Page 1

Firelands Electric Cooperative

JANUARY 2018 2019

Official publication | www.firelandsec.com

Snowy forecast Hanging out with Ohio’s visitors from the north

ALSO INSIDE Who’s who at the Statehouse Super snacks for game-day fun Unity in division in College Corner


Building the next generation of

LEADERS

THROUGH PROGRAMS LIKE: • Washington, D.C., Youth Tour • College scholarships • Be E3 Smart classroom curriculum • Safety and energy efficiency demonstrations

ohioec.org/purpose


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2019

INSIDE HIGHLIGHT 10 SNOWY FORECAST

Outdoors Editor Chip Gross explains last year’s irruption of snowy owls in the Buckeye State — and tells when it may happen again.

FEATURES 26 UNITED BY DIVISION

The town of College Corner sits directly on top of the Ohio-Indiana state line, which even serves as halfcourt in the high school gymnasium.

32 150 YEARS OF YOUNG’S Young’s Jersey Dairy near Yellow Springs hosts its own birthday party with all its iconic favorites.

Cover image on most issues: The penetrating stare of a snowy owl. Photo by Getty Images/manipulation by Anita Cook.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

YEAR IN REVIEW E

lectric cooperatives across Ohio had a busy and largely successful 2018, continuing to improve the reliability of your electric service while striving to hold down cost. The year’s highlights:

• Assuming operational responsibility from AEP for the Cardinal, Mone, and Greenville power plants. Initial results are promising, as we focus on running the plants safely, reliably, cost-competitively, and in an environmentally responsible manner. • The Cardinal Power Plant staff achieved two milestones never before seen in the plant’s 50-year history: 2 million hours without a lost-time injury and 1.5 million hours without an injury requiring an employee to be transferred or absent. Plant leaders are prepared to roll out the “Commitment to Zero Harm” initiative, designed to reduce the possibility of injuries both at work at a home — a mindset that already exists at our plants. • A team of 17 linemen from Ohio’s electric cooperatives journeyed to Guatemala to power two villages — Las Tortugas and San Jorge, bringing the benefits of electric service for the first time to nearly 1,000 impoverished residents. Donations from cooperative employees across the state provided shoes, electric stove tops, water filters, and school supplies to further benefit the people of those communities. • Dozens of line workers and support staff from cooperatives throughout Ohio spent several days assisting cooperatives in North Carolina with restoring power to thousands of members after devastating damage from the one-two punch of hurricanes Florence and Michael. • Expansion of education programs for cooperative directors and employees helped your cooperative provide the best possible electric service at a reasonable cost. The Central Ohio Lineworker Training program saw its biggest year yet. The four-year apprentice curriculum provides a path to journeyman certification, with hands-on training happening year-round in our state-of-theart indoor facility. • Long-term efforts to work with other utilities that own and operate the high-voltage grid facilities delivering power from our plants to your local cooperatives resulted in far fewer outages in recent years — about half of what we experienced 10 years ago. • Efforts to control costs enabled us to, once again, keep electric generation and transmission rates flat. The better news? Rates are likely to remain stable in 2019. It was a productive, eventful year for the men and women who work for Ohio’s electric cooperatives. I thank each of them for their diligent efforts to serve you. I’m also grateful for your continued patronage and support of your local electric cooperative.

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Efforts to control costs enabled us to, once again, keep electric generation and transmission rates flat. The better news? Rates are likely to remain stable in 2019.


January 2019 • Volume 61, No. 4

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES

SWING STATE: Ohio voters make a serious statement by electing a Republican governor and Democratic U.S. senator.

7 WHO REPRESENTS YOU? New statehouse rosters show changes in who represents areas served by Ohio electric cooperatives.

Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Rebecca Seum Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer

12 CO-OP PEOPLE

Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Craig Springer, Damaine Vonada, and Spencer Waugh.

15 GOOD EATS

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

FARM GIRL WITH CURLS: Lauren Schwab Eyre has made herself into an ag-ambassador from her Butler County pig farm.

 SUPER SNACKS: New flavors and old favorites make up a

tantalizing spread for guests to nosh during the big game.

19 LOCAL PAGES News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO

DIFFERENT KIND OF LINEMAN: One co-op has a unique

way to give recognition to high school football players.

30 OHIO ICON For all advertising inquiries, contact American Main Street Publications 800-626-1181 info@amp.coop The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes.

THESE ARE MY JEWELS: A statue outside the Ohio Statehouse pays tribute to some of the state’s political heroes.

36 CALENDAR

WHAT’S HAPPENING: January events and other things to do.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

NEW YEAR’S CHEERS: Readers show off different ways they ring

in the new year.

IN THIS ISSUE Columbus (p.7, 30) Berlin (p.10) Somerville (p.12) College Corner (p.26) Yellow Springs (p.23)

Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


Mike DeWine

Sherrod Brown

GOVERNOR ELECT

U.S. SENATE

SWING STATE

Ohio voters make several statements in recent election BY SPENCER WAUGH

Ohio’s electric cooperatives were born out of politics. It was President Franklin D. Roosevelt, recognizing the disparity between urban life (with electricity) and rural life (without electricity), who included the Rural Electrification Act (REA) as part of his New Deal. With that in mind, your cooperative remains actively engaged in government at the local, state, and federal levels. The decisions made by elected officials and regulators and the people elected or appointed to make those decisions have real impacts on the affordability, reliability, and safety of your electric system.

4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019


Ohio’s — and America’s — electric cooperatives played an active role in the November midterm election, including vigorous voter registration efforts and outreach to candidates during the campaign. Even though it was a midterm, it was apparent that the results would have an impact on the decisions made by policymakers in Columbus and Washington, D.C. — and, recognizing that importance, voters turned out at the highest rates in nearly 100 years. “There are a number of issues that we know are important to your cooperative and your community, and we will continue to communicate those issues to all of our elected representatives,” says Marc Armstrong, director of government relations at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. “Our political strength is based on the strong ties and trust that elected officials have with their electric cooperatives. By establishing relationships throughout this campaign season, we are in a strong position with all of our elected officials.” At the federal level, Democrats picked up 38 seats in the House of Representatives, giving them the majority in the lower chamber for the first time since 2010. In Ohio, 14 of 16 representatives were re-elected to Congress. Troy Balderson (R-Zanesville) won his first full term after earlier winning a special election to replace Pat Tiberi, who retired, and Anthony Gonzalez (R-Rocky River) won an election to replace Jim Renacci, who did not run for re-election in order to focus on his U.S. Senate campaign. Renacci was defeated in that race, as Ohio re-elected Democrat Sherrod Brown to a third term. Republicans, however, added two seats to their majority, which stands at 53 to 47. Brown touted his support of innovation in the energy sector during the campaign, including support of “the next generation of coal-based energy production,” as well as his work to support co-ops’ access to low-interest loans through the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Cordray, former Ohio treasurer and attorney general, in the governor’s race. DeWine promised to work on a range of issues that affect rural Ohioans, including reducing the opioid crisis and improving job training and the economic climate in order to bring new jobs to all areas of the state. Also winning statewide were Dave Yost (attorney general), Frank LaRose (secretary of state), Keith Faber (auditor), and Robert Sprague (treasurer).

The decisions made by elected officials and regulators and the people elected or appointed to make those decisions have real impacts on the affordability, reliability, and safety of your electric system. In the state House of Representatives, Democrats gained six seats, including three in suburban Franklin County. However, Republicans will keep a veto-proof majority with 60 seats in the 99-member chamber. In the state Senate, Republicans will maintain a 24 to 9 majority. Your cooperative will remain committed to playing an active role in policymaking at the local, state, and federal levels. But if the last few elections have taught us anything, it’s the importance of voters in rural Ohio and rural America to make it a priority to participate in government. The simplest way for cooperative members to do that is to make sure they vote every year for candidates who understand the important role cooperatives play in their communities.

Ohio voters elected Republicans to all five statewide executive offices. Mike DeWine defeated Richard

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


#

Clip this offer and please call today!

Now, from United of Omaha Life Insurance Company and Companion Life Insurance Company...

Whole Life Insurance. Are you between the ages of 45 and 85*? Then this GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE policy is for YOU! >> Choose from 4 benefit levels - up to $25,000! >> Rates “lock-in” at the age you enroll - never go up again! >> Call for your FREE all-by-mail enrollment packet! >> Call TOLL-FREE

1-866-429-4430

Or enroll online at

www.GetMutualDirect.com

NO medical exam!

NO health questions!

Plus... Proceeds paid directly to your beneficiary Builds cash value and is renewable up to age 100!**... Then automatically pays YOU full benefit amount! Policy cannot be canceled – EVER – because of changes in health!

Why this policy? Why now? Our graded death benefit whole life insurance policy can be used to pay funeral costs, final medical expenses...or other monthly bills. You know how important it can be to help protect your family from unnecessary burdens after you pass away. Maybe your own parents or loved one did the same for you. OR, maybe they DIDN’T and you sure wish they would have! The important thing is that, right now, you can make a decision that could help make a difficult time a little easier for your loved ones. It’s a responsible, caring and affordable decision. And, right now, it’s something you can do with one simple phone call. You may have been putting off purchasing life insurance, but you don’t have to wait another day. This offer is a great opportunity to help start protecting your family today.

Your affordable monthly rate will “lock-in” at your enrollment age* ... $3,000.00 Benefit

Age 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-85

Male $10.45 $11.50 $14.20 $17.20 $20.50 $27.40 $37.00 $50.50

Female $8.80 $9.70 $11.95 $13.30 $16.00 $21.40 $30.10 $42.55

$5,000.00 Benefit

Male $16.75 $18.50 $23.00 $28.00 $33.50 $45.00 $61.00 $83.50

Female $14.00 $15.50 $19.25 $21.50 $26.00 $35.00 $49.50 $70.25

$10,000.00 $25,000.00 Benefit

Benefit

Male Female Male Female $32.50 $27.00 $79.75 $66.00 $36.00 $30.00 $88.50 $73.50 $45.00 $37.50 $111.00 $92.25 $55.00 $42.00 $136.00 $103.50 $66.00 $51.00 $163.50 $126.00 $89.00 $69.00 $221.00 $171.00 $121.00 $98.00 $301.00 $243.50 $166.00 $139.50 $413.50 $347.25

The rates above include a $12 annual policy fee.

This is a solicitation of insurance, an agent (In OR & WA: producer) may contact you. These policies contain benefits,

reductions, limitations, and exclusions to include a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership. Policy Form ICC11L057P or state equivalent (in FL: 7722L-0505; in NY: 827Y-0505).

