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Firelands Electric Cooperative

Official publication | www.firelandsec.com

NOVEMBER 2017

Producing the power Firelands members get a look at the generation of clean, reliable electricity

ALSO INSIDE Help after hurricanes Vintage toy stores Holiday gift guide


Holiday Energy Efficiency Tips

Decorate with eco-friendly lights Use LED lights for your tree—one of the best ways to save energy during the Christmas season. LED lights use 70% less electricity than standard lights. Get creative Opt for tinsel, garland, wreaths, even silver bells—holiday decorations that twinkle don’t have to use electricity! Time your lights Set a timer to switch off lights and prevent them from staying on all day or all night. ohioec.org OEC-OCL_NOV 17_FULLCOVERREV.indd 2

10/16/17 3:18 PM


INSIDE

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

HIGHLIGHTS 4

THE NIGHT THE LIGHTS WENT OUT IN GEORGIA

When Hurricane Irma blew through the southeastern United States in September, Ohio’s electric cooperatives came to the aid of their Georgia brethren.

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and important information from your electric cooperative.

FEATURES 24 SHOPPING BACK IN TIME

There are spots around Ohio and beyond where lovers of vintage toys — and other memorabilia — can find all sorts of childhood treasures.

30 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

We spent the entire year scouring the state to find fun, unique, or just plain useful gifts for anyone on your list.

Cover photo on most editions; Matt Sutton and his dog, Daisy, by Damaine Vonada

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE COOPERATIVE LIVING LIVING

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UP FRONT

RESTORING

COMMON SENSE The electric power “grid” that serves our country is a complex and highly technical system that depends on hundreds of organizations working together, each responsible for specific roles, to make it work. Its reliability and stability also depend on common-sense rules from federal regulators and power system operators that direct the actions of electricity providers, both large and small. I have voiced my concerns, on occasion, about ill-conceived or over-reaching regulations that add costs or undermine reliability with little or no benefit to consumers. I’d like to take note of some recent actions by federal regulators to restore some common sense to the rules that govern the functioning of our electric power grid. Energy Secretary Rick Perry has told federal regulators to consider the benefits of baseload coal and nuclear power plants in the design and operation of wholesale power markets. These large plants, which require huge investments to build and maintain, provide the backbone of our power supply system. Yet, for years, the rules of power system operators have favored less-robust sources of supply — such as wind, solar, and natural gas plants — that are designed for operation only during peak-demand periods. Common sense tells us that we need a balance of sources to have the robust and resilient bulk power system we expect. U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has placed under review the so-called “Clean Power Plan” issued by his predecessor. The plan not only was legally questionable, it threatened to make our power system less reliable and more expensive, in exchange for only minimal environmental benefit. More sensible rules can provide less risky and lower-cost ways to reduce emissions. Recently, hurricanes have tested the resilience of our power system with both high winds and flooding in Texas, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and Puerto Rico. These threats should serve as a reminder not to take our electric power system for granted. All of us who work for Ohio’s electric cooperatives thank you for your patronage and support again this year as we work to overcome the challenges of providing you and your family with clean, safe, reliable, and affordable electricity. Best wishes for the Thanksgiving holiday. 2 2

OHIO OHIO COOPERATIVE COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017 2017

Pat O’Loughlin

President & CEO Ohio's Electric Cooperatives

For years, the rules have favored less-robust sources of supply that are designed for operation only during peakdemand periods. Common sense tells us we need a balance of sources.


November 2017 • Volume 60, No. 2

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Samantha Rhodes Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Contributors: Margo Bartlett, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Pat Keegan, Catherine Murray, Damaine Vonada, Diane Yoakam, and Margie Wuebker. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. With a paid circulation of 294,359, it is the official com­mun­ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215, or call 1-800-282-0515. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 8 CO-OP PEOPLE DOGGY DUTIES: An Ohio Northern University program utilizes volunteer labor from students to train puppies how to be service animals.

10 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

BEAGLES AND COTTONTAILS: Hunting bunnies with beagles

is becoming a lost art, says W.H. “Chip” Gross.

15 GOOD EATS EXTRAORDINARY: Cranberries don’t have to be a

November-only treat.

23 CO-OP OHIO

CONCERN FOR COMMUNITY: Electric co-ops around the state take up collections for hurricane relief.

38 CALENDAR

WHAT’S HAPPENING: November events and other things to do.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

THANKFUL: What are you grateful for this holiday season?

DID YOU KNOW?

Service dogs are capable of amazing feats — including saving their owners’ lives. In September, one Ohio service dog did just that. Bella, a two-year-old service dog from North Ridgeville, Ohio, saved her owner Tony Damato’s life by waking him from a nap to alert him to a house fire. According to Fox 8 Cleveland news, Damato said Bella jumped on him to ensure he got up. Though Bella required oxygen and was taken to the animal hospital, she survived and is currently in recovery.

IN THIS ISSUE

Ada (p.8) Carrollton (p.8) Xenia (p.6, 9) Paulding (p.23) Mount Gilead (p.23) Lancaster (p.23) Columbus (p.27) Springboro (p.26) West Carrollton (p.26) Maumee (p.27)

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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POWER LINES

THE

BY JEFF MCCALLISTER

NIGHT LIGHTS WENT OUT IN GEORGIA THE

Ohio crews jumped to the aid of southern cooperatives after September’s hurricanes left half a million without power

C

huck Chafin has worked on electric lines with the South Central Power Company for 18 years, during which time he’s seen his share of power outages and general destruction both in Ohio, and beyond, caused by extremes in weather. So while he wasn’t particularly surprised at the damage that he and 72 other lineworkers and supervisors from Ohio’s electric cooperative network found in Georgia in the wake of Hurricane Irma in early September, it still presented a big job. “There were poles down, conductor line laying on the ground covered by fallen trees, and we heard stories about transformers swinging from broken poles,” says Chafin, director of field operations at South Central Power. “They said it was the worst storm to come through there in 25 years.” Chafin was among the 40 workers from Ohio tasked with helping Georgia’s TriCounty Electric Membership Corporation, in the central part of the state, to restore electricity to more than 18,000 members — more than 85 percent of its membership — who lost power as the result of the storm. The South Central crew was joined by crews from Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative, Butler Rural Electric Cooperative, Consolidated Electric Cooperative, The Frontier Power Company, Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative, Pioneer Electric Cooperative, and Washington Electric Cooperative giving assistance at Tri-County.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017 LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017


Linemen from Logan County Electric Cooperative and Midwest Electric Cooperative found a friendly Buckeye face in the midst of Georgia Bulldog country, though all the Ohio workers reported residents were, without exception, friendly and full of gratitude for their efforts.

Another 33 Ohio workers — from Carroll Electric Cooperative, The Energy Cooperative, Firelands Electric Cooperative, Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, Logan County Electric Cooperative, Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative, Midwest Electric, North Central Electric Cooperative, North Western Electric Cooperative, and Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative — headed to northeast Georgia’s Jackson EMC, which, with more than 220,000 members, is the second-largest electric cooperative in the nation. More than 115,000 of those members were left without power after Irma blew through, and 70,000 were still dark when Ohio crews arrived. “We plan for this kind of thing all the time,” says Dwight Miller, director of safety and loss control for Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide association that serves the 25 Ohio-based electric distribution cooperatives. “In this case, we had a decent amount of warning that the storms were on their way, and when the calls went out, our guys were on the trucks and moving.” With the 18 cooperatives and all those men involved, it was the largest single mobilization of manpower and machinery to provide mutual aid in the Ohio association’s history. Only some unfortunate timing kept more Ohio co-ops away — the desire to help in these situations is both strong and universal. “When you see a group of Ohio lineworkers who were not only ready, but eager to answer the call for help from their fellow cooperatives, that’s a big part of the

Ohio lineworkers were greeted with a similar scene wherever they went (opposite page and above) as they helped Georgia’s cooperatives restore power after the early September storms: toppled trees that pulled down power lines, broken poles, and plenty of other wind damage.

cooperative difference,” says Pat O’Loughlin, CEO of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. “We help each other out when we’re needed.” The Ohio crews arrived in Atlanta on Sept. 12 with 21 bucket trucks, 14 digger derricks, and six pole trailers, along with all the tools, chainsaws, and other equipment needed for the task at hand. Jason Woods, safety and loss control consultant at OEC, called it a “small logistical miracle” coordinating the crews and trucks with sleeping and storage arrangements. The Ohio contingent was among an estimated 1,500 co-op lineworkers from 15 states who came to help in Georgia alone, where all 41 of the state’s electric cooperatives suffered enough damage that mutual aid was needed. Continued to Page 6

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 2017 2017 • OHIO •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

5


Continued from Page 5 “The big thing we emphasize in those situations is the safety of our guys,” Miller says. “So many people are using generators, and if just one of them is hooked up wrong, it can put our workers in an extremely hazardous situation. We’re always careful to emphasize the need for our workers to treat every downed line as if it’s going to become re-energized while they are working on it. The guys made it back without any serious work-related injuries, and we are proud of the professional approach they take daily while their families wait for them back home.” At its peak, more than half a million Georgia co-op members were without power. That number was whittled to only a few thousand by the time the crews headed back north on Sept. 16. “The guys didn’t want to come back when they did, because they felt that there was still a job to do,” Miller says. “That’s just the way they are. They always want to help, and that says a lot about them. But Jackson and Tri-County both felt they had the situation under control, and both of those communities were grateful for the help.” Above: Ohio crews brought 21 bucket trucks, 14 digger derricks, and six pole trailers to Georgia to help two of the state’s 41 electric cooperatives restore power after the hurricane. Right: Linemen from Midwest Electric and Logan County Electric combine their efforts to raise new conductor wire and restore power during the mutual aid effort in Georgia in September.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017


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NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

CO-OP PEOPLE

CAMPUS

CANINES

Sutton creates legacy of training dogs for service at Ohio Northern

G

raduation Day, as it is for most who walk the stage to receive their diplomas, was a proud one for Matt Sutton last year. Not only was he receiving his engineering degree from Ohio Northern University, but he also was able to showcase a program that has become part of his legacy at the Ada school.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  LIVING • NOVEMBER •  NOVEMBER 2017 2017

Walking alongside him — and displaying her best puppy manners — was Primrose, a collie Sutton was raising for Polar Paws, a campus organization he had co-founded only a few years before. He was so proud of both the puppy and the program that he had placed a graduation cap on the dog’s head and led her across the stage; she made the walk like a pro.


Laying the groundwork Sutton had set his sights on attending Ohio Northern when he was in seventh grade, after he toured the university with his older brother, Scott, who also studied civil engineering there. “ONU has a gorgeous campus, and it’s surrounded by corn fields,” he says. “Because I grew up on a farm, it felt like home.” The fact that Ada was reminiscent of home also was important to Matt’s father, Harold Sutton, who still runs the farm where his family has raised cattle since the early 1900s. Following in both his father’s and mother’s footsteps, Harold Sutton is on the board of trustees at Carrollton-based Carroll Electric Cooperative, and, in fact, has been the board’s president since 2005. With such close ties to his electric cooperative and its principles that include concern for his community, the younger Sutton started looking for ways to put his passions to work for a good cause, almost as soon as he got to Ohio Northern. That was when he and some of his like-minded, animal-loving friends founded Polar Paws.

Currently, Polar Paws has 34 members who serve either as puppy raisers or puppy sitters, according to Polar Paws adviser Sharyn Zembower, an ONU instructional designer. As service dogs in training, the pups accompany their handlers everywhere, including class and campus events — such as graduation. At ONU, they’re even allowed to live in the dorms. “Under the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act), the puppies can go anywhere,” Sutton says. “They have equal access rights like humans.”

Lasting impression Polar Paws students train about nine dogs every school year, according to Zembower, and the program has supplied 4 Paws with more than 30 trained service dogs since its inception. Now employed as a transportation engineer in the Indianapolis area, Matt Sutton still keeps tabs on Polar Paws, and he is helping the group plan an on-campus service dog park. When he attended ONU’s homecoming

Polar Paws volunteers show off their trainees for the group’s founder, Matt Sutton (back row, left).

Filling a need Polar Paws is a group of ONU volunteers who foster puppies for the 4 Paws for Ability University Program. 4 Paws for Ability is a Xenia-based nonprofit that provides trained service dogs to children with disabilities and to veterans who have lost their hearing or use of their limbs. By donating their time to raise service puppies, university students make 4 Paws dogs more affordable for recipients.

last September, he brought along his new pet black Labrador, Daisy, that he’s schooling in keeping with Polar Paws’ curriculum. “I got Daisy because of a black Lab named Ziggy I trained for Polar Paws,” he says. “Ziggy was the best dog I ever had, and after fostering him, I had to have my own black Lab.” E-mail Polar Paws at polarpaws@onu.edu. For information about 4 Paws for Ability, call 937-374-0385 or visit www.4pawsforability.org.

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO 2017  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE COOPERATIVE LIVING LIVING

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WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

BEAGLES COTTONTAILS AND

Do hunting dogs go to heaven?

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  LIVING • NOVEMBER •  NOVEMBER 2017 2017


Four guys holding on to what is becoming a lost art: Scott Lynch, Dave Miller, Greg Thomas (also shown at left), and Rick Truman, hunting with their beagles.

