.com; 800-888-1447 2. Jung Seed: www.jungseed.com; 800-247-5864

Strawberry Blonde

Teddy Bear

The Joker

Stunning rose-pink sunflowers brushed with lemon-yellow tips surround a dark chocolate center. It has a nice branching habit, so there are plenty of 5- to 6-inch pollen-free blooms to enjoy in the garden or showcase in a vase indoors. Grows 5 to 6 feet tall. (1)

A truly unique sunflower, “Teddy Bear” has soft and cushy chrysanthemum-like 4- to 6-inch blooms topping sturdy branched stems. This dwarf variety grows 21⁄2 to 3 feet tall, and the full double yellow blooms are as eyecatching in the garden as they are in a vase or larger floral arrangement. (1,2,3)

A whimsical mix of eyecatching colors in semi-double and double blooms. The 4- to 7-inch flowers sport a two-tone mix of red, orange, brown, gold, and other autumnal hues for a blanket of color that’s sure to impress. This multi-branched sunflower grows to 6 feet in height, is pollen-free, and is one of the earliest to bloom. (3)

3. Territorial Seed Company: www. territorialseed.com; 800-626-0866

JULY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 25


Cruise-ins! Unless it’s the dead of winter, rest assured, there’s a car show coming to a town near you BY DAMAINE VONADA

Baseball may be the national pastime, but cruise-ins are Ohio’s obsession. From spring through fall, anybody and everybody — towns, museums, businesses, and even wineries — showcase vintage vehicles, and whether it’s a collectors’ show or informal cruise-in, Ohioans turn out in

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2018

droves to relish the craftsmanship, chrome, and charisma of classic cars. Since cruise-in season is underway in the Buckeye State, we’ve selected eight great events where the good times roll.


Arthritis Foundation Classic Auto Show & Cruise-In Dublin; July 5–7, 2018 The beauty of this suburban Columbus event is that it combines a top-notch visitor experience, a wide variety of cars, and an awesome location with green spaces and water features at Dublin’s Metro Center. Staged for more than 30 years and benefiting the Arthritis Foundation, it attracts some 1,100 cars from more than 20 states. “You’ll see a ton of cool cars in about 50 different classes based on brands, age, ownership, or unrestored originals,” says chairperson Kevin Gadd. Admission fee; 614-362-7370; www.arthritis.org/autoshow.

Performance Classic Car Show Delaware; July 21, 2018 Formerly called “Blast from the Past,” it showcases hundreds of cars, trucks, and motorcycles on Delaware’s main drag and has earned a reputation as one of Ohio’s best downtown automotive extravaganzas. “Delaware shuts down Sandusky Street just for the show, and every year, it gets between 12,000 and 15,000 people,” says chairperson Jeff Brashares. While car owners covet the classic’s 6-foot-tall “Best of” trophies, spectators appreciate its family-friendly environment and the numerous shops and restaurants that are open during the show. 740-369-9611; www. performanceclassiccarshow.com.

JULY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 27


Cambridge Classic Cruise In Cambridge; August 18, 2018 The biggest one-day event in downtown Cambridge brings thousands of visitors to Wheeling Avenue (a.k.a. the Historic National Road). “The festive atmosphere really sells this show,” says chairperson Brian Stillion. “It’s like a big block party.” Headquartered at the majestic Guernsey County Courthouse, the Cruise In includes cars, trucks, motorcycles, tractors, and even riding mowers. “If it rolls on wheels, we’ll take it,” Stillion says. 740-439-2238; www. downtowncambridge.com/event/cambridge-classic-cruise-in.

Cruisin’ by the Bay Sandusky; September 7–8, 2018 Presented by the Remember Cruisin’ Car Club of Northern Ohio, this popular charity event assists local cancer patients, and Sandusky closes off Columbus Avenue and other streets for more than 500 hot rods and classic cars that roll in. “Downtown Sandusky is a hard-to-beat car show venue,” says club president Mike Willinger. “The parks have big trees and beautiful flower beds, and Columbus Avenue ends at Sandusky Bay.” Other perks include Sandusky’s lively restaurant scene, Jet Express ferry rides, and the Merry-GoRound Museum. 419-271-1701; www.cruisinbythebay.com.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2018


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Molto Bella Car Show Akron; September 9, 2018 Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens is the estate created by the industrialist who helped put America on wheels — Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company co-founder F.A. Seiberling; what better venue for a luxury car show? Featuring more than 400 exotic sports cars and rare classics, Molto Bella wows visitors with its “very beautiful” mix of Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Packards, and Duesenbergs as well as its splendid setting on Stan Hywet’s Great Meadow. You can also tour Hywet’s magnificent Manor House and extensive gardens. The show benefits the Kidney Foundation. Admission fee; 330-8365533; www.stanhywet.org.