Not available in all states. In NY, during the first two years, 110% of premiums will be paid. Website unavailable for NY residents. EASY WAY Whole Life Insurance is underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Omaha, NE 68175, which is licensed nationwide except NY. Life insurance policies issued in NY are underwritten by Companion Life Insurance Company, Hauppauge, NY 11788. Each company is responsible for its own financial and contractual obligations. *Age eligibility and benefits may vary by state. **In FL policy is renewable until age 121. AFN44167_0113

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019


133RD OHIO GENERAL ASSEMBLY Legislators representing areas served by Ohio electric cooperatives Adams Rural Electric Cooperative

Darke Rural Electric Cooperative

Rep. Doug Green (R-Mount Orab); Rep. Brian Baldridge (R-Winchester); Rep. Shane Wilkin (R-Hillsboro); Sen. Joe Uecker (R-Miami Township); Sen. Bob Peterson (R-Sabina)

Rep. Todd Smith (R-Germantown); Rep. Jena Powell (R-Arcanum); Rep. Susan Manchester (R-Lakeview); Sen. Stephen Huffman (R-Tipp City); Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima)

Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative

Firelands Electric Cooperative

Rep. Brian Baldridge (R-Winchester); Rep. Shane Wilkin (R-Hillsboro); Rep. Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell); Rep. Jay Edwards (R-Nelsonville); Sen. Joe Uecker (R-Miami Township); Sen. Bob Peterson (R-Sabina); Sen. Frank Hoagland (R-Adena)

Rep. Mark Romanchuk (R-Mansfield); Rep. Dick Stein (R-Norwalk); Rep. Darrell Kick (R-Loundonville); Sen. Nathan Manning (R-North Ridgeville); Sen. Larry Obhof (R-Medina)

Butler Rural Electric Cooperative Rep. Lou Blessing III (R-Cincinnati); Rep. Naraj Antani (R-Miamisburg); Rep. Todd Smith (R-Germantown); Rep. Sara Carruthers (R-Hamilton); Rep. Candice Keller (R-Middletown); Sen. Bill Coley (R-West Chester); Sen. Stephen Huffman (R-Tipp City); Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering); Sen. Lou Terhar (R-Green Township)

Carroll Electric Cooperative Rep. Tim Ginter (R-Salem); Rep. Reggie Stoltzfus (R-Minerva); Rep. Don Jones (R-Freeport); Rep. Jack Cera (D-Bellarie); Rep. Brett Hillyer (R-Uhrichsville); Sen. Frank Hoagland (R-Adena); Sen. Jay Hottinger (R-Newark); Sen. Michael Rulli (R-Salem)

Consolidated Cooperative Rep. Mark Romanchuk (R-Mansfield); Rep. Kris Jordan (R-Ostrander); Rep. Rick Carfagna (R-Westerville); Rep. Scott Ryan (R-Newark); Rep. Tracy Richardson; (R-Marysville); Rep. Riordan McClain (R-Upper Sandusky); Sen. Andrew Brenner (R-Powell); Sen. Larry Obhof (R-Medina); Sen. Dave Burke (R-Marysville); Sen. Jay Hottinger (R-Newark)

The Frontier Power Company Rep. Larry Householder (R-Glenford); Rep. Brett Hillyer (R-Uhrichsville); Sen. Brian Hill (R-Zanesville); Sen. Jay Hottinger (R-Newark)

Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative Rep. Larry Householder (R-Glenford); Rep. Ron Hood (R-Ashville); Rep. Don Jones (R-Freeport); Rep. Al Landis (R-98); Sen. Brian Hill (R-Zanesville); Sen. Frank Hoagland (R-Adena); Sen. Jay Hottinger (R-Newark)

Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative Rep. Theresa Gavarone (R-Bowling Green); Rep. Jim Hoops (R-Napoleon); Rep. Jon Cross (R-Kenton); Rep. Riordan McClain (R-Upper Sandusky); Rep. Bill Reineke (R-Tiffin); Rep. Steve Arndt (R-Port Clinton); Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon); Sen. Randy Gardner (R-Bowling Green); Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima); Sen. Dave Burke (R-Marysville)

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   7


Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative Rep. Scott Wiggam (R-Wooster); Rep. Bill Roemer (R-Richfield); Rep. Darrell Kick (R-Loundonville); Rep. Larry Householder (R-Glenford); Rep. Brett Hillyer (R-Uhrichsville) Sen. Larry Obhof (R-Medina); Sen. Christina Roegner (R-Hudson); Sen. Jay Hottinger (R-Newark)

Licking Rural Electrification Association (The Energy Cooperative) Rep. Mark Romanchuk (R-Mansfield); Rep. Rick Carfagna (R-Westerville); Rep. Darrell Kick (R-Loundonville); Rep. Scott Ryan (R-Newark); Rep. Larry Householder (R-Glenford); Rep. Brett Hillyer (R-Uhrichsville); Sen. Andrew Brenner (R-Powell); Sen. Brian Hill (R-Zanesville); Sen. Larry Obhof (R-Medina); Sen. Jay Hottinger (R-Newark)

Logan County Electric Cooperative Rep. Jon Cross (R-Kenton); Rep. Susan Manchester (R-Lakeview); Rep. Nino Vitale (R-Urbana); Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon); Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima)

Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative Rep. Scott Wiggam (R-Wooster); Rep. Gayle Manning (R-North Ridgeville); Rep. Joe Miller (D-Amherst); Rep. Dick Stein (R-Norwalk); Rep. Steve Hambley (R-Brunswick); Rep. Darrell Kick (R-Loundonville); Sen. Nathan Manning (R-North Ridgeville); Sen. Larry Obhof (R-Medina)

Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative Rep. Bob Cupp (R-Lima); Rep. Jon Cross (R-Kenton); Rep. Susan Manchester (R-Lakeview); Rep. Tracy Richardson (R-Marysville); Rep. Riordan McClain (R-Upper Sandusky); Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon); Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima); Sen. Dave Burke (R-Marysville)

Midwest Electric Rep. Bob Cupp (R-Lima); Rep. Craig Riedel (R-Defiance); Rep. Susan Manchester (R-Lakeview); Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon); Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima)

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

North Central Electric Cooperative Rep. Mark Romanchuk (R-Mansfield); Rep. Theresa Gavarone (R-Bowling Green); Rep. Dick Stein (R-Norwalk); Rep. Rep. Bill Reineke (R-Tiffin); Sen. Nathan Manning (R-North Ridgeville); Sen. Larry Obhof (R-Medina); Sen. Dave Burke (R-Marysville)

North Western Electric Cooperative Rep. Jim Hoops (R-Napoleon) Rep. Craig Riedel (R-Defiance); Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon)

Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative Rep. Bob Cupp (R-Lima); Rep. Jim Hoops (Napoleon); Rep. Craig Riedel (R-Defiance); Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon); Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima)

Pioneer Electric Cooperative Rep. Phil Plummer (R-Dayton); Rep. Bill Dean (R-Xenia); Rep. Kyle Koehler (R-Springfield); Rep. Jena Powell (R-Arcanum); Rep. Susan Manchester (R-Lakeview); Rep. Nino Vitale (R-Urbana); Rep. Tracy Richardson (R-Marysville); Sen. Stephen Huffman (R-Tipp City); Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering); Sen. Robert Hackett (R-London); Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima); Sen. Dave Burke (R-Marysville)

South Central Power Company Rep. Richard Brown (D-Canal Winchester); Rep. Allison Russo (D-Columbus); Rep. Doug Green (R-Mount Orab); Rep. Larry Householder (R-Glenford); Rep. Tim Schaffer (R-Lancaster); Rep. Ron Hood (R-Ashville); Rep. Brian Baldridge (R-Winchester); Rep. Shane Wilkin (R-Hillsboro); Rep. Gary Scherer (R-Circleville); Rep. Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell); Rep. Don Jones (R-Freeport); Rep. Jack Cera (D-Bellaire); Sen. Tina Maharath (D-Canal Winchester);


d a e h A

rve u C he t of Limited Collector’s Edition

Not shown actual size.

Damascus steel forged to throw them for a curve at only $79

Sen. Joe Uecker (R-Miami Township); Sen. Stephanie Kunze (R-Hilliard); Sen. Bob Peterson (R-Sabina); Sen. Brian Hill (R-Zanesville); Sen. Frank Hoagland (R-Adena); Sen. Jay Hottinger (R-Newark)

Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative Rep. Theresa Gavarone (R-Bowling Green); Rep. Derek Merrin (R-Maumee); Rep. Jim Hoops (R-Napoleon); Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon); Sen. Randy Gardner (R-Bowling Green)

Union Rural Electric Cooperative Rep. Beth Liston (D-Dublin); Rep. Kris Jordan (R-Ostrander); Rep. Jon Cross (R-Kenton); Rep. Nino Vitale (R-Urbana); Rep. Tracy Richardson (R-Marysville); Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon); Sen. Robert Hackett (R-London); Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima); Sen. Stephanie Kunze (R-Hilliard); Sen. Andrew Brenner (R-Powell); Sen. Dave Burke (R-Marysville)

Washington Electric Cooperative Rep. Ron Hood (R-Ashville); Rep. Jay Edwards (R-Nelsonville); Rep. Don Jones (R-Freeport); Rep. Jack Cera (D-Bellaire); Sen. Brian Hill (R-Zanesville); Sen. Frank Hoagland (R-Adena)

F

or centuries, a Damascus Curva Damascus steel Knife, you’ll be blade was instantly ready to throw a recognizable and curve of your own. commanded Limited Reserves. immediate respect. Damascus steel Recognizable blades are a lost art because the unique form that only a and mysterious handful of artisan BONUS! Call today and you’ll also smelting process bladesmiths have receive this genuine leather sheath! left a one-of-amastered. These kind, rippled What customers are saying texture on the steel, and respected about Stauer knives... because Damascus steel’s sharp edge and êêêêê resistance to shattering were the stuff of “Very hefty, well-built knife and legend. If you carried Damascus steel, sheath. Extremely good-looking you were ahead of the curve. and utilitarian.” Today, you can own the legend. — R., Lacey, Washington

The Damascus Curva Knife celebrates legendary blades take time to forge those legendary blades. It uses modern and only a few are crafted each month. Damascus steel, with the same rippled Don’t let this beauty slip through your texture pattern on the blade, to create a curved folding knife that’s 7 ½" in total fingers. Call today! length. With a liner lock mechanism, Damascus Curva Folding Knife $179* which allows the knife to be opened Offer Code Price Only $79 + S&P and closed using just one hand, and a Save $100 ergonomic handle made of buffalo horn and colored bone, this $79 knife is a trophy for any hunter or collector. Your Insider Offer Code: CFK219-01 Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed. You must use the insider offer code to get Feel the knife in your hands, wear it our special price. 14101 Southcross Drive W., on your hip, inspect the impeccable ® Ste 155, Dept. CFK219-01 craftsmanship of Damascus steel. If Burnsville, Minnesota 55337 you don’t feel like we cut you a fair www.stauer.com deal, send it back within 30 days for *Discount is only for customers who a complete refund of the item price. use the offer code versus the listed But we believe that once you hold the original Stauer.com price. Rating of A+