F

or some 25 years, I raised beagles for hunting cottontail rabbits. Reluctantly, I gave it up about a decade ago when my oldest dog died. What I miss most about the sport is the sound of the chase. Hunters call it hound music. My longtime friend and fellow outdoors writer Mike Tontimonia is another who knows the sound well. A member of Carroll Electric Cooperative in eastern Ohio, Tontimonia estimates he’s owned 150 beagles during his lifetime — both hunters and field-trialers — with as many as 20 dogs in his kennel at any one time. “There aren’t as many of us as there used to be,” Tontimonia says, referring to the number of rabbit hunters using dogs today. “Raising and training beagles takes a serious time commitment, and that’s a commodity Americans don’t seem to have much of these days, including most hunters.” Tontimonia has been hunting with beagles so long, he doesn’t even care to take along a shotgun anymore. Instead, he prefers letting others of his hunting party do the shooting. “I just enjoy watching and hearing the dogs work,” he says. Hunting conditions couldn’t have been better that mid-January morning last winter when I joined Mike and a few of his friends for a hunt. The temperature was just above freezing, with no wind, and the ground was moist — excellent scenting conditions for the dogs. Hot, dry, and windy conditions of early fall cause scents to dissipate too quickly. Entering a woody briar patch, we didn’t have to wait long before one of four beagles (we had Brooke, Daisy, Gabby, and Ike with us) crossed a fresh rabbit track and opened up in a long, drawn-out howl. The other three dogs soon joined in, and the first chase of the day was

on, as the beagles filled the woods with their excited yipping and barking. Cottontails in quality habitat live their entire lives within about a quarter-mile section of land. They know that parcel intimately, and seldom venture out of it, since all their needs — food, water, and shelter — can be found within that parcel. That explains why, when a beagle strikes a hot rabbit track, it’s the wise hunter who stays put. He knows that if the rabbit doesn’t dive into a hole during the chase, it will eventually circle back to the original jump point, offering a shot. Tontimonia and his hunting buddies make good use of the rabbits they take, turning them into “hare soup,” a hearty stew with vegetables. “It’s an ugly-sounding name, but the soup’s delicious,” Tontimonia says. Wildlife biologists in Ohio say that even given a daily bag limit of four rabbits per hunter (which is seldom achieved) and a generous annual hunting season of four months (early November through the end of February), there is no concern of overharvest, because cottontails reproduce like…well, like rabbits; they have up to five litters per year. When a hunting dog grows old and dies, it takes a little of a hunter’s heart with it. Years ago, when one of my beagles would die, I’d solemnly slip off its collar and bury the dog in a small woodlot on our property, marking the grave with a few large stones. Today, I can still make out the circle of graves from the house, but only when the leaves are off the trees; only when November gets that certain look — and it’s once again time to hunt. Do hunting dogs go to heaven? If so — and assuming I make it there myself — I should have quite a pack of excellent beagle hounds awaiting me. Look me up. We’ll find a log, sit for a while, and listen to the dogs run. The 2017 Ohio cottontail rabbit hunting season opens November 3. NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

FARMERS & HUNTERS

FEEDING THE HUNGRY T

wenty years ago this fall, Rick Wilson was driving along a Virginia highway when he spotted a woman standing beside a car with the trunk open. “From the way she was dressed and by the appearance of the car, it looked like she was not doing too well financially,” Wilson says. “When I stopped and asked if her car was broken down, she said, ‘No, but could you please help me load a deer into the trunk?’” A dead six-point buck lay beside the road, and Wilson asked the woman if she had hit it with her car. When she shook her head no, Wilson explained that unless she first reported the deer to the state police or a wildlife officer, she could be issued a citation for transporting an untagged deer. “She looked into my eyes,” remembers Wilson, “and slowly answered, ‘I don’t care. My kids and me are hungry.’” Thus was born a national organization — Farmers & Hunters Feeding the Hungry — that during the past two decades has touched the lives of hundreds of thousands of needy people across America. Hunters in some parts of the country, including in Ohio, are able to harvest more deer than they can eat or share with their friends and family. In addition, farmers are issued management permits to reduce deer numbers that damage their crops. The way the FHFH program works is that those farmers and hunters are encouraged to donate their deer, other big game, or livestock, to approved meat processors that participate with FHFH. The venison and other meat is then given to community agencies such as food pantries, church feeding ministries, the Salvation Army, community food banks, emergency assistance programs, rescue missions, and children’s homes to distribute or serve to their clients. “Our organization has been in Ohio since 2001,” says Josh Wilson, executive director of FHFH and son of the founder, Rick Wilson. “Thus far, we are close to 900,000 pounds of meat donated and distributed to local feeding programs in the Buckeye State, enough for 3.6 million quarter-pound servings.” There are FHFH chapters in 30 states, with 31 chapters in Ohio — the most of any state. The Ohio Division of Wildlife makes an annual matching grant to FHFH, totaling over $700,000 since 2008. Hunters who would like to donate a deer this hunting season, or farmers who would like to donate a livestock animal, should go online to www.fhfh.org/ohio or call 866-438-3434 for more details. There is no charge to donate, financial support is welcome, and volunteers are always needed.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017


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AARON HEILERS, LEGACY LANE FARM, SHELBY COUNTY Project Manager, Blanchard River Demonstration Farm Network OHIO FARM BUREAU SOLUTIONS: IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

“ALL FARMERS ARE CONCERNED WITH WATER QUALITY, BUT WANT TO MANAGE RISK. WE SHOW THEM FIRSTHAND HOW NEW DATA IS GETTING BEST PRACTICES ON THE GROUND AND MAKING A DIFFERENCE.”

WATER IS LIFE.

“WE NEED TO HAVE CLEAN WATER WITHOUT LIMITING OUR CAPACITY TO GROW FOOD.” – AARON HEILERS, PROJECT MANAGER, BLANCHARD RIVER DEMONSTRATION FARMS NETWORK

AARON HEILERS, LEGACY LANE FARM, SHELBY COUNTY Project Manager, Blanchard River Demonstration Farm Network

“ALL FARMERS ARE CONCERNED WITH WATER QUALITY, BUT WANT TO MANAGE RISK. WE SHOW THEM FIRSTHAND HOW a farmer, Heilers BEST knows the concerns many farmers about NEWAsDATA ISAaron GETTING PRACTICES ON THEhave GROUND managing risk while improving water quality. And as project manager for MAKING A Farms DIFFERENCE.” the BlanchardAND River Demonstration Network, he also knows how new data is getting best practices on the ground and making a difference to farmers – and to all Ohioans. The Demonstration Farms Network is part of Ohio Farm Bureau’s multi-million dollar investment, putting members’ dues to good use by helping farmers protect the environment. To read our 2017 Water Quality Status Report, visit farmersforwater.org.

Join us on the journey and be a part of preserving farms and protecting natural resources. Become a member of Ohio Farm Bureau today at ofbf.org/joinonline.


GOOD EATS

BY MARGIE WUEBKER; LIGHTER FARE BY DIANE YOAKAM PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHERINE MURRAY

Extraordinary

Most of us think of the uniquely American cranberry only for its juice or as a saucy complement to holiday roast turkey. But these tart little wonders, used fresh, frozen, or dried, can put a surprising twist on familiar recipes all year long.

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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CRANBERRY SOUR CREAM COFFEE CAKE Coffee Cake: 2 cups all-purpose flour ¾ cup sugar 1½ tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. baking soda ¾ cup chopped walnuts 2⁄3 cup sour cream

¼ cup milk 1 large egg ¾ cup chopped cranberries Glaze: ½ cup confectioners’ sugar 2½ tsp. milk

Grease a 9-inch round cake or pie pan. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a medium mixing bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, nuts, sour cream, milk, and egg. Stir until all ingredients are moistened. Spread half of the batter into pan. Spread ½ cup of the chopped cranberries over batter. Spread remaining batter over the cranberries. Top with remaining ¼ cup of chopped cranberries. Bake for 25 minutes or until golden brown. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before topping with glaze. To make glaze: Combine confectioners’ sugar and water in a small mixing bowl. Stir until smooth. Drizzle over warm cake. Serves 12.

CRANBERRY-PEAR COBBLER ½ cup light corn syrup 1⁄3 cup sugar 1 Tbsp. cornstarch 1½ cups cranberries 2 medium pears, unpeeled and sliced

1 large egg, slightly beaten ¾ cup all-purpose flour ½ cup sugar 1⁄3 cup butter 1 cup quick oats

Grease a 9-inch square baking pan. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. In a medium saucepan, combine corn syrup, 1⁄3 cup sugar, and cornstarch. Stir in cranberries. Heat to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer. Simmer for 5 minutes or until cranberries pop open. Stir in sliced pears and mix slightly. Pour fruit mixture into prepared pan. In a mixing bowl, combine flour and ½ cup sugar. Cut in the butter until mixture forms crumbs. Stir in oats; mix well. Add egg and mix until moist. Crumble mixture evenly over the fruit. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until golden brown. Serves 8.

CRANBERRY POPCORN BARS 6 cups popped popcorn 1 Tbsp. butter 3 cups miniature marshmallows

1 cup dried cranberries 1 cup chopped walnuts 2 Tbsp. orange zest ¼ tsp. salt

Place popcorn in a large bowl; set aside. In a saucepan over low heat, melt butter; add marshmallows and stir until smooth. Stir in cranberries, walnuts, orange peel, and salt; mix well. Pour over popcorn and toss to coat. Press into a greased 11 x 7 x 2-inch baking pan. Cool. Cut into bars with a serrated knife. Makes 1 dozen. Per serving: 160 calories, 7 g total fat (1 g saturated fat), 2 g fiber, 2 g protein

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

LIGHTER FARE


LIGHTER FARE

ORANGE-GLAZED TURKEY WITH CRANBERRY RICE 2 cups chicken broth 1 cup dried cranberries 2 cups instant rice, uncooked

1 lb. (8) turkey cutlets ½ cup orange marmalade

In a medium saucepan, combine broth and cranberries; bring to a boil. Add rice; remove from heat, cover, and let stand 5 minutes. Heat a large nonstick skillet coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat; add turkey and cook about 2 minutes. Turn and cook over high heat 2 minutes more or until browned. Spoon marmalade over turkey; cook, uncovered, over medium heat 2 additional minutes or until cooked through. Fluff rice with a fork; divide evenly onto 4 plates and top with 2 cutlets. Serves 4. Per serving: 430 calories, 3 g total fat (1 g saturated fat), 3 g fiber, 30 g protein

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

17


THE ENERGY EXPERT

THE

RIGHT

BY PAT KEEGAN

LIGHT

Switch things up with bulbs and fixtures for stylish, efficient lighting for your home

W

e often take lighting for granted, but when it’s time to refresh the look of the lighting around the house, it’s important to consider some key issues: how to meet specific lighting needs of the room, how to make fixtures work together, and, of course, how to save money on energy bills. Saving energy starts with choosing the correct bulb. Halogen bulbs, or energy-efficient incandescents, are a step up from older incandescent bulbs, but compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are even more efficient. Energystar.gov estimates that consumers can save $75 a year by replacing the five most-used incandescent bulbs or light fixtures with ENERGY STAR-certified LED or CFL lighting. Of the three types, LEDs tend to save more money over the long run, as LED prices have decreased in recent years. CFLs save nearly as much, but they do contain a small amount of toxic mercury that can be released into your home, if one breaks.

The right mix and strength of ambient and task lighting will result in the best illumination with lowest energy use.

PIXABAY.COM; CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE

When considering which type of bulb to buy, consider both watts and lumens. Watts indicate how much energy (and therefore, money) is used to produce light, while lumens indicate how much light the bulb produces. A handy comparison is that a traditional 60-watt incandescent bulb produces about 800 lumens. Bulbs also give off different colors of light, known as color temperature. If a bulb burns out — or in the case of an LED, as it dims over time — it can be challenging to find a replacement that matches other lights in the room. If the variation bothers you, you may want to purchase and install bulbs of the same brand and wattage for the entire room or area at the same time. Installing dimmers instead of on/off light switches is a good way to save energy while giving you greater control of the amount of light in the room. Not all bulbs are dimmable, so be sure to check the label.

HOW MUCH DO THOSE “CHEAP” BULBS REALLY COST? Source: energy.gov and Collaborative Efficiency

18

Bulb type

Watts

Lifespan in Hours

Annual Energy Cost*

12

50,000

$1

15

9,000

$1.20

43

1,000

$4.80

60 watt equivalent

LED

CFL

HALOGEN

*Based on two hours per day of use, and an electricity rate of 11 cents per kilowatt-hour

Just as there are differences in bulbs, there are also differences from fixture to fixture. Ambient lights, such as sconces and glass-covered fixtures, provide gentler overall lighting, while directional fixtures, such as pendants, desk lamps, and track lighting, provide task lighting that focuses on areas where work is done. Not all bulbs can be used in an enclosed fixture or work outdoors. Make sure to choose a fixture that can provide the correct level of brightness, with an appropriate size and number of bulbs. It can be disappointing to install a ceiling light with the style you love, only to realize it doesn’t provide enough light for the room; or the opposite, that your room is flooded with too much light, which also wastes energy and money. Pat Keegan writes for Collaborative Efficiency, an energy communications company.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017


FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES GM’S REPORT

ELECTRIC

CO-OPS UNITE

TO HELP THOSE IN NEED

The history of electric cooperatives is rich and inspiring. It’s a success story of people banding together to improve their lives, of rural Americans standing up for themselves when investor-owned utilities wouldn’t provide them power. Although we’ve come a long way since our cooperative started over 81 years ago, we still honor the same business model and principles today. One of these core principals is cooperation among cooperatives, which allows us to operate as a small organization with the power of a large company behind us. We’re members of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, a statewide association comprised of 25 electric co-ops, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). Together, we are 42 million strong in 47 states, and make up the largest electric utility network in the United States. Watching Hurricane Harvey smash directly into electric cooperatives along the Texas Gulf Coast weighed very heavy on my heart, especially for those directly impacted by the storm. But the good news is that electric cooperatives share the same fundamental principle of cooperation among cooperatives, which stipulates that co-ops come to each other’s aid in times of need. In the wake of Harvey’s massive flooding and devastation, neighboring electric cooperative crews provided a helping hand to rebuild the ravaged systems.

Little did we know that Hurricane Irma would bring deadly storm surges nearly two weeks later. In a show of solidarity during a time of need, around 5,000 electric co-op workers from 25 states converged in the hurricane’s impact zone to assist fellow co-ops with restoration efforts. These crews mobilized to restore power to an estimated 1.3 million co-op members left in the dark following Hurricane Irma’s destruction.

April Bordas General Manager

When we heard that our co-op friends in Georgia needed our help, we didn’t hesitate to answer the call. Firelands Electric sent two linemen to Georgia to assist in power restoration efforts resulting from Hurricane Irma. Our linemen, Phil Pickering and Rick Bowers, were among the 72 workers sent from Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. Phil and Rick were sent to Jackson EMC, a large electric cooperative serving more than 220,000 members — around 115,000 of whom were without power at the height of the storm. Jackson EMC is located in the heart of northeast Georgia, and its service territory includes a ten-county area stretching from metro Atlanta north to Gainesville and east to Athens. Our linemen worked for five days to repair damage, replace broken poles, and get power restored in the Peach State. Cooperation among cooperatives is very important to Firelands Electric, and we were happy to help in a time of need.