Dayton Concours d’Elegance at Carillon Park Dayton; September 16, 2018 Channeling Dayton’s legacy of automotive innovation (including the electric self-starter and ethyl gasoline), the Concours not only epitomizes beauty and style but also takes place at an inviting outdoor museum whose attractions include a carousel, a brewpub, and miniature train rides. The event is limited to 200 select cars and motorcycles, which must be more than 25 years old and either preserved in original condition or restored to original condition. “We get more than our share of multi-milliondollar vehicles,” says chairperson Skip Peterson. Admission fee; 937-293-2841; www.daytonconcours.com.

30

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2018


Cruisin’ on the Square Milan; Tuesday evenings through September A pretty village square with a trove of 1800s buildings provides a charming and historic backdrop for Chamber of Commerce-sponsored cruise-ins in Thomas Edison’s hometown. “Our car shows are like taking a step back in time, and they embody Americans’ love of classic cars,” says chairperson Greg Cumston. Tip: Look for the “Young Edison” statue depicting the budding genius being homeschooled by his mother, and plan to arrive early enough to tour Milan’s Edison Birthplace Museum. 419-499-9929; www.facebook.com/Cruisin-on-theSquare-1568396136718665.

Gervasi Vineyard Cruise-in Canton; Wednesday evenings through September A Tuscan-inspired oasis complete with a winery, restaurants, and upscale lodging, Gervasi provides an idyllic setting for weekly car club cruise-ins where you can drink in a variety of domestic (like Corvettes and Buicks) and imported (think Jaguars and Ferraris) brands. Participating cars are displayed throughout the picturesque grounds, and afterward, you can enjoy Gervasi’s wonderful wines and great food. Tip: Check out the Piazza for sangria, live music, and lovely lake views. 330-497-1000; www.gervasivineyard.com.

JULY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 31


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8 | OHIO LANDOWN ER TOOL KIT

LINE FEN CE

Line fen ce confusion law became a ma jor source landowner and contention of for muddied s, as court decisio many rural the meani ns and cus The line fence law ng of much of the toms s were upd Sept. 30, law. 200 attempting 8. The result is ated, effective a all types to balance the con set of laws of farmers side and landow rations of ners.

When the

line fenc

e law appl The line fence law ies applies to an estate any own for life, an er of land easemen the own in fee simp t, or er as a farm le, outlet. 1 The a right of way whil Departm ent of Natu e law also applies to used by ral Reso and polit urces, cons ical the Ohio erva recreation subdivisions with al trails, a real prop ncy districts, wheneve control land erty inter r they own that neig , lease, man est in law does hbors a land age, or not othe own rwise appl er with lives The line y to the fence law state or state tock. 2 The within mun does not agencies. apply to icipal corp the enclo propertie orations, sure of s laid out the enclo into lots sure of adjo lots or fences outs required ining to be cons ide of municipal 4959. 3 The corporati tructed by line fenc ons, railroads e law will landown under ORC also not ers enter apply if the into a writt if the fenc adjoining evidenci en agreeme e is not actu ng the fenc nt under includes ally a parti e and its built will ORC 971.0 thos tion fenc 4 location. 9 then proc 4, or e. A “par been cons e on a division line, Any repla eed as if removed. tition fenc idere or those the origi cement fenc Landown e” that have survey show d to be the divis nal fenc ers e removing historical ion s the fenc a partition should consult with e had never been ly e is not direc line, even if a subs intends to fence, whe neighbor equent land tly on repla s before ther or not the line. 5 Existing Fenc the land “Equitabl ce it. es owner e” maintena For thos the follo e partition nce is to wing fenc be determin enactmen 1. The topo six factors: 10 t of the new es that were in ed by cons existence grap be main ideri law hy of the (Sept. 30, ng prior to 2. The pres tained in the 2008 equitable ence of bodi property; landown shares betw ), the fence mus 3. The pres ers, rega es t rdless of ence of trees of water; been rece the fence’s een the adjoining 4. The level ntly 7 remo /vines/veg condition 6 of risk of ved and Sept. 30, etation; . If the own trespasser 2009, the to populatio er had filed a fence had s on eithe maintena proceed n density an affidavit nce r property as if it had propertie or recreation due by never been of any replacement shares in al use of 5. The impo s; maintena removed, fence will adjoining nce. 8 Goin rtance of requiring to remove 6. g mark equitable forward, The num a fence and ing divis ber and if a land applicati not imm ion lines owner wish type of lives on of the containe ; ediately equi es tock own replace it, d by the affidavit fence. ed by eithe but retai within one table shares rule, Previousl n the r owner they mus y, the law year of its 1 ORC landown t file an had requ removal 971.01(D)(1) ers. The ired equa with the 2 ORC use of the 971.01(D)(2) county reco not nece term “equ l maintenance betw 3 ORC ssari rder 971.03(A)-(C itable,” mea een a fence. “Equ ly result in 50/50 4 ORC ns shares 971.01(E) ) maintena itable” inste 5 ORC may nce or cost determin 971.01(E) ad will 6 ORC shar e use the shares 971.06 individua of the main the six factors abov ing of 7 Within l situation. 2 years prior tenance e to 8 ORC and to This resp filing 971.05, 971.06 cost base onsible for could mea of affida vit. d on the (C)(1)-(3) n one land the entir e cost of owner is building solel y or maintaini 9 ORC ng a fenc 971.06(C)(1)e. 10 ORC (3) 971.09(E)