1-800-333-2045

Stauer

• Damascus steel blade & bolster • Buffalo horn & colored bone handle • Liner lock • Overall length, open : 7 ½" • Includes genuine leather sheath

Stauer… Afford the Extraordinary.®

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   9


A Snowy

WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Winter

forecast STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

O

n Thanksgiving Day 2017, an uninvited guest arrived at an Amish farm just a few miles north of Berlin, Ohio — and decided to stay. It was a young snowy owl, and the bird hung around for several weeks, perching atop the peaks of Orris Wengerd’s several barns. It quickly became a celebrity, attracting hundreds of birders and photographers. The snowy was one of the first such owls to arrive in the Buckeye State last year. A few snowy owls migrate south from northern Canada to Ohio each winter, but last year saw many more of the spectacular white birds — think 5-foot wingspan — spending the winter in our region than usual. Ornithologists call it an irruption. “It seemed

Getting the shots I had never seen a snowy owl in the wild before last year, so I made a trek to the Wengerd farm, anticipating not only adding the bird to my life list but also photographing it, if possible. Arriving on a sunny, early-December morning, I thought the weather perfect for an arctic owl — temperature in the mid-20s with wind chill in the teens. I stayed several hours and during that time, was fortunate to take the photos accompanying this story — the flight shot being one of the best wildlife photographs I’ve ever made. I’d like to thank Tom Quinn, a member of Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative, for allowing me to also use his photo of a snowy owl perched atop a rock (top of page 11). He took the photo last winter at Lorain Harbor along the Lake Erie shoreline. Ohio’s next snowy owl irruption should occur during the winter of 2021–2022. We’ll see if I’m right …

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

to be a good irruption in Ohio last winter,” says Mark Shieldcastle, research director for the Black Swamp Bird Observatory (www.bsbo.org) in Oak Harbor, Ohio. “Well above normal.” Snowy owl populations peak every four years; the phenomenon is tied to a similar cycle in lemmings, their favorite prey. When lemming populations peak, snowy owl numbers respond in kind. Many more young owlets


are produced than normal during such years, and when winter arrives in the north and food becomes scarce, these young birds are forced south to survive. The adult birds, being more experienced hunters, tend to remain north. Snowies, being true birds of the arctic, think of traveling to Ohio and elsewhere in the northern U.S. as a winter vacation. They also are so used to seeing people that they often allow birders to get quite close. No matter how tempting, however, observers should resist that urge; causing an owl to fly means you’ve approached too closely and stressed it, making its survival that much more problematic. Instead, use a pair of binoculars or a telephoto lens to enjoy the bird at a distance. “As big as snowies look,” says Shieldcastle, “I was shocked, after handling so many bald eagles, at just how small the bird is in comparison — they’re all feathers. It’s no wonder that a snowy owl is no match for an eagle. However, the feet of a snowy, with all that dense feathering and surface area, would give the impression it could walk on water if it wanted.” W.H. “CHIP” GROSS, a member of Consolidated Cooperative, is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor; email him at whchipgross@gmail.com.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


CO-OP PEOPLE

Girl WITH Curls

FARM

Butler Rural Electric member Lauren Schwab Eyre has parlayed her farm life and communications skills into work as an agriculture ambassador BY CELESTE BAUMGARTNER

L

auren Schwab Eyre has carefully and intentionally cultivated her image as a “farm girl with curls.” She not only works on her family’s pig farm near Somerville, but she’s also a well-known agricultural ambassador who uses every opportunity she can to get the message out about her career of choice. “Not every farmer has a talent or passion for communicating; like my dad, they just love being out in the barnyard taking care of their animals every day and have no interest in going on Facebook or Instagram or YouTube to talk about the farm,” Lauren says. “I have found that I have a talent and a passion for that, and I can use that to tell his story and that of other farmers. There are a lot of misconceptions out there, and if we as farmers aren’t telling our stories, someone else will, and a lot of times, the right messages don’t come across.” Lauren’s father, Jeff Schwab, is a first-generation farmer who started the family’s pig farm right out of high school. He eventually decided to concentrate on breed-to-wean, and the business, a member of Butler Rural Electric Cooperative, now is home to 1,200 breeding sows that produce around 1,200 piglets every other week. As farrowing house manager, it’s Lauren’s job to care for those piglets until they’re old enough to wean and move along to another Ohio farmer to be raised for market.

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

“While the farm started as my dad’s dream, I developed a real satisfaction from working here,” she says. “I want to continue helping him as long as I can.” As kids, Lauren and her brother, Ryan, spent a lot of time in the barnyard with their dad. He taught them about the importance of caring for animals. Lauren says she came to feel satisfied caring for the pigs, getting them


off to a good start and helping to give them the best life possible. She also knew that she was a part of something bigger — helping to feed people around the world. While in high school, her flair for writing and public speaking blossomed through FFA and her school newspaper. Lauren was the 2008 Ohio Pork Industry queen and the Butler County Junior Fair queen. She went on to study journalism at Miami University, where she wrote about agriculture and found that she was sharing a story and a culture with people who typically would not hear about it.

Lauren personally examines all 1,200 or so piglets that are born every other week on her family farm.

Now, along with those 10-hour (or longer) days caring for the piglets, Lauren also travels, writes, and blogs at www.farmgirlwithcurls.com. She has served as a national agriculture ambassador for the FFA, presenting workshops to schools and civic organizations, and as an ambassador for the Ohio Pork Producers Council. She also was selected as one of the “New Faces of Farming” by the Farmers and Ranchers Alliance. “There are so many conferences I go to as part of winning these awards that make it seem like everyone is aware of the agriculture business, but then I have to remind myself that it’s less than 1 percent of the population who are farmers,” Lauren says. “That means there are a lot of people out there we need to reach, and it means a lot to me personally to be able to do my part.”

Piglets stay on the farm for about two or three weeks before they’re weaned and transported to another Ohio farm to be raised for market.

The “Farm Girl with Curls” poses with the hand-lettered sign that stands in front of the family farm.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


Why pay $2,300 or more?

HEAR BETTER

FOR ONLY

$299 EACH!

SEND ✔ FDA Registered NO MONE Hearing Aid Y N O W ! ✔ 100% Risk-FREE FOR QUALIFIE D BUYERS. 45-day home trial ✔ FREE shipping ✔ Payment plans available ✔ Licensed professionals

45-DAYEE RISK-FRL TRIA

SAME HIGH-QUALITY DIGITAL HEARING AIDS OFFERED BY AUDIOLOGISTS AND ENT’S. The Apollo-6200 is the perfect FDA registered digital hearing aid if you want the BEST technology for the BEST price. American Made electronics give you advanced technology in a durable, easy to maintain hearing aid. Includes four channel compression for crisp, clear sound and feedback cancellation that virtually eliminates squeal. Discreet slim-tube design gives you the most natural sound with total comfort.

R

D

STE EGI RE

The typical hearing aid costs at least $2,300 but your price is nowhere near that with this special offer! Try the Apollo-6200 with NO MONEY DOWN completely Risk-FREE for 45 days in the comfort of your own home and see if it’s everything we’ve promised. Call now: 1-888-847-1189 and mention promo code 59-204. High-quality American Made electronics

Doctor Designed ● Audiologist Approved

“I can’t tell you how much this hearing aid has helped my hearing. I can hear clearly in meetings and at church. I no longer have to ask others to repeat themselves. Thank you for a wonderful product at an affordable price!” S.M. – Cleveland, OH

Try the Apollo™-6200 hearing aid risk-free for 45 days.

SEND NO MONEY NOW! If you like it then pay only $299 per aid or simply send it back.

By phone (Mon-Fri • 8 am - 5 pm Central Standard Time)

Expires: 3/31/19

CODE 1-888-847-1189 PROMO 59-204

Visit us online and SAVE! (Send no money offer is not available online. Call toll-free.)

Trusted Since 1979

• Hearing aids by mail for 39 years • Over 750,000 satisfied customers

www.HearingHelpExpress.com 45-DAY RISK-FREE HOME TRIAL

A+ Rating

Satisfaction

Better Business Bureau

GUARANTEED

100%


buffet

Game-day

FRIED PICKLES WITH HONEY MUSTARD SAUCE Prep: 20 minutes | Cook: 10 minutes | Servings: 12 3/4 teaspoon salt 24-ounce jar pickle spears (approximately 12 spears) 1/4 teaspoon cayenne 2 cups vegetable shortening 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon paprika 1/4 cup cornstarch 3/4 cup water 1 teaspoon baking powder

For sauce: 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon yellow mustard

2 tablespoons honey 1/2 tablespoon rice vinegar

To make honey mustard dipping sauce, whisk together mayo, yellow mustard, honey, and rice vinegar until smooth. Scoop vegetable shortening into a tall stockpot over medium-high heat until oil reaches 375 F. Measure temperature with a heat-safe candy thermometer (important: the oil will start to brown and smell like it’s burning if it’s too hot and won’t bubble when adding fry batter if it’s too cool). Drain pickles and lay them out to dry on a cooling rack for a few minutes. Mix flour, cornstarch, baking powder, salt, cayenne, pepper, and paprika in a shallow bowl. Add water and whisk until smooth.

Whether they’re more interested in great plays or great commercials, your guests will appreciate this spread of new flavors and old favorites.