Firelands Electric Co-op’s Lead Lineman Phil Pickering, left, and Journeyman Lineman Rick Bowers, right, returned home to their families, following five days of Hurricane Irma restoration efforts in Georgia. (Photo courtesy of Natalie Bowers)

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

19


FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES CARDINAL POWER PLANT

PRODUCING THE POWER In September, over 40 Firelands Electric Co-op members and guests, including a group from Hillsdale Middle School, learned firsthand where and how their electric power is generated. Located in Brilliant, Ohio, Cardinal Station Units 2 and 3 are capable of producing over 1,200 megawatts of power for the 25 electric cooperatives serving Ohio. Cardinal Station is one of the cleanest coalfired power plants in the world, thanks to numerous environmental upgrades completed between 2009 and 2012.

Above, Janet Rehberg, director of marketing for Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, left, and Firelands Electric Co-op member Roger Shopbell, who was involved with environmental upgrades made at Cardinal Unit 3 from 2009 to 2012. 20

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

Firelands Electric member Roger Shopbell, who had a role in these improvements, participated in the coop’s recent tour of the facility. “The changes weren’t complete when I left, and this was the first time I’ve been able to return,” Shopbell says. “It was nice to see the finished results.” During the improvements at Unit 3, Shopbell was part of the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 18, District 6. He and several others from the district worked on the project with Brandenburg, a Chicago company specializing in demolition and site preparation. He performed several tasks at the plant, including operating an excavator to remove the tray at the base of the cooling tower. This demolition was part of a plan to replace aging components inside the tower. Ramps were built to give easy access to the tower’s core. “Trucks, loaders, and heavy equipment could just drive right inside,” Shopbell says. The most innovative portion of the upgrade project involved converting the tower at Cardinal Unit 3 to handle both cooling water vapor and scrubber exhaust. This design would not only reduce sulfur dioxide emissions by more than 95 percent, but it also avoided the need to build a second tower — saving Ohio’s electric co-op members millions in construction costs. To learn more about power generation for Ohio’s electric co-ops, and the measures used to protect the environment, visit www.ohioec.org/buckeye-power. At left, Firelands Electric members get an up-close look at how their power is produced during the co-op’s annual tour of Cardinal Generating Station.


integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

EMPLOYEE NEWS

ROB SWIGER CELEBRATES

15 YEARS

Rob Swiger marked his 15th anniversary with the cooperative in October. He was hired as an engineering services representative in 2002, doing field staking work. In March 2003, he was selected for an apprentice lineman position. After completing the Dennis Merchant lineman training program and 8,000 hours of on-the-job line training, Rob was promoted to journeyman lineman. In June 2007, Firelands Electric named Rob a lead lineman, where his responsibilities include running a crew; installing transformers, oil circuit breakers, and switches; and repairing single-phase and three-phase conductors. Some of his projects include line rebuilds, pole replacements, substation and underground residential distribution (URD) maintenance, completing the alteration and repair of single-phase and three-phase conductors, and doing what it takes to provide members with the most reliable service.

OF SERVICE

As such, Rob says operating on energized systems during extreme weather and unpredictable elements is always a concern. “I enjoy my job even when the weather turns bad, because I work with a great group of guys who always have my back,” Rob adds. When asked about some of his greatest challenges as a lineman, Rob recalls assisting with restoration efforts following the 2005 ice storm that caused about 94 percent of Firelands Electric’s distribution system to be without power. That same year, Rob helped with restoration efforts in Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina. He was one of 53 Ohio electric cooperative linemen who responded to the call for help from sister cooperatives affected by the devastation, with some systems almost completely destroyed by the storm. Rob is a native of the New London area. He and his wife, Dusty, enjoy motorcycle rides and spending time with family and friends. Rob likes to hunt and work on various projects in his garage.

To further his education, Rob participated in Dale Carnagie Training several years ago, where he received the Highest Achievement Award. “I found the course to be an exceptional experience,” Rob says. “The useful skills and principles learned from the course have given me the confidence to face challenges and capitalize on opportunities both professionally and personally.” Working outdoors in a field where every day is different is something that Rob truly enjoys. However, linemen face their share of trials brought on by severe storms, damaging winds, flooding, mud, and ice.

Firelands Electric began site prep work on its new cooperative facility in October, and an official ground breaking will be announced later this month. Several representatives of the building committee proudly showcase the job sign located at 103 Industrial Drive, New London. Pictured from left to right is Director of Member Services and Communications Andrea Gravenhorst, Line Superintendent Don Englet, Project Consultant John Copley, and General Manager April Bordas.

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES YOUTH PROGRAMS

Co-op program recognizes middle school students “The A Team” recognizes students in grades 6-8 for their hard work and dedication to education. Students whose parents or guardians are members of Firelands Electric Cooperative, and who have a minimum of three A’s on their most recent report card, are eligible to enter. A drawing will take place at the end of each grading period where three students will be chosen to receive an iTunes gift card. Winners will also have their photo published in an upcoming issue of Ohio Cooperative Living magazine, as well as be featured on the co-op’s website and social media outlets. The deadline for the next drawing is Dec. 10. For complete details on how to enter, visit www.firelandsec.com/content/team.

IN THE COMMUNITY

Step Up for Soldiers When you are far away from home, it’s common to miss it even more during the holiday season. This can be especially true for members of the military. United Service Organizations (USO) centers around the world work to make the holiday season bright for service members and their families — for both American soldiers stationed abroad and those returning home from deployment. Firelands Electric Co-op is proud to join forces with local radio stations WLKR-FM and K96-FM to support the USO of Northern Ohio Step Up For Soldiers annual drive. Beginning on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, and running through Dec. 15, the co-op will serve as a donation location for the USO. “This year marks our tenth year collecting for the USO, and Firelands is honored to support the brave men and women serving our country,” says Andrea Gravenhorst, director of member services and communications for the co-op. Items such as toys, games, household items, canned goods, health and wellness items, diapers, and many others can be donated. A complete list of suggested donation items is available on Firelands Electric’s website, www.firelandsec.com/content/uso-northern-ohio, and Facebook page. Care package items can be dropped off until Friday, Dec. 15, at Firelands Electric Co-op’s office in New London during regular business hours Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 20B OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017


integrity

accountability IN THE COMMUNITY

MUSICAL

community commitment

innovation

BY TRACY GIBB

MASTERPIECES

Constandino “Dino” Bersis grew up in a world filled with family and music. His father and grandfather were both luthiers (those who build and repair stringed instruments), as well as carpenters. Dino’s earliest memories revolve around his father’s retail stores in Athens, Greece. At Dino Bersis has been designing and building instruments for over four years old, he 50 years. would spend hours turning scraps of wood into toy boats and learning to play guitar while seated on his older cousin’s lap. After his family immigrated to the U.S. in the late 1950s, Dino continued to learn the art of instrument-making. At 14, he rebuilt his first bouzouki, a Greek stringed instrument with a flat front and rounded back that produces a sharp, metallic sound, similar to that of a mandolin but with a lower pitch. A few years later, he built an instrument made completely from his own design.

Before beginning an instrument, Dino painstakingly draws out the design, complete with the smallest embellishments. It takes about three months to build a single bouzouki or guitar, and it takes an additional year for an instrument to cure. Without this process, the piece would be too fragile to play. For nearly 40 years, Dino and his wife, Ellen, lived in New Jersey, raising their three children and operating instrument shops in the Garden State and in nearby Queens, New York. Twelve years ago, the couple, who will celebrate their fiftieth wedding anniversary next month, moved to the Holiday Lakes area of Willard, Ohio. Dino isn’t finished creating musical masterpieces, however. His workshop and home are still bursting with bouzoukis, guitars, and other stringed instruments under construction or repair — right alongside toy box designs for two of his eight grandchildren and countless family photos. To see more of Dino’s work, visit www.engravingsbydino.com/home.html or search for Guitars by Dino on Facebook. Dino can also be contacted at 567-224-4873. Places & Faces is a monthly feature showcasing people, businesses, and organizations located throughout the Firelands Electric Cooperative service territory.

Eventually, Dino began making acoustic and electric guitars, in addition to his beloved bouzouki. His one-of-a-kind designs, which are played all over the world, involve intricate wood inlay, motherof-pearl, and engraving, making the instruments true works of art. “The bouzouki makes music from the heart,” Dino says, “and every luthier puts his own expression into making each instrument.”

Dino Bersis, left, and Firelands Electric Co-op employee Stephanie Loescher, right, with several of Bersis’ instruments.

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

UNCLAIMED FUNDS

CAPITAL CREDITS

Notice of

UNCLAIMED FUNDS

Official notice is given that the following current or former patrons have cash retirements of capital credits or other payments from Firelands Electric Cooperative that have gone unclaimed for more than four years. According to Article VIII, Section 3, of the Code of Regulations, unless claim is made within 60 days of the second publication of this list, such funds will become an irrevocable gift and assignment by such patron to the cooperative. Inquiries should be directed to Firelands Electric Cooperative, P.O. Box 32, New London, Ohio 44851, or by phone at 419-929-1571 or 1-800-533-8658. This is the second of two notices. ABRAM, DAVID A ABRAMS, FRANK S ABSHER, LINDA ABSHER, MARLENE ACKERMAN, KATHLEEN ADAMS, EDNA ADAMS, ROBERT ADKINS, CHARLES ADKINS, SHERRY AKERMANN, MARK ALEXANDER, ARNOLD ALEXANDER, ROBERT P ALLEN, BEVERLY ALLEN, KATHERINE ALLEN, ROBERT M ALLEN TRAINING STABLES ALT, BERNARD J AMBURGY, BONNIE F AMSTUTZ, MARION AMSTUTZ, RANDY A ANDERSON, DAVID R ANDERSON, GARY L ANDERSON, ROBERT C ANDERSON, TYLER N ANDREA, MICHAEL T ARMAN, RICHARD C ARMSTRONG, DENNIS R ARMSTRONG, JAMES A ARNOLD, DOUGLAS D ARNOLD, EILEEN ARTHUR, KIM A-S ENERGY INC ASANOWICZ-OMALLY, G H ASHLAND PIPE LINE CO AT & T COMPANY STORE# OH3440 ATKINS, DANIEL J ATKINSON, GLENN F ATKINSON, ROBERT T AUKERMAN, RUBY BAHNSEN, DOUGLAS E BAHR, GREGORY BAILEY, DAVID L BAILEY, KEITH V BAILEY, KENNETH BAILEY, SHARON BAKER, CARL

BAKER, MABELLE BAKER, STACEY BAKER, TERRY BALDUFF, PERRY BALL, FRED S BALL, TINA BALSIZER, RICHARD L BALTES, JOSEPH BANFIELD, KAREN BARBER, WALTER BARNES, MARK BARNETT, CAROL BARRON, K K BASSLER, GEORGE BATES, JAMIE S BAUCUM, FRANCES B BAXTER, LARRY BEAL, ELFRIEDE L BEAL, PAUL D BEATTIE, MATTHEW J BECK, PAMELA K BECKER, DARYL W BEDDOW, CAROLYN BEER, ALBERT BELL, DIANA K BELL, DONALD R BENDER, THOMAS BERBERICK, CYNTHIA S BERG, MARLENE BERGER, JUDY S BERMAN SHAFER OIL BERNOSKY, LAWRENCE BERRY, CLINT BERRY, FANNIE BERRY, KATHRYN BESS, JOHN BESS, LESTER L BISSELL, SHARON S BLAKE, NANCY BLANK, CHARLES T BLANTON, ARNOLD S BLANTON, BILLY BLANTON, CHARLES BLANTON, CRAIG BLANTON, DENNIS BLANTON, SHIRLEY BLOODHART, BARBARA P

20D OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

BLOODHART, BONITA R BOB MILLER TRAINING BOEGLIN, JANET BOEHN, DANIEL BONNEY, MARGARET BOOKER, RANDY BOOTH, TIMOTHY E BORGELT, CHARLES BORN, HOWARD BOSELY, BRUCE BOSS, BENJAMIN M BOTDORF, TERRY BOWERS, ROBERT J BOWLING, HAROLD BOWMAN, PAUL J BOX OFFICE BOYD, JESSE BOYD, KATHY J BOYD, P BOYD, TERRY L BOYER, E L BP PIPLINE, FOSTORIA BRACKEN, JAMES BRACKEN, JANET BRACKEN, WILBERT BRADLEY, GERTRUDE BRANT, LARRY BRANT, TIMOTHY L BREHM, WILLIAM A BREWER, JEFFREY S BRIGGS, LARRY E BRIGHT, BEVERLY BRINEGAR, ORA JR BROCKWAY, DENNIS D BROWN, CINDY BROWN, E BROWN, KURT D BROWN, RON BROWN, TIMOTHY J BROWNE, LONNIE A BRUBAKER, EDWARD BRUMME, CATHI BRUSACORAM, PAULETTE BRYANT, DEBRA BUCHANAN, ROGER BUCKINGHAM, BRIAN BUCK’S FURNITURE