Together WITH

farmers


Inspiring

OHIOANS FOR MORE THAN

YEARS

ohiohistory.org

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   33


THE INDIAN ART OF

ROBERT GRIFFING

A journey into America’s 18th-century eastern frontier Possessing an innate talent for drawing, Griffing enrolled in art school after high school, and became art director at an advertising agency in Pittsburgh for the next 30 years, but he pursued his painting hobby during odd hours. “I just couldn’t get Indians out of my head,” he says. In 1991, Griffing’s alma mater, the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, offered him a one-man show featuring his art. It was an evening that changed his life. “Within an hour, all of my paintings of Eastern Woodlands Indians had sold, and many people ordered prints of those seven original portraits,” he says. Soon after, Griffing resigned from his ad-agency job and turned to painting full-time. “It was the best career move

W

here others see modern-day cities, he sees ancient Indian villages. Where others see today’s crop fields, he sees vast virgin forests. In short, Robert Griffing sees Ohio as it was long before it ever became a state. He also sees — and paints — the Native American people who lived here more than 250 years ago. Born and raised in the extreme northwest corner of Pennsylvania (Linesville, to be exact), Griffing has been intrigued by North American Indians ever since that memorable day as a boy when he found his first flint arrowhead lying along the shoreline of nearby Pymatuning Lake. “That was the beginning of my fascination with Indians,” Robert says. The Newcomers

34

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2018


Into the Unknown

I ever made,” he says. Since then, he has created more than 325 paintings of Eastern Woodlands Indians, and he shows no sign of slowing his pace. Prices for his original artwork now range from a few thousand dollars to as much as five figures. Lithograph prints of his original paintings, more within the financial reach of most people, sell from $40 to several hundred dollars each. What makes Griffing’s artwork so popular are not only the subject matter and historical accuracy and detail of his paintings, but also his use of dramatic lighting, reminiscent of the Dutch master painters of the 1700s. Not surprisingly, it’s the same type of light frequently found in old-growth forests. His paintings tell a story, creating a certain mood. Ohio has a rich Indian history, and Griffing takes full advantage of that fact. For instance, one of his more recent works depicts a dozen warriors traveling along a small stream. The background setting for the painting is Old Man’s Cave, today part of Hocking Hills State Park in southeast Ohio. Models for his paintings during the early years of his career were mainly re-enactors — non-native people interested in 18th-century living history. But during the last decade, Griffing has developed relationships with Native Americans of several tribes who have become good friends and now act as his models. One of those people is Roger Moore, who lives in Mansfield. Moore’s portrait graces the cover of the first of two books of Griffing’s art. “When I got the natives involved, my paintings began to take on a different look,” Griffing says. “There’s just

Her Mother Taught Her Well

something about a real Native American in the way he stands and in his actions that gives my paintings the authentic look of a warrior, chief, or Indian woman.” W.H. “CHIP” GROSS is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor. A third book featuring Griffing’s paintings will be published in August, to be unveiled during a three-day celebration (August 3–5, 2018) honoring him and his art in his hometown of Linesville, Pennsylvania. The celebration will include a major exhibit of his work, his largest ever. A listing of the weekend’s events can be found on the Linesville Community Business Alliance Facebook page. To see Robert Griffing’s latest works online, or for more information about purchasing his prints or original art, go to www.paramountpress.com.

JULY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 35


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JULY 2018 CALENDAR NORTHWEST

JUL. 6 – First Fridays Downtown, historic downtown Sidney. Participating shops and restaurants stay open later and offer a First Friday discount. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. JUL. 6–8 – 3rd Annual Flag City Daylily Tour, Findlay, Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 12–6 p.m. Free. Self-guided tour of six daylily gardens around Findlay. 419-889-8827, anders@findlay.edu, www. pplantpeddler.com, or on Facebook: Flag City Daylily Tour.

JUL. 7, 14, 21, 28 – The Great Sidney Farmer’s Market, 109 S. Ohio Ave., 8 a.m.–noon. Farmers bring their freshest produce, and crafters offer a large variety of homemade items. Fresh baked goods, jams and jellies, plants, and flowers. 937-658-6945 or www. sidneyalive.org. JUL. 13–15 – Huron River Fest, Huron Boat Basin, 330 N. Main St., Huron. Free. Pageants, parades, live entertainment, games and rides, 5K/Fun Run, Road Show, and other activities. Fireworks Friday at 10:15 p.m. www.huronriverfest.com.