Individually dunk each pickle spear into the batter until coated. Carefully place one at a time into fry oil for 30 to 60 seconds or until golden, flipping once with heat-safe tongs. Serve fried pickles with honey mustard dipping sauce immediately after frying or reheat under broiler. Per serving: 126 calories, 8 grams fat (2 grams saturated fat), 12.5 grams total carbs, 0.3 grams fiber, 0.7 grams protein

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   15


REUBEN DIP Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 20 minutes | Servings: 10 11/2 cups shredded Swiss cheese, 8 ounces cream cheese divided 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 pound deli-sliced corned beef, 2 tablespoons ketchup chopped 1 tablespoon relish 14.5-ounce can sauerkraut, drained, 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce patted dry, and chopped 1 teaspoon caraway seeds Preheat oven to 375 F. Combine cream cheese, mayonnaise, ketchup, relish, Worcestershire sauce, and caraway seeds in a food processor or blender and puree until smooth. Transfer the mixture to a large bowl and stir in remaining ingredients, reserving 1/2 cup Swiss cheese to sprinkle on top, if desired. Spread dip in a medium baking dish and sprinkle with remaining cheese (optional). Bake uncovered until browned and bubbling, about 20 minutes. Serve with rye crackers or crudités. Per serving: 199 calories, 16 grams fat (8 grams saturated fat), 6 grams total carbs, 1 gram fiber, 8 grams protein

SOFT PRETZEL TOUCHDOWNS Prep: 30 minutes | Cook: 8 minutes | Servings: 10 1 cup lukewarm water 1/4 cup melted butter, lukewarm 21/4 teaspoons active yeast 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons packed brown sugar 3 cups all-purpose flour 9 tablespoons boiling water 1 tablespoon baking soda 1/4 cup melted butter 3 tablespoons coarse sea salt Stir together water, 1/4 cup butter, and yeast in bowl of a stand mixer until yeast is mostly dissolved. Let rest 5 minutes. Add salt and brown sugar; stir to combine. Add flour to butter mixture and mix at medium speed using the dough hook attachment until dough balls up and no longer sticks to bowl. Continue mixing for an additional 5 minutes (or knead dough by hand for 5 minutes). Preheat the oven to 450 F. Pull off small handfuls of dough and form ropes. If dough bounds back, let it rest for 5 minutes and try again. Shape into footballs (or any shape of choice). Line baking sheet(s) with parchment paper and place pretzels on top. Mix together boiling water and baking soda. Thoroughly brush tops of pretzels with baking soda mixture, then brush with butter. Sprinkle generously with salt. Bake 8 minutes. Pretzels are best eaten the first day. Dough keeps well in the fridge for up to a week. Per serving: 227 calories, 10 grams fat (6 grams saturated fat), 31 grams total carbs, 1 gram fiber, 4 grams protein

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019


GREEK ORZO PASTA SALAD Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 5 minutes | Servings: 8 1/4 c up pitted Kalamata 11/2 cups uncooked orzo pasta olives, sliced 11/2 cups grape or cherry tomatoes, halved 1/4 cup olive oil 1 orange bell pepper, 1/4 cup red wine vinegar diced small 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped 6 ounces roasted red pepper, 1/4 teaspoon salt diced small 1/4 teaspoon pepper 3 ounces feta cheese, crumbled Place orzo in a pot of salted, boiling water. Add a few drops of olive oil to water and cook until al dente, about 5 minutes. Drain well and run under cold water. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients. Stir well. Serve cold or room temperature. Per serving: 225 calories, 10 grams fat (2.6 grams saturated fat), 29 grams total carbs, 2.2 grams fiber, 6.2 grams protein

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


SCOTTAmerica’s ANTIQUE MARKETS Favorite Treasure Hunts!

Experience The Power of Dreams Through Honda’s History of Innovation.

TM

WHERE ONLINE SELLERS GO TO BUY!

OHIO EXPO CENTER - COLUMBUS, OH

800 - 1200 Exhibit Booths! 2019 Shows JAN 26 & 27 FEB 23 & 24

MAR 23 & 24 NOV 30 & DEC 1 DEC 21 & 22

Show Hours:

Sat. 9am - 6pm Sun. 10am - 4pm

Directions: I-71 Exit 111 (E 17th Avenue) to Ohio Expo Center

ion publicat Official ec.org .ohio

of your

electric

www

Visit HondaHeritageCenter.com for hours and information. Admission is free. Marysville, Ohio | 937.644.6888 Mention this ad to receive a free gift.

KILL LAKE WEEDS Before

After

Snowy days, t swee treats

tive

coopera

740.569.2800

www.scottantiquemarkets.com

Y UARER JANEMB DEC 2018

FAYETTE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS WASHINGTON COURT HOUSE, OH 2019 Shows APR 26 & 27 JUN 28 & 29 SEP 27 & 28

50 Acre Event!

Show Hours: Fri. & Sat. 9am - 5pm Directions: I-71 to Exit 65, East on US 35, 12 miles to WCH. Fayette County Fairgrounds at the intersection of US 35, US 22 and US 62.

ATLANTA EXPO CENTERS - ATLANTA, GA

3,500 Booths! 2019 Shows JAN 10 - 13 FEB 7 - 10 MAR 7 - 10

APR 11 - 14 MAY 9 - 12 JUN 6 - 9

JUL 11 - 14 AUG 8 - 11 SEP 12 - 15

Show Hours: Thurs. 10:45am - 6pm, Fri. & Sat. 9am - 6pm, Sun. 10am - 4pm Directions: 3 miles East of Atlanta Airport, I-285 at Exit 55 (3650 & 3850 Jonesboro Rd SE)

Reach 300,000 of your best customers

Ohio Cooperative Living has been a valued presence in rural Ohio homes and businesses for the past 60 years. 83.4% of our readers have taken action from something they have seen in Ohio Cooperative Living. Morton_OHCoopLiv_1.19.qxp_Layout 1 11/19/18 11:24 AM Page 1 IDE ALSO INS Youth Tour lives changes holiday Festive y dinner part ntry Amish Cou tour cookie

A union destined to last. In the building built to last.

10 lb. bag treats up to 4,000 sq.ft. $89.00. 50 lb. bag treats up to 20,000 sq.ft. $336.00.

FREE SHIPPING! Certified and approved for use by state agencies. State permit may be required. Registered with the Federal E.P.A.

Celebrate limited-time savings when you declare your project commitment during Building Value Days. Now through February 28.

KillLakeWeeds.com Order online today, or request free information.

Our 64th year

AQUACIDE CO.

PO Box 10748, DEPT 115 White Bear Lake, MN 55110-0748

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

800-447-7436 | MORTONBUILDINGS.COM ©2019 Morton Buildings, Inc. A listing of GC licenses available at mortonbuildings.com/licenses. Certain restrictions apply. Ref Code 613


FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES GM’S REPORT

OUR

Pr��i�� TO YOU

Firelands Electric Cooperative has a New Year’s resolution. As we ring in 2019, we promise to continue providing our membership with the best possible customer service and communications.

More and more these days, we use modern technology to enhance our communications and exchange of information with our members. Since 2014, Firelands Electric has offered the convenience of the free SmartHub app, which allows members to make online bill payments, check the status of their electric service, and receive real-time updates on energy use. Nearly half of our 9,100 members have enrolled in SmartHub. Many also take advantage of the new features introduced in 2018, such as outage and peak alert notifications and usage comparison tools. Moving into the new year, Firelands Electric Cooperative will continue to improve and expand SmartHub’s communication features, including text, email, and personalized letters mailed to our members. Plans are in place to develop additional features, such as enhanced information for load management and budget participants and member surveys. Firelands Electric Cooperative will also be moving forward with new workflow software in 2019. This

program will make internal communications and operations more efficient. Employees in the field will have increased access to data and service orders, and dispatching will become more streamlined. These features will make it easier and faster for our staff to assess outages and other issues.

Although we are working to grow our mobile and paper communication Dan McNaull options, connecting with GENERAL MANAGER people face-to-face will remain an important part of Firelands Electric Cooperative’s philosophy in the coming year. While our new all-in-one facility includes fast, convenient options, like a drive-through window and payment drop box, we appreciate our personal relationship with our members. The longheld traditions of greeting members at the counter and having a live person answer the phone are services we are proud to provide. Firelands Electric Cooperative still values face time with our members. Listening to our members improves understanding, builds trust, strengthens relationships, and fosters cooperation. So, how do we serve you better in 2019? The same way many of us try to serve community, society, and family better — by listening. In our office, on telephones, through social media exchanges, and during in-person meetings, we’re ready to listen. When you have questions about energy efficiency, electrical service, or any of our products or services, just ask us. Call or drop in and see us — we’re always glad to hear from you!

JANUARY 2019 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

1-19--January.indd 1

19

12/10/2018 3:23:28 PM


FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES CO-OP NEWS

Brighten up the night with

OUTDOOR LIGHTING Firelands Electric can install a dependable source of lighting that can help provide safety and peace of mind, lengthen your outdoor evenings, and discourage intruders. The cooperative’s outdoor lighting program is a convenient way to have all the light you need around your home or business. The cooperative will furnish and install a light-emitting diode (LED) fixture at a location suitable to both parties, make all necessary electrical connections, and supply electricity for the device, which is controlled by a photo cell for maximum efficiency. In addition to having extra light around the house, especially during those long winter nights, there are many other advantages to cooperative-provided outdoor lighting: • NO ADDITIONAL ELECTRICAL USE — The power for the light doesn’t go through your electric meter. Your monthly charge includes all electricity for operation. • FREE MAINTENANCE — Have you ever thought about how you would reach the bulb to change it or how much the bulb would cost to replace? No need to worry, because Firelands Electric Cooperative will repair the fixture if it’s not working properly. • SAFE AND SECURE — A new outdoor light from the cooperative can provide you with the peace of mind that comes from bright, dependable light after dark. Whether you’re coming home late from work or shooting basketball with the kids, this light will be a silent sentry watching over your home and its contents — even when you’re not home.

20

Firelands Electric only offers LED fixtures for new applications in its outdoor lighting program. LEDs contain a brighter form of white light than traditional fixtures. In addition to providing a higher light output, they offer more lumens per watt, meaning they shine brighter and longer than halide or high-pressure sodium lights. Traditional lighting takes time to warm up and turn on. LEDs are instant-on, because they need little heat to operate, even in below-freezing weather. The durability of LED fixtures is unlike other outdoor lighting, because they’re manufactured with heavy-duty plastic materials and not glass. LEDs also have a longer life. They can last up to 25 years, depending on how they are used, which can result in significant energy savings. Firelands Electric changed its outdoor lighting program several years ago to include LED fixtures, due to advancements and improved performance with technology. Adding LEDs was also a result of policy changes issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) nearly a decade ago that have resulted in mercury vapor, metal halide, and high-pressure sodium lamps becoming very expensive and nearly obsolete. Investing in the latest energy-efficient technologies is less costly than maintaining traditional legacy fixtures. Over the past decade, Firelands Electric has faced multiple wholesale power increases, without making any adjustments to its outdoor lighting program monthly base rate.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2019

1-19--January.indd 2

12/10/2018 3:23:29 PM


integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

Approx. Light Output Lumens/Kelvin AVAILABLE LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE (LED) Residential/Commercial LED 70W 6,000L/5000K Residential/Commercial/Roadway LED 110W 13,000L/4000K Lighting Application

Lamp Type

Wattage

LEGACY FIXTURES (no longer available) Residential/Commercial Sodium 100W 9,500L/2100K Residential/Commercial Mercury 175W 7,900L/4100K Residential/Commercial Halide 150W 13,500L/4000K Residential/Commercial Halide Flood 250W 13,500L/4000K Residential/Commercial Sodium Flood 250W 17,000L/2100K Residential/Commercial Sodium Flood 400W 25,000L/2100K Residential/Commercial Halide Flood 400W 36,000L/4000K Firelands Electric recently revised the pricing of its outdoor lighting schedule for new and existing outdoor lighting applications that will be effective starting Jan. 23, 2019. The cooperative will only install LEDs going forward, for both requests for new outdoor lighting as well as replacements of any existing fixtures requiring maintenance.

