Page 1

Firelands Electric Cooperative

Official publication | www.firelandsec.com

JANUARY MARCH 2018

gardening issue

Special

Improve the look, health, and productivity of YOUR garden!

Also inside Buzzards, bears, and big bad wolves

Ohio’s Blarney fascination

Member Interactive: Baby faces


THE SIMPLE CHOICE FOR ENERGY SAVINGS Replacing a major appliance? Purchasing ENERGY STAR-certified appliances is a great way to save energy. As an electric cooperative member, you have access to free information on how to save energy and money. Contact your co-op and learn about the latest technologies to keep your home running efficiently.

ohioec.org

EnergyStarAppliance.indd 1

6/12/17 10:34 AM


INSIDE

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

SPECIAL ISSUE:

GARDENING 24

BETTER YIELDS

Looking for a productive — and tasty — kitchen garden? Here are a few tips to power up your planting and maximize your yields.

26

ULTIMATE RECYCLING

Don’t toss out those kitchen scraps — instead, turn them into a rich addition to your garden soil through composting.

28

FASCINATING SHAPES

Everyone knows to use different colors and textures to add variety to a flower garden. Here’s a few suggestions to add unique shapes to the mix as well.

FEATURES 34

OHIO BLARNEY

The Buckeye State is doused in Irish influence, and nowhere is that more evident than in the numerous places and events named after the Blarney Castle.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

1


UP FRONT

C

Back to Guatemala Electric cooperatives were founded in the spirit of neighbor helping neighbor. Co-ops brought light to rural America, and that partnership lit the way for us to carry the tradition beyond our borders. In 2016, linemen from across Ohio’s electric cooperative network mirrored that effort for our international neighbors in Guatemala. We brought power to the village of La Soledad, changing lives, providing hope for the future — and providing perspective on the impact we can have on underserved people still today.  This month, we’re going back; the people of Las Tortugas in Guatemala’s rainforest region need our help. Guatemala remains one of the poorest countries in Latin America. More than 75 percent of Guatemalans live below the poverty line. In rural areas, it’s worse. Rural residents make up two-thirds of Guatemala’s population, yet they only comprise one-third of the country’s income and consumption. Little things can mean a lot to people living in such conditions. We sent a small team to Las Tortugas in September 2017 for preliminary engineering and field planning with the region’s electric utility company. Early this month, 17 volunteers, primarily linemen, from cooperatives around Ohio are heading that way to bring electric service to the nearly 600 people who currently live in startlingly primitive conditions. Without electric service, so much of what we take for granted — refrigeration, sanitation, running water, lighting, motorized equipment — is nearly impossible. With help from students at a local trade school and many of the village’s residents, our volunteers will work long, hard days, in hot and humid conditions, connecting more than 100 homes to the modern world. It’s going to be a long and difficult trip for those who have volunteered to leave their homes and families for the duration of the mission. The work will be performed the old-fashioned way — without the benefit of lift trucks and other modern equipment. All the poles will be climbed, all holes will be hand-dug, and all transformers will be manually raised. We have already seen — both here in the 1930s and on our first trip to Guatemala in 2016 — that the time, the work, and the expense that these efforts require are all well spent on a brighter future. Please keep our men in your prayers as they spread the good fortune of our circumstances and goodwill of our people to those much less fortunate.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

Pat O’Loughlin

President & CEO Ohio's Electric Cooperatives

We brought power to the village of La Soledad, changing lives, providing hope for the future — and providing perspective on the impact we can have on underserved people.


March 2018 • Volume 60, No. 6

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Samantha Kuhn Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Pat Keegan, Pamela A. Keene, Toni Leland, Catherine Murray, Paul Wesslund, Kris Wetherbee, and Rick Wetherbee. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. With a paid circulation of 294,359, it is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES

A LOOK AT RENEWABLES: Renewable energy sources are

becoming more popular with the public, but most are not yet ready to carry the electric load.

6 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE BUZZARDS, BEARS, AND BIG BAD WOLVES: A look at the Great

Hinckley Hunt of 1818.

10 CO-OP PEOPLE BACKYARD CONSERVATIONIST: One Firelands Electric Cooperative member has created a diverse nature preserve in the middle of farm country.

15 GOOD EATS SPRINGTIME SAMPLER: Put the early-season harvest from your

garden to use in these tempting dishes.

23 CO-OP OHIO O’LOUGHLIN HONORED: The CEO of Ohio’s statewide electric

cooperative service organization has earned a prestigious communications award.

38 CALENDAR The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215, or call 1-800-282-0515. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes.

WHAT’S HAPPENING: March events and other things to do.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE BABY FACES: Readers share a peck of priceless pictures of the

next generation.

IN THIS ISSUE

Hinckley (p.6) New London (p.10) Columbus (p.23) Delaware (p.23) Van Wert (p.23) Cleveland (p.37) Toledo (p.37) Worthington (p.37)

Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer. MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

3


POWER LINES

BY PAUL WESSLUND

RENEWABLE ENERGY

Here are the basics of a small but important source of your electricity

Electric cooperatives work hard to ensure their members have access to the cleanest, safest, most affordable and reliable power possible. They keep up with both technology and trends to maintain that balance through sunny, hot summers; gray, bone-chilling winters; and everything in between. These days, renewable sources such as solar energy and wind power are growing in popularity,

4

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

though they still make up a pretty small portion of the energy sources that generate the electricity we use every day — about 6 percent of the energy consumed by Ohio electric cooperative members — because they still provide neither the affordability nor the reliability to balance the other demands. Here’s a crash course in how wind, the sun, and water generate electricity.


DID YOU KNOW? Approximately 15 percent of the nation’s electricity is generated from renewable energy sources, like hydro, wind and solar power. That percentage may seem low, but renewable energy generation is gaining momentum.

6.5%

generated by hydropower.

5.6%

0.9%

generated by wind.

generated by solar.

*Additional sources, like geothermal and biomass, contribute to the 15 percent of renewable energy generation.

Source: Energy Information Administration

Solar energy

Wind power

Solar energy generates only about 1 percent of the nation’s electricity, though that’s a significant increase from just five years ago, when the number was too small even to report for the U.S. Department of Energy. Solar growth is expected to continue as long as costs fall, technology improves, and people figure out better ways to use solar energy.

Use of wind power has increased significantly as costs have decreased. Wind power generates nearly 6 percent of the nation’s electricity. Ohio cooperative members get as much as 30 megawatts of power from the Story County Wind Energy Center in Iowa — of course, that depends on how windy the weather is at a given time.

In photovoltaic generation, when certain materials get hit by sunlight, their atoms spit out electrons — and electricity is simply a stream of electrons. Wafers of these materials, called photovoltaic cells, are combined and integrated into solar photovoltaic modules to harness the energy in that stream.

In a way, wind generates electricity the same way as traditional sources such as coal (which is the source of about 93 percent of power used by Ohio co-op members): by spinning a turbine that creates an electricity-producing magnetic field. The difference is that wind turbines are turned by enormous propeller-like blades designed to catch gusts of moving air. Obviously, they require wind to generate power, and so can’t be counted upon from one day to the next.

Solar power is produced in different levels: Utility scale refers to large banks of solar panels owned and operated by an electric utility or other large organization, producing many megawatts of solar energy. Industrial solar installations can range from several kilowatts up to multi-megawatts, and can be placed on office rooftops, over parking lots, or on land near industrial and commercial enterprises. Residential solar installations are installed primarily on individual rooftops to power individual homes. Community solar allows groups of neighbors to take advantage of a larger scale they wouldn’t otherwise be able to access. Community solar, which is offered by many of Ohio’s electric cooperatives, can ease the higher expense of self-owned rooftop solar. The co-op builds a large solar installation and sells shares in the project to members interested in an investment in renewable energy. It allows a homeowner to avoid both maintenance of their own system and the hassle of sorting out different offers from rooftop solar vendors.

Hydroelectric power Another way to turn an electricity-generating turbine is to harness the power of water as it flows. It doesn’t create greenhouse gas or other chemical pollutants by burning fossil fuel, though large-scale hydro typically calls for building a permanent dam across a river valley and flooding the area behind it. Another option is to put hydroelectric generators directly in rapidly flowing rivers to capture power — Ohio cooperatives use 55 megawatts of power from the turbines underneath Niagara Falls, for example; it’s about 4 percent of the power used by cooperative members in Ohio every day. PAUL WESSLUND writes on cooperative issues for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

5


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

BUZZARDS, BEARS, The story of the Great Hinckley Hunt of 1818

6

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018


and

,

STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OHIO HISTORY CONNECTION

BIG BAD WOLVES O

hio, the Buckeye State, was admitted to the Union in 1803, but even 15 years later it remained a very wild place — too wild, in the opinions of some settlers, and they determined to do something about it, frontier style.

Near Hinckley, in the northeast quarter of the state, large predators — mainly black bears and timber wolves — were killing livestock almost nightly. Writing in 1890 in The American Field, one of the early outdoor magazines of the time, a Captain Milton B. Pierce said that the settlers were “seriously embarrassed” by the many wolves ravaging their sheep. In one incident alone, wolves slaughtered more than 100 sheep over several wilderness farms. In addition, bears often raided hog pens. To put an end to the depredation threatening their livelihood, the pioneers came up with the idea of conducting a grand hunt, one that would encompass the entire township. At dawn on the day before Christmas in 1818, some 600 men and boys (many recruited from around the state) surrounded Hinckley Township. Most of the men carried a firearm, likely a musket. The boys were armed with either bayonets or large butcher knives mounted on long poles.

Once everyone was in position, the signal was shouted down the line to begin moving slowly forward, toward the center of the circle. Almost immediately white-tailed deer began bounding from cover in high arching leaps, tails erect; wolves ran in confused circles, searching for escape routes; bears lumbered toward the hunters in such numbers as they had never seen before. And above the melee flew flocks of wild turkeys, trying to make their escape over the line of firing hunters.