JUL. 7 – Beach Spectacular and Fireworks, Indian Lake State Park, Old Field Beach, Russells Point, 11 a.m. A day filled with Independence Day-themed festivities, pageants, food, games, and JUL. 14 – BBQ Fest, 109 S. Ohio Ave., Sidney, 11 a.m.–10 p.m. BBQ more. Classic car show registration 10 a.m.–3 p.m.; fee $10; dash competition; visitors can start sampling at 11 a.m. Also live music. plaques to first 50 participants; awards at 3 p.m. Fireworks at 10 p.m. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. 937-843-5392 or www.indianlakechamber.org. JUL. 14–16 – Annual Malinta Festival, Monroe Twp. Fire House, JUL. 7 – Classics on Main Car Show, 130 S. Main St., Bowling Malinta, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Flea market, car show, BBQ, kids’ area, live JUL. 1 – Stryker Sportsman Club 3-D Archery Shoot, 02638 Co. Green, 12–4 p.m., vehicle check-in 8 a.m.–noon. Free admission/ entertainment, auctions, and lots more. 419-966-9909. Rd. 20, Bryan (1/2 mile north of St. Rte. 6 on the right), 9 a.m.–noon. parking. Features close to 400 vehicles from vintage 1920s models JUL. 22 – Lakeside Wooden Boat Show and Plein Air Art $10, under 18 free. Thirty targets. 419-636-4987 or on Facebook. to modern electrics. More than 50 trophies awarded. 419-354-4332 or Festival, 236 Walnut Ave., Lakeside, 12-4 p.m. Gate fee applies. More www.downtownbgohio.org. JUL. 4 – Independence Day Concert, Rutherford B. Hayes Presthan 80 wooden boats, each classified on the year of the model, will idential Library and Museum lawn, Spiegel Grove, Fremont, 2–3:30 JUL. 7–8 – The Fantastic Tiffin Flea Market, Seneca Co. Fgds., be featured. The festival also hosts more than 30 plein air artists p.m. Free patriotic concert by the Toledo Symphony Concert Band. 100 Hopewell Ave., Tiffin, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. from across the Midwest, whom you can watch paint. Artwork Civil War reenactors will punctuate the performance of the “1812 Free admission. 300 to 450 dealers per show. Featuring antiques, can be purchased. 419-798-4461 (ext. 347), 866-952-5374, or www. Overture” with cannon fire. 419-332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org. collectibles, furniture, crafts, produce, tools, glass, and more. 419lakesideohio.com. 447-9613 or www.tiffinfleamarket.com. JUL. 4–7 – Old-Fashioned Fourth of July Weekend, Sauder JUL. 28 – Good Ole Summertime Festival, downtown North Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $17, Srs. $15, C. JUL. 7–8 – Toledo Lighthouse Waterfront Festival, Maumee Baltimore, 8 a.m.–11:30 p.m. Golf tournament, car show, craft/ (6–16) $11, under 6 free. Veterans and active-duty military free. Enjoy Bay State Park, 1750 State Park Rd. #2, Oregon. Lighthouse tours, flea market, 5K run, games, live music, and food. Concert at 7 p.m. ice cream, old-fashioned games, and patriotic songs played on the weather permitting; see original 1904 fresnel lens, one of only three features Sean Williams. Festival ends with fireworks display at the reed organ. Witness a U.S. District Court naturalization ceremony of its type. Live entertainment, kids’ activities, arts and crafts venpark. www.nbacc.org. on July 4 at 11 a.m. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org. dors, and food. 419-691-3788 or www.toledolighthousefestival.com.

NORTHEAST

Fri. 6 p.m., Sat. 3 p.m. Free. More than 20 gospel groups performing. Concessions available for donation. 330-618-6524 (call or text).

mock battle, early American games and crafts. 330-874-2059 or www.fortlaurens.org.

JUL. 7 – Loudonville Car Show, Fireworks, and Antique Festival, 131 W. Main St. and Central Park, Loudonville. Free. 419994-2519 or visit www.discovermohican.com.

JUL. 17–20 – Zoar Adult History Camp, 198 Main St., Zoar, 1–4 p.m. daily. $25 per adult per day, $85 for all four days. Hands-on activities, demos, and costumed interpreters representing the 19th-century Ohio frontier. Friday camp takes place at Fort Laurens in Bolivar. 800-262-6195 or www.historiczoarvillage.com.

JUL. 7–8 – 26th Annual Ashland County Yesteryear Machinery Club Show, Ashland County–West Holmes Career Ctr., 1783 St. Rte. 60 S., Ashland. Free admission; donations accepted. Featuring Oliver, Cockshutt, Wards, and Custom tractors and engines. Car show on Sunday. 419-651-4109 (Tom Adams) or www. yesteryearmachinery.org. JUL. 8–15 – Trumbull County Fair, 899 Everett Hull Rd., Cortland, 8 a.m.–10 p.m. daily. An array of grandstand entertainment, daily shows, local bands, exhibits, and rides. 330-637-6010 or www. trumbullcountyfair.com. JUN. 29–JUL. 4 – Rib, White, and Blue, Lock 3, 200 S. Main St., Akron, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Free admission. Rib vendors from all over the state. Concerts at 7 and 8:30 p.m. 330-375-2877 or www. lock3live.com.