BUFFINGTON, K C BUNKER, DALE BUNT, MARK W BURCHETT, GEORGE D BURGER, JOAN BURK, JOHN BURK, MARTHA E BURKHOLDER, RICHARD W BURNS, ALBERT BURROWS, MAGLENE BURSLEY, OPAL M BURSLEY, RENEE L BURWELL, CARL BUTZLER, E BYZANTINE TRADITIONS, LLC CAHILL, SHARON S CAIN, LISA E CALTRIDER, RON CAMP, MARY M CAMPBELL, ALFRED CAMPBELL, RALPH N, JR CAMPBELL, TIMOTHY W CANO, JAVIER CANODE, DONALD CANTRILL, LEO R, JR CAPELLE, STEVEN CARNS, D N CAROTHERS, FAYE CARR, DONALD L, II CARR, JOYCE E CARROLL, DELBERT CARRUTHERS, GUY A CASEY, DEMPSEY R CASKEY, STEVEN CASTLE, LANNY CAUDILL, BUFORD CAUDILL, PAM CEGALIS, JOHN CHAFFEE, MICHAEL CHANDLER, ARTHUR E CHANDLER, ELIZABETH CHANDLER, ROBERT L CHAPIN, KAREN L CHAPIN, LEOTA CHITTENDEN, W L CHRISTA OIL COMPANY CHRISTIAN, LORIE E


integrity

accountability CHRISTOPHER ON THE HILL CHURCH, CLAIR D, II CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY CLANTZ, SCOTT CLARK, A J CLARK, BEATRICE CLARK, DANIEL CLARK, DOUGLAS CLARK, JAMES R CLARK, PHIL CLARK, ROBERT W, JR CLAUS, CLIFFORD M CLIFTON PHONE SYSTEMS CLINE, GARY CLUTE, MARK COBLENTZ, EMANUEL H COCHRAN, L CODY, SANDY COFER, JEFFREY W COLAHAN, CHARLES COLE, ALICE V COLE, BURL COLEY, BARBARA COLLINS, BILLY CONLEY, RICHARD CONRAIL CORP CONSOLIDATED RAIL CORP COOK, MAMIE COOK, SANDRA COOKE, K COOMBS, JAMES M COPUS, DAVID S CORDAS, NORMA P CORNELL, KATHLEEN COSNER, RICHARD B COSTELLO, KAITLYN COUCH, DELMAR COULL, WILLIAM COURTRIGHT, DANIEL A COWAN, GLEN COX, CLOVIA COX, SCOTT CRANDALL, LELAND CRANK, DAVID J CRANMORE, BRIAN CREAMER, LOWELL CREWS, JOHN W CRIPE, OLUS CRITES, DONALD L CRONE, JAMES G CROOKS, ROBERT CROSE, COY CROSS, KELLY CROUSE, P CRUSE, LARRY D CUMBERLEDGE, EDITH CUNNINGHAM, GEORGE L DALLAS, DAVID DALLAS, JEFFREY E DALTON, RONALD W DAMRON, SHERRI L DAMRON, THERESA DANHOFF, PAUL DANHOFF, ROBERT E

community commitment

innovation

DANIELS, YVONNE DARON, WAYNE R DAUGHERTY, R DAVID SHAFER OIL DAVIS, CLEO F DAVIS, JEFF DAVIS, R C DAVIS, VALERIE J DEAN, MARY M DEAN, ROBERT E DEAN, TINA DEATON, M R DEITZ, LORIE DEKIN, ROBERT J DEPPEN, JOHN R DEPPEN, ORPHA DESANTO, JAMES DETTERMAN, ROBERT E DEVLIN, ROBERT M DIBBLE, ALICE DICK, RUSSEL A DIDION, LEO F DIEHL, NELLIE R DILLON, JESSE H DOBSON, LARRY D DODSON-LINDBLOM DONELSON, ALLEN DONELSON, RUTH A DONLEY, CRAIG J DORAND, ROBIN DORN, JOHN DOTSON, DANNY DOUGHTY, J DOVE, ROGER DOWNING, DARRYL DOYLE, TIM DRAGE, ALICE R DRESSLER, RONALD G DREYER, CARL DRUGAN, RONALD DUDLEY, SANDRA DUGAN, JAMES M DULANEY, CHERYL A DURHAM, TERRY DUTA, JOHN DUTCH PANTRY INC #70 EAGLE, HARVEY JR EARLY, MAX, II EASTER, JUDY M EASTERDAY, L EASTERLIN, C EATON, KENNETH ECKER REAL ESTATE CO ECKROTH, JOHN, JR EDWARDS, ELIZABETH EDWARDS, FAYE EDWARDS, JOHN EDWARDS, JOSEPH W EHRMANTRAUT, TERESA EIBEL, THOMAS A EICHENLAUB, JACK EICHLER, DAVID ELDRIDGE, JEFF ELKINS, ROY ELLIOTT, ALLEN T

ENERGY WORKS GALLAHER, JOSEPH ENNEMOSER, LEO R GALLION, TANYA EQUITABLE SAVINGS GAMMAGE, MATTHEW J ERICSSON, JOHN H GAMMALO, OPAL ESTEP, CLEVE, JR GANFIELD, ROY W ETZWILER, ETHEL A GANNETT, KELLY EVANS, JEFFERY, JR GARCIA, DAVID EVANS, VALERIE GARDNER, MARK EVENER, JEFF GARDNER, ROBERT A EVENER, PAMELA J GARNER, SCOTT J EVERHART, HAROLD GARRISON, KYLE L EWELL, WILLIAM H GAST, ROBERT L FAITH UNITED METHODIST GATES, JOHN C CHURCH GEARHART, HURL FANNIN, TAMARA GECSEDI, MICHAEL FARNSWORTH, MARILYN GEDE, ELSIE FARNSWORTH, VIRGINIA GEDEON, FRANK P FARR, DEBRA A GENTRY, C FEATHERINGILL, KIM GEORGE, DAVID FEGAN, PATRICK J GERTEN, RUDY FERNYAK, JOHN C GIAR, JAMES L FERRELL, LACK GIARD, LORETTA FEY, EVA GIBSON, JOSEPH A FIFE, EARL D GIBSON, PATTY FIFE, WALTER D GILBERT, CHARLES O, JR FIFE, GERALD L GILES, STEVEN FILIUS, DONALD R GINDLESBERGER, ROBERT S FINLEY, RANDY GIORDANO, ANTHONY FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS GIUMMO, DEBRA FISHPAW, JOHN GIUMMO, JOHN J FITCHVILLE UM CHURCH GIVEN, SUSAN FITZGERALD, LARRY V GLANZ, KEVIN FLEMING, MICHAEL R GLASS, J E FLENNER, WILLIAM L GMEREK, GERALD FOGLE, KELLY GMTW PARTNERS FOLCK, ROBERT GOARD, EVELYN FOOS, BRIAN E GOBLE, ALFRED D FOSTER, CAROL GODSEY, STEVEN FOWLER, ANN GOLDEN, GERALD F FOX, RAYMOND GOMCSAK, EDWARD E FOX, ROBERT E GOODSITE, DEBORAH A FRANCIS, GARY JR GOSCHE, C R FRANK, JAMES FRANK, NEIL FRAZIER, LORNA J FRAZIER JR, WM D FREDERICK, CHARLES FREED, THOMAS FREELON, JAMES R, JR FREELON, LYNN FREY, DANNY R FRIEND, PAMELA S FRITZ, CHARLES FRIZZELL, RYAN D FRYE, ROBERT H FULK, DAVID FULLER, M A FULTON, DIANNE L FULTON, ROBERT R FURLONG, SCOTT FURY, ERIN GADD, JEFFREY GADD, JERRY L GAINES, A C GALIK, JOHN R

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UNCLAIMED FUNDS

FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES GRAVELY, ROBERT L, JR GREEN, STACEY GREEN, WILLIAM GREER, SANDY GREGERSEN, BRUCE A GREGORY, CHARLES E GRIFFEY, M GRIFFITH, DONALD M GRIFFITH, STEPHANIE GRIGGS, NORMAN, JR GRIGGS, RICHARD GRILLEY, KIKU GRIMWOOD, DONALD E GROCHOWSKI, JERRY GROFF, VIVIAN GROSSCUP, LOIS M GROSSWILER, JOSH GRUNDEN, THEODORE L GTE TELEPHONE OPERATIONS GUM, KATHERYN HAASZ, DAVID HALE, ANGELA HALE, JOHN HALE, JUDITH HALE, REBECCA HALES, ALMENA HALES, BARBARA HALES, PAUL HALEY & MCFADDEN HALL, DALE HALL, DORTHIE HALL, DOUGLAS HALL, JEFFREY L HALL, MARINA HALL, RALPH F HALL, ROBERT HALL, SCOTT HAMILTON, LAURIE HAMILTON, PATSY HAMILTON, RONALD HAMMAKER, RON HAMMETT, LARRY HAMPTON, JOHN T HANDSHOE, MARIE HANGE, C O HANNAN, MARY L HARBAUGH, PHYLLIS HARDY, MARILYN J HARPER, HORACE J, JR HARPER, RUSSELL, II HARRINGTON, LINDA HARRIS, CHERYL HARRISON, KENNETH L HARROD, JOHN HARTSCHUH, JAMES HARTSEL, LINDA HARVEY, BRIAN W HARVEY, WILLIAM S HASSINGER, TIMOTHY J HASTINGS, KEN D HATFIELD, EDDIE A, JR HATFIELD, MARK C HATTON, ROBERT W, JR HAUPRIGHT, JOHN L

HAVEN, EVELYN M HAWKINS, B HAY, LARRY HEFFELFINGER, ALICE R HEIN, GEORGE HEINBERGER, MICHAEL HEISER, JAMES F HEITZMAN, MIKE HENDERSON, CHARLES HENES, RICHARD C HENRY, MICHAEL E HENRY, STEVEN W HERGATT, CLARENCE D HERGATT, JOHN L HERMANN, SARAH HERWIG, GLENN HERZKE, JUDITH HEYNES, JANETTE R HICKS, DAVID E HICKS, EARL R HIGH, REUBEN HILL, DIANE HILLYER, N F HINCKLEY, AMY HINCKLEY, MARK HOFFMAN, BARBARA A HOLBROOK, J R HOLEDA, NANCY J HOMAN, MARVIN HONAKER, JASON HOOTMAN, ARITA D HOPKINS, GINA HOPKINS, HELEN HOPKINS, KENNETH R HORSLEY, KEVIN C HOUGHTBY, BRIAN E HOUGHTLEN, WILLIAM HOWARD, RUBY HOWELL, ROBERT HOWMAN, ARLENE HOWMAN, DONALD HOY, JOHN M HOYT, JON E HUGHES, MORGAN HULLINGER, DEBRA HUMPHREY, J HUMPHREY, MARK T HUNT, JOHN R HUNTER, LORETTA L HURST, HENRY JR HUTCHESON, EARL B HYATT, RANDALL HYLTON, JAMES T IGNAT, LEE INMON, JUDITH A INMON, KENNETH IRWIN, JAMES ISON, BRUCE JACKMOVICH, FRED JACKSON, JANET M JACOBS, POLLY JACOBS, THEODORE R JACOBS, TIMOTHY JARVIS, CHERYL M JEFFREYS, BENJAMIN W

20F OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

JENKINS, ALFRED JENNINGS, DARRELL C JENNINGS, M JENNY, MICHAEL J JOHNSON, L M JOHNSON, MARY L JOHNSTON, DENNIS JONES, DANNIE JONES, LESTER JONES SPACELINK OF OHIO JORDAN, GEORGE KADUCK, MARGARET KAMANN, SANDY KAMENIK, KENNETH T KANZIG, RANDY J KARNOSH, MELISSA L KATE, KEVIN KEENE, TIMOTHY L KELLER, JANET KELLER, KELLY R KELLEY, CHRIS KENDALL, ALBERT KENNARD, DELMAR KENNARD, RANDY L KENNEDY, BRUCE KENNEDY, MICHELLE G KERSHNER, DIANA L KERSHNER, HAROLD KESSLER, JAMES R KETCHELL, JAMES KEYERLEBER, DENNIS KEYSOR, KYLE K KIEFFER, RODNEY C KIMMEL, M J KINER, JUNE E KING, CONSTANCE S KING, DONALD R KING, HAROLD F KING, JAMES E KING, KEITH KING, VICKIE KINNEY, JAY R KINSEL, JAMA L KINTER, LOREN E KINTON, MARY C KIRK MANAGEMENT KISTLER, COLLEEN D KLINE, DONALD L KLINE, L R KLINGER, MARK KNAPP, ESTELLE KNITTEL, FRANK KNOLL, DAVID P KNOWLTON, RICHARD KNOWLTON, TIMOTHY KOCHENDERFER, BETH KOEGLER, PAUL KOPKE, JAMES KOUTSOPOULOS, GERMANO E KOVAC, PAUL R KRAUSS, RALPH E KRENRICK, DAVID R KRISKO, DAVID KRUKI, JASEN

KULIGA, KELLEY M KUNKEL, MICHAEL E KUNKEL, WILLIAM F KUNTZ, M KURTZ, RAYMOND KYLER, J W L & K MOTELS INC L & M INVESTMENTS LACEY, LORNA G LANMAN, REGONA M LARCK, CLAYTON W LARIZZA, FRANK J, JR LAWRENCE, WILLIAM H LAWSON, THOMAS F LEHMAN, L E LEMOND, ROGER L LENCIONI, JEFFREY J LESJAK, JOHN W LEWIS, BILL LEWIS, JAMES LILLO, JAMES F LINDSEY, JENNIFER LINN, BRIAN LINN, CRYSTAL LINN, ROBERT G LITTLEFIELD OIL COMP LONG, CARL R LONG, LARRY LORENTZ, EDWARD L LORIMOR, JOE D LORTCHER, PAMELA S LOVE, LOUIS M LOW, DENISE L LOW, KENNETH SR LOWE, JAMES A LOZIER, RON LUCAS, ROBERT H LUMLEY, DIANE M LUNA, RUBEN LYON, DEBRA A MACK, BARBARA MAHL, SUSAN M MALONE, R S MANINO, KAREN L MANN, RONALD R MARATHON OIL COMPANY MARCUM, HUBERT MARETT, MARY S MARKEL, THOMAS K MARSH, JOHN MARSHALL, RANDY L MARTIN, RAYMOND H MARTIN, WILLIAM MARVICSIN, ROGER MASI, JOSEPH J MASK, SANDRA L MASSARO, EDWARD, JR MATHER, TIMOTHY W MATTESON, JEAN MAURER, BECKIE MAYNARD, DONNIE MAYNARD, KILE E MAYTON, PHILIP MBT INC MCCARTHY, ALFRED V


integrity

accountability MCCLAVE, CHARLES MCCORMICK, ALBERT MCCREADY, MIRIAM K MCGEE, GEORGIA A MCGHEE, SUSAN MCI TELECOMMUNICATIONS MCKERNAN, ROBERT C MCKINLEY, CAID MCLAIN, NANCY MCNAULL, JOHN M MCNEMAR, ELEANOR J MCPHERRON, GENNY MCWHORTER, LARRY D MEDIA ONE OF OHIO, INC MEDRANO, DANIEL MEIER, F G MEINHOLD, WALTER METZ, ANITA G MEYER, JOSEPH B MICHALSKI, TIM MIDDLETON, PAUL MIECZKOWSKI, NORMAN H MIFFLIN GRACE BRETHERN MIGHT, DONALD R MILLER, DENNIS MILLER, DONALD S MILLER, ERIC W MILLER, FREDA A MILLER, JOHN MILLER, JONI L MILLER, KEVIN MILLER, LANA S MILLER, LORNE MILLER, ROBERT D MILLER, ROBIN E MILLER, WILLIAM E MINUT, LEROY C, SR MITCHELL, KINNEL MITCHELL, MARK A MITCHELL, PHILLIP MOELLER, HARRIET F MOFFETT, FERN A MOHERMAN, DAVE MOHN, OTIS N MOHR, CHARLENE MOLINA, EPHREM MOLL, DARRELL T MOLL-BARNETT MONAHAN, BLANCHE C MONTGOMERY, DEB MONTONEY, BETTY MOOMEY, DAVID MOORE, JAMES M MOORE, JORDAN MOORE, TIMOTHY D MORGAN, DAVID MORRIS, DONALD R MORRIS, JOAN MORRIS, THERESA MORRIS, TRACY W MORROW, SCOTT MORTENSEN, JENS MOSER, HELEN L