The carnage was over by late afternoon. Taken in the hunt were more than 300 deer, 21 bears, 17 wolves, and countless numbers of smaller game such as turkeys and raccoons. Only two hunters were reported injured. The game animals — deer and turkeys — were divided equally among the men, many no doubt consumed the next day as family Christmas dinners. The predators were skinned for their pelts — a $15 bounty was paid for each pelt, many of the carcasses left to rot. Known as a “circle hunt,” the Great Hinckley Hunt of 1818 was the largest of its kind ever held in Ohio. W.H. “CHIP” GROSS (whchipgross@gmail.com), a member of Consolidated Electric Cooperative, is Ohio Cooperative Living’s Outdoors Editor.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

7


Buzzard town Today, the small town of Hinckley is famous for one thing: buzzards, also known as turkey vultures. There’s even the likeness of a buzzard on the town’s logo. Officials used to claim that the vultures returned to Hinckley and the surrounding area from their migration trip south each winter precisely on March 15. It’s a myth, of course. During some years of milder weather, the birds return weeks earlier. But hey, it’s an excuse for a late-winter party. The Buzzard Day celebration this year at Hinckley Reservation, a Cleveland Metropark, is set for Thursday, March 15, and there is a tie-in to the Great Hinckley Hunt. Legend has it that vultures were first attracted to the area by the stench of the thawing predator carcasses left behind from the Great Hinckley Hunt of 1818. That, too, is myth. Vultures return to Hinckley each year — both then and now — to take advantage of the high rock ledges in the area, on which they nest and roost. Since 2014, Sharon Hosko, manager of Brecksville Nature Center, has been the official “Buzzard Spotter” for Cleveland Metroparks. “On March 15, people begin gathering as early as 6 a.m. at the Buzzard Roost at Hinckley Reservation Metropark, before it’s even daylight,” she says. “And we begin watching for the soaring turkey vultures around 7 a.m. It’s definitely a ritual of spring in this part of Ohio.” Hosko added that anywhere from 50 to 200 people usually attend, depending upon the weather. “We’ve been doing this every year since 1957, and people still come from across the country. Some come every year.” Then, the following Sunday — this year, March 18 — there is a bigger celebration in downtown Hinckley, organized by the Hinckley Chamber of Commerce. Included in the festivities is a popular breakfast at the town hall where “buzzard pancakes” are served, the proceeds going to local scholarships. — W.H. “CHIP” GROSS For more information, go to www.clevelandmetroparks.com or www.hinckleyohchamber.com.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018


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MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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Backyard

BY W. H. “CHIP” GROSS

CO-OP PEOPLE

I

conservationist

t’s easy to find Joe Bodis’s property in Huron County, a few miles southeast of New London, Ohio. Just look for the house surrounded by “weeds.”

In actuality, those “weeds” are a carefully planned and developed island of wildlife habitat in a sea of corn and soybean fields. “When I first moved in, neighbors used to stop and ask when I was going to mow the weeds,” Bodis says. “Now they ask what things they can do on their property to attract wildlife.” A retired pharmaceuticals salesman and member of Firelands Electric Cooperative, Bodis moved to his 5 acres in 2002. “My passion is bluebirds, and it was a dream of mine to create a habitat that would be attractive not only to bluebirds but also to as many wild bird species as possible,” Bodis says. “I put up 10 bluebird nesting boxes every spring, and the bluebirds use one or two of them. The other boxes are used by nesting tree swallows.” Bodis estimates that over the years his nesting boxes have fledged more than 100 young bluebirds and

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

some 700 tree swallows. Bodis’s property also has attracted many red-winged blackbirds and other songbirds, various hawks and owls, wild turkeys, ring-necked pheasants, and an occasional bald eagle. The larger mammals he’s seen include coyote, red fox, and white-tailed deer. “I’ve actually seen doe deer give birth on my property twice,” he says. His next project is to add a water feature to his property — a small, L-shaped pond for fish, frogs, turtles, and water birds.

DIY: Getting started If you own a few acres of land — or even a decentsized backyard — and would like to create the type of wildlife habitat Joe Bodis has, first have a plan in mind and make a rough sketch of what you’d like your property to eventually look like. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife (http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov), is a great place to begin, as the agency has lots of free information about creating wildlife habitat on small parcels of ground.


A co-op member has created his own diverse nature preserve in the middle of farm country

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

11


BY PAT KEEGAN

THE EFFICIENCY EXPERT

THE RIGHT CONTRACTOR

A little research can ensure you get just the right person for your job

R

enovations can be the perfect time to improve your home’s energy efficiency. To make sure you get those energy savings, it’s important to do some planning right from the beginning. The first step is to educate yourself so you can be in control of your project. Helpful, easy-to-understand energy-efficiency information is available for virtually any area of your home and any renovation project. Just be sure to use reputable sources, like www. energy.gov, www.energystar.gov, or in many cases, your local electric cooperative. You can use your newfound knowledge to ask the right questions of potential contractors. Ask about the product to be installed, the energy savings it should yield, and whether it will improve comfort. Because energy-efficiency installations and construction are specialized, most measures are unlikely to be installed correctly unless the installer has experience — and hopefully some appropriate training or certification. You may decide you’d like to hire a small specialty contractor or a larger general contractor. Either way, it’s crucial to hire someone with a contractor’s license, a local business license, and three types of insurance: liability, personal injury, and workers’ compensation. Check references to verify that the contractor has a solid history of cost-control, timeliness, good communication, and excellent results — including significant energy savings. You might learn that your lowest bidder has a tendency to increase the price after the job has begun. As you choose between contractors, quality should be an even more important consideration than price. Poor-quality energy-efficiency work will not deliver maximum savings. Once you have settled on a contractor, be sure to get a written contract, which should include details such as who will be doing the actual installation; the

An energy auditor can help you determine the work you will hire a contractor to do.

specific R-value of any insulation being used, if you’re insulating; the make, model, and all efficiency ratings if you’re replacing a furnace or air conditioner; and who must pay for the necessary building permits. Finally, be cautious about pre-paying. Keep the upfront payment as low as possible; set benchmarks the contractor must meet to receive the next payment; and make sure a reasonable amount of the payment is not due until the project is completed, the work passes building inspections, and you are fully satisfied. PAT KEEGAN writes on efficiency issues at www. collaborativeefficiency.com. If possible, hire a contractor with energy-efficiency training and certification such as ACCA or NATE for HVAC work, or BPI for a range of specialties.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018


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GOOD EATS

RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHERINE MURRAY

Springtime sampler There’s no surer sign of spring than those first fresh delights from the garden after a long, gray winter, and some of those crops will be ready for harvest any time now. Put those early-season delicacies to mouth-watering use in these tempting dishes!

FEBRUARY MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

15


FRESH HERB AND WHEAT BERRY SALAD Prep: 10 minutes; Servings: 8 2 c ups thinly sliced 4 cups cooked wheat radishes berries 1 shallot, chopped fine 1 cup fresh parsley, chopped 1/4 cup Dijon mustard 1 cup fresh mint, 1/4 cup red wine vinegar chopped

2 Tbsp. olive oil 2 Tbsp. water 1/2 tsp. salt

Mix wheat berries, parsley, mint, and radishes together in a medium bowl. Mix remaining ingredients in a separate bowl, pour over the wheat berry mix, and stir. Serve cold or at room temperature. Per serving: 167 cal.; 4g total fat; 0.6g sat. fat.; 2.1g fiber; 26g total carbs; 5g protein; 536mg sodium.

RICE PUDDING WITH STRAWBERRY RHUBARB SAUCE Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 11/2 hours | Chill (if desired): 2 hours; Servings: 6–8 1 lb. strawberries (tops 1/2 cup heavy cream 1/2 cup water removed), chopped 1/4 cup sugar 3/4 cup Arborio rice 1/4 cup water 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 cup sugar 5 rhubarb stalks, 3/4 cup milk chopped For the rice pudding: Bring water to boil in medium saucepan. Add rice and salt. Cover, reduce heat to low, and cook until water is gone, about 20 minutes. Uncover rice and add milk, cream, sugar, and vanilla extract. Increase heat to medium-low and cook uncovered, stirring frequently to prevent liquid from boiling over. Cook until all but 1/4 inch liquid has been absorbed by the rice. (Pudding should remain easy to stir, even after refrigerated. If it becomes sticky or solid, add more milk at any time.) Cool to room temperature, stirring occasionally to avoid a film on top, about 30 minutes. For the sauce: Combine rhubarb, strawberries, water, and sugar in a medium saucepan on medium-high heat, stirring constantly until fruit is soft and sauce thickens. Spoon sauce over rice pudding and serve warm or cold. Store rice pudding and sauce separately in fridge for up to a week. Per serving: 210 cal.; 5g total fat; 3g sat. fat; 2.5g fiber; 38g total carbs; 5g protein; 195mg sodium.

SPRING MINESTRONE SOUP Prep: 20 minutes | Cook: 30 minutes; Servings: 8 2 cans (14 oz.) diced 1 bunch spring onions tomatoes 3 Tbsp. olive oil 1 cup peas 1 cup chopped celery 1 cup small shell pasta 4 cloves garlic, minced 3 cups water 1 cup chopped carrots 2 Tbsp. minced parsley 4 cups vegetable broth 1 tsp. dried basil

1½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. black pepper 2 cups cooked white beans (cannelini or great northern) 2 cups chopped fresh baby spinach

Finely chop spring onions, discarding the green tops. Measure olive oil into large stock pot and heat on medium. Add onion, celery, garlic, and carrots to pot and sauté until onions become translucent and carrots begin to soften, about 7 minutes. Add vegetable broth, tomatoes with juice, peas, pasta, water, and spices to pot and stir. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 20 minutes. Add beans and spinach and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Serve hot. Per serving: 316 cal.; 7g total fat; 1g sat. fat; 11.5g fiber; 49g total carbs; 17g protein; 2024mg sodium.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018


ASPARAGUS, MUSHROOM, AND CHIVE QUICHE Prep: 20 minutes | Cook: 1 hour; Servings: 8 2 cups asparagus, tough ends 11/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces more for rolling 1 clove garlic, chopped 1/2 tsp. salt 1 cup cream 1 stick unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch dice and chilled 3 large eggs 5 Tbsp. snipped chives 1/2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. ice water 1/4 tsp. pepper 2 Tbsp. olive oil dash of nutmeg 2 cups mushrooms, sliced dash of cayenne To make the crust, combine fl our, salt, butt er, and 3 tablespoons of chives in a food processor. Pulse in 1-second bursts unti l the mixture becomes crumbly. Drizzle in ice water and pulse in 1-second bursts unti l dough begins to sti ck together. Gather dough and form a ball. Roll out crust and fi t into a 9-inch pie or tart pan, pressing crust into corners. Place in freezer for 10 minutes. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Line crust with parchment or aluminum foil and fi ll with pie weights, dried beans, or dry rice. Make sure the weights are snug against the sides of the pan. Bake 10 minutes. Remove weights and parchment. Bake another 5 to 10 minutes unti l the dough is golden brown. Let cool. Lower oven temperature to 350 degrees. With 1 tablespoon olive oil, sauté mushrooms unti l lightly browned. Set aside. With 1 tablespoon olive oil, sauté asparagus, sti rring occasionally unti l lightly browned. Combine remaining ingredients and whisk unti l well blended. Pour into cooled crust, then add the sautéed mushrooms, asparagus, and garlic. Place on cookie sheet and bake for 35 to 40 minutes, unti l center is puff ed but jiggles slightly when picked up. Remove from oven and allow to cool 15 minutes before serving. Per serving: 245 cal.; 17g total fat; 9g sat. fat; 1.5g fiber; 18g total carbs; 6g protein; 410mg sodium.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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GM’S REPORT

FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES GM’S REPORT

SCAMMERS THREATEN

TO TURN OFF YOUR ELECTRICITY

In the past few months, utilities across the U.S. have received calls from consumers reporting scams. The scam is always the same story. A consumer receives a phone call from someone who says their payment has been denied, or was never received, and the caller demands immediate payment or the consumer’s power will be shut off. There are three main utility scams: Scam #1: Green Dot Card — Scammers insist consumers must pay their bill immediately or they will be disconnected. They tell consumers to purchase Green Dot money cards and call them with the verification codes. Scam #2: Phishing — Scammers insist consumers must pay their bill immediately or they will be disconnected. They ask for verification of the credit card or bank account the consumers use to pay their bill. Scam #3: Google Scam — A Google Calendar invitation pops up in the consumer’s e-mail inbox with the subject line, “Your electric bill is available.” If a Firelands Electric employee contacts you by phone, they will never DEMAND confidential, personal, or financial information — like a credit card number or your checking/savings routing or account numbers. Only give your financial information to the co-op if you have contacted the co-op directly to make a payment. Because Firelands Electric does sometimes contact members by phone, it can be difficult to tell a scammer from a member representative. Here are some tips:

• Never allow anyone into your home to check electrical wiring or appliances unless you have scheduled an appointment or reported a problem. Also, ask employees for proper identification. All utility industries have been on alert, and as long as the scammers continue to make money, it will unfortunately continue to be an issue.

Dan McNaull General Manager

Firelands Electric Co-op wants to make sure you avoid any and all types of scams that could put you or your financial information in jeopardy. You can avoid receiving unwanted telemarketing calls by placing your phone number on the National Do Not Call Registry at www.donotcall.gov, or by calling 1-888-382-1222. If you are on the registry, telemarketers may only call you if you have done business with them in the past 18 months. If you have questions or want to report a suspected scam, contact the Ohio Attorney General at 1-800282-0515, or online at www.ohioattorneygeneral. gov/About-AG/Contact/Report-A-Scam. Protecting Ohio families is the Ohio Attorney General’s highest priority.

• If a caller specifically asks you to pay using a prepaid debit card, this is a red flag. • If you feel pressured for immediate payment or personal information, hang up the phone and call the cooperative’s phone number, 1-800-533-8658, which is located on your bill. This will ensure you are speaking to a genuine representative of the co-op. MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES CO-OP NEWS

FIRELANDS ELECTRIC

WELCOMES

NEW LEADERSHIP

Rob Turk brings diverse skills and experience to the board As announced in January, former trustee Dan McNaull resigned from Firelands Electric’s board of trustees to be the cooperative’s new general manager. Following the process of selecting a new trustee, the board filled the position in January by appointing Rob Turk to represent the members of District 7.

which are raised for their ultra-soft fleece. Due to the growing demand, Gaelic Glen has evolved and the herd has grown to include 18 alpacas. The Turks’ alpacas have visited craft shows, petting zoos, fairs, community events, and nursing homes. They’ve also participated in numerous parades, including Cleveland’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

Turk brings a vast amount Rob Turk of business experience to District 7 Trustee Firelands Electric’s board. He retired from The CocaCola Company in Georgia after 31 years, where he was a national account operations manager. Other leadership positions throughout his career include being the Trumbull County manager for Production Credit Association (known today as Farm Credit Services); a past board member of the Mohican Area Community Fund; and is the eucharistic minister and past member of the financial committee at St. Peter Church in Loudonville. He remains active in various civic organizations, including the Masonic Lodge in Ashland.

He believes the increased cost of producing and maintaining the electrical system, along with necessary upgrades in a changing environment, are major issues facing electric cooperatives today. In his mind, continuing to deliver reliable electric power that is cost-effective, while meeting the future needs of Firelands Electric’s membership, is the highest priority. He looks forward to working with the other eight trustees on the Firelands Electric board, and is ready to serve the co-op’s members.

Following retirement and relocating back to Ohio, Turk and his wife, Kathy, moved to a small farm outside of Perrysville about eight years ago, where they began their post-retirement adventure of owning their own small business, Gaelic Glen Alpacas. After extensive research and investigation, the Turks started out with just five alpacas on their farm, 20

Turk says his past employment skills combined with his small business owner knowledge and insights enable him to make sound financial decisions, while providing oversite and direction for Firelands Electric to achieve its intermediate and long-term goals.

Firelands Electric Cooperative serves 9,130 members throughout rural areas of Ashland, Huron, Lorain, and Richland counties. The co-op’s service territory is composed of nine districts, each represented by a member — a trustee — who is elected to serve a three-year term on the board of trustees that governs the operations of the co-op. The board of trustees meets monthly to review, discuss, and approve issues. They determine the strategic direction for Firelands Electric, test the cooperative’s business strategy, approve key investment decisions, and set the rates to ensure the co-op meets its financial responsibilities and remains focused on its member-driven mission.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

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integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

BY TRACY GIBB

IN THE COMMUNITY

STITCHING FOR A CAUSE

For more than a decade, quilters from New London and neighboring communities have gathered every month to sew, socialize, and share.

machine quilting, hand-stitching, appliqué, and more,” says founding member and current co-chair Yvonne Westover.

An informal group of fellow enthusiasts from New London United Methodist Church officially organized the New London Quilt Guild in 2006. “They started to hold frequent sewing get-togethers and held the first organizational meeting on Feb. 15 of that same year,” says Chris Porter, current co-chair for the club.

In addition to monthly workshops, the group organizes special classes for both sewing and quilting. These sessions are open to the public and are geared toward crafters of all skill levels.

The group quickly expanded to include members from throughout the Village of New London and the surrounding area. By 2007, the guild boasted 25 members and held its first public quilt show, showcasing 87 pieces at New London Grange Hall. The guild now meets regularly at New London Alliance Church to sew and socialize. Business meetings take place on the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m., while quilting workshops are held the fourth Saturday of the month from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Members share ideas, inspiration, tips, and friendship. “We have members skilled in a number of techniques, including

Perhaps the most significant way these quilters share their talents, though, is through community service projects. The group has created and donated quilts to Huron County foster families, the New London Area Historical Society, and Teen Challenge (a faith-based organization helping women with drug and alcohol addictions). They have made walker bags for nursing home residents and helped Girl Scout troops make aprons and pillowcases. This concern for community and sharing is obvious in every project created by this gifted group — right down to the individual stitches. The guild’s next public quilt show is scheduled for April 21, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at New London Alliance Church, located at 4625 State Route 162. Those interested in joining can contact the guild on Facebook, at www.nlqg.blogspot.com, or stop by a meeting. Questions may also be directed to Chris Porter at 419-681-2295. Places & Faces is a monthly feature showcasing people, businesses, and organizations located throughout the Firelands Electric Cooperative service territory.

Members of the New London Quilt Guild create colorful quilts like these during their monthly workshops. MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Our trustees make a difference Firelands Electric Co-op is guided by an elected board of trustees who represent its members’ best interest when making important decisions. Being a member of the co-op’s board is an incredibly important position in our community. A trustee’s decisions will impact issues such as service rates, rights-of-way, and work plans.

NORWICH

1

RICHMOND

PERU

BRONSON

GREENFIELD

NEW HAVEN

HARTLAND

CLARKSFIELD

FAIRFIELD

FITCHVILLE

NEW LONDON

RIPLEY

GREENWICH

RUGGLES

3

A trustee holds great responsibility and requires men and women who understand their community’s needs. It is important to elect strong leaders to the cooperative’s board, selected from a diverse pool of candidates, which is why the co-op encourages new members to run in our board elections. Fresh ideas and new perspectives help the co-op enact policies that keep our community competitive. Firelands Electric’s board is a democratically elected body nominated by members of the cooperative’s service territory and voted into position by any member who chooses to participate in the cooperative’s open election. Any co-op member who is in good standing and resides in a district with an open spot on the board is welcome to run for that position.

9

2

BUTLER

ROCHESTER

TROY

CLEAR CREEK

ORANGE

JACKSON

MILTON

MONTGOMERY

PERRY

6 WELLER

Firelands Electric will hold elections during the cooperative’s annual meeting on June 23; board members for districts 2, 7, and 9 will be decided by those members who Board vote. Any candidate who applies is required to nomination receive 20 member signatures from within his or her district, and submit an election application by petitions are Wednesday, April 18. Petitions are available at the Firelands Electric office beginning March 1. available March Trustees matter and can make a difference. Call 1-800-533-8658 or visit www.FirelandsEC.com for more information on how to run for our board of trustees and to find out more about the election process.

4

MIFFLIN MIFFLIN

8

7

VERMILLION

MOHICAN

5 MONROE

GREEN

LAKE

1

for districts 2, 7, and 9.