JUL. 12–14 – Olde Canal Days Festival, 123 Tuscarawas St., Canal Fulton, Thur./Fri. 5–11 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Free admission. Rides $1 each, or $15 for all-day wristband. Grande Parade Sat. 11 a.m., fireworks Sat. 10 p.m. 330-854-9095 or www. discovercanalfulton.com.

JUN. 30–JUL. 1 – Mad River Bike Tour, Mad River Harley Davidson, 5316 Milan Rd., Sandusky. Registration Sat. 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Begin a self-led ride to the Kelleys Island Ferry Boat Line in Marblehead, then tour the island for a chance to win a vacation package. $10 for the tour, $20 per bike for the round-trip ferry. 419-746-2360 or www.kelleysislandchamber.com.

JUL. 13–15 – Great Mohican Indian Pow-Wow, 23270 Wally Rd., Loudonville, Fri./Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m. $8, C. (6–12) $4, under 6 free. Weekend passes available. Native American live music, dancing, drum competitions, storytelling, tomahawk throwing, and fire starting demos. 800-766-2267 or www.mohicanpowwow.com.

JUL. 3–7 – Orrville Firefighters Independence Day Celebration, Orr Park, Orrville. Parade on the 3rd at 7 p.m., fireworks on the 7th at 10:15 p.m. 330-684-5051 or www.orrville.com.

JUL. 13–15 – Island Fest, Memorial Park, 112 Division St., Kelleys Island, Fri./Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Features a waterfront craft show, street dances, parade, and fireworks. Food and beer available for purchase. 419-746-2360 or www. kelleysislandchamber.com.

JUL. 4 – Fort Laurens Fourth of July Ceremony, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar. Free. Ceremony at Tomb of the Unknown Patriot honors the sacrifices of Fort Laurens soldiers. Includes guest speaker, color guard, honor guard, and wreath laying. 330-874-2059 or www.fortlaurens.org. JUL. 5, 12, 19, 26 – Fort Steuben Summer Concert Series, Berkman Amphitheater, Fort Steuben Park, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, 6:30–9 p.m. Bring a blanket and picnic basket and enjoy a free concert overlooking the Ohio River. 740-283-1787 or www. oldfortsteuben.com. JUL. 6–7 – Independence Celebration Gospel Sing, Ashland Co. Park District, Sauers Farm Park, 260 Twp. Rd. 260, Greenwich,

WEST VIRGINIA

JUL. 14–15 – Music in the Valley Folk and Wine Festival, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, 10 a.m.–7 p.m. (museum closes at 5 p.m.). Local musicians, wines from Ohio-based wineries, and plenty of local food offerings. Wine and cheese pairing seminar at 2 p.m., sensory tasting at 4 p.m. 330-666-3711 or www.wrhs.org. JUL. 14–15 – Revolution on the Tuscarawas, Fort Laurens, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $10; age 12 and under, $5. Revolutionary War encampment and reenactment. Colonial history, musket drills,

JUL. 3 – Wheeling Symphony Orchestra: 4th of July Concert, Clarksburg Amphitheater, Rte. 98, Veterans Memorial Way, Clarksburg, 7:30–10 p.m. Free concert followed by fireworks. 304-232-6191 or www.wheelingsymphony.com. JUL. 6–8 – Wild and Wonderful Craft Festival, Jackson Co. Jr. Fgds., Cottageville. A festival like no other, featuring an impressive range of crafts and tunes by some of the country’s most talented artisans. 304-531-2009 or www.wildandwonderfulcrafts.com.

38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2018

JUL. 21 – Ohio River Valley Texas Longhorn Association Annual Show, Wayne County Fairgrounds, Cattle Arena, 199 Vancover St., Wooster, 9 a.m. 330-231-0345 or 419-606-6184. JUL. 26–28 – Doughty Valley Steam Days, 5025 St. Rte. 557, Charm. $4 per day, 12 and under free. See antique farm machinery, tractors, and steam engines in action. 330-763-0303 or jrschrock86@gmail.com. JUL. 27–29 – Antique Power and Steam Show, 14653 E. Park St., Burton, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. Displays of steam engines, gas engines, construction equipment, tractors, and many other types of machinery. Grand prize: 1959 Oliver 550. 440-669-2578 or www. historicalengine.com. JUL. 27–29 – Film Fest, Kelleys Island Ball Field, 121 Addison St., Kelleys Island. Free. Enjoy a three-day weekend featuring six feature films. Event has both indoor and outdoor options. 419746-2360 or www.kelleysislandchamber.com. JUL. 28–29 – Zoar Harvest Festival, 198 Main St., Zoar, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $9 for adults. One of the nation’s most prestigious antiques shows, with more than 60 dealers of high-quality country antiques. Includes juried artisan showcase, contemporary crafts, historical demos, and museum tours. Antique car show on Sunday. 800-262-6195 or www.historiczoarvillage.com. JUL. 30–AUG. 5 – Columbiana County Fair, 225 Lee Ave., Libson. Harness racing, demo derby, combine derby, truck and tractor pulls, delicious food, and much more! www.columbianacountyfair.org. JUL. 30–AUG. 5 – Medina County Fair, 720 W. Smith Rd., Medina, Mon.–Sat. 8 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.–8 p.m. Demolition derby, motocross, bullriding, and more. Fireworks on Sunday. 330-723-9633 or www.medina-fair.com.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

CENTRAL

JUL. 3 – Red, White & BOOM!, downtown riverfront and the Arena District, Columbus, noon–midnight. Kids’ activities, live music, parade, and more, ending with Ohio’s largest fireworks display. www.redwhiteandboom.org.

Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Explore landscaped gardens; view artwork, sculptures, and water features; and walk inside a butterfly enclosure. Enjoy live music and participate in workshops on sustainability. 740-969-2873 or www.lilyfest.com.

JUL. 7–8, 13–15 – Palace Production of Disney’s Newsies, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $18–$40, C. $12. This Tony-winning Broadway hit musical inspires everyone to fight for what’s right and seize the day. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

JUL. 14–15 – Coshocton County Antique Power Association Annual Summer Show, 707 Kenilworth Ave., Coshocton. Free. Antique tractors and equipment featuring Allis Chalmers. The Antique Flea Market is also held July 14 at the fairgrounds. 740545-7792 (Sam Wyler) or www.visitcoshocton.com/events.

JUL. 7–8, 14–15, 21–22, 28–29 – Rock Mill Weekends, Stebelton Park at Rock Mill, 1429 Rockmill Place NW, Lancaster, 12–4 p.m. Free. Tour the restored 1824 gristmill, walk on the iconic Rock Mill Covered Bridge, and enjoy Hocking River Falls. 740-681-7249 or www.fairfieldcountyparks.org.

JUL. 21 – Annual Presidential Wreath Laying, Harding Memorial, corner of Delaware Ave. (St. Rte. 423) and Vernon Heights Blvd., Marion, 10:30 a.m. rain or shine. Honoring President Warren G. Harding. 740-387-9630 or www.hardinghome.org.

THROUGH AUG. 19 – Trumpet in the Land, Schoenbrunn Amphitheatre, 1600 Trumpet Dr. NE, New Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m. $10–$20. Tragic, inspiring story of David Zeisberger and his Christian Indian followers during the Revolutionary War. 330339-1132 or www.trumpetintheland.com.

JUL. 8 – Union County Master Gardeners Tour of Gardens, Agricultural Center, 18000 St. Rte. 4, Marysville, 1–5 p.m. $6 advance, $8 day of tour. See landscaping examples of butterfly, conifer, hosta, perennial, shade, and vegetable gardens. 937-6448117 or https://union.osu.edu.

JUL. 1 – Lancaster Community Band: Patriotic Concert, Lancaster Bandstand, corner of Main and Broad Sts., Lancaster, 4 p.m. Free. 740-756-4430.

JUL. 12–15 – Miami Valley Steam Threshers Association 69th Annual Show and Reunion, Pastime Park, Plain City. $5, under 13 free. Steam engines, antique tractors, gas engines, and other family fun. 614-270-0007, mvstashow@gmail.com, or www.miamivalleysteamshow.org.

JUL. 1–29 – CAPA Summer Movie Series, Ohio Theatre, 55 E. State St., Columbus, Wed.–Sun. 7:30 p.m., Sun. matinee 2 p.m. 614-469-0939 or www.capa.com. JUL. 2–7 – Marion County Fair, 220 E. Fairground St., Marion. Rides, livestock shows, tractor/truck pulls, demo derby, bull rides/barrel races, music, and more. Enjoy fireworks at 10 p.m. on the 4th. 740-382-2558 or www.marioncountyfairgrounds.com.

SOUTHEAST

JUL. 13–14 – Coshocton Canal Quilters Quilt Show: “A Walk in the Garden,” Coshocton Career Ctr., 23640 Airport Rd., Coshocton, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Free parking. Handicapped accessible. www.facebook.com/CCQQuiltShow. JUL. 13–15 – Lilyfest, Bishop Educational Gardens, 13200 Little Cola Rd., Rockbridge, Fri. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.,

JUN. 6, 13, 20, 27 – Rise and Shine Cambridge Farmers Market, Tractor Supply on Rte. 209/Southgate Pkwy., Cambridge, 8 a.m.–noon. 740-439-2238 or www.downtowncambridge.com.