community commitment

innovation

MOSER, RANDALL L MOSLEY, TAMMY MOTT, LUCILLE S MOWRY, LUELLA MOWRY, NANCY C MULLET, STEVE MULVANE, GREG MUMAW, DAVID MURR, DEBBRA MURR, DEBORAH E MURR, ELEANOR MURR, PERRY MURR, SANDRA MURRAY, GEORGE J MURRAY, JACKIE MUTCHLER, HARRIETTE MYER, PAULINE MYERS, BLANCHE MYERS, CHARLES R MYERS, HAROLD V MYERS, STEPHAN R NAGY, JOE NAVORSKA, DONALD R NEAD, BONNIE A NEDOLAST, STEPHEN NEDOLAST, WILLIAM NEEL, CHRISTY NEELY, TERRY NEFF, HAZEL NESBIT, ROBERT J NESTOR, LAURIE NEW LONDON CHURCH OF GOD NEW LONDON HEALTH CARE NEW LONDON REGALIA MFG NEWCOMB, JOHN D NEWCOMB, WANDA NEWMAN, JOHN NEWMAN, RANDALL S NEWMAN, RICK NEWSOME, CAROL NICHOLAS, TIMOTHY A NICHOLS, LORI NICHOLSON, MARIE NICKOLI, WALTER NIEDERMEIER, CAROL NIELSEN, DIANE NOGGLE, DAVID NOMMAY, STEVE NORFOLK SOUTHERN CORP NORRIS, HAROLD NORRIS, YONG N NYFENGER, ROBERT OBRYAN, CYNTHIA L OCONNOR, PATRICIA OHL, BOB OHL, ROBERT OHLEMACHER, JEFF ONDERAK, ANNA K ONEY, ANDREA ONEY, CHARLES E ONEY, TONYA OSBORNE, DANNY OSBORNE, ROBERTA OSLIE, SCOTT OSTERLAND, AMANDA

OWENS, DANNIE OWL HOOT BEVERAGE OWSLEY, RICHARD L PACK, STANLEY PAGANO, DAVID PARKER, CHERYL PARKER, HAROLD PARKER, THOMAS E PARKS, ROSE PARSONS, PEGGY PATCHIN, ROBERT J PATRICK, B J PATRICK, ERIN PATRICK, J D PATRICK, P GAYLE PATTERSON, EMMA J PATTON, JACK JR PATTON, JAMES B PAULY, EDWARD PAY, ANNA PAYNTER, JAMES PAYNTER, SCOTT PEARCE, DOROTHY E PEEL, ERIS M PELHAM, KENNETH R PENN, LAURENCE PERKINS, JEFFERY L PERKINS, ROBERT B PERL, ROGER O PERRY, CHARLES L PERRY, JOHN PERRY, LARRY PERRY, LINDA PETERS, JERRY PETERSEN, DENNIS PFEIL, STEWART PFIRSCH, KARL H PHILLIPS, COZENE G PHILLIPS, ED PHILLIPS, RON PICK, CLARENCE PICKENS, CHARLES B PICKETT, JAMES L PICKING, HAROLD PICKLESIMER, PHILLIP B PIERCE, EDWARD A PIERCE, SCOTT C PIERSON, M PITONAK, CURTIS PITTENGER, ROBERT R PLASKETT, MOLLY PLEASANT VIEW TRAP CLUB POLHE, PHILLIP M POLICE ATHLETIC LEAGUE POTH, ALBERT POTH, JOSEPH R PRESTON, KATHLEEN D PRICE, MICHAEL PRICE, STEPHEN PRIDDY, JEFFREY J PROCTOR, KURT PRYOR, JOSEPH A PRYOR, REBECCA PUGNEA, PAUL W PYNCHON, PATRICIA

QUAKER STATE CORP QUEEN, FRANK QUICK, RON QWEST MICROWAVE R Z FROST ASSOC INC RAINES, LARRY RANDLEMAN, EMMA E RANDLEMAN, SHIRLEY RANDLEMAN, STEPHANIE RARDEN, PHYLLIS RAUDKIVI, UNO REBER, ROBERT REBMANN, EDWARD A, JR REDIES, DORIS M REED, DEBBIE REED, DORSIE REED, PAUL P REED, STANLEY B REED, THOMAS REGAN, JAMES REGULA, JUDITH B REGULA, L J REID, NAOMI REIDY DAIRY FARM RENCH DIVERSIFIED RENNECKER, HAROLD REYNOLDS, FRANKIE REYNOLDS, ZORANA C RHODES, JERRY RICE, ALICE RICE, FOREST RICHARDS, PORTER B RICHARDSON, ROBERTA RICHEY, GAYLORD S, SR RICKETT, JANET S RICKEY, ELLEN L RILEY, JOE RINGER, DELAYNE RISNER, CYNTHIA RITCHEY, JAMES RITTER, LYNN ROBERTS, DARRELL D

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

20G


UNCLAIMED FUNDS

FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES ROBERTS, GARY ROBINSON, DELORES J ROBINSON, DOUGLAS ROBINSON, JANET S ROBINSON, MICHAEL L ROBINSON, RANCE ROBSON, KEVIN ROE, JOHN ROE, M W ROEDER, ROBERT J ROEDER, WILL ROGERS, JOHN ROHRER, LARRY ROLAND, CLARK W, JR ROLLASON, DENNIS A ROOKS, BONNIE ROPER, JAMES D ROSCOE, J ROSE, ERNEST ROSS, MELODY A ROTHACKER, GLENN ROUSH, RUSSELL J ROUTE 30 WELDING ROWLAND, ELBERT RUDD, J B RUEHLE, M J RUGGLES, DEBBRA J RUMSEY, BRIAN L RUSS, ANDREA RUSS, WILLIAM RUSSELL, B R RUSSELL, DAN RUSSELL, JOHN SACRAMONE, AMBER SALISBURY, LOYD B SALTZGABER, MARJORIE A SALYER, LEATHA SANCHEZ, KEVIN SANDERS, DAVID SANDIFER, ROGER SANSEVERINO, DONALD F SARVIS-SAPP, HEIDI L SAWYER, EMMA SAWYER, JAMES SCANLON, WILLIAM SCARPETE, EMIL SCHADEK, SYLVIA J SCHAFER, DONALD J SCHAFFER, CAROL A SCHAFFER, MICHAEL T SCHAKE, ROBERT H SCHARLOTT, RAYMOND W SCHIE, DEAN SCHIFFER, JOHN R SCHLINGMAN, DAVID B SCHLUMBOHM, KENNY SCHMIDT, J SCHMIDT, SANDRA J SCHMIDT, W W SCHNEITER, MARILYN J SCHNELL, DOUGLAS W SCHNOBRICH, KATRINA SCHOENIAN, FLORA SCHOEWE, DUANE A SCHOONOVER, WILSON

SCHRADER, RAY J SCHROEDER, EDWARD J SCHWAB, WILLIAM E SEIBERT, LORNA J SEITTERS, MABEL SEITZ, SANDRA K SELKIRK, WILLIAM R, JR SELLS, JAMES L, II SENDELBACH, P SENGSTOCK, FRANCES A SEVILLE, SHIRLEY SEXTON, RICK SEXTON, VELMON SHAIKH, LEAH SHAMBRE, ARLET SHANE, SCOTT A SHAW, DAVID L SHELLY, MARGARET J SHEPHERD, ANGELA K SHEPHERD, DARRELL SHEPHERD, H SHEPHERD, KELLEY SHEPHERD, ROBERT C SHERRARD, DAVID SHERRILL, GENEVA J SHERRILL, ROY M SHERRY, CHARLES SHIREY, RON G SHOEMAKER, GERALD L SHORTS, RALPH E SHOUP, JOYCE L SHOWALTER, CONNIE SHRADER, CARL H SHUMLAW, DONALD SIEGMYER, BEATRICE L SIGAFOOS, JAMES R SIKORA, MARK J SILCOX, ROBERT SIMMONS, SHIRLEY J SIMONE, MARIJANE SIMS, G B, JR SIMS, J L SKINNER, JEFFREY G SKOVICH, TAMMY SLATER, DONALD K SLOAN, BETHANY J SLOAN, J SLONE, CLINUS SLONE, HIBBARD SMETANA, TONY R SMITH, ALAN L SMITH, ANNIE SMITH, BRIAN T SMITH, CLARA B SMITH, CONNIE SMITH, DON SMITH, F SMITH, HELEN SMITH, JAMES SMITH, JOHN D SMITH, JOSEPH T SMITH, MARILYN A SNYDER, ALLEN C SNYDER, APRIL SNYDER, PETER W

20H OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

SNYDER, RUBY SOPER, DAVID E SOUDERS, STEVEN L SOULE, EUGENE R SPARR, ISABELLE SPAYD, D J SPEARS, ROBERT A SPEARS, SHERRI R SPENCER, JERALD R SPRINGER, DALE K, JR STALLARD, STEVEN M STANLEY, DARRELL L STANLEY, DERRAL STARKEY, FLORENCE V STARKEY, JACK STARKEY, NELDA R STARR, NORMAN STEELE, DANIEL M STEELE, FRANCIS H STEFFANUS, RAYMOND STEIN, HAZEL STEIN, JUDITH STEINER, JONATHAN J STEPHENS, JAMES STEPHENSON, HOWARD E STEVENS, CHRISTOPHER J STEVENS, ROBERT B STEWART, BETTY STILLION, TRACY STIMMELL, PATRICK STOBER, DWIGHT STOBER, V L STOLTZ, NOEL O STONE, R STONEHAM, BLANCHE M STRAIT, BRUCE STRINE, JEREMY R STUBBS, WILLIAM STUDER, JOSEPH W STUMBO, MARIE STUTZMAN, DANIEL L STUTZMAN, JACOB SUKKE, ROBERT SUMMERS, C SUTHERLAND, RODNEY SUTHERLAND, SANDRA L SWAIN, RICHARD SWAISGOOD, DOUGLAS W SWANSON, SHIRLEY SWICK, LYNNE K SWIGER, WENDY SWINDALL, MARVIN SWINEHART, JASPER H TANNER, RHONDA TAYLOR, DALE TAYLOR, GARY L TAYLOR, JAMES JR TENLEY, CYNTHIA L TENORIO, SHEILA TERRY, BELINDA TETRICK, MARION THARP, KIMBERLY M THE LAWSON MILK CO 4546 THE SHOE STORE THE UNION BANK SAV CO

THOMAS, DEBRA L THOMASON, PEGGY THOMPSON, JODY THOMPSON, MICHAEL E THOMSON, CHERYL TILLIA, BARB TILTON, DWIGHT E TIURA, GREGORY P TOM MATTOX & CO TORRESO, LYNN S TOWER, CHARLOTTE TOWER, DAVE TRAIL TO LIFE CAMP TRAPP, DARREN D TREASTER, CANDY TRIO PETRO, INC TRUSHEL, TERRY TUCKER, ALICE TUTTLE, DERRICK TUTTLE, GAIL TUTTLE, JOHN TWADDLE, L U S GEOLOGICAL SURVEY U S WILDLIFE ASSOC UJVARI, CHRIS URICH, WILBERT R, JR VALE OF ALFORD VANDERPOOL, DENNIS VANHOUTEN, WILLIAM VANNESS, ROBERT L VANSCYOC, GREG VERHOVEC, DAVID, SR VETERANS ADMINISTRATION VFW POST 4654 VIDEN, TED WADE, MARY WALDRUP, LORNA L WALKER, JOHN T WALTER, PAM J WALTON, ILLA WALZ, MICHAEL WANDER, MARK WARD, DAISY WARD, KELLY S WARD, MICHAEL K WARGO, ANDREW H, SR WARREN, SUSAN WATSON, ROBERT A WAUGH, ANTHONY W WEAVER, ADA F WEAVER, JAMES WEAVER, JEANNIE WEAVER, MICHAEL L WEBER, SHANNON L WEEKLEY, MILDRED WEILER, BENJAMIN V WEINER, SHARON WEIR, ALLEN WEIRICK, J M WEISS, MIKE WEITZEL, SUSAN WELCH, BERT G WELLS, THOMAS S WENDLINGER, ANNA


integrity

accountability WENNER, V WENZEL, GEORGE WESNER, GEORGE W WEST, DAVID A WESTERMAN, JAMES D WESTERMAN, P W WHEELER, DONALD W WHILE, CHERYL WHITE, T WHITMER, EUGENE M WHITTINGTON, MICHAEL A WICKHAM, PAULETTE WILBER, LISA WILBUR, WILLIAM C WILBURN, KEVIN

community commitment

innovation

WILDE, MARTIN WILEY, MARTIN D WILLARD, GEORGE C WILLEKE, JAMES S WILLIAMS, DEB WILLIAMS, JOHN P WILLIAMS, KAREN J WILLIAMS, LEWIS WILLIAMS, ROBERT L WILLIS, JUDY WILSON, FRANK WILSON, JEFFERY R WILSON, RICHARD WILSON, SOPHIE M WINANS, VANESSA

WINSTEAD, R K WISENBARGER, JANET L WITTMER, RONALD G WOLBERT, DAVID WOLF, GERALD E WOLFE, DORIS M WOLFORD, VICKIE WOOD, RYAN H WORKMAN, CLIFFORD L WORKMAN, LAVON A WORSTALL, CAROLYN S WRIGHT, JEFFREY S WYNN, RANDALL WYRICK, DUANE YAHNEY, MICHAEL C

YANKOVIC, DONALD J YEATER, LINDA YOUNG, JERE D YOUNG, PATTY YOUNG, PAUL III YOUNG, ROBERT YOUNGLESS, EDWARD YUNKER, RONALD A ZACHARIAS FARMS ZAJAC, MIKE ZEBB, WALTER J ZEIGLER, DONALD ZEITER, ROBERT A ZELLNER, MARCELLA C ZIGMAN, ANTHONY

CAPITAL CREDITS

1

Your co-op tracks how much electricity you buy and how much you pay for it throughout the year.

PRINCIPLE #3: ECONOMIC PARTICIPATION

2

At the end of the year, Firelands completes financial matters and determines whether there is excess revenue, called margins.