Firelands Electric’s office will be closed March 30 in observance of Good Friday. Happy Easter from your local Touchstone Energy® Cooperative! 20B

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integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

EMPLOYEE NEWS

DON ENGLET

PROMOTED TO DIRECTOR OF ELECTRIC OPERATIONS Firelands Electric congratulates Don Englet on his recent promotion as the cooperative’s new director of electric operations. Englet is filling the position following the retirement of his predecessor, Denny Marugg. Englet started at Firelands in March 2000. After completing his apprentice lineman coursework, he Don Englet was appointed as the Director of Electric cooperative’s engineering Operations services representative, where he handled new services and upgrades, until being promoted to line supervisor in 2005. His recent job duties included scheduling projects for Firelands Electric’s line crews, which consists of four lead linemen, four journeymen, and one apprentice lineman. Purchasing and maintenance of trucks, tools, and equipment have also been part of his responsibilities. Englet has worked with local government and zoning departments on various projects throughout the years, and serves as safety coordinator for the co-op, making him a perfect fit. Firelands Electric Cooperative continues to be an active participant in the Rural Electric Safety Achievement Program (RESAP), sponsored by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, which evaluates if the cooperative is meeting safety standards set forth by the government agency Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Participation in RESAP allows Firelands to

maintain a strong safety foundation for employees and for the general public — reaffirming the importance of safety. Englet will continue to be involved in the RESAP process. Some of Englet’s new duties include managing ongoing and future rebuild projects to modernize the cooperative’s facilities, which is necessary to accommodate increasing power loads seen over the years, and relocating lines closer to roads to allow efficient maintenance and repairs in the future. Englet said he enjoys working for the cooperative and is fortunate to work with an excellent group of people. Over the past 18 years, he has been involved in numerous projects, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-funded rebuild project completed about eight years ago following a major ice storm that affected the area in 2005. What has changed the most in the electric utility industry in Englet’s 18 years at Firelands Electric? According to Englet, the biggest difference has been “an increased amount of state and local regulation, especially when it comes to safety, and also the role technology plays in the industry.” In addition to adjusting to his new role, Englet has been taking classes through Mount Vernon Nazarene University, where he is pursuing his Bachelor of Science in business. Englet lives in Greenwich Township and is a member of the South Central Local Schools Board of Education. He and his wife, Sara, have two sons, Clayton and Jackson. Englet likes spending time with his family and being involved in their activities. He also enjoys camping, fishing, and occasional hunting in his spare time.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES EMPLOYEE NEWS

RICK BOWERS CELEBRATES

10 YEARS

Journeyman Lineman Rick Bowers marks his 10th anniversary with the cooperative this month. Bowers was hired in 2008 as an apprentice lineman and was promoted to journeyman lineman in June 2012 after receiving his power lineman certification from Marion Technical College. As a journeyman lineman, Bowers handles all types Rick Bowers of electric power line Journeyman Lineman problems: overhead and underground distribution lines, transformers, reclosers, and substations. His duties include line construction and maintenance tasks like changing out poles, transformers, and wires. Bowers also handles all advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) equipment located in the cooperative’s substations and metering points. Bowers said he enjoys his job and being part of the cooperative’s effort to provide quality power to all of Firelands Electric’s members. “Every day is different with new challenges, and as a lineman, you’re ready for the next challenge,” Bowers said. Linemen respond to trouble calls related to power outages, accidents, fires, and weather conditions. “I enjoy my job, even when the weather turns bad, because I work with a great group of guys,” Bowers added. Working for Firelands Electric over the past decade enabled Bowers to assist others in need. Last year, in the wake of Hurricane Harvey’s massive flooding and devastation followed by Hurricane Irma’s deadly storm surges, Bowers was one of the 5,000 electric co-op workers to provide a helping hand in rebuilding the ravaged electrical distribution systems. He was part of the massive effort to restore power to an estimated 1.3 million co-op members left in the dark following Hurricane Irma’s destruction. 20D

OF SERVICE

“When we heard that co-op friends in Georgia needed our help, I was honored to be able to answer the call and assist with power restoration efforts,” Bowers said. Phil Pickering and Bowers were among the roughly 72 workers sent from Ohio’s electric cooperatives. The two Firelands Electric linemen were sent to Jackson EMC, a large electric cooperative serving more than 220,000 members, where they worked for five days to repair damage, replace broken poles, and get power restored in the Peach State. In 2016, Bowers was given the opportunity to participate in NRECA International, which has brought safe, reliable, and affordable electric power to more than 110 million people in 42 countries over the past 56 years. Bowers traveled with volunteers from several of Ohio’s electric cooperatives to La Soledad, Guatemala, as part of a two-week rural electrification project — bringing electricity to the isolated mountaintop village for the first time. “The Guatemala trip was very important to me,” Bowers said. “It was an opportunity to give back to the Central American country where my adopted son, Sam, was born twelve years ago. NRECA International is a terrific program and I am forever thankful for the opportunity. Originally a native of Greenwich, Bowers resides in the New London area with his wife, Natalie. They have a son, Sam, and a grown daughter, Alex. The Bowers are also proud grandparents and recently celebrated their grandson’s first birthday. The Bowers family has enjoyed hosting multiple exchange students over the years and appreciate the opportunity to provide “American” experiences to teenagers from various parts of the world. In addition to spending quality time with family, Bowers enjoys coaching youth and high school softball, as well as occasional fishing and hunting adventures. He’s also an avid Buckeyes fan.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

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integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

We want to

HEAR FROM YOU!

Your thoughts and opinions about Firelands Electric Co-op help us to serve you better. In April, Firelands Electric Cooperative will be working with NRECA Market Research Services to complete a member satisfaction survey. The surveys will be both by phone and e-mail, but not everyone will be contacted. If you are contacted, we would greatly appreciate a few minutes of your time to share your opinions of the cooperative. We strive to provide all members with safe, affordable, reliable, and clean electric service. By participating in the survey, you will help us make decisions that benefit you, your family, and your neighbors. Thank you!

All information is confidential.

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FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES BILL PAY

PAYMENT OPTIONS Your cooperative is committed to making it easy to do business with us. That’s why Firelands Electric Co-op offers numerous ways to pay your monthly electric bill.

Automatic Bank Draft

Phone Payments

Payments are made on the 14th of the month, but if this falls on a holiday or weekend, funds are deducted the next business day. Members can choose whether to receive a paper statement or an electronic version. This will let you know how much your payment will be and what day it will be drafted from your account.

In addition to the traditional methods of paying your bill by mail or in the office, the co-op’s member services representatives can also take your payment over the phone. This option is free of charge, and, with Firelands’ convenient after-hours answering service, payments can be made 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by calling 1-800533-8658. For the most efficient service, please have your complete bank account or card number information readily available. If paying by card, have the card in front of you before you call. To use a checking or savings account, please have a check or a copy of your bank routing and account numbers in hand.

Firelands Electric also offers bank draft. This handy option automatically deducts your electric bill from your checking account or credit card each month.

With this easy-to-use option, you avoid late fees, save time and postage, and never have to worry about remembering to put your payment in the mail. Access your account through our secure SmartHub application, click on the Billing and Payments tab, and select Auto Pay Program to get set up.

SmartHub

Firelands’ SmartHub payment system allows members to pay their electric bill through our secure online portal. Members can use a bank account or debit/credit card, and payment methods can be saved for future use, if the member chooses to do so. SmartHub also has the ability to schedule future payments, so you can set them up whenever and wherever you want. For additional information on bill payment methods, visit www.firelandsec.com/content/payment-options or contact Firelands Electric’s billing department at 1-800-533-8658.

Thurs Jan. 11, 2018 Meter # 000000: 38.08 kWh Average Temperature: 56º F

Tues Jan. 9, 2018 Meter # 000000: 47.87 kWh Average Temperature: 30º F

20F

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integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

CO-OP CONTEST

Take charge with Enroll before May 1 for your chance to win a $25 bill credit.

Firelands Electric Co-op’s SmartHub system now offers even more ways for members to take charge of their electric account.

SmartHub isn’t just for paying bills or monitoring electric use. It also has the ability to send important account notifications to members via e-mail, text message, or a combination of both. Members can add multiple contact numbers and e-mail addresses, as well as choose which notifications are sent to each contact. Selections can be changed at any time, giving members total flexibility and control. A variety of notifications are available, including: • Payment Confirmation • Credit Card Expiration • Power Usage

Sign up for a chance to win

Join T.E.A.M. SmartHub between now and May 1 to be entered into a drawing for the chance to win one of several $25 bill credits. Just follow these simple steps to enter: 1. Visit www.firelandsec.smarthub.coop/Login.html. 2. Enroll in SmartHub. 3. Sign up to receive at least one notification. Winners will be drawn on April 1 and May 1. Winners’ names will be published in an upcoming issue of Ohio Cooperative Living magazine, as well as on Firelands’ social media outlets. Contact Firelands Electric’s member services department at 1-800-533-8658 or e-mail members@ firelandsec.com with questions regarding SmartHub or the contest.

. M . A E.

• Planned Power Outage • Power Outage • Power Restored • Peak Alert (Load Management) Detailed descriptions of SmartHub’s features, as well as step-by-step instructions for setting up your account and notifications, are available at www. firelandsec.com/content/smarthub-101.

T.

T — Take charge of your electric use! E — Enroll in SmartHub. A — Add your contact information. M— Make your notification choices. MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

3-18--March.indd 9

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FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES TREE TRIMMING

MAINTAINING RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR RELIABILITY There are many ways Firelands Electric Cooperative provides you with safe, reliable electric service. One of the most common — and crucial — is referred to as right-of-way clearing, or vegetation management.

tops of utility poles can cause voltage fluctuations, blinking lights, or even an outage for hundreds of cooperative members. This gives Firelands Electric’s right-of-way maintenance crews a big job to do. Tree contractors began the cooperative’s annual rightof-way maintenance program at the beginning of the year.

A right-of-way refers to the strip of land underneath or around power lines that your electric cooperative has the right, and responsibility, to maintain and clear. Trees must grow at a proper distance from wires in order to prevent harm to people or a disruption in electric service. Specifications vary, but a general guideline for maintaining a safe right-ofway is 15 feet of clearance on either side of primary lines and 20 feet of overhead clearance above the highest wire on the pole. Clearing right-of-way is critical to keeping our members’ power on. In 2017, around 32 percent of Firelands Electric’s power interruptions were caused by trees and brush, compared to 21 percent caused by small animals. If a tree encroaches on the right-ofway, our vegetation management team will trim back branches and brush using chainsaws, bucket trucks, tree climbers, brush chippers, and mowers. Chemical control methods are occasionally used to stop lowgrowing plant species that can climb and surpass the tall trees growing beneath power lines.

7%

It is inevitable that a tree planted under power lines will have to be cut down in the future, so why not move to a better location outside the right-of-way before you plant? That way, you can enjoy your new tree for many years to come. Please notify Firelands Electric if you have existing trees on your property that are in danger of coming into contact with power lines. For more information on the cooperative’s vegetation management program, questions about tree trimming, or assistance in selecting the right tree to plant, visit our website at www.firelandsec.com/ content/right-way-clearance, or contact Firelands Electric’s System Right-of-Way Coordinator James Miller at 1-800-533-8658.