JUL. 25–AUG. 5 – Ohio State Fair, Ohio State Fgds., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. daily. 888-646-3976 or www. ohiostatefair.com. JUL. 27–28 – Canal Winchester Blues and Ribfest, downtown Canal Winchester, Fri. 5–11 p.m., Sat. noon–11 p.m. Free admission. Featuring live blues music, world-class ribs, a wide variety of quality non-rib food options, kids’ activities, fan-cooled dining areas, and a beer and wine garden for ages 21 and over. 614-270-5053 or www.bluesandribfest.com. JUL. 27–30 – AKC Dog Shows, Marion Co. Fgds., 220 E. Fairground St., Marion. 740-387-2394 or www.marioncountyfairgrounds.com. JUL. 29 – “Sunday Drive” Car Show, Malabar Farm State Park, 4050 Bromfield Rd., Lucas, 12–4 p.m. Free admission; entrance fee for those entering a car. Featuring the cars of the Fabulous ’50s! 419-892-2929 or www.malabarfarm.org.

JUL. 19–22 – Jamboree in the Hills, 43510 National Rd., Belmont. The nation’s longest-running and most popular country music festival. Lineup features some of country music’s bestknown artists. 800-624-5456 or www.jamboreeinthehills.com.

JUL. 7 – Flaming Moonlight Canoe Trip, 31251 Chieftain Dr., Logan. $45 per canoe for two people. Reservations required. Experience JUL. 20–21 – Sweet Corn Festival, Muskingum Park, downtown the Hocking River as it quietly settles in for the night. The tiki torch Marietta, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–8 p.m. Enjoy fresh local roasted will lead the way. 800-634-6820 or www.hockinghillscanoeing.com. sweet corn. See antique tractors and gas engines or take part in the JUL. 11–14 – Ohio Hills Folk Festival, Quaker City. Celebrate the pedal tractor pull, corn hole tournament, and corn eating contest. www.mariettasweetcorn.com. festival’s 114th year! Parades, car show, country store, entertainment, rides, and activities for kids. 740-670-2070.

JUL. 14 – “Fort Ancient and Their Landscape — Not a Passive Force,” lecture by Dave Minney, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 1 p.m. Free admission, $8 vehicle parking fee. http:// arcofappalachia.org. JUL. 1 – Music at the Mound with Steve Free, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 1 p.m. Free admission, $8 vehicle parking fee. Join the acclaimed singer/songwriter for an open-air concert. http://arcofappalachia.org/steve-free/.

JUL. 14 – Railroad Days Rendezvous, Pike Lake State Park, 1847 Pike Lake Rd., Bainbridge (Ross Co.), 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. Displays of model railroads, collectibles, memorabilia, exhibits, and model train displays. Games and live music with refreshments. 740-4932212 (Matt Minter) or www.piketravel.com.

JUL. 3–4 – Gallipolis River Recreation Festival, Gallipolis City Park, 300 block of Second Ave., Gallipolis. Contests and races, food, arts and crafts, parade, and fireworks. 740-446-0596 or www. gallipolisriverrec.com.

JUL. 14, 18 – Riverboat Days, Ohio River Levee, downtown Marietta. See two of the largest sternwheelers on the Ohio River, the Queen of the Mississippi and the American Queen. Multiple calliope artists perform on the 14th. www.mariettaohio.org. Benatar and Neil Giraldo. Concerts are followed by the biggest and best fireworks in the tri-state area. http://blueashevents.com.

SOUTHWEST

JUL. 4 – Piqua 4th Fest, Lock Nine Park, downtown Piqua, noon–9:30 p.m., fireworks at 10 p.m. Activities for all ages, including painting of the snow plows, pop-up splash pad, cornhole tournament, kids’ zone, and more. www.piquaoh.org/piqua-4th-fest. JUL. 5–7 – Festival of the Bells, Southern State Community College, Central Campus, 100 Hobart Dr., Hillsboro (new location), Thur. 5–10:30 p.m., Fri./Sat. 9 a.m.–10:30 p.m. 5K run Sat. 8 a.m. Free concerts, parade, car show, games and rides, historical displays, and many crafters and food vendors. www.festivalofthebells.com.

JUL. 2, 6, 13, 20, 27 – Oxford Summer Concert Series, Martin Luther King Jr. Park, 2 W. High St., Oxford, 7–9:30 p.m. Free. 513524-5200 or www.gettothebc.com/events.

JUL. 5–8 – Greenville Farm Power of the Past, Darke Co. Fgds., 800 Sweitzer St., Greenville, 9 a.m.–9 p.m. $5, under 12 free. Antique tractor and gas engine show, tractor pulls, horse and pony pulls, and more. 937-547-1845 or www.greenvillefarmpower.org. JUL. 6 – Bluegrass Night, Fibonacci Brewing Company, 1445 Compton Rd., Cincinnati, 7–9 p.m. Free. Featuring Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Eats and craft beers available on site. 513-832-1422, events@fibbrew.com, or www.fibbrew.com.