3

4

Firelands’ trustees allocate the margins to members as capital credits, based upon their use of electricity during the year.

When Firelands’ financial condition permits, your board of trustees decides to retire, or pay, the capital credits.

5

Firelands Electric notifies you of how and when you’ll receive your capital credits retirement.

As a Firelands Electric member-owner, you receive electric service at cost, and any margin the cooperative makes is allocated back to your capital credits account. We invest those capital credits in new infrastructure in order to provide a reliable supply of cost-effective electric power. Those credits are then retired, or paid back, to you as it is financially feasible to do so.

innovation accountability community commitment integrity

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES COOPERATIVE UPDATE

BOARD MEETING

highlights

Firelands Electric Cooperative’s Board of Trustees met Aug. 22 and covered the following items: • Board President Dan McNaull reported 47 new membership applications for approval by the board.

• The board reviewed and accepted safety reports on training conducted July 25, pole top and bucket rescue qualification drills on July 26, and a workplace safety observation conducted Aug. 15. • Director of Finance and Accounting Tabi Shepherd reviewed July financials and reported on accounting and billing department activities. • General Manager April Bordas reviewed the cooperative’s recent power requirement study and rate study with the board. • Line Superintendent Don Englet discussed the issue of line loss (electricity lost due to resistance during transmission) with the board. Englet explained that management is currently working to reduce transformer core losses by reviewing other possible causes and remedies.

• Director of Electric Operations Denny Marugg updated the board on recent projects in the operations department. • Englet reported on recent line crew activities in the operations department, including the cooperative’s favorable results of an on-site Rural Electric Safety Achievement Program observation. • Director of Member Services and Communications Andrea Gravenhorst reported on recent communications pieces and information technology (IT) projects. She also discussed upcoming activities involving the member services department. Firelands Electric is democratically controlled and governed by local people committed to policies that result in a safe and reliable electric system, fair rates, financial responsibility, and superior member service. The cooperative’s next board meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 28, at Firelands Electric’s office, located at One Energy Place, New London.

Firelands Electric Co-op wishes you and your family a wonderful Thanksgiving! As a reminder, our office will be closed Nov. 23 and 24 so our employees may enjoy the holiday with their families. Emergency service is always available by calling 1-800-533-8658. FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

GENERAL MANAGER

OUTAGE HOTLINE

Dan McNaull

April Bordas

Lowell Kreager

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION?

Dan Schloemer

E-mail your ideas to: members@firelandsec.com

1-800-533-8658 OFFICE

One Energy Place P.O. Box 32 New London, OH 44851 419-929-1571

President, District 7

Vice President, District 2 Secretary/Treasurer, District 1

W.E. Anderson District 8

Carl Ayers District 5

OFFICE HOURS

Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. www.FirelandsEC.com

Steve Gray District 3

Bruce Leimbach District 4

Kevin Reidy District 6

Neil Winslow District 9

22

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017


CO-OP OHIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP O HIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-O OP OHIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP O HIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-O OHIO  CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP O

Co-ops fill trailers for hurricane victims As part of the statewide mutual aid effort, several Ohio electric cooperatives sought the help of their local communities and came together to fill trailers with muchneeded items for those impacted by both Hurricanes Irma and Harvey. Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative, located in Paulding, teamed with Apostolic Christian Church of Junction with the goal of filling one small semi with nonperishable goods. But with the help of their selfless community, PPEC filled the semi three times. Consolidated Electric Cooperative, with offices in both Delaware and Mt. Gilead, also sent a loaded trailer full of nonperishable supplies, donated by employees and community members.

South Central breaks ground on OurSolar project South Central Power Company broke ground on its 4-acre, 1,900-panel OurSolar project — the largest in the state — on Sept. 18. The array’s 1,900 panels, scheduled to be fully installed by the end of the year and operational by early 2018, will produce enough electricity to power about 60 homes. The array is located in Lancaster’s Rock Mill Corporate Park in Fairfield County.

Inspirational speaker stresses safety importance Silence — that was the reaction when Chuck Tiemann, a safety and loss control specialist with Indiana Electric Cooperatives, told his story to Midwest Electric and Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative workers recently. In 1980, at the age of 24, Tiemann was working as a lineman in Oklahoma when he made contact with a live wire he had assumed was dead. In an instant, 7,200 volts of electricity surged through his fingers and body, stopped his heart, and blew a hole out through the big toe of his right foot. He lost his left arm below the elbow and his right leg below the knee. Now, Tiemann travels the country to share his story, showcasing himself as a powerful reminder that safety is crucial. “I want everyone to go home at night to hug and kiss their families,” Tiemann said. “Never make apologies for being safe.”

Cooking out with co-ops Earlier this year, Butler Rural Electric Cooperative, located in Oxford, and Darke Rural Electric Cooperative, based in Greenville, sponsored an exhibitor picnic at the Preble County Fairgrounds in Eaton. Junior fair exhibitors and their families enjoyed hot dogs, chips, cookies, and drinks — a way to relax after a day of hard work.

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

23


STORY AND PHOTO BY BECKY LINHARDT

BACK IN TIME AT

BERDINE’S FIVE & DIME

H

arrisville, West Virginia, boasts the oldest operating dime store in the United States. Berdine’s Five & Dime began as a general store in 1908 and has been operating at its current location on Court Street since 1915. It looks to be ready for an even longer stay. Fred Berdine, son of the founder of the store, sold it to the Six family in 1983, and the new owners worked to restore it to its original look and feel. “Their vision was to keep it as living history and as an escape from the contemporary world,” says store manager Karen Harper. “It is and always has been a small family business.” Berdine’s promotes itself as “One Giant Leap Back in Time.” The store is located in a white clapboard building with the green lawn of the 19th-century Ritchie County Courthouse on one side and an 1899 brick building housing law offices on the other. Steps lead up to the porch and a bench outside, while inside, customers find original wood shelving, pressed tin ceilings, and lots of unique products. Adults have a tendency to become kids again as they wander the aisles, finding old favorites along with fun and interesting new items. More than one customer has had to have the “secret” of woven “finger traps” revealed. Grandparents love to buy wooden pop guns, Jacob’s Ladders, and ball-and-cup toys to share with their grandchildren. “We have a large selection of paper dolls, and jack-in-the-boxes sell very well,” Harper says. “We also have contemporary bobbleheads and unique ‘Moving Picture’ books that have images that appear to move like in a movie.” Those who remember pressing their noses against the expansive candy counters at their local five-and-dime will not be disappointed with the Berdine’s experience. Often, visitors responding to a friendly hello from the staff with a “just looking” become customers — buying candy, if nothing else.

24

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

“Customer favorites include real oldfashioned chocolate drops, chocolatecovered English walnuts, and red velvet cherries — dried cherries coated in a red-colored white chocolate,” Harper says. Berdine’s also stocks numerous types of “penny candy” and sour cherry balls. “When I visit Berdine’s, I have to buy coconut bonbons, my husband’s favorite,” says Donna Reaser of Clarksburg. Over the years, Reaser has developed a collection of Christmas ornaments purchased at Berdine’s. “I love the old-time Christmas decorations they have,” she says. Other products that may seem old-fashioned include ladies’ hankies, Rosebud Salve, Unker’s Healing Salve, and Poison Ivy Soap. Kitchen items include measuring spoons marked Pinch, Dab, Nib, and Smidgen. “The owner likes science stuff, so we always have something scientific — but playful,” says Harper. Current stock includes Newton’s cradles, Euler’s Disks (kinetic energy), a wind-power generating kit, science/magic items, and even “spyglasses” — sunglasses with rear-vision mirroring that allows you to see behind you, because, after all, looking back can be fun.

Berdine’s Five & Dime 106 N. Court St., Harrisville, WV 26362. 304-643-2217 or www.berdinesdimestore.com


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25


TOY STORY

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MARGO BARTLETT

These gems around Ohio take toy shoppers back in time

N

o one ever went into the vintage toy business out of dreary obligation.

In fact, many of the people we met during our look at vintage toy stores around Ohio started as hobbyists collecting the memories of their own childhoods. “A hobby turned into a business,” says Mike Patterson, owner of Mike’s Vintage Toys in Springboro, describing his career path Patterson’s small store at 50 Tahlequah Trail is packed with Batman, G.I. Joe, Star Wars, and Marvel Comics figures, as well as Transformers, Cabbage Patch dolls, board games, Ninja Turtles, Ghostbusters characters, and Pez dispensers by the tubful. Pez dispensers, it turns out, are a leitmotif running through vintage toy stores. They’re everywhere.

This toy amusement ride was $375 at the Maumee Antique Mall.

Patterson says his business was inspired by his own boyhood toys, but “as an owner, you realize you’ll buy anything you can sell.” Still, his customers tend to be action figure collectors, and they find a kindred spirit in Patterson. Customer Casey Bellman, who collects Star Wars and Marvel Legends pieces, confirmed that. Bellman is dedicated to completing collections that are accurate down to the tiny blaster. Should he learn a piece, or part of a piece, is a reproduction, “my goal is to instantly try to replace it,” Bellman says. “Mike does an excellent job of authenticating his stuff,” Bellman says. “He knows what’s real and what’s not.”

A ride-on horse with wheels was $395 at 580 Antiques in Columbus.

26

LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017 OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2017

We visited a neat little shop in West Carrollton, near Dayton, though it’s moving soon to make room for new development. As of early October, Toy FanAddict was still holding out at 1178 E. Dixie Dr., where it was floor-to-ceiling toys, action figures, and paraphernalia from play dates of yesteryear. Olivia Shirley, clerking there recently while owner Tony Bolling was away, took from a locked case a Star Wars comic book dated Feb. 8, 1978. The price then: 10 cents. The price now: $200.


A large — possibly life-sized — Yoda, armed with a long green lightsaber, was $500; a metal truck emblazoned with the words “Bank of America” was $175. But not all items were high-dollar. A Ninja Turtle on a skateboard was only $5, and other small trucks, horses, and board games were $10 to $30. An Annette Funicello doll, legs inexplicably wrapped in foam, had no price that employee Shirley could find. Perhaps her contributions as a 1950s Mouseketeer render her priceless. A small mountain of Pez dispensers was on hand, of course. Toy FanAddict plans to announce a new location on its Facebook page soon. Jason Williams’s business card identifies him as “chief engineer” at Big Fun, 672 N. High St. in Columbus’s Short North neighborhood (the original Big Fun is in Cleveland). Williams offered this rule of thumb: A toy expensive when new will be expensive when vintage. As an example, he cited Transformers. About $100 in the 1980s, an ’80s Transformer recently sold for $500. The buyer was lucky; Williams has sold Transformers for $650 each. G.I. Joes are popular, and lots of Legos are bought and sold, Williams says. We found Pez dispensers here too, some in a locked display case and others tumbled in a bin. Mark Nelson, who has a booth at Off Broadway Antiques, 3369 Indianola Ave., Columbus, says toy shoppers fall into one of two groups: serious collectors willing to pay for rare toys, and browsers, who “ooh and aah” but move on (probably speedily) when they see the price. For that reason, Nelson said, he’s been advertising a $228 Kingsbury ladder truck online, though he may bring it back to his booth if it doesn’t sell. Other Off Broadway vendors offer vintage toys, including a $35 Roy Rogers guitar, a tin trolley, and a Barbie doll dressed as Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O’Hara.

Olivia Shirley enjoys showing off the collectible figurines and other wares at Toy FanAddict in the Dayton area.

Debra’s Vintage Toys proprietor Debra Coleman maintains Booth 71 in the Maumee Antique Mall, 1552 S. Reynolds Road, Maumee. Her well-stocked booth recently included board games (Wild Bill Hickok, Happy Days, The Waltons), several Shirley Temple items, a doll wearing a Brownie uniform and beanie, and a James Dean doll. Coleman says her toys can’t be categorized. “Mostly people seek me out,” she says, and her offerings are as varied as her customers. Elsewhere in the mall — a former grocery store — a vintage toy shopper can find books and comics, including Hopalong Cassidy’s “My Horse Topper” and the comic book Girls’ Love Stories. Also on hand recently: a toy amusement ride for $375; $48 Popeye toothbrushes; and a Bart Simpson alarm clock that announces: “Time to go, man!”

Eileen Piurowski owns both Off Broadway Antiques and another antique mall east of Indianola Avenue, 580 Antiques, 580 Oakland Park Ave. “I don’t get huge waves of toys,” Piurowski says. “People kind of hold on to them.” At the Oakland Park mall, an $85 Keystone Ride ’Em Power Shovel and a riding pedal horse with wheeled hooves ($395) awaited new homes. So did a large round-headed doll perched on a couch. “We call her ‘creepy doll,’” Piurowski says. The doll, which had a smile and a $150 price tag, wasn’t all that creepy, but she did resemble — just a bit — Big Baby of Toy Story 3.

2017  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING LIVING

27 27


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BY DAMAINE VONADA

2017 Holiday

You won’t need to go dashing through the snow to do your Christmas shopping.

Abundance Soaps • Liberty Center

Bre¯ zel • Columbus and Cincinnati

Black Radish Creamery’s Fruit Preserves and Cheeses • Granville and Columbus

Gina DeSantis Ceramics Classes and Workshops • Lakewood

Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative member Karin McGilvery handmakes 50 different bar and liquid soaps using foodgrade oils and organic herbs that she grows on her micro farm. Although Lavender Bud is her best seller, McGilvery’s Peppermint Stick, Eggnog, and Sugar Cookies soaps are perfect stocking stuffers. 419-345-0537; www.abundancesoaps.com.

Owners John and Anne Reese, members of The Energy Cooperative, use original recipes to create exquisite preserves and artisanal cheeses at Black Radish’s commercial kitchen in Granville. They have a shop inside Columbus’s North Market, where favorites include cheese curds and Billionaire preserves made with Ohio strawberries and rhubarb. info@blackradishcreamery.com; www.blackradishcreamery.com.

30

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

Brittany and Timothy Baum produce pretzels with a twist — Bavarian-style snacks that are hand-rolled, preservative-free, and made fresh daily at their Brēzel shops in Columbus’s North Market and Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. Choose from 50 varieties, including Jalapeño Cheddar or Cranberry Spice. 614586-0523; 513-407-7916; www.brezelpower.com.

Along with producing artfully designed tableware and decorative items, DeSantis conducts pottery classes and workshops at her Cleveland-area studio. Hands-on options range from parent-child wheel throwing to clay date nights, and gift cards are available. 440-785-5409; www. ginadesantisceramics.com.