4% 2% Transmission Bad power supply transformer

Right-of-way clearing also keeps your family Public safe by ensuring that tree branches do not accidents become energized because of close contact with a downed power line. Able to carry up to 34,500 volts, a power line can 9% energize a tree branch, which can be Weather incredibly dangerous — even deadly. Be mindful when around 11% trees close to power lines, and Equipment make sure children know that climbing trees near power lines 14% Unknown is extremely dangerous.

32% Trees

21% Animals and birds

Firelands Electric has 995 miles of power lines to maintain, which serve 9,130 members. Branches and limbs that come into contact with primary wires at the 20H

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

3-18--March.indd 10

2/6/2018 8:48:22 AM


integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

Plant the Right Tree in the Right Place Trees beautify our neighborhoods, and when planted in the right spot, can even help lower energy bills. But the wrong tree in the wrong place can be a hazard… especially to power lines.

LARGE TREES

Height/spread of more than 40 feet, such as: • • • •

Maple Oak Spruce Pine

• Birch • Sweetgum • Linden

MEDIUM TREES

SMALL TREES

Height/spread of 25 to 40 feet , such as:

Avoid planting within 20 feet of power lines. When planting within 20 feet is unavoidable, use only shrubs and small trees.

• Washington hawthorn • Golden rain tree • Eastern redbud • American arborvitae • Dogwoods

Height /spread of no more than 25 feet , such as: • Star magnolia • Crabapple • Lilac 40ft.

40 ft. high or less les

Tree pruning zone

Maximum tree height 25 ft.

70 ft.

60 ft.

50 ft.

40 ft.

30 ft.

20 ft.

10 ft.

0

10 ft.

20 ft.

Source: The Arbor Day Foundation and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

2018 RIGHT-OF-WAY MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Vegetation management has already begun in some areas. Right-of-way tree maintenance is tentatively scheduled in 2018 for the following areas and will include brush hogging, cutting, trimming, and any necessary tree removals: • Ashland County — Green and Mifflin townships • Richland County — Mifflin and Monroe townships, and Pleasant Hill Lake

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

3-18--March.indd 11

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2/6/2018 8:48:24 AM


FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES COOPERATIVE UPDATE

BOARD MEETING

highlights

Firelands Electric Cooperative’s board of trustees met Dec. 21 and covered the following items: • Board President Dan Schloemer reported the cooperative received 53 membership applications for approval by the board. • Director of Finance and Accounting Tabi Shepherd reviewed November financials and reported on accounting and billing department activities. • The board reviewed an Oct. 30 safety and training report. • General Manager April Bordas asked the board for approval of the 2018 budget, which was approved. • The board reviewed a report prepared by Director of Electric Operations Denny Marugg on recent projects in the operations department. • Line Superintendent Don Englet reported on recent line crew activities and projects.

• As a result of Dan McNaull’s resignation as trustee in November, the board elected Dan Schloemer to serve as board president and Carl Ayers as secretary/treasurer for the remainder of the existing terms. Kevin Reidy was named the cooperative’s representative to serve on the Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives Board of Directors. • Due to the untimely passing of trustee Lowell Kreager, the board elected trustee Bruce Leimbach to serve as vice president for the remainder of the existing term to fill the vacancy on the co-op’s board of trustees. Firelands Electric is democratically controlled and governed by local people committed to policies that result in a safe and reliable electric system, fair rates, financial responsibility, and superior member service. The cooperative’s next board meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, at Firelands Electric’s office, located at One Energy Place, New London.

• The board reviewed a report from Director of Member Services Andrea Gravenhorst on recent communications pieces and upcoming activities involving the member services department.

FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

GENERAL MANAGER

OUTAGE HOTLINE

Dan Schloemer

Dan McNaull

Bruce Leimbach

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION?

Carl Ayers

E-mail your ideas to: members@firelandsec.com

1-800-533-8658 OFFICE

One Energy Place P.O. Box 32 New London, OH 44851 419-929-1571

President, District 1

Vice President, District 4

Secretary/Treasurer, District 5

W.E. Anderson District 8

Steve Gray District 3

OFFICE HOURS

Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. www.FirelandsEC.com

Kevin Reidy District 6

Rob Turk District 7

Neil Winslow District 9

22

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

3-18--March.indd 12

2/6/2018 8:48:25 AM


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

O’Loughlin earns national award Pat O’Loughlin, president and CEO of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, is the recipient of the 2018 J.C. Brown CEO Communication Leadership Award. The award, presented by National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, recognizes an electric co-op executive who advances communication in the industry. O’Loughlin’s focus on communications promoted the not-for-profit cooperative business model, launched the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives (OEC) brand, and led to the creation of a three-year strategic plan to elevate the cooperative principles. Under his leadership, OEC conducted internal communications audits and helped craft communications plans for six member co-ops in 2017.

Pat O’Loughlin (left) accepting his award. Photo by Michael W. Kahn.

Donation to fund solar panels, youth programs Consolidated Cooperative donated $5,000 to the nonprofit Stratford Ecological Center, a 236-acre educational organic farm and nature preserve in Delaware, to fund the center’s solar and youth programs. The donation was matched by CoBank of Greenwood Village, Colorado — a cooperative bank and lender of Consolidated — as part of its Sharing Success program, which matches co-op donations. Half of the $10,000 donation will go to the center’s 156-panel solar array project, and the rest will be split among youth programs, including a pen pal program based around reading books.

CFC gives $35,000 to Project Ohio electrification efforts The National Rural Utilities Cooperative Finance Corporation (CFC) recently presented a $35,000 grant to Project Ohio and its efforts to electrify the Guatemalan villages of Las Tortugas and San Jorge. CFC, headquartered in Dulles, Virginia, is a member-owned nonprofit cooperative that provides financial and management services to its electric cooperative distribution and power supply members nationwide. Linemen from Ohio electric cooperatives leave for Guatemala March 5.

Co-ops sponsor human trafficking awareness event Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative and Midwest Electric are sponsoring author and advocate Theresa Flores as she presents her story at the Niswonger Performing Arts Center in Van Vert March 27. Flores travels the U.S. sharing her story of being trafficked at 15 years old and tortured for two years while living in an upper-middle-class suburb of Detroit, Michigan. Flores’s organization, TraffickFree, builds awareness about human trafficking to educate students, professionals, and motel staff on the red flags and how to identify a victim. For tickets, call 419-238-6722 or visit NPACVW.org.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

23


10 KITCHEN

gardening issue

BY KRIS WETHERBEE

GARDEN TIPS

FOR BETTER YIELDS

24

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018


BY KRIS WETHERBEE; PHOTOS BY RICK WETHERBEE

Kitchen gardens are sprouting up more and more as folks take the farm-totable practice into their backyards — and now’s the time of year when the first signs of spring have many of us eagerly anticipating those tasty tomatoes, juicy melons, fresh salad greens, crisp cucumbers, and other fresh edibles that come from our own gardens. These tips will help power up your planting and maximize your yields for a tastier, more productive kitchen garden.

 4  5  6  7

1 2

 repare the soil P Healthy soil is the foundation to growing healthy and extra-productive plants. Enriching the soil with a 1- to 2-inch layer of aged manure or compost (see Page 26) each spring will encourage a more extensive root system that can better access nutrients and water deep in the soil.  aise your beds R Raised garden beds not only make the most efficient use of space, they also make planting, growing, and harvesting a whole lot easier — and they work exceptionally well at defining your planting areas, which makes it easier to keep weeds under control.

3

 ake use of mulch M Shredded leaves, straw, grass clippings, compost, and other organic mulch help conserve soil moisture, moderate soil temperatures, improve soil texture, and deter weeds. Covering the soil with a 2- to 4-inch layer of organic mulch in spring or early summer will help ensure great yields.



I nclude paths Loose and fertile soil is a key element to healthy plants. Each time you step on your garden beds, the soil compacts a bit more. Make paths between garden beds, as well as mini-paths in a wide garden bed, so feet stay off the prime growing areas.



Step it up with seedlings Jump-start your own seeds indoors, or buy transplants from your local garden center. Using living plants instead of directly seeding the garden often produces better yields and shortens the time to harvest.



Position plants for productivity Plant in blocks or squares rather than rows — you can grow more plants in a square foot of multiple planting areas than you can in widely spaced rows.



Grow high-yield veggies Whether buying seeds or transplants, certain features will give you the upper edge to greater yields. Look for labels such as “disease resistant,” “improved yields,” “consistent grower,” or “ever-bearing.”

 8



Plan for plant diversity Growing herbs, flowers, and other plants with your veggies creates better plant diversity in the garden by attracting birds, pollinating bees, and helpful insects that feast on bad bugs.

 9



Keep bare spots to a minimum Succession planting helps keep your garden producing right through the growing season. Replant each area as soon as the previous crop is harvested; for example, early-spring snap peas might be followed by early peppers, then fall radishes.

10

 tilize the vertical dimension U Grow pole beans, winter squash, and other vining vegetables and fruits on an arbor, fence, or vertical trellis. You’ll produce more abundant yields in less space, and the added sun and air will bring a superior quality to produce.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

25


gardening issue

BY PAMELA A. KEENE

COMPOSTING : The ultimate way to recycle Stop: Don’t toss out those nonmeat kitchen scraps. By following the right techniques and combination of ingredients, you can have some of the best and least-expensive garden soil amendments. “The secret to successful gardening is the quality of the soil you plant in, and when you amend your soil with compost, you’re improving your chances for a more productive garden,” says Joe Lamp’l, founder of joegardener.com and the television program Growing a Greener World, which is broadcast in many parts of the country. He also produces podcasts that air on JoeGardener.com and is a sought-after speaker at regional and national gardening symposiums and workshops. “Commercial soil amendments and organic material can be expensive, but when you can make

your own out of kitchen scraps, grass clippings, and leaves, everyone wins. It’s really not that hard, and you can have fun in the process.” Without getting too technical, compost is made from biodegraded organic matter. In the right proportions and conditions, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, earthworms, and arthropods (such as beetles and springtails) break down the materials. There are four basic ingredients to make compost: carbon (brown waste), nitrogen (green waste), air, and water.

You can build a multi-stage composting system by connecting several wooden pallets together.

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018


Composting turns nonmeat, nonfat kitchen scraps and clean yard waste into rich, nutritions garden additive.