JUL. 3–4 – Americana Festival, Main and Franklin Sts., Centerville, 7–10:30 p.m. Free admission. Parade, fireworks, concert, 5K run, JUL. 7 – Monroeville: Bringing the Mountains Here, Lake Bailee and street fair. 937-433-5898 or www.americanafestival.org. Recreational Park, 2070 Jackson Rd., Hamilton, 8 p.m. Enjoy an JUL. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 – Movies Under Moonlight: Tuesdays in evening of down-home music with the Monroeville Band (from Tenthe Park, The Park at Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty, nessee), Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, and the Haddix Family. at dusk. Free. Handicapped accessible. Featuring family-friendly 513-893-5585, jessevonstein@aol.com, or www.lakebailee.com. films, with pre-event entertainment starting two hours before JUL. 11 – Bluegrass at Greenhills Commons, 24 Farragut Rd., showtime. www.liberty-center.com/movies-under-moonlight. Cincinnati, 7–9 p.m. Free. Enjoy an evening of lively bluegrass JUL. 4 – Red, White and Blue Ash, Summit Park, Blue Ash, music at the bandstand with Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. 4–10:30 p.m. Music, rides, games, and family fun. Featuring Pat Bring a lawn chair. 513-607-1874 or www.fotmc.com.

JUL. 21 – Fern Hike, Highlands Nature Sanctuary, 7660 Cave Rd., Bainbridge. Guided fern identification field trips in the Arc of Appalachia’s preserves. Registration is required. 937-365-1935.

JUL. 27–29 – Ohio River Ferryboat Festival, Fly, OH (Monroe Co.), and Sisterville, WV (Tyler Co.). Enjoy food, vendors and crafts, and entertainment along both ferryboat landings. Take the ferry back and forth between states, winning prizes just for riding. 740-472-4848 or www.facebook.com/ferryboatfestival/. JUL. 27–29 – International Sunflower Festival, Frankfort. Free. Sunflower contest and show, grand parade, princess pageant, baby contest, arts and crafts, and more. www.sunflowerfestival.net. JUL. 28 – Forgotten Places and Spaces Walking Tour, through Historic Downtown Cambridge, 3–4:30 p.m. 740-705-1873 or www. ohiomadegetaways.com JUL. 12–15 – Troy Summer Skating Competition, Hobart Arena, 255 Adams St., Troy. This figure and freestyle competition is part of the Future Champions Series and will host over 300 participants from all over the U.S. www.troyskatingclub.org. JUL. 14–15 – History Alive at the Johnston Farm, 9845 N. Hardin Rd., Piqua,12–5 p.m. Reenactors present a historical timeline of the years 1748 (Pickawillany) to 1862 (Camp Piqua). Visit the Johnston home, tour the Indian and Canal Museum, and ride on the canal boat General Harrison of Piqua. 800-752-2619 or www. johnstonfarmohio.com. JUL. 20–21 – Miami Valley Music Festival, Eagles Campground, 2252 Troy-Urbana Rd., Troy. Features diverse music from some of the region’s best musicians and artists. www.miamivalleymusicfest.com. JUL. 27 – Bluegrass at Colerain Park, 4725 Springdale Rd., Colerain, 7–9 p.m. Free. Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Bring a lawn chair. E-mail twilson@colerain.org (Tawanna) or www.colerain.org. JUL. 27–29 – 55th Annual Annie Oakley Festival, Darke Co. Fgds., South Show Arena Area, 800 Sweitzer St., Greenville. New location! A festival honoring Darke County’s most famous daughter. Shooting contests, fast draw competitions, bullwhip exhibitions, and more. New this year is a Cowboy Mounted Shooting Contest. www.annieoakleyfestival.org. JUL. 28–29 – Gathering at Garst, 205 N. Broadway, Greenville, Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m, Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Living history encampment with reenactors representing eras ranging from the French and Indian War to the American Civil War. Antique auction, live music, arts and crafts, plus a wide range of vendors. 937-548-5250 or www.gatheringatgarst.com.

JULY 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


Sprinkler fun MEMBER INTERACTIVE

1 Summertime is full of water adventures for my nephew, Sawyer, and my son, William. Kira Davis Midwest Electric member

2 Our grandchildren, Nathan, Amelia, and Sam, enjoying Grandpa’s famous water slide. Miriam Lapp 1

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Pioneer Electric Cooperative member

3 Hudson tried surfing at grandma’s house. A sprinkler on a hot summer day is the best! Rachel Blevins Consolidated Cooperative member

4 My granddaughter, Josie Bell, playing with the water hose, summer 2017. Robin Beaver

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South Central Power Company member

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5 Our three grandchildren, T.J., Tori, and Trevor Wilson, having fun in our backyard!   Patty Quaglia South Central Power Company member

6 Our kids, Megan and Aiden, enjoying fun in the sun. Tim Brunney Jr. South Central Power Company member

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Send us your picture: For October, send “Costume party” by July 15; for November, send “We love our veterans” by August 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive, and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in your photos.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2018


THE BIRTH OF A CO-OP

Co-op ingenuity brought poles and wires by hand in the 1930s. Today, co-op ingenuity brings aordable renewable energy options, online energy management, and a much faster, easier way to set poles. Learn more about co-op ingenuity at ohioec.org/purpose.

ohioec.org/purpose


Ohio Cooperative Living - July 2018 - Frontier  
Ohio Cooperative Living - July 2018 - Frontier