Monthly Base Rate $10.00 $12.00 $10.00 $10.00 $14.00 $15.25 $14.75 $18.50 $19.00

If you are interested in having an outdoor lighting system installed, please contact Firelands Electric Cooperative. You can call the office at 1-800-533-8658, send an email to billing@firelandsec.com, or complete the outdoor lighting contract form available at www.firelandsec.com/content/member-forms.

The cooperative will install one pole and one span of secondary wire of up to 150 feet in length per light fixture. The monthly base rate includes the fixture, pole, wiring, maintenance, and electricity. If additional poles are required, the monthly rental charge will be increased $4.00 for each additional pole constructed.

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month Is your hot water tank warm to the touch? Consider insulating it to save 7 to 16 percent annually on water heating costs. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. Source: energy.gov

JANUARY 2019 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

1-19--January.indd 3

20A

12/10/2018 3:23:31 PM


FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES YOUTH PROGRAMS

C lass of 2019

College scholarships Are your parents Firelands Electric Co-op members? You could win up to $5,150 in scholarships • Scholarships available in both boys’ and girls’ divisions. • Applicants must have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 or above on a 4.0 scale. • Finalists in the Firelands Electric scholarship competition will be interviewed at the cooperative office on Feb. 18, 2019. • Applicants will be judged on scholastic record, school and community activities, cooperative knowledge, and personal interview. • The first-place Firelands Electric Cooperative scholarship in each division is $1,500.

• Four runners-up will also receive scholarships in each division. • NEW in 2019! One student in each division will be chosen to receive a $300 Judges’ Choice Scholarship. • The top overall winner will be eligible to compete at the statewide competition in April, where he or she can win up to $3,650 in additional scholarship awards from Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. Complete rules and applications are available at www. firelandsec.com/content/scholarship-opportunities, by contacting Firelands Electric’s member services department at 1-800-533-8658, or by visiting your high school guidance department.

Applications due Feb. 1, 2019

20B

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2019

1-19--January.indd 4

12/10/2018 3:23:35 PM


integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

YOUTH PROGRAMS

June 14–20 America’s electric co-ops believe in educating tomorrow’s leaders. Since the late 1950s, the Electric Cooperative Youth Tour has brought high school students to Washington, D.C., to experience our nation’s capital up close. Through educational and sightseeing activities, students gain a personal understanding of American history and their role as citizens. About 40 students from electric cooperatives throughout Ohio participate in this COMPLETELY FREE program each year. Students meet at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives in Columbus and travel by chartered bus to Washington, D.C. Chaperones from the community, including parents, teachers, and electric co-op employees, accompany students on this weeklong trip. Groups are organized at the state level, but over 1,600 students from across the country come together for Youth Day. Students have the chance to meet their U.S. representatives and senators, as well as to hear featured speakers who provide insight into the important roles electric cooperatives play in their local communities. Students attending Youth Tour also have the opportunity to be selected as their state’s representative on the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s

(NRECA) Youth Leadership Council (YLC). One student from each state is selected to return to Washington, D.C., in July for a leadership workshop that focuses on the electric cooperative industry. YLC members are also invited to attend NRECA’s annual meeting the following spring.

Firelands Electric will select up to two high school sophomores and juniors to represent the co-op on the 2019 Youth Tour, scheduled for June 14–20. Students must reside in a home served by the co-op and submit a completed application, including an essay, by Feb. 1. Full details and application materials are available at www.firelandsec.com/content/youth-tour-experience.

Applications due Feb. 1, 2019 JANUARY 2019 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 20C

1-19--January.indd 5

12/10/2018 3:23:39 PM


FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES CO-OP NEWS

Fitchville substation severely damaged On Monday, Nov. 26, at approximately 9:30 p.m., Firelands Electric Cooperative’s Fitchville substation experienced a catastrophic failure. The issue occurred in the center-phase voltage regulator, which led to a fire and significant damage to the substation and equipment. One of the substation’s circuits, including the overcurrent protection device, the bypass switches, and the underground cable that feeds that circuit, were all severely damaged. Firelands Electric Cooperative crews were able to restore service to those affected by temporarily backfeeding from several other substations. Power was restored to all affected members by 11:09 p.m. The substation’s transformer is being tested for damage and will be re-energized as soon as the results indicate that it is safe to do so. Material has been requisitioned to make permanent repairs, but it will be several months until all of this work can be completed. The temporary backfeeding will continue until all repairs are done. The Fitchville substation was last updated and rebuilt in the summer of 2015. “Thanks to sound engineering that allowed us to quickly re-route power and to our employees’ commitment to providing safe, reliable electricity, the cooperative was able to prevent this event from causing a very lengthy power outage for the 1,013 members served by this substation,” Firelands Electric General Manager Dan McNaull says. “We are grateful that the damage was not more severe and that no one was injured.”

On Nov. 26, a major failure at Firelands Electric Cooperative’s Fitchville substation resulted in a fire and significant damage to several pieces of equipment.

The next drawing for The A Team is Feb. 10. For complete details on how to enter, visit www.firelandsec.com/content/team.

20D

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2019

1-19--January.indd 6

12/10/2018 3:23:42 PM


integrity

accountability

community commitment

innovation

IN THE COMMUNITY

BY TRACY GIBB

DAPPER DOGS PHOTOS BY RANDY STRINE

In April 2012, Betsy Strine took a leap of faith. After years of working for pet stores and other groomers, she decided to start her own business. Armed with just a box of tools and a folding table in the basement of her old farmhouse, she launched Betsy’s Honeycreek Dog Boutique.

Like most fledgling business owners, Betsy was unsure if her plan would succeed. In the beginning, she spent many hours marketing herself. She posted flyers at every place she could think of and talked about her new business with anyone and everyone. “I had to get creative and brave,” Betsy says. Her efforts paid off. Within a year and a half, Betsy had more clients than she could handle by herself. Her husband, Randy, soon joined her on a full-time basis. The couple make a great team, with Randy handling their canine clients’ bathing needs and Betsy putting her skills with scissors and clippers to use. Honeycreek Dog Boutique grooms roughly 30 dogs every week. Their package includes bath, blow dry, cut, nail trimming, and ear cleaning for one low price. A small dog, like a Shih Tzu, starts at $38, and the only service that costs extra is flea treatment. Even the boutique’s six specialty shampoos are included in the package pricing. The Strines accept animals 40 pounds or less and make it a priority to develop a special relationship with each of the dogs. Many of their regulars are excited when they arrive. “One in particular even runs to the door as soon

as the owner opens their car,” Randy says. The boutique is so popular that repeat clients usually schedule their next appointment before they leave. At one point, the Strines simply could not take on any new customers. They have recently expanded their hours to be able to accommodate more dogs, however. Appointments are accepted Tuesdays and Fridays 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wednesdays and Thursdays 12 p.m. to 7 p.m., and every other Saturday. Betsy’s Honeycreek Dog Boutique is located at 2219 County Road 775 outside of Perrysville. To set up an appointment, call or text Betsy at 419-512-2201, or visit them on Facebook for more information. Betsy’s business has come a long way since those early days. A walk-in bathing station and adjustable grooming table now occupy the space where the folding table once stood. And any doubt Betsy had when she started out nearly seven years ago is long gone. “I wouldn’t dream of doing anything else,” she says. Places & Faces is a regular feature that showcases people, businesses, and organizations located throughout the Firelands Electric Cooperative service territory.

JANUARY 2019 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 21

1-19--January.indd 7

12/10/2018 3:23:44 PM


FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

highlights

COOPERATIVE UPDATE

BOARD MEETING Firelands Electric Cooperative’s board of trustees met Oct. 23 and covered the following items: • Board President Dan Schloemer reported the cooperative received 50 membership applications for approval by the board. • The board reviewed a report for workplace safety observation that was held Oct. 11 and safety training reports for meetings held Aug. 23, Sept. 26, and Oct. 2. • Director of Finance and Accounting Tabi Shepherd reviewed the September financials and reported on recent accounting and billing department activities. • The capital credits discount rate for estates was updated, making it comparable to the cooperative’s average long-term debt interest rate. • General Manager Dan McNaull reviewed the preliminary 2019 capital budget with the board. A finalized capital budget will be presented to the board at the November meeting. • The board reviewed a listing agreement for sale of the cooperative’s buildings and agreed to proceed with listing the office and primary warehouse.

board in January. District 4 Trustee Bruce Leimbach nominated Laura Landis, District 5 Trustee Carl Ayers nominated Tom Swindall, and District 8 Trustee Anderson nominated Annis Strine. • McNaull provided the board with an update on the cooperative’s metering system. • The board reviewed the Operation Round Up report from September. • Director of Electric Operations Don Englet reported on recent projects and crew activities in the operations department. He introduced Line Superintendent Zach Collins and discussed updates to the NASA Mansfield Transport Corridor Relocation project that is affecting the cooperative’s distribution system. • Director of Member Services and Communications Andrea Gravenhorst updated the board on recent activities involving the member services department and upcoming information technology projects involving the new facility. The cooperative’s next board meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 22, at Firelands Electric’s new facility, located at 103 Industrial Drive, New London.

• Dan McNaull asked the board to approve three appointments to the cooperative’s People Fund

FIRELANDS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

GENERAL MANAGER

Dan Schloemer

Dan McNaull

OUTAGE HOTLINE

President, District 1

1-800-533-8658 OFFICE (effective Jan. 17)

103 Industrial Drive P.O. Box 32 New London, OH 44851 419-929-1571 OFFICE HOURS

Mon.–Fri. 8 a.m.–5 p.m. www.firelandsec.com

Bruce Leimbach Vice President, District 4

Carl Ayers

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION?

Email your ideas to: members@firelandsec.com

Secretary/Treasurer, District 5

W.E. Anderson District 8

Steve Gray District 3

Gene Lamoreaux District 2

John Martin District 9

Kevin Reidy District 6

Rob Turk 22

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2019

1-19--January.indd 8

District 7

12/10/2018 3:23:45 PM


O-OP OHIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHI O  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO O-OP O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP O O  CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP C O  CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

 Local organizations benefit

from member giving

Embodying the seventh co-op principle of “Concern for Community,” the board of the Butler Rural Community Connection recently awarded $38,155 in grants to local organizations. Funds were gathered from members voluntarily rounding up their bills to the next dollar or donating a set amount each month and were awarded to benefit communities within the Butler Rural Electric Cooperative area. Organizations that received charitable donations included Animal Friends Humane Society, Preble Shawnee and Talawanda school programs, and the Milford Township Fire Department.