“You don’t need any fancy equipment or tools to start a compost heap,” he says. “Just select an out-ofthe-way spot — behind some shrubs or a far corner of your yard — and you can just begin putting the ingredients into a pile. Find an easy-to-access place with water nearby and you’re all set.” If you want to contain the pile, build a three-sided wire cage, or tie three wooden pallets together with coat hangers. You can also order closed composting systems online or from garden centers. Your batches will be smaller than when using an open bin, but the results will be faster. “Start with woody materials, branches, or sticks that will aid in ventilation, then layer brown, then green materials, using a formula of roughly two-thirds brown and one-third green,” Lamp’l says. Examples of green materials, which have a higher nitrogen content, include fresh grass clippings, pulled weeds, and nonmeat, nonfat kitchen scraps such as vegetable and fruit peelings and cores, coffee grounds, and used tea leaves. Brown ingredients, those that furnish carbon that’s important to the decomposition process, include dried leaves, shredded cardboard or paper, and small wood chips. You can add a shovelful of garden soil or a handful of

fertilizer such as 10-10-10 or Milorganite slow-acting fertilizer to speed up the process. It’s important to keep the pile moist, with the consistency of a damp sponge, and regularly aerated. Also, make sure the ingredients added are not too big. As the pile decomposes, it creates heat that further breaks down the ingredients. Some gardeners periodically cover the pile for a couple of weeks with black plastic garbage bags to hold in heat. Composting can take two months to a year or more, depending on the ratio of brown to green ingredients, how often the pile is turned or aerated, how much heat is generated during the process, the size of the pile, and other conditions. Adding compost to your garden will increase the level of nutrients and improve the texture of the soil. “Once you’re started composting, using it in your garden and as top-dressing for your landscape, you’ll never go back,” Lamp’l says. “It’s one of the best ways to truly recycle and save money at the same time. And your gardening successes will improve.” PAMELA A. KEENE is a freelance writer based in Atlanta.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

27


GARDENING ISSUE

BY TONI LELAND

Jazz up your garden WITH

interesting shapes

CANNAS

Color and texture are triedand-true ways to add interest to your garden, but gardeners may not always stop to consider shapes. Contrast feathery with bold, tall and slender with wide and round, or any other variations you can imagine. Here are a few plants that just might inspire you.

Cannas are wonderful large additions to any garden, be it a border or a foundation bed. The many varieties provide gorgeous, exotic blooms in a variety of colors, but sometimes the leaves are the stars. Canna ‘Cleopatra’ spends most of her life as foliage in your garden, sporting large vivid green leaves slashed with burgundy. In July, she produces tricolor blooms in red, yellow, and orange with speckles. Bulbs should be dug in fall to overwinter.

28

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

CROCOSMIA

EDELWEISS


Crocosmia is a showy bulb ordinarily used as an annual. For a tall statement in the garden, crocosmia grows to 4 feet by 2 feet and stuns the senses with long stalks of brilliant scarlet flowers from June through August. Plant in full sun with some shade in the hottest summer areas. Bulbs can be dug in the fall and stored for replanting in spring. Edelweiss is an alpine perennial that always gets attention. Lowgrowing gray-green, somewhat furry, lance-shaped leaves spread out, then in July, stems pop up and produce the most interesting fuzzy, white, wooly blooms. It grows to about 1 foot with about the same spread in full sun. This plant looks great paired with astilbe and heuchera. Goatsbeard can command all the attention at the back of the landscape bed, looking for all the world like a giant astilbe. The pinnate leaves are dark green and lacy, forming a lovely background for the showy plumes of white flowers that appear in May. This perennial grows to 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide. It loves full sun with some shade, needs plenty of moisture, and tolerates rabbits.

Lupine is an old-fashioned plant that is often overlooked because it does poorly in hot weather. Tuck this herbaceous perennial into a sunny spot that has light shade from intense afternoon sun, and you’ll be rewarded in the spring and early summer with tall spikes of fragrant flowers. The leaf clusters look like small palm trees, and the scent of lupine in full bloom is incredible. It is attractive to butterflies and slugs. Foxglove is another old-fashioned plant that needs some patience, as it only blooms the second year, but the stalks of trumpet-shaped flowers are stunning at the back of a bed, and the velvety leaves contrast nicely with other plants. Foxglove grows to 5 feet and comes in several colors, but the most common are yellow or purple. Plant in full sun to part shade and watch the hummingbirds arrive. It tolerates rabbits and deer. Red Hot Poker is a dynamite plant to put into a sunny, dry garden space. Once established, this herbaceous perennial grows to about 3 feet tall with sword-like leaves and a brilliant orange bloom that opens slowly and lasts a long time. It tolerates rabbits, deer, drought, and dry soil. Continued on Page 30

LUPINE

GOATSBEARD

FOXGLOVE

RED HOT POKER

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

29


gardening issue Continued from Page 29

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

Talk to us When life gets busy and hectic, what’s your favorite stress-break that lets your brain rest for awhile? Do you crochet? Work puzzles? Take a long hike? Tell us by connecting with your electric cooperative on Facebook, and we’ll include the top tips in a future Ohio Cooperative Living.


Rhubarb. Who would have thought to use this vegetable as an ornamental? Gorgeous huge, ruffled leaves start in early spring, then come May, tall stalks of lacy white flowers appear. It makes a beautiful statement in a large landscape bed, with the added plus of fresh rhubarb stalks during the second year of growth. It tolerates rabbits.

Sweetfern is a deciduous shrub with narrow, fragrant, deeply notched lustrous green leaves of about 4 inches. The effect is lacy and a wonderful backdrop to bolder plants. It grows well in full sun to part shade and is low maintenance. It produces insignificant flowering, but the resulting burr-type nutlets add interest. The plant tolerates drought. Taro ‘Cranberry’ or ‘Black Magic’ is a bulb to be reckoned with! A spectacular addition to a sunny garden (although hot afternoon sun will bleach the leaves), Taro grows to 6 by 6 feet, producing green-black, heartshaped leaves that measure almost 2 feet long. Taro is a tender bulb and should be lifted in the fall. It tolerates wet soil and is a good choice for pond-side. TONI LELAND is a master gardener from Ohio who now writes from her home in Connecticut.

TARO

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

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OHIO’S

BY SAMANTHA KUHN

BLARNEY

FASCINATION S

t. Patrick’s Day festivities, embroidered pillows bearing Irish blessings, leprechaun coloring books, and lucky four-leaf clover kits — without a doubt, America embraces all things “Irish,” especially during Irish-American Heritage Month in March. The Buckeye State is doused in Irish influence, as those of Irish heritage were among the earliest white settlers in Ohio in the late 1700s to early 1800s, immigrating to escape Ireland’s potato famine, and finding work as laborers on the canals and railroads. More than 13 percent of Ohioans are Irish, according to the 2013 U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey. Irish is Ohio’s second-most frequently reported ancestry, trailing German. Perhaps most evident of the Emerald Isle’s influence in Ohio is the number of restaurants, bars, businesses, streets, and even 5K runs named after the Blarney Stone, a legendary block of limestone built into Blarney Castle, a medieval fortress near Cork, Ireland. The original castle dates from before 1200. Today, more than 200,000 tourists from around the world visit Blarney Castle each year to kiss the Blarney Stone, which, according to Irish folklore, gives the kisser the ability to speak with eloquence. Hollywood stars, political icons, literary geniuses, and well-known figures from around the world have climbed the narrow, uneven staircases through the maze-like castle to attain the “Gift of Gab.” Scores of notables, from former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to rock singer Mick Jagger, have smooched the stone. The stone is situated 85 feet up, on the east wall of the battlement, and in order to land a kiss, you have to bend backward while grabbing a railing for support with a guard holding your legs to ensure you don’t slip through the opening and fall to your death — once upon a time, that did happen when visitors were dangled by their ankles over the ledge and lowered headfirst to kissing level. Now that it’s a bit safer, the Discovery Travel Channel has listed kissing the Blarney Stone among its 99 things to do before you die.

34

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018


Y

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SAMANTHA KUHN is associate editor of Ohio Cooperative Living. She and her husband recently honeymooned in Ireland, where she kissed the Blarney Stone.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

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Though you may never have the opportunity to smooch the Blarney Stone, you can visit an Ohio Blarney establishment near you with minimal effort — Ohio has a not-so-secret fascination with the ancient castle and its ability to impart the gift of gab. Here are a few of the more well-known spots in Ohio that have borrowed the attention-grabbing name.  The Blarney Stone, 13334 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, 216-941-6972: Owned by an Irish family from County Mayo, the McGowans, this no-frills Irish pub is where visitors go for an authentic experience. Here, you won’t find anything flashy — just perfectly poured Guinness and friendly service.  The Blarney Irish Pub, 601 Monroe St., Toledo, 419-418-2339, theblarneyirishpub.com: Owner Ed Beczynski visited over 35 pubs in Ireland in March 2006, and he was inspired to open an Irish pub in downtown Toledo. After finding the right building with an old feel, he opened The Blarney the same year, buying much of the furniture and décor from Ireland. With nostalgic Guinness advertisements,

windows reminiscent of cathedral stained glass, and live music Thursday through Saturday, the pub is often packed to near-full capacity on weekends.  Blarney Stone Tavern, 2151 W. Dublin Granville Rd., Worthington, 614-505-6041, blarneystonetavern.com: With a bevy of entertainment ranging from local bands to holiday shows and free trivia on Tuesday nights, this tavern maintains a warm atmosphere year-round. Patrons can reserve a private room or section of the bar for events, and the bar’s rotating list of beers and whiskey is sure to please. Their motto, “Irish soul, American attitude” reflects their kitchen options, so don’t leave without trying their Blarney Burger.

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MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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MARCH 2018 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST

p.m., $30. Toledo’s premier wine festival, featuring wine tasting, tions. Pure maple syrup for sale. 937-843-2717 or http://parks. food, and shopping. 419-255-3300 or www.eriepromotions.com. ohiodnr.gov/indianlake. MAR. 3–4 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima (2 miles east of Lima on St. Rte. 309), Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, members and under 18 free. Over 400 tables of guns, knives, hunting equipment, and collectibles for purchase. 419-647-0067 or www.tristategunshow.org.

MAR. 23–25 – PRO Home and Garden Show, SeaGate Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave., Toledo, Fri. 4-8 p.m., Sat.10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Interior and exterior products for your new or ready home, plus the latest in home design. 419-4710101 or www.hireaprotoday.com.