Gift Guide

We’ve searched the state for unique Ohio gifts to please everyone on your list.

H. Gerstner & Sons Wood Chests and Cases • Dayton

Harry Gerstner started making heirloom-worthy tool chests in 1906. Four generations later, his descendants specialize not only in hardwood chests but also in cabinets, attaché cases, and jewelry chests. With hand-rubbed finishes and tongue-andgroove joinery, Gerstner products are unsurpassed for quality and craftsmanship. 937-228-1662; www.gerstnerusa.com.

Honeyrun Farm Candles • Williamsport

Beekeepers and South Central Power Company members Jayne and Isaac Barnes produce and sell honey, soaps, and candles at their Pickaway County farm. Made of beeswax with cotton wicks, their molded floating star candles and pretty pine cone and pine tree-shaped candles burn naturally merry and bright. 330-763-4752; www.honeyrunfarm.com.

Maverick Chocolate Company • Cincinnati

From organic cocoa beans to whimsically wrapped bars, Paul and Marlene Picton handcraft luscious chocolates at their Findlay Market shop. Mix naughty and nice with Maverick’s Gingerbread White Chocolate bars and bourbon-infused Prohibition Dark Milk Chocolate bars. 513-381-0561; www. maverickchocolate.com.

Quailcrest Farm’s Holiday offerings • Wooster

Serviced by the Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, Quailcrest is a “magical place in the country” where members of the Bruch family delight customers with their farm’s gorgeous gardens and exceptional selection of plants. Quailcrest offers gift certificates that cover anything in the greenhouse; seasonal wreath and centerpiece workshops; or Christmas lunches of homemade soup and herbed bread. 330-345-6722; www.quailcrest.com.

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER2017 • OHIO 2017 •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

31


Rue Farms Rustic Potato Chips • Springfield

T. Michael Studios Serveware • Canal Winchester

Silver Bridge Coffee Company • Gallipolis

The Bom Chocolates • Cleveland

Rue Farms owners Jeanne and Matt Rue use only local, non-GMO russet potatoes for their kettle-cooked potato chips. The delicious result is golden brown chips that are more crunchy than crispy and come in palate-pleasing flavors like Dill Herb, Back Woods BBQ, and Apple Cider Vinegar. 937-717-6707; www.ruefarms.com.

Her company’s name may give a nod to a historic local bridge, but Lorraine Walker brings coffee beans from around the world to her Gallipolis roasting facility. Smooth-tasting Buckeye Breakfast Buzz, Pumpkin Spice Blend, or Snow Angel, a Yuletide offering with hints of coconut, caramel, hazelnut, and vanilla, fit nicely in any coffee-lover’s stocking. 740-709-1610; www.silverbridgecoffee.com.

32

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

Timothy Michael Kelly transforms slate reclaimed from barns and historic building into rustically beautiful trays and hot plates for serving bread, displaying fruit, holding hot casseroles, and protecting surfaces. Bonus: Kelly engraves each piece with the date of the structure where the slate was originally used. 614-887-7107; www.tmichaelstudio.com.

Owner Carolina Martin crafts hand-dipped chocolate truffles using liquors (for adults) and fruit juices (for kids). The Bom’s Peppermint Schnapps truffles fly off the shelves at Christmas, and Martin’s truffle-making parties make for fun —­and effortless — holiday get-togethers. Just bring friends and your favorite spirit. 216-941-7643; www.thebom.us.


Twins Feather Trees • Cincinnati

The Jones Market’s Baby-Friendly Jewelry • Westerville

Twin sisters Karen Shields and Sharen Bauer pay homage to their German heritage with simple, elegant feather trees that are ideal displays for treasured Christmas ornaments. Made of dyed goose feathers or cotton batting, the handcrafted trees range from 18 inches to 7 feet tall, and pre-lighted styles are available. 513-681-9357; www.twinsfeathertree.com.

Candis Jones makes baby-safe necklaces and bracelets from soft jersey and wooden beads. Non-toxic and leadfree, her jewelry is comfy, lightweight, and lovely enough to wear long after the teething-and-tugging stage is over. info@thejonesmarket.com; www.thejonesmarket.com.

University of Dayton’s Erma Bombeck Items • Dayton

Witty words from America’s funniest mom and famous UD alumna Erma Bombeck emblazon coffee mugs and other items at the campus bookstore. Designed in cooperation with UD’s Erma Bombeck Writers’ Workshop, the bookstore’s exclusive Erma Bombeck line is chockfull of easy gifts such as coffee cups, wineglasses, and notecards. 937-229-3233; www.udayton.edu/bookstore.

Apparel from The Yarn Barn  • Somerville

Owners Robbie and Carrie Davis, members of Butler Rural Electric Cooperative, operate an alpaca ranch that includes a fiber mill and farm store featuring premium yarns and clothing designed, knit, crocheted, or woven in-house. Customers love the fingerless mittens, cozy hats, scarves, and socks. 937-705-0068; www.ilovetheyarnbarn.com.

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER2017 • OHIO 2017 •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

33


Dryer Balls from Valhalla Acres Fiber Farm • Hopewell

Colorful dryer balls that Jane Evans makes with wool from her own sheep are a sure way to brighten laundry day. The hand-dyed balls reduce static, shorten drying time, and can be used again and again. Incidentally, Evans’s felted balls with jingle bells inside are great cat toys. 740-221-2588; www.valhallaacres.com.

Wishwell Farms Relishes • Bellefontaine

Logan County Electric Cooperative members Jason Wish and Joel Wish concoct hot and sweet relishes from vegetables grown on their family farm. While excellent on burgers and franks, the versatile relishes are a great addition to ham, egg, or tuna salads, and they make a quick, tasty dip when combined with cream cheese. 937-592-2173; www.wishwellfarms.com.

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NOVEMBER 2017 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST

NOV. 10–11 – Buckeye Farm Antiques Annual Swap Meet, Shelby Co. Fgds., 655 S. Highland Ave., Sidney, Fri. 8 a.m. till dark, Sat. 8 a.m.–5 p.m. $2 per day. Consignment auction Sat. 9 a.m. Tractor parts and related items, crafts, and antiques. 419302-6017, 937-726-2485, or www.buckeyefarmantiques.com.

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operating model trains, and see Santa and Mrs. Claus (on select days). 419-423-2995 or http://nworrp.org. NOV. 24–DEC. 31 – Firelands Festival of Lights, Sawmill Creek Resort, 400 Sawmill Creek Dr. (off U.S. 6), Huron, 5–10 p.m. Free drive-through light display. 800-729-6455, 419-433-3800 (ext. 784), or www.facebook.com/FirelandsFestivalOfLights.

NOV. 11 – Blade Holiday Parade, Summit and Jefferson Sts., downtown Toledo, 10 a.m.–12 p.m., staging at 8 a.m. One of the largest and best holiday parades in the Midwest. 419-724-6394, NOV. 24–JAN. 7 – Hayes Train Special Exhibit, Hayes Museum, Spiegel Grove, Fremont, Mon.–Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 12–5 mpeddicord@toledoblade.com, or www.dotoledo.org/Events/. p.m. $7.50, Srs. $6.50, C. (6–12) $3. This operating model NOV. 11 – Veterans Remembered, Fulton County Museum, 229 train display runs through an intricate Victorian holiday scene. Monroe St., Wauseon, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Free to all who serve or Interactive buttons allow visitors to control aspects of the trains’ have served. 419-337-7922 or www.fultoncountyoh.com. movements. 419-332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org.

NOV. 4–5 – Homespun Holiday Art and Craft Show, Stranahan Great Hall, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission and parking. Jump-start your holiday shopping! Also collecting household and food items to benefit Cherry Street Mission Ministries. www.toledocraftsmansguild or 419-842-1925.

NOV. 17–DEC. 31 – Lights Before Christmas, Toledo Zoo, 2 Hippo Way, Toledo, Sun.–Thur. 3–8 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 3–9 p.m. $14–$17, under 2 free. 419-385-5721 or www.toledozoo.org. NOV. 18–FEB. 2018 – “Glorious Splendor: Treasures of Early Christian Art,” Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Exhibit features some 30 masterpieces of Late Roman art: precious stones, metals, and jewelry. 419-255-8000 or www. toledomuseum.org/exhibitions.

NOV. 25 – Wauseon Christmas Parade, downtown Wauseon, 7 p.m. A beautifully lighted Christmas parade with floats, bands, and horses. Meet Santa and Mrs. Claus after the parade at the Wauseon Depot. 419-335-1735.

NOV. 7–9, 11 – “Angels in the Attic” Crafts Show, Ross Historical Ctr., 201 N. Main Ave., Sidney, Tues.–Thur. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. $2. A one-of-a-kind show set in a beautiful Victorian mansion that is now the home of the Shelby County Historical Society. Handmade crafts of all kinds by local artists. Reasonable prices, complimentary refreshments, door prizes. 937-498-1653 (Historical Ctr.) or 937-658-1819 (Darla Cabe).

NOV. 25–26 – Crafts for Christmas, Lucas Co. Recreation Ctr. (LineDrive Sportz), 2901 Key St., Maumee, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Our winter spectacular! A showplace of fine handmade juried crafts, gifts, and holiday decorations that will make your season bright. Also collecting donations for Toys for NOV. 19 – Farm Toy Show, Champaign Co. Fgds., 384 Park Ave., Tots. www.toledocraftsmansguild.org or 419-842-1925. Urbana, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. 937-826-4201. NOV. 25, DEC. 2, 8, 9 – Holiday Lantern Tours: “A 1920s ChristNOV. 24–DEC. 30 – North Pole Express, 12505 Co. Rd. 99, mas,” Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 4–8:30 p.m. Findlay, Fri. and Sat. 5–9 p.m., Sun. 5–8 p.m. $3, C. $2. Closed Reservations required. Experience American Christmas traditions Christmas Eve, open Christmas Day. Take a ride on a quarof the 1920s. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org. ter-scale locomotive through our festive decorated property, see

NORTHEAST

after the show. 440-248-3055 (Sam), jld464@yahoo.com, or www.cleveshows.com.

home décor fill the museum with an unrivaled holiday spectacle. 330-343-7513 or http://thewarthermuseum.com.

NOV. 9–11 – ’Tis the Season Christmas Open House, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Millersburg, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. 330-893-3604 or http:// tistheseasonchristmas.com.

NOV. 12 – Fort Laurens Veterans Day Ceremony, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, 1–4 p.m. Free. Wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Patriot includes honor and color guard, keynote speaker, and lunch provided by Friends of Fort Laurens. 330-874-2059 or www.fortlaurens.org.

NOV. 9–DEC. 16 – Our Christmas Dinner, Ohio Star Theater, Dutch Valley, 1387 Old Rte. 39, Sugarcreek, Wed./Fri. 7 p.m., Thur./Sat. 1 p.m. 855-344-7547 or www.dhgroup.com/theater.

NOV. 1–4 – The Confession Musical, Ohio Star Theater, Dutch Valley, 1387 Old Rte. 39, Sugarcreek, Wed./Fri. 7 p.m., Thur./ Sat. 1 p.m. 855-344-7547 or www.dhgroup.com/theater. NOV. 4 – Buckeye Book Fair, Fisher Auditorium, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. $2. Meet nearly 100 Ohio writers, illustrators, and photographers. Literary activities and events for the whole family. 330-262-2103, buckeyebookfair@ gmail.com, or www.buckeyebookfair.com. NOV. 4 – Building a Model Railroad, Lakeland Community College, Athletic and Fitness Center (AFC) Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Free. Learn the basics of layout framing, laying track, wiring of layout, transformer wiring, and scenery. 440-256-8141 (Bob), promoday@mcr5. org, or www.mcr5.org. NOV. 4 – Canton Fall Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, St. George Serbian Ctr., 4667 Applegrove St. NW, North Canton, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. This large show will feature artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. www. avantgardeshows.com/events. NOV. 4 – 2-Rail “O” Scale Train Meet, Lakeland Community College, AFC Auxiliary Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. $7, under 13 free, active military w/ID free. Come see the high end of “O”-gauge model railroading, with over 150 tables to view. Door prizes. Layout tours by reservation

CENTRAL

NOV. 10–12 – Christkindl Market, Canton Museum of Art, 1001 Market Ave. N., Canton, Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $7, under 13 free. Northeast Ohio’s premier juried, holiday-inspired fine arts and crafts show. 330-453-7666 or www.cantonart.org/christkindl. NOV. 11 – “Christmas by the River” Craft Show, Black River Education Ctr., 257 Co. Rd. 40, Sullivan. jmaslanka@blackriver.k12oh.us. NOV. 11 – Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens Free Tour, 714 N. Portage Path, Akron, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Complimentary self-guided tour of the estate for all veterans and active military. All other days, members of military receive 50% off regular daytime tour with military ID. 330-315-3294, dspiegler@stanhywet.org, or www.stanhywet.org. NOV. 11 – Strongsville Fall Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Ehrnfelt Recreation Ctr., 18100 Royalton Rd., Strongsville, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. This large show will feature artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. www. avantgardeshows.com/events. NOV. 11–12 – Olde Stark Antique Faire, Stark Co. Fgds., Exhibition Bldg., 305 Wertz Ave., Canton, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Early-bird admission Sat. 7 a.m., $7. A large indoor exhibition of quality antiques and collectibles from over 100 dealers and collectors. 330-7949100 or oldestark@neo.rr.com. NOV. 11–19 – Warther’s Christmas Tree Festival, Warther Museum, 331 Karl Ave., Dover, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; 19th only, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $5. Over 100 predecorated trees, wreaths, and

NOV. 1–AUG. 2018 – “A Very Private Collection,” Ohio Glass Museum, 124 W. Main St., Lancaster, Tues.–Sat. 1–4 p.m. Exhibit features a wide variety of vintage glass items from 1875 to 1920 from an anonymous private collection. Glassblowing studio always open during museum hours. 740-687-0101 or https://ohioglassmuseum.org. NOV. 3–5 – The Drowsy Chaperone, Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $16. A loving musical send-up of the Jazz Age, masterfully poking fun at all the clichés that surround the musical theatre genre. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. NOV. 3–19 – Seussical the Musical, Wagnalls Community Theater, 150 E. Columbus St., Lithopolis, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. $10–$15. A family-friendly musical adaptation of Dr. Seuss tales. www.wagnalls.org. NOV. 4 – Dinner with the Presidents, Harding High School, 1500 Harding Hwy. E., 5:30–8:30 p.m. $26 single, $47 cou-