Co-op’s Lineman of the Game recognizes local athletes South Central Power sent some of its best ambassadors to community high schools to present its Lineman of the Game award during the past football season. Each week, one electrical lineman presented the award to one high school football lineman, in a show of camaraderie recognizing the extensive training, hard work, and enduring commitment that both types of linemen devote to their roles.

Former Buckeye Power CEO dies Richard K. Byrne, former president and CEO of Buckeye Power and Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, has died. He served Ohio’s co-ops in this role for 13 years, retiring in 2002. During his time at Buckeye Power, Byrne oversaw the building of the Robert P. Mone peaking plant and was a national leader in the electric cooperative community, steadfastly promoting the unity and strength of our way of business.

Consolidated expands offerings to members Consolidated Cooperative’s new partnership with Alianza to bring residential and commercial phone services to its members was recently featured in an article on www.toolbox.com. “High speed data connectivity is crucial to the prosperity of our members and communities,” said Phil Caskey, president and CEO of Consolidated, in the article. “Voice services are a much needed enhancement to make our new offerings more attractive to our members. We are quite pleased to have a found a partner like Alianza to help us in our mission to improve the quality of life of those we serve.”

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   23


WATERFURNACE UNITS QUALIFY A 30% FEDERAL TAX CREDIT WATERFURNACE UNITS QUALIFY FORFOR A 30% FEDERAL TAX CREDIT*

Homeowners around the world have switched from propane to a WaterFurnace geothermal comfort system. That’s because WaterFurnace units tap into the clean, renewable energy found in your own backyard to provide savings of up to 70% on heating, cooling and hot water. A WaterFurnace system provides complete comfort for your home with a single unit. And because the system doesn’t burn fossil fuels, there are no carbon monoxide safety concerns. Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer today and make the smart move from propane to geothermal.

visit us at waterfurnace.com

*30% through 2019, 26% through 2020 and 22% through 2021 • WaterFurnace is a registered trademark of WaterFurnace International, Inc.

24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019


YOUR LOCAL

DEALERS

Ashland Ashland Comfort Control (419) 281-0144

Defiance Schlatters Plbg & Htg (419) 393-4690

Lancaster Fairfield Heating (740) 653-6421

Portsmouth Accurate Htg & Clg (740) 353-4328

Bowling Green United Home Comfort (419) 352-7092

schlattersgeothermal.com

fairfieldgeothermal.com

accurategeothermal.com

Dresden Federal Htg & Clg (740) 754-4328

Lancaster McCullough Htg & Clg (740) 653-4740

Sardis Brian’s Refrigeration (740) 934-2013

federalheating.com

mcculloughgeo.com

briansref.com

East Liberty Reliant Mechanical (937) 666-5800

Mansfield Eberts Htg & Clg (419) 589-2000

Sidney Lochard Inc. (937) 492-8811

reliantgeo.com

ebertsheatingandcooling.com

Findlay Knueve & Sons Inc. (419) 420-7638

Marion Wenig’s Inc. (740) 383-5012

Springfield Danco Enterprises (937) 969-8440

knueve.com

wenigsinc.com

Greenville Barga Htg, A/C & Refrig. (937) 548-3645

Medina Sisler Heating (330) 722-7101

bargageo.com

sislerhvac.com

billspadegeothermal.com

Holgate Holgate Hardware (419) 264-3012

Mt. Vernon Cosby Htg & Clg (740) 393-4328

Coldwater Ray’s Refrigeration (419)678-8711

Kalida Knueve & Sons Inc. (419) 420-7638

New Knoxville New Knoxville Supply (419) 753-2444

raysrefrigeration.com

knueve.com

newknoxvillesupply.com

Columbus Geo Source One (614) 873-1140

Kalida Sarka Electric Plbg & Htg (419) 532-3492

Newark Hottinger Geothermal (740) 323-2330

geosourceone.com

sarkaelectric.com

hottingergeothermal.com

unitedhomecomfort.com

Canal Winchester Kessler Htg & Clg (614) 837-9961 kesslerheating.com

Canal Winchester Patriot Air (614) 577-1577 patriotair.com

Chillicothe Accurate Htg & Clg (740) 775-5005 accurategeothermal.com

Cincinnati Bill Spade Htg & Clg (513) 941-0075

dancoenterprises.com

Tipp City Ed’s HVAC Plbg Electric (937) 667-6713 Toledo Overcashier & Horst (419) 841-3333 Waverly Combs Htg & A/C (740) 947-4061 Wellington Wellington Indoor Comfort (440) 647-3421 Westerville Westin Air (614) 794-1259 geothermalcentralohio.com

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


A place on the map College Corner is a city united by its divide BY CRAIG SPRINGER

M

aps make for good reading. In the names of places, you’ll find some history, drama, romance, biography, and even some fiction — or at least some mistakes. All that and more lies within a map covering College Corner, Ohio. It’s a quaint place, an unassuming, long-established village with quirks that few towns anywhere could claim. The little burg with the curious name literally lies atop the Ohio-Indiana state line. The town’s thousand souls live in four townships, three counties, two telephone area codes, and two ZIP codes, though they are serviced by one post office. Until recently, College Corner was split by two time zones. Two electric cooperatives — Butler Rural Electric Cooperative in Ohio and Whitewater Valley Rural Electric Membership Corporation in Indiana — serve the town. “We’ve all kind of gotten used to the quirks of living on the state line,” says Sandy Johnson, who grew up in

26   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

College Corner and never left. “When the electricity goes out at night from a storm, it highlights the state line because one side stays lit.” The village sits comfortably along a smooth ridge made by retreating mile-thick glaciers from a long Pleistocene winter. Glaciers made it this far south 10,000 years ago, piling up rich, finely ground arable soils prime for planting corn and soybeans or naturally growing oaks and maples. Retreating ice sculpted the land, leaving behind the undulations so pleasing to the eye. The first settlers of any lasting permanence on the Ohio side of the border built cabins in 1803 in the newly surveyed lands made available by the General Land Office in Cincinnati under the authority of Congress. The survey laid down lines in square-mile blocks from the west side of the Great Miami River, through College Corner, and continuing piece by piece to the Pacific. The kernel of the eventual town was in the corner of


PHOTO BY MIKE SIMS

College Township, which, by law, was to harbor an institution of learning. Nearby Miami University soon followed, and the name changed to Oxford Township. The sinuous and artful lines of nature still intersect with the pike-straight fences, bridges, and roads, the artifices of man and our inherent desire for precision in parceling land. All streams pour away from College Corner like veins on an oak leaf. On the north side of town, Four Mile Creek purls downhill toward Hueston Woods State Park past Talawanda Springs, where cold water percolates from the glacial soil. A short walk south of town, tiny Corner Run and College Creek converge at the cemetery to form the West Fork Four Mile Run, which has no connection whatsoever to Four Mile Creek. The misnamed brook instead conjoins Indian Creek.

Opposite page: Looking into West College Corner from Ohio, just across the state line; top: Melissa Sims (left) and Sandy Johnson curate Heritage Hall, a collection of Union School’s artifacts, housed within the school; middle: John Kubacki’s tailor and “gents furnishings” shop; right: the old Knights of Pythias building (with the fire escape) still stands on Main Street, which was known as Oxford Street in this early 1900s photo. (All black-and-white images courtesy of the Smith Library of Regional History in Oxford.)

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   27


Basketball teams through the years at Union School (shown below in the 1890s, the mid-20th century, and today), such as the 1946 squad shown at left, play on a court where one side is in Indiana, the other in Ohio. Other photos on the opposite page show early 1900s street fairs in the town.

Despite the many lines dividing the town, the folks are united by their beloved Union School. “I can honestly say there’s nowhere else in America quite like this place,” says Melissa Sims, who grew up in College Corner and still lives there with her husband, Mike, the general manager at Butler Rural Electric. “There has never been any animosity or even any rivalry from either side of the state line.” The town has earned its 15 minutes of fame a few times; long ago, the FBI descended upon College Corner after one of its agents was murdered there (a historical marker stands at the spot), and another time when CBS Sunday Morning, the long-running iconic show that showcases Americana, came for a feature on Union School.

28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

The old school, now educating kids in preschool through fifth grade, lies directly on top of the Ohio-Indiana border — in fact, the half-court line in the gymnasium is the state line. With a moment’s concentration and imagination, you can hear the squeak of sneakers and the thump of a pimpled basketball pounding the hardwood. “It’s kind of cute to think that before Indiana joined the Eastern Time Zone, a basketball player could shoot a halfcourt shot and make a basket an hour later,” Johnson says. “When I was growing up, you had to have two basketball referees, one from Ohio and one from Indiana.” Though it’s not actually in the middle of the map, Union School is still the figurative center of town, says


Johnson, who retired three years ago after a 40-year career working at the school. She and Sims maintain the school’s Heritage Hall, a treasure trove of memorabilia from the school’s and town’s history. The school faced closure several years back, and locals beat back the idea of sending their children to schools in Eaton or Oxford, Ohio, or Liberty, Indiana. Instead, the school got an addition, instilling a sense of permanence. “People of College Corner are generous and willing to help their neighbors,” says Johnson. “Folks who were born and raised here — some are coming back. It’s a safe place to be. We’re the best of both states.” Craig Springer visited College Corner last summer.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   29


OHIO ICON

THESE ARE MY JEWELS Columbus BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: On the grounds of the Ohio Statehouse at the northwest quadrant of Capitol Square. Provenance: Created for an Ohio exhibit at the 1893 World Columbian Exposition in Chicago, These Are My Jewels is a sculpture featuring bronze statues of seven Ohioans — Salmon P. Chase, James A. Garfield, Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, Philip H. Sheridan, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Edwin M. Stanton — as well as the figure of a Roman noblewoman, Cornelia Africana. The sculpture’s concept originated with Mansfield newspaper editor Roeliff Brinkerhoff, and it’s based on an anecdote about Cornelia and her sons, the military and political leaders Tiberius Gracchus and Gaius Gracchus. As the story goes, Cornelia was visited by some wealthy women who were showing off their expensive jewelry. When the women asked if she had any finery, Cornelia produced her sons and declared, “These are my jewels.”