MAR. 4 – Lima Symphony Family Concert: Just Dance!, Civic Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 3 p.m. $10. 419-222-5701 or www. limasymphony.com.

MAR. 24 – Maple Syrup Festival, Williams Co. Fgds., 619 E. Main St., Montpelier, 8 a.m.–noon. $5, under 7 free. Pancake and sausage breakfast starts at 7:30 a.m. Learn about tree tapping and the collection process, and about Ohio native wildlife, forestry, wood carving, beekeeping, gardening, and much more. 419-636-9395 or e-mail amichaels@williamsswcd.org.

MAR. 8 – Toledo Symphony Concert, Sauder Village, Founders Hall, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 7:30 p.m. Advance tickets recommended. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org. MAR. 1–18 – “Fired Up: Contemporary Glass by Women Artists,” Glass Pavilion, Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Showcases the most innovative and celebrated women glass artists. 419255-8000 or http://www.toledomuseum.org/exhibitions. MAR. 2 – Glass City Beer Festival, Lucas Co. Recreation Ctr., 2901 Key St., Maumee, 6–11 p.m. Featuring over 40 craft breweries and more than 230 beers, food vendors, and live music. Free parking. 419-724-2739 or https://glasscitybeerfest.com.

MAR. 8–11, 15–18 – The Great American Trailer Park Musical, Van Wert Civic Theatre, 118 S. Race St., Van Wert, Thur.–Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $15. 419-238-9689 or www.vwct.org. MAR. 10 – Lima Irish Festival, Robb Ave. and Main St., Lima, noon–1 p.m. Starts at the corner of Robb Ave. and Main St., heading south to the Town Square. To participate in the parade, register by calling 419-860-0072.

MAR. 10–11 – Spring Festival of Crafts, Stranahan Great Hall, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 MAR. 3 – Annual Arrowhead Day, Lowe-Volk Park, 2401 St. Rte. a.m.–4 p.m. Free. New crafts, gifts, and decorating ideas. Drop off 598, Crestline, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Free. Local artifact collections and household and food items to benefit Toledo SeaGate Food Bank. more. Bring your own artifacts for identification. 419-683-9000 419-842-1925 or www.toledocraftsmansguild.org/shows.html. or www.crawfordparkdistrict.org. MAR. 17–18 – Maple Syrup Festival, Indian Lake State Park, MAR. 3 – Glass City Wine Festival, SeaGate Convention Ctr., 12774 St. Rte. 235 N., Lakeview. Pancake and sausage breakfast, 401 Jefferson Ave., Toledo. Tasting sessions: 1–4 p.m., $25; 6–9 wagon rides, tree-tapping tutorials, and processing demonstra-

NORTHEAST

competitive carvers, and wildlife/waterfowl artists. 419-8743671 or www.odcca.net. MAR. 10 – Geauga Fresh Farmers’ Market - Winter Market, Lowe’s Greenhouse and Gift Shop, 16540 Chillicothe Rd., Bainbridge, 9 a.m.–noon. Pastured meats, free-range eggs, winter vegetables, honey, maple syrup, and bakery items. 330348-3053 or www.geaugafarmersmarket.com. MAR. 10–11 – Chagrin Falls Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Federated Church-Family Life Ctr., 16349 Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Falls, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Local artists and crafters selling original handmade items. Portion of proceeds benefits Cleveland Animal Protective League. 440-227-8794 or www.avantgardeshows.com.

THROUGH MAR. 4 – Cleveland Auto Show, IX Center, One I-X Dr., Cleveland. $13, Srs./C. (7–12) $11, under 7 free. Indoor test drives, vehicle giveaway, classic car competition, and other special features. See website for hours and schedule of events. www.clevelandautoshow.com. MAR. 3–4 – Dave & Ed’s Super Auto Events Pro-Formance Swap Meet, Stark Co. Fgds., 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton, Sat. 8 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.–3 p.m. Single day $7, weekend pass $10, under 12 free. Ohio’s largest indoor/outdoor performance meet. 330-477-8506 or www.autoevents.com. MAR. 3–4, 10–11 – Maple Syrup Festival, Malabar Farm State Park, 4050 Bromfield Rd., Lucas, 12–4 p.m. Free. Experience sugar camp with live historical demonstrations. Enjoy horsedrawn wagon rides, music, and food. Donations to the horse group appreciated. 419-892-2784 or www.malabarfarm.org. MAR. 9–11 – Ohio Decoy Collectors and​Carvers Association Show and Sale, Holiday Inn, 15471 Royalton Rd., ​ Strongsville, Fri. 8 a.m.–10 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 17 free. A venue for decoy collectors,

WEST VIRGINIA

MAR. 10–11, 17–18 – Maple Sugar Festival and Pancake Breakfast, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath. $15, C. (3–12) $10, Members $5. Enjoy a hearty breakfast and learn about tree tapping and the maple sugar process. See oxen demonstrations and view period arts and crafts demonstrations. Breakfast served 10 a.m.–3 p.m. www.wrhs.org/events. MAR. 17 – Annual Campbell-Dickinson St. Patrick Bike/Run/ Walk and Kids 1K, 201 S.4th St., Toronto. Adults $15; Stds. 11– 18, $10; C. 1–10, $7. Proceeds go to the Tony Teramana Cancer Center TEAR Fund. 740-317-3947 or www.thegemcity.org. MAR. 17 – Mutts Gone Nuts, Renaissance Performing Arts, 138 Park Ave.W., Mansfield, 7 p.m. $15–$24. From shelters to showbiz, these amazing mutts unleash havoc and hilarity in an action-packed, comedy dog spectacular. 419-522-2726 or www.mansfieldtickets.com. MAR. 18 – Bubble Guppies Live: Ready to Rock, KeyBank State Theatre, Playhouse Square, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, 2 p.m. From $10. A hilarious rocking, interactive show that teaches kids about a wide range of topics. 216-771-4444 or www.playhousesquare.org/events.

MAR. 10–18 – Mid-Ohio Valley Quilt Show, Blennerhassett Island Historical State Park Museum, 137 Juliana St., Parkersburg. $4, C. $2. Entries accepted March 2–3. 304-420-4800. MAR. 18–23 – Quilters’ Spring Retreat, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. Enjoy the peaceful atmosphere of the park while working on some long-put-off quilting projects. 304-643-2931 or www.northbendsp.com.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

MAR. 24 – Marsh Madness Hike, Maumee Bay State Park, 1400 State Park Rd., Oregon, 10–11 a.m. Guided hike around the boardwalk. We’ll be celebrating World Frog Day and focus on the amphibians who call our marsh home. 419-836-9117 or http:// parks.ohiodnr.gov/maumeebay. MAR. 24–25 – Williams County Antique Show and Sale, Montpelier Schools, 1015 E. Brown Rd. (Co. Rd. K), Montpelier, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Antiques, collectibles, vintage, and mid-century modern, including furniture, glass, toys, farm, and primitive items. Appraisal station 11 a.m.–2 p.m, both days; $5 per person, limit 2 items. 419-4858200 or www.williamscountyhistory.org.

MAR. 18 – Teddy Bear Concert: Peter and the Wolf, Renaissance Performing Arts, 138 Park Ave.W., Mansfield, 2:30 p.m. $5. A classic orchestral story is paired with a cute story adaptation. Perfect for young ones and their families. 419-522-2726 or www.mansfieldtickets.com. MAR. 23–24 – Historical and Militaria Collectors Show and Police/Fire/EMS Collectors Show, Lakeland Community College, Athletic and Fitness Center Main Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland (Rt. 306 and I-90 exit 193), Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, Stds. $3; veterans and active military with ID, $3. Admission covers both shows. Over 150 tables of items to buy, sell, or trade. Military relics including uniforms, edged weapons, medals and decoration, helmets, WWII memorabilia, and more. 440-525-7529, lakelandmilitariashow@gmail.com, or www.facebook.com/lakeland.militaria.show. MAR. 23–25 – Tri-State Home and Garden Show, St. Florian Hall, 286 Luray Dr., Wintersville. 740-282-6226. MAR. 24 – Avon Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Emerald Event Ctr., 33040 Just Imagine Dr., Avon, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Artists and crafters selling original handmade items. Portion of proceeds will benefit a local nonprofit, Prayers From Maria. www.avantgardeshows.com. MAR. 24 – Concert: The Hoppers, Ohio Star Theater, 1387 Old Rte. 39, Sugarcreek, 7 p.m. Award-winning group known as the “favorite family of gospel music.” 855-344-7547 or www.dhgroup.com/theater. MAR. 24 – Mt. Hope Train and Toy Show, 8076 St. Rte. 241, Mt. Hope, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Over 600 dealer tables. All gauges and parts, running layouts, farm and vintage toys, die-cast models, and more. Food catered by Mrs. Yoder’s Kitchen. 330-262-7488, cathijon@sssnet.com, or www.cjtrains.com. MAR. 24–25 – Antlers and Anglers, Ashland Co. Fgds., 2042 Claremont Ave., Ashland. $2. Vendors, seminars, food, prizes, and more. 419-289-1343 or www.armstrongonewire.com.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

CENTRAL

camp options from throughout central Ohio, family activities, and much more. 877-543-7801 or www.kidslinked.com.

Suzanne Newcomb, and the winners of our Student Concerto Competition. www.newalbanysymphony.net.

MAR. 9–11 – All American Columbus Pet Expo, Ohio Expo Ctr., Multi-Purpose and Buckeye Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. 1–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Includes the All About Cats Expo, Columbus Bounce Mania, and the Mega Pet Adoption. www.allaboutcatsexpo.com.

MAR. 16–17, 23–24 – Magic Tree House: Dinosaurs Before Dark, Epiphany Lutheran Church, 268 Hill Rd. N., Pickerington, Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15, Srs./C. $12. Presented by Pickerington Community Theatre. All-kid musical based on the award-winning children’s adventure series by Mary Pope Osborne. 614-508-0036 or http://pctshows.com.