38

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

NOV. 17–18 – Season’s Splendor Arts and Crafts Show, Fisher Auditorium, Shisler Conference Ctr., 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission and parking. Lunch available. 130 booths showcasing handcrafted merchandise, including floral designs, Santas and seasonal décor, jewelry, wooden and fabric items, glass block and wine bottle lights, candies, stained glass, handwoven baskets and rugs, candles, and soaps. 330-682-2926. NOV. 18–19 – Rocky River Fall Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Memorial Hall (next to the Rec. Ctr.), 21016 Hilliard Blvd., Rocky River, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. This large show will feature artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand. www.avantgardeshows.com/events. NOV. 21–JAN. 7, 2018 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Free. See the world’s largest collection of life-size nutcrackers on display at Fort Steuben Park. 866-301-1787 or www.steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. NOV. 25 – Thanksgiving Train Show, Train Collectors Association–Lake Erie Chapter, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, under 12 free. New and old trains to buy, sell, or trade. All-gauge show including O, S, HO, N, Z, and large scale. 440-845-2700 (David) or tcalakeerie@earthlink.net. NOV. 25, DEC. 2 – Christmas in the Alpaca Barn, 16800 Cowley Rd., Grafton, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 440-477-4300 or www. ourlittleworldalpacas.com. NOV. 25–DEC. 30 – International Tree and Model Train Display, Black River Transportation Ctr., 421 Black River Lane, Lorain, Fri./Sat. 5–9 p.m., Sun. 3–7 p.m. Free. http://lorainwinterfest.com. ple. Step back in time as you dine with different presidents from U.S. history. 740-387-4255 or www.marionhistory.com. NOV. 9 – “The Original Flim-Flam Man: How Gaston Means Fooled the Nation,” lecture by Jon Anderson, Marion Public Library, Marion, 6:30 p.m. $5 for non-members. Learn about con man Gaston Means, the author of a 1930 book that extensively damaged the reputations of President and Mrs. Harding. 800-600-6894 or www.hardinghome.org. NOV. 11 – Christmas at the Cabin, 1482 Glass Rock Rd., Glenford, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Choose from unique hand-crafted gifts, decorations, and specialty items made by local artists. www.facebook.com/christmasatthecabin/. NOV. 11 – Veterans March and Ceremony, Stradley Park, 36 S. High St., Canal Winchester, 10 a.m. The march begins at Frances Steube Community Ctr., 22 S. Trine St., and ends at Stradley Park for the ceremony. 614-837-8276 or www. canalwinchesterohio.gov.


NOV. 18 – Annual America Recycles Day Eco Art Show, May Pavilion, Palace Theatre, 276 West Center St., Marion, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Shop green for unique holiday gifts. Choose from fine art and hand-crafted gifts made from recycled material. 740-223-4120 or www.wastenotmarion.com.

NOV. 23–DEC. 25 – Christmas by Candlelight, Marion Co. Fgds., 220 E. Fairground St., Marion, Thur.–Sun. 6–10 p.m. Open every night the week of Christmas. $6 per car. Marion’s only drive-through holiday light display featuring animated characters. Live Nativity on Sat. and Sun. nights. 740-3822558 or www.marioncountyfairgrounds.com.

NOV. 18 – Lancaster and Fairfield County Holiday Parade: “A Season of Giving,” Fairfield Co. Fgds., 159 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 10 a.m. 740-653-9189 or lancasterholidayparade@ gmail.com. NOV. 19 – Fall Harvest Festival of Bands, Makoy Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard, 1–6:30 p.m. $10–$20. Sponsored by the Central Ohio Hot Jazz Society. 614-794-1977 or www.cohjs.org.

SOUTHEAST

NOV. 1–JAN. 1, 2018 – Dickens Victorian Village, downtown Cambridge. Stroll the streets to view scenes depicting life in 1850s England, featuring life-sized, handmade mannequins wearing real vintage clothing. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. NOV. 1–JAN. 1, 2018 – Guernsey County Courthouse Holiday Light Show, Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. nightly. Four different light and music shows performed each evening. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com.

SOUTHWEST

NOV. 25–26 – United Ford Owners Super Swap, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $8. Ford and Mercury new and used parts. Car corral. 614-276-4916.

NOV. 10–11 – Southern Ohio Indoor Music Festival, Roberts Convention Centre, 123 Gano St., Wilmington, noon–11 p.m., doors open at 10 a.m. One of the Midwest’s premier bluegrass events. 937-372-5804 or www.somusicfest.com.

WEST VIRGINIA

NOV. 17–19 – Jingle Bell Weekend, 126 W. Second St., Waverly. Luminary Christmas parade, quilt show, holiday craft show, beef and noodle dinners, and much more. 740-947-9650 or www.piketravel.com/JingleBell.

NOV. 4 – Miller’s Automotive Swap Meet and Cruise-In, Ross Co. Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $7, free for women and for kids under 14. 740-701-2511, 740-7013447, or on Facebook.

NOV. 18 – Gingerbread House Workshop, The Castle, 418 Fourth St., Marietta, 10 a.m.–12 p.m. $25 per kit, $5 helper fee. Reservations required by Nov. 4. 740-373-4180 or http:// mariettacastle.org.

NOV. 4 – “Welcome to the Holidays” Craft Show, Sardis Community Ctr., 37184 Mound St., Sardis, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Start your Christmas shopping early! Find unique gifts or treat yourself to something special. www.facebook.com/sardisohcc/.

NOV. 22 – “Gallipolis in Lights” Park Lighting Ceremony, Gallipolis City Park, 300 block of Second Ave., Gallipolis. Pre-lighting activities begin at 5:30 p.m., including refreshments and music by local artists. Lighting at 7:00 p.m. 740-446-6882.

NOV. 8–DEC. 8 – Gingerbread House Contest and Display, Guernsey County Senior Citizens Ctr., Cambridge, Mon.–Fri. 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Free admission. 740-439-6681.

NOV. 25 – Holiday Open House, National Museum of Cambridge Glass, Cambridge, 12–4 p.m. Free admission. 740-4324245 or www.cambridgeglass.org.

NOV. 11 – Veterans Day BBQ Dinner, hosted by Joseph Freeman American Legion Post 476, 26100 Legion Rd., Langsville, 5–7 p.m. Free for veterans with military ID or VA/Legion/ AMVETS/VFW card.

NOV. 25 – Holiday Parade, Wheeling Ave., downtown Cambridge, begins at 5 p.m. 740-439-2238 or www.downtowncambridge.com.

NOV. 11 – Veterans Day Parade, Cambridge, 10 a.m. Includes a performance by the Cambridge City Band. 740-439-9180.

NOV. 10–11 – Springfield Swap Meet and Car Show, Clark Co. Fgds., Springfield, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. $8. Please note the change to Friday and Saturday this year. 937-376-0111, info@ohioswapmeet.com, or www.ohioswapmeet.com.

NOV. 11 – Holiday Horse Parade, downtown Piqua. Free. Imagine horse-drawn carriages, hitches and riders, all outfitted with holiday lights, making their way down Main Street. Christmas banners and decorated street trees will create an amazing backdrop for this dazzlingly fun family-friendly event. 937-773-9355 or www.mainstreetpiqua.com. NOV. 11 – Veterans Day Ceremony, Adams County Court House, 110 W. Main St., West Union, 11 a.m. 937-386-0293. NOV. 11–12 – A Winter’s Yuletide Gathering, downtown Tipp City. A holiday shopping paradise! Shopkeepers warmly invite you to their open house. Don’t miss the visit by Santa, strolling carolers, musicians, and carriage rides. 937-6670883 or www.downtowntippcity.org.

NOV. 17–DEC. 31 – Christmas Fantasy Light Show, Krodel Park, Point Pleasant. 304-675-3844.

NOV. 26 – Holiday Historic Homes Tour, Fairmont, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $16 in advance, $18 day of tour. See 8 to 12 historic homes that are open to the public for this one day a year. 304-367-5398 or www.marionhistorical.org/pages/ events.php.

NOV. 27 – Christmas Open House, John and Annie Glenn Historic Site, New Concord, 5:30–8 p.m. 740-826-3305 or www. johnglennhome.org.

NOV. 18–20 – Christkindlmarkt, Germania Park, 3529 West Kemper Rd., Cincinnati, Fri. 5–10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $3, under 13 free. The oldest and most authentic German Christmas Market in the Cincinnati region. http://germaniasociety.com/christkindlmarkt. NOV. 24 – Hometown Holiday Celebration, downtown Troy, begins at 6:30 p.m. Free. Parade, Grand Illumination, phone calls to the North Pole, visits with Santa, carriage rides, holiday music, refreshments, shopping, and Mayor Beamish’s special holiday reading. 937-339-5455 or www.troymainstreet.org. NOV. 25 – Hometown HoliDazzle Illuminated Parade and Festival, Main St., Wilmington, 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Parade at 7 p.m. 937-302-1528 or www.hometownholidazzle.com. NOV. 25–26 – Old-Fashioned Christmas in the Country, 4872 Cincinnati Brookville Rd., Shandon. Free. Bring the whole family for this Christmas celebration in Ohio’s first Welsh settlement, offering horse-drawn carriage rides, homemade food, signature Welsh cakes, live Welsh harp music, and more. 513-738-4180.

NOV. 18 – Hometown Holiday Horse Parade, S. Broadway, Greenville, 7 p.m. Lighted parade boasts more than 90 entries, including horse-drawn carriages, wagons, riders, and buggies. 937-548-4998 or www.downtowngreenville.org.

NOV. 18–DEC. 31 – Holiday in the Park, City Park and Southwood Park, Parkersburg, 6–9 p.m. A holiday light drivethrough display. 304-480-2655.

NOV. 29–JAN. 1 – “A Storybook Christmas,” Zanesville and Muskingum Co. locations. Visit over 100 unique stores and attractions, and explore the beautifully decorated streets and parks. Stop by to enjoy the nightly “Light & Music Show” at the Muskingum Co. Courthouse, Sun.–Thur. 6–9 p.m., Fri./Sat. 6–10 p.m. 740-455-8282, 800-743-2303, or www. visitzanesville.com.

NOV. 1–30 – Dally Memorial Library Escape Room, 37252 Mound St., Sardis. $15 per person. Find the clues and solve the puzzles in this fun, exciting escape adventure! Call for reservations. 740-483-1288.

NOV. 11 – “Christmas in the Country” Craft Show, Clinton-Massie Middle School, 2556 Lebanon Rd., Clarksville, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $1 admission, or donation of a non-perishable food item. Over 100 vendors, artisans, and crafters. 513-897-1946.

NOV. 4–5 – Dayton Train Show, JC Penney, Upper Valley Mall, 1475 Upper Valley Pike, Springfield, Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11–4 p.m. Sponsored by “Miami Valley” Division 3, MCR, of the National Model Railroad Association. New and pre-owned locomotives, rolling stock, and structures in scales G, O, S, HO, N, and Z. Over 30 model railroad displays/ exhibits, operating in G, O, S, HO, HOn3, N, and Z. www. daytontrainshow.com.

NOV. 25–26 – Scott Antique Market, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission, $5 parking. 800–1,200 exhibit booths. www. scottantiquemarket.com.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.

NOVEMBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

I am thankful for these adorable little wranglers — ­ my grandkids, Steele, Danielle, and Diesel. Look at all that love! Debbie Vogt Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member

I am thankful for cardinals to remind us of loved ones no longer with us. Tonya Bess South Central Power Company member

I am thankful for the splendor of the fall. Lindsay Eilerman Pioneer Electric Cooperative member

Send us your pictures! Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive. For February 2018, send “Lovebirds of all kinds” by Nov. 15; for March, send “Baby Faces” by Dec. 15. Make sure to give us your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, and an explanation of the photo, including the names of people shown. 40

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2017

Talk to us

Connect with your local cooperative on social media, and let us know your favorite romantic meal. We’ll print some of the best responses in a future edition of Ohio Cooperative Living!


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MUST MENTION OFFER CODE AT TIME OF ORDER: GIFT50 Courtesy of InfinityDISH with activation, certain conditions apply.

WE ARE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK; 8 AM – MIDNIGHT EST, SUNDAY 9 AM – MIDNIGHT EST. OFFER ONLY GOOD FOR NEW DISH SUBSCRIBERS. • SE HABLA ESPAÑOL All calls with InfinityDISH are monitored and recorded for quality assurance and training purposes. Offer for new and qualifying former customers only. Important Terms and Conditions: Qualification: Advertised price requires credit qualification and eAutoPay. Upfront activation and/or receiver upgrade fees may apply based on credit qualification. Offer ends 01/16/18. 2-Year Commitment: Early termination fee of $20/mo. remaining applies if you cancel early. Included in 2-year price guarantee at $49.99 advertised price: America’s Top 120 programming package, Local channels HD service fees, and equipment for 1 TV. Included in 2-year price guarantee for additional cost: Programming package upgrades ($59.99 for AT120+, $69.99 for AT200, $79.99 for AT250), monthly fees for additional receivers ($5-$7 per additional TV, receivers with additional functionality may be $10-$15) and monthly DVR fees ($10-$15). NOT included in 2-year price guarantee or advertised price (and subject to change): Taxes & surcharges, add-on programming (including premium channels), DISH Protect, and transactional fees. Premium Channels: 3 Mos. Free: After 3 mos., you will be billed $55/mo. for HBO, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and DISH Movie Pack unless you call to cancel. Other: All packages, programming, features, and functionality and all prices and fees not included in price lock are subject to change without notice. After 6 mos., you will be billed $8.99/mo. for DISH Protect unless you call to cancel. After 2 years, then-current everyday prices for all services apply. For business customers, additional monthly fees may apply. Free standard professional installation only. All rights reserved. HBO®, Cinemax® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. Internet: Internet speeds, prices, and providers vary by customer address. Call for details. Visa® gift card must be requested through your DISH Representative at time of purchase. $50 Visa® gift card requires activation. You will receive a claim voucher within 3-4 weeks and the voucher must be returned within 60 days. Your Visa® gift card will arrive in approximately 6-8 weeks. InfinityDISH charges a one-time $49.99 non-refundable processing fee which is subject to change at any time without notice. Indiana C.P.D. Reg. No. T.S. R1903.

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9/18/17 10:25 AM 10/16/17 3:18 PM

Ohio Cooperative Living - November 2017 - Firelands  
Ohio Cooperative Living - November 2017 - Firelands