Christopher Columbus Discovery Monument, it’s possibly the most famous work in the Statehouse’s outdoor art collection. It’s a little-known fact that: James Thurber included the sculpture in “The Day the Dam Broke,” his humorous short story about a fabricated Columbus flood. “Outside, men were streaming across the Statehouse yard, others were climbing trees,” wrote Thurber. “A woman managed to get up onto the These Are My Jewels statue, whose bronze figures of Sherman, Stanton, Grant, and Sheridan watched with cold unconcern the going to pieces of the capital city.” These Are My Jewels, 1 Capitol Square (corner of Broad and High streets), Columbus, OH 43215. 614-752-9777; http://www.ohiostatehouse.org.

Significance: In keeping with Brinkerhoff’s assertion that Ohio’s greatest asset is her people, Cornelia symbolizes Ohio, and the statues arrayed on a granite base beneath her outstretched arms depict Ohioans who played significant national roles during and after the Civil War. Stanton was Abraham Lincoln’s secretary of war, while Chase was both Lincoln’s secretary of the treasury and the Supreme Court’s chief justice. Grant commanded the Union army; Sherman’s “March to the Sea” hastened the Confederacy’s defeat; Sheridan was a cavalry hero; Garfield fought at Shiloh and Chickamauga; and Hayes, who was McKinley’s army comrade, suffered combat wounds at Stone Mountain and other battles. Grant, Hayes, and Garfield also served, respectively, as the 18th, 19th, and 20th U.S. presidents. Currently: These Are My Jewels is unique to Ohio and has been a Capitol Square landmark since 1894. Having graced the 10-acre site longer than prominent pieces such as the William McKinley Monument and

30   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

Image courtesy of the Capitol Square Review and Advisory Board

Funded by the state of Ohio, These Are My Jewels cost $30,000 and was sculpted by Cleveland artist and architect Levi Scofield. It honored six Ohioans when displayed in Chicago, but after the Columbian Exposition closed, the sculpture was moved to Columbus and another Buckeye State gem — Rutherford B. Hayes — was added at the suggestion of Ohio Governor William McKinley.


insurance and you could save.

geico.com | 1-800-947-AUTO | Local Office

Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states, in all GEICO companies, or in all situations. Boat and PWC coverages are underwritten by GEICO Marine Insurance Company. Homeowners, renters and condo coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, Inc. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, DC 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. © 2018 GEICO

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   31


Iconic Yellow Springs destination celebrates its 150th birthday BY DAMAINE VONADA

32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019


W

hat’s Cow Patty ice cream? According to Dan Young, CEO and chief ice cream scooper at Young’s Jersey Dairy, that’s customers’ most common question. Folks need only glance at the pasture where Young’s Jersey cows graze to figure out what inspired Cow Patty’s name, but Young considers the question an opportunity to interact with guests. “We tell them if they like chocolate, they’re going to love Cow Patty, because it’s double dark chocolate ice cream with cookie pieces, toffee pieces, and chocolate chips,” says Young. Cow Patty is among the best-selling of more than 80 flavors of ice cream produced at Young’s, a leading Ohio agritourism destination visited by well over 1 million guests every year. It’s located in the countryside near Yellow Springs, but people routinely come from Columbus or Cincinnati to treat themselves to Young’s homemade ice cream and cheese and enjoy a working farm where they can feed the resident goats, visit baby animals, and watch cows being

milked. “This farm has definitely become a social gathering place where family and friends meet to do fun stuff together,” says Young. Young’s original farmstead dates to 1869, when an ancestor built the red barn along present-day U.S. 68, and Youngs have raised Jersey cows there for more than a century. Jerseys are the smallest Opposite page: Visitors can get up close and personal with some of the residents of Young’s Jersey Dairy during their visit; above: Jo and Dan Young with the herd on the farm, circa 1956; left: Jo Young (aka Grandma Young) standing in front of the original Dairy Store in 1958. Next pages: Young’s mascot, “Cowvin,” takes a run on the Fast Slide (top); kids always enjoy feeding the goats in the petting area.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   33


THE ANATOMY OF A

Buckeye candy garnish: one chocolate/peanut butter buckeye made at Young’s bakery

Topping: real whipped cream

 inishing touch: F sprinkling of Reese’s Pieces

 loating top scoop: F 4-ounce dip of Peanut Butter Cup ice cream

 hake ingredients inside S cup: 5 ounces Chocolate Peanut Butter ice cream; 5 ounces Peanut Butter Cup ice cream; 5 ounces milk; 1.5 ounces peanut butter topping; 1.5 ounces chocolate syrup

Cup volume: 22 ounces

34   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019


dairy breed but give milk with high butterfat content — which, says Young, is the reason Jersey milk tastes better. In 1958, Charles “Hap” Young and his sons, Carl, Bob, and Bill, decided to sell milk directly to the public. “The milk cost 60 cents a gallon,” says Young, “and we used the honor system. People simply picked up milk and left their money in a box.” The Youngs soon expanded to ice cream, added a small retail shop to the red barn, and in response to customers’ requests, built a glass-sided pen where children could look at calves. The growing demand for Young’s ice cream prompted the family to build the standalone Dairy Store in 1968, and they also replaced the calf pen with a herd of friendly and entertaining goats. “By the late 1980s, we were not yet using the term ‘agritourism,’” says Young, “but we realized that providing a fun visit was more important than merely selling ice cream.” Today, Young’s boasts a year-round complex of ag-tivities that Young oversees with help from his sister, wife, son, and other family members. While ice cream remains the top attraction, Young’s is also known for farmstead cheeses made from Jersey milk in the red barn’s old dairy shop. The Dairy Store, which also houses a bakery and fast-food-style eatery, features Young’s signature Cow Shakes, Bull Shakes, and Buckeye Bull Shakes, while the full-service Golden Jersey Inn serves country comfort foods such as chicken and dumplings. Young’s entertainment offerings range from farm-themed

miniature golf at its two Udders & Putters courses to the Kiddie Corral with pedal tractors and a play corn pit and seasonal events, including an Easter egg hunt, ice cream charity bike tour, and pick-your-own pumpkins. Young’s Jersey Dairy turns 150 in 2019, and the family is planning a birthday celebration from January 18 to 21. “Our birthday is a very inexpensive time for families to bring their kids and have fun,” says Young. One-dip waffle cones will be specially priced at $1.50; both the Dairy Store and Golden Jersey Inn will offer cheeseburgers and kids’ meals for $1.50; and customers purchasing a sundae, shake, or deep-fried cheese curds will receive a souvenir milk bottle. Udders & Putters will offer miniature golf games for $1.50. Young’s Jersey Dairy, 6880 Springfield-Xenia Rd., Yellow Springs, OH 45387. 937-325-0629; www.youngsdairy.com.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   35


JANUARY 2019 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST

JAN. 9 – National Russian Ballet’s Cinderella, Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St., Toledo, 7:30 p.m. $29–$59. Composed by Sergei Prokofiev, this full-length ballet is notable for its jubilant music, lush scenery, and hilarious double-roles of the stepsisters, more mad than bad in this treatment. 419-242-2787 or www.valentinetheatre.com. JAN. 10 – Through the Drinking Glass Tasting and Pairing Event — Craft Beers, 109 S. Ohio Ave., Sidney. Time to be determined. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. JAN. 11 – Silver Screen Classics: The King and I, Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St., Toledo, 7:30 p.m. $5. 419-242-2787 or www.valentinetheatre.com.

JAN. 5 – Model Train Clinic, Hayes Presidential Library and Museums, Spiegel Grove, 1337 Hayes Ave., Fremont, 1–4 p.m. $2, or free with purchase of regular museum ticket. Veteran model train hobbyists assist you with advice related to model train maintenance and repair, as well as estimating the value of older model trains. 419332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org.

CENTRAL

JAN. 18–20 – Camp Perry Open: Civilian Markmanship Program, 1000 N. Lawrence Rd., Port Clinton. Open to air rifle and air pistol competitors of all ages and skill levels. Spectators welcome. 419-6352141 ext. 731, kharrington@thecmp.org, or http://thecmp.org.

JAN. 11–20 – Ohio RV and Boat Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th St., Columbus, Wed.–Fri. 12–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $14, C. (6–13) $3, under 6 free. See hundreds of campers and boats from over 21 dealers, plus camping gear, equipment, and related products. www.ohiorvandboatshow.com.

JAN. 19 – Hocking Hills Winter Hike, 19852 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan, continuous starts from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Free. See the beauty of Hocking Hills in the winter as you hike 6 miles from Old Man’s Cave to Ash Cave, with a stop at Cedar Falls for refreshments. 740-685-6841 or www.hockinghills.com.

JAN. 4, 25 – Improv in the May, Marion Palace Theatre May Pavilion, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7:30 p.m. $5. Audience members suggest ideas for the games and skits that seasoned stage actors perform. It’s a night of hilarious and unpredictable fun. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

WEST VIRGINIA

JAN. 19–20 – Lima Symphony: Mozart by Candlelight, Sat. 7:30 p.m., Trinity United Methodist Church, Lima; Sun. 4 p.m., St. Joseph Catholic Church, Wapakoneta. $20. An exquisite evening of Mozart and candlelight awaits as two local sanctuaries open their doors to the experience of music as it was performed during Mozart’s lifetime. 419-222-5701 or www.limasymphony.com.

JAN. 26 – Prom Dress Consignment Sale, 109 S. Ohio Ave., Sidney, during office hours. Beautiful dresses and accessories at great JAN. 13 – Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella, Veterans prices. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $44–$84. 419-224-1552 or www.limaciviccenter.com.

JAN. 12 – Annie Moses Band, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 8 p.m. $12–$28. Cutting-edge sound fuses American roots, folk rock, and jazz. 740-383-2101 or www. marionpalace.org.

JAN. 4–6 – Columbus Build, Remodel, and Landscape Expo, Greater Columbus Convention Ctr., Halls C and D, 400 N. High St., Columbus, Fri. 12–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, under 18 free. From top-quality exhibits, to informative seminars, to insightful demonstrations and more, you’ll discover thousands of smart, stylish, and cost-effective ways to design or renovate your home. www.homeshowcenter.com.

JAN. 18–20, 25–27 – Mamma Mia!, Encore Theater, 991 N. Shore Dr., Lima, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $12–$17. ABBA’s hits tell the hilarious story of a teen’s search for her birth father on a Greek island paradise. www.amiltellers.org.

JAN. 19 – Logan Frozen Festival, Main St., Logan, 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Free. Features more than 30 ice carvings lining Main Street, ice carving demonstrations by the award-winning Rock On Ice, musical entertainment, dining options, and a Pop-Up Shop. 800-462-5464. JAN. 19–20 – Midwest Sports Spectacular, Ohio Expo Ctr., Cardinal Hall, 717 E. 17th Ave, Columbus, Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $10 for weekend pass. $5 parking. Sports collector cards, vintage and new collectibles, memorabilia, and autograph signings. https://ohiosportsgroup.com. JAN. 25–27 – Johnson’s Log Home and Timber Frame Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., Rhodes Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri.