MAR. 10 – Brass Transit: “The Musical Legacy of Chicago,” Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 8 p.m. $18–$28. This eight-piece Toronto group performs Chicago’s catalog from the ’70s. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

MAR. 1–4 – Arnold Sports Festival, Greater Columbus Convention Ctr., 400 N. High St., Columbus, Daily EXPO ticket, $15 (plus fees) in advance, $20 at door, under 14 free. Fitness and fun for all ages, with more than 75 sports and events, including 17 Olympic sports. See website for daily schedules. www.arnoldsportsfestival.com. MAR. 3 – Columbus Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Makoy Event Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Artists and crafters selling original handmade items. Portion of proceeds will benefit local nonprofit Hope Hollow. www.avantgardeshows.com. MAR. 4 – Wedding Expo and Show, Columbus Marriott, 5605 Blazer Pkwy., Dublin, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Fashion shows 12:30 and 3 p.m. $5 advance, $8 at door, under 13 free. http://ohiobridalexpos.com. MAR. 8 – KidsLinked KidsFest, Marysville YMCA, 1150 Charles Ln., Marysville, 5–8 p.m. Great family-friendly event featuring

SOUTHEAST

MAR. 10 – Maple Tapping Festival and Pancake Breakfast, Charles Alley Nature Park, 2805 Old Logan Rd. SE, Lancaster. Breakfast 8–11 a.m. ($5). Festival 8 a.m.–noon (free). 740681-5025. MAR. 10 – St. Patrick’s Day Celebration and Parade, Bridge and High Sts., Dublin, 7 a.m.–12 p.m. Free. Events take place throughout the city, starting around 7:30 a.m. with a pancake breakfast, followed by the parade at 11 a.m. 800-245-8387 or www.irishisanattitude.com. MAR. 10–11 – Maple Sugaring, Hocking Hills State Park, 19852 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan, 12–4 p.m. Meet at the Naturalist Cabin located behind the Old Man’s Cave Visitor Center. 740-385-6842 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/hockinghills. MAR. 15 – KidsLinked KidsFest, Healthy New Albany, 150 W. Main St., New Albany, 5–9 p.m. Free. Family-friendly event features camp options from throughout central Ohio, family activities, and much more. 877-543-7801 or www.kidslinked.com. MAR. 11 – Lions, Tigers, and Bears — Oh My!, New Albany Symphony, 100 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., New Albany, 3 p.m. $12–$20. Our annual children’s concert goes under the Big Top for a carnival of sights and sounds featuring Orlay Alonso,

MAR. 16–18 – Ohio Deer and Turkey Expo, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. 2–9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Hundreds of exhibitors, demos and displays, contests, free seminars, gear, and more. www.deerinfo.com/ohio. MAR. 18 – Columbus Toy and Collectible Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., Lausche Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $7, under 13 free. Early admission 8–9 a.m., $10. Buy, sell, and trade new and used toys, video games, and collectibles. www.ctspromotions.com. MAR. 18 – Ragtime Rick & the Chefs of Dixieland, Clintonville Woman’s Club, 3951 N. High St., Columbus, 2–5 p.m. Sponsored by the Central Ohio Hot Jazz Society. 614-5582212 or www.cohjs.org. MAR. 23 – Lone Raven, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7:30 p.m. $18, C. $12. Fiery Irish reels, Gypsy fiddle tunes of Romania, and haunting melodies will fill the air when central Ohio’s renowned Celtic group takes center stage. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. MAR. 25 – NINE, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 3 p.m. $16. Easter celebration with the a cappella singing group NINE (No Instruments Needed Ever) performingspiritual, gospel, and Gaither-style songs. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

MAR. 3 – National Cambridge Glass Collectors “All Cambridge Benefit Auction,” Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge, preview at 8:30 a.m., auction at 9:30 a.m. $2. 740-432-4245 or www.cambridgeglass.org.

MAR. 16–17 – River City Blues and Jazz Festival, Lafayette Hotel, 101 Front St., Marietta. Talented blues and jazz performers from around the country. 304-615-7997, 740-376-0222, or http://bjfm.org/blues-festival.

MAR. 3 – Statehood Day Celebration, various locations, Chillicothe, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Celebrate Statehood Day in the first capital of Ohio! Includes tours, mock debate on becoming a state, and special displays and exhibits. 800-413-4118 or www. visitchillicotheohio.com/events.

MAR. 17 – Muddy Leprechaun: St. Patrick’s Day Trail Run, 9:30 a.m. $30–$35. Hosted by the Hope Clinic of Ross County. Run or walk this little-known trail through the Hopewell Mound Group, part of the Hopewell Culture National Historic Park. https://runsignup.com/Race/OH/Chillicothe/ MuddyLeprechaun4MileRunWalk.

MAR. 9–11 – Home, Garden, and Business Expo, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, Fri. 11 a.m.– MAR. 18 – Southeastern Ohio Symphony Orchestra Children’s 8 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. noon–5 p.m. 740-439-6688 or Concert, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Camwww.cambridgeohiochamber.com. bridge, 3:30 p.m. 740-826-8197 or www.seoso.org.

MAR. 1–3 – The Colony Short Film Festival, Peoples Bank Theatre, 222 Putnam St., Marietta, $5–$10, weekend pass $18–$50. A showcase for independent films from all over the U.S. and across the globe, with a focus on featuring local and regional talent from the Ohio Valley. Features range from innovative to off-the-wall, and quirky to provocative. 740-371-5152 or www.peoplesbanktheatre.com. MAR. 2–4, 9–11 – Kiss Me, Kate, Stuart’s Opera House, 2 Public Square, Nelsonville, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Advance tickets $12, Stds. $8. Presented by the ABC Players. 740-753-1924 or www.stuartsoperahouse.org.

SOUTHWEST

MAR. 10 – The McCartney Project, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7:30 p.m. $18–$20. Songs from The Beatles, Wings, and Paul McCartney. 740-772-2041 or www. majesticchillicothe.net/events/event/mccartney-project. MAR. 10 – Miller’s Automotive-Racers Swap Meet, Ross Co. Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $7, under 14 free. From restoration to racing: race cars, tools, hot rods, apparel, collectibles, go-karts, and more. 740-701-2511 or 740-701-3447. MAR. 16 – Living Word Banquet and Auction, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 5–9 p.m. $30. 740-439-2761 or www.livingworddrama.org.

Co. Fgds., 665 N. Broadway, Lebanon, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $7 at door, $5 online. Free parking. Quilts, patterns, fabrics, vintage textiles, and more. 513-932-1817 or www.wchsmuseum.org. MAR. 2–4 – GemStreet USA, Sharonville Convention Ctr., 11355 Chester Rd., Cincinnati, Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $7, under 12 free. Fine gems, jewelry, beads, minerals, and fossils. www.gemstreetusa.com. MAR. 3 – Maple Sugarin’ at the Prairie, 4267 St. Rte. 502, Greenville, 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Sugar shack, guided tours, learn the process of turning sap into syrup. 937-548-0165 or www. darkecountyparks.org.

MAR. 1–4 – Cincinnati Home and Garden Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati, Wed.–Fri. noon–8 p.m., Sat. 10:30 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m. $11 online, $13 at door. www.cincinnatihomeandgardenshow.com. MAR. 2–3 – Lebanon Quilt and Fabric Arts Show, Warren

MAR. 5 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Miami University Downtown Downhome, 221 High St., Hamilton, 7–9 p.m. Free. Lively bluegrass music. vaughnjh@gmail.com. MAR. 11 – Cincinnati Spring Avante-Garde Art and Craft Show, Oasis Golf Club and Conference Ctr., 902 Loveland-Miamiville Rd., Loveland, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Artists and crafters selling original handmade items. Portion of proceeds benefits Dragon Fly Foundation. www.

MAR. 18, 21 – Vertigo, Athena Grand, 1008 E. State St., Athens, 7 p.m. $12.50. 740-593-8800 or wwww.athenagrand.com. MAR. 22–24 – Cambridge Lions Club Variety Show, Scottish Rite Auditorium, 941 Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, 7:30 p.m. $10. 740-260-1149 or www.cambridgelions.com. MAR. 31 – Easter Egg Hunt, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd. (St. Rte. 22), Cambridge. 740-435-3335 or www.deerassic.com. MAR. 31 – Forgotten Places and Spaces Walking Tour, historic downtown Cambridge, 3–4:30 p.m. 740-705-1873 or www. ohiomadegetaways.com.

avantgardeshows.com. MAR. 17 – Cabin Fever Arts Festival, Southern State Community College, Patriot Ctr. Gym, 100 Hobart Dr., Hillsboro, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Over 60 artisans with handcrafted work. 937-393-2747 or www.appartguild.com. MAR. 23–24 – Southern Ohio Indoor Music Festival, Roberts Ctr., 123 Gano Rd., Wilmington, 10 a.m.–11 p.m. $35–$65. Award-winning bluegrass, old-time, and gospel music and family fun. 937-372-5804 or http://somusicfest. com/index.html. MAR. 24 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Plain Folk Café, 10177 St. Rte. 132, Pleasant Plain, 7:30 p.m. Free. Lively bluegrass music. 513-877-2526, contactus@plainfolkcafe. com, or www.plainfolkcafe.com. MAR. 31 – Easter Egg Hunt, Caesar Creek State Park, 8570 E. St. Rte. 73, Waynesville, 12 p.m. Find hidden eggs with prizes. Afterward, learn how to identify native birds, eggs, and nests. 513-897-3055 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/caesarcreek.

MARCH 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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MEMBER INTERACTIVE

BabyFaces 2

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1. My daughter, Hazel, decided her new headband was better suited as an eye patch. Sarah Copeland South Central Power Company member 2. Our grandson, Ronin, at 8 months old. Cheryl and Jim Fortman Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative member 3. My granddaughter, Madilyn Ella Rayne Pennell, strikes a pose. Wayne Klass Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member

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4. This is my granddaughter, Raelynn. She wanted to show you her beautiful blue eyes and her two new teeth. Kim McGuire Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative member

7. Our granddaughter was a very happy baby, unless you tried to swaddle her. Aspen Strickler Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member

5. Grandson Jeffrey, eating pasta with Grandma Beau’s homemade sauce — his favorite. Patty Quaglia South Central Power Company member

8. My daughter, Evelyn Wolters, making a funny face at her aunt. Dan Wolters, Midwest Electric member

6. My grandson, Zane Reber, watching his Uncle Talus Reber play soccer. Tracey Reber Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative member

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2018

9. A smile after a weeklong battle with chickenpox. Carter Schmid Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative member 10. My great-niece on her first Christmas at GreatGrandma and Great-Grandpa Rhodes’s house! Kendra Hess South Central Power Company member


LET US BE FIRST!

Stay away from storm debris. Power lines can be hidden! Let us inspect the area before you clean up downed trees and branches.

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Ohio Cooperative Living - March 2018 - Firelands  
Ohio Cooperative Living - March 2018 - Firelands