JAN. 5 – Little Princess Ball, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. $130 per father/daughter. Bring your little princess (ages 5–12) to the ball! Celebrate with dinner, a father/ daughter dance, arts and crafts, and souvenir photo. Price includes lodging. Registration required. 304-643-2931 or https:// wvstateparks.com/event/little-princess-ball/. JAN. 25–27 – Huntington RV and Boat Show, Big Sandy Superstore Arena, 1 Center Plaza, Huntington, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. An expo featuring new products and services for travelers, campers, boaters, and outdoor recreation enthusiasts. 304-757-5487 or www.bigsandyarena.com. JAN. 26 – Honey Bee Expo, West Virginia University– Parkersburg, Rte. 47, Parkersburg. $20 advance, $25 at door; age 12 and under, $8. All-day conference dedicated to the honey bee and the hobby of beekeeping. Workshops for all levels of beekeepers, from beginners to advanced. www.movba.org.

36   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

1–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $10 admission, good for all three days. An expo for log home, timber frame home, and rustic furniture enthusiasts. 866-607-4108 or www. loghomeshows.com. JAN. 26 – Rumours ATL: A Fleetwood Mac Tribute, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 8 p.m. $15–$28. Rumours captures the energy of Fleetwood Mac at the height of their career by blending perfect harmonies, precise instrumentation, and a visually engaging stage show. 740-3832101 or www.marionpalace.org. JAN. 26 – Workshop for Beginners: Grafting the Right Way, Dawes Arboretum Greenhouse Classroom, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 8:30–11:30 a.m., $30/$40 non-members. Learn about grafting in a hands-on workshop to ensure future success in reproducing plants. Rootstock and scion wood are provided; attendees may bring their own scion wood, if appropriate rootstock is available (call to verify). Participants take home the material they graft to nurture. Appropriate for ages 14 and above. Register by Jan. 24 at 800-443-2937 or www.dawesarb.org. FEB. 2 – Lancaster Antique Show, Fairfield Co. Fgds., Farm Bureau Bldg., 157 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $6. Reception and early buying on Friday, Feb. 1, 6–8 p.m.; $10 admission includes Saturday’s show. More than 35 dealers specializing in country and period antiques, stoneware, decorative arts, and more. 614-325-8873, 614-989-5811, or www.facebook. com/lancasterantiqueshow.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/ website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

NORTHEAST

JAN. 5 – Snow Dogs Train Show, presented by Cuyahoga Valley S Gauge Association, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, under 12 free. Free parking. All-gauge show with over 150 tables of trains and toys, operating layouts of several gauges, and good food at reasonable prices. www.cvsga.com.

JAN. 19 – Northern Ohio Fly Fishing Expo, Days Inn and Suites, 4742 Brecksville Rd., Richfield, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $10, Youth (13–18) $5, under 12 free. Free with military ID. Fishing seminars, fly tying lessons, fishing gear and supplies, and more. www.ncffexpo.com.

JAN. 9–13 – Ohio RV Supershow, I-X Center, One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Wed.–Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. $13, under 13 free. $10 parking. Check out over 600 of the newest RVs including tent campers, travel trailers, fifth wheels, and motor homes. 330-678-4489 or www.ohiorvshow.com.

THROUGH JAN. 7 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Free. Over 150 unique, life-size Nutcrackers on display at Fort Steuben Park. Market booths open on the weekend. 740-283-1787 or www. steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. JAN. 5 – Antique and Collectible Toy Show, Lakeland Community College, AFC Auxiliary Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. $6, C. (6–12) $2, under 6 free. New and antique toys, dolls, diecast cars, planes, and other models to buy, sell, or trade. 216-470-5780 (Tom), cleveshows@att.net, or www. neocollectibletoys.com.

SOUTHEAST

JAN. 12–13 – Mohican Winter Fest, 131 W. Main St., Loudonville, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Award-winning Aaron Costic and his crew from Elegant Ice Creations are back to sculpt truly inspired creations from ice. See over 25 elegant ice sculptures. Additional ice carving around Central Park fountain. 419-994-2519 or www. discovermohican.com. JAN. 17–21 – Mid-America Boat Show, I-X Ctr., 1 I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Thur./Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $14, Srs. $12, under 13 free. Features the “boating experience” pavilion and Twiggy the Water-Skiing Squirrel! www.clevelandboatshow.com. JAN. 18–20 – Appalachian Music Festival, Mohican Park State Lodge, 1098 Ashland Co. Rd. 3006, Perrysville. Free and open to the public. This weekend-long event celebrates the heritage of Appalachian music. Jam sessions, performances, and more. 419938-5411 or www.mohicanlodge.com.

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Dickens Victorian Village, downtown Cambridge. Stroll the streets to view scenes depicting life in 1850s England, featuring life-sized, handmade mannequins wearing real vintage clothing. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. THROUGH JAN. 1 – Holiday Light Show, Guernsey County Courthouse, Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. nightly. Four different light and music shows performed each evening. 800-933-5480 or www. dickensvictorianvillage.com.

JAN. 20 – Norwalk & Western RR Winter Model Train Show, German’s Villa, 3330 Liberty Ave., Vermilion, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 10 free. Free parking. All scales, operating layouts and displays, model train supplies, railroad historical items, and more. 419-706-8038 or www.norwalkandwesternrr.com. JAN. 25–27 – Cleveland Motorcycle Show, I-X Center, One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 9:30 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $17, under 12 free. $10 parking. www.motorcycleshows. com. JAN. 26 – TCA Great Lakes Division Train Meet, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Adult $6, Family $8, kids admitted free. Free parking. All-gauge show including O, S, HO, N, Z, and large scale with over 175 tables and many operating displays. New and old trains to buy, sell, or trade. 440-665-0882 (Ed Mularz), emularz1124@aol.com, or www.greatlakestca.org. FEB. 2 – Mid-Winter Stamp and Coin Show, Mozelle Hall, Ashland Co. Fgds., 2042 Claremont Ave., Ashland, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Free admission and parking. Contact: Ashland Stamp and Coin Club, P.O. Box 269, Ashland, OH 44805.

displays of many prehistoric objects, materials recovered from 18th-century native and military camps located in Ohio will be on display for the first time. Programs offer hands-on activities and demonstration, and the chance to handle real dinosaur bones! 740373-3750 or www.campusmartiusmuseum.org. JAN. 20 – Bridal and Prom Showcase, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 12–3 p.m. $5. Caterers, DJs, photographers, realtors, hair salons, makeup artists, and more will be available with ideas to make your special day memorable. 740439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com.

JAN. 13 – Rhonda Vincent & The Rage, Stuart’s Opera House, 52 Public Square, Nelsonville, 3 p.m. $29–$39. The most award-winning JAN. 26 – Country on the Carpet, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., band in bluegrass music history performs at a special Sunday 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 7 p.m. $6 in advance, $8 at door. Put matinee. 740-753-1924 or www.stuartsoperahouse.org. on your dancin’ shoes — or boots! — for a night full of country and JAN. 19 – “Digging the Past” Archaeology Day, Campus Martius bluegrass music. 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com. Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Along with

music. Reservations recommended. 513-385-9309 or www. vinokletwines.com.

SOUTHWEST

JAN. 5–6 – Wedding Expo and Show, Wright State University Nutter Ctr./McLin Gym, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, 11 a.m–4 p.m. $5 in advance, $8 at door. Fashion shows at 1 and 3 p.m. Giveaways, door prizes, demonstrations, and seminars. www. weddingapolis.com. JAN. 19 – Chocolate Meltdown, Oxford Community Arts Ctr., 10 S. College Ave., Oxford, 1–5 p.m. $7 in advance, $10 at door, under 13 free. Chocolate delicacies for tasting, an amateur baking contest, children’s activities, raffle baskets, an auction, educational materials about chocolate, and an art exhibit. info@oxarts.org or 513-524-8506.

JAN. 2, 9, 16, 23 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Free admission. Enjoy dinner and an evening of lively bluegrass

JAN. 18–20 – Cincinnati Golf Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati, Fri. 5–9:30 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $11 online, $13 at door; includes admission to Travel, Sports, and Boat Show. Find deals on equipment and clothing, get tips from golf pros, and find out the best places to golf near and far. www.cincinnatigolfshow.com.

JAN. 18–20, 23–27 – Cincinnati Travel, Sports, and Boat Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati. See website for times. $11 online, $13 at door, under 13 free. See boats, campers, ATVs, motorcycles, and adventure sports equipment. Find everything you need to plan your next outdoor adventure! www. cincinnatiboatshow.com. JAN. 25 – We Banjo 3, Clark State Performing Arts Ctr., 300 S. Fountain Ave., Springfield, 8 p.m. From $20. The award-winning quartet from Galway, Ireland, delivers a groundbreaking mixture of traditional Irish music and old-time American and bluegrass influences. 866-722-8587 or www.springfieldartscouncil.org. JAN. 26–27 – Lebanon Antique Show and Sale, Warren Co. Fgds., 665 N. Broadway, Lebanon, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $6 online, $8 at door. More than 50 vendors featuring 18th-, 19th-, and early 20th-century American and Continental furnishings and decorative arts, textiles, jewelry, primitives, folk art, and fine art. www.harmonmuseumohio.org.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


MARKETPLACE

Designed to Last. G e ne ra t ion s . New Oh io Factory– Open in g in 201 9!

Lorem ipsum (855) 744-0022

M id w e s t e rn B u i l d i n g s . c o m

Post frame building expert

567-209-1109

Labor-only quotes available on request Owner/builder onsite Siding and metal roof preferred contractor

Serving OH, WV, PA, KY, IND, MICH

BIG SALE! Our 55th Year

BUY 2, GET 3rd 55% OFF

38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019

OLD BARNS WANTED

Buying barns, bank barns, and granaries. Insured, 20 years experience. 440-315-1985


SUPER COUPON

FREE

1,000+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com SUPER COUPON

a BEATS Snap-on*

WITH

1/2" HIGH TORQUE AIR IMPACT WRENCH FT. LBS.

TORQUE

BOLT BREAKAWAY

1190

1210 YES

BLOWS PER MINUTE

1270

LOW SOUND LEVEL

YES

FORWARD/REVERSE

ONE-HANDED

YES

WEIGHT

4.2 LBS.

1190

Customer Rating

YES

EARTHQUAKE EQ12XT

FT. LBS.

• 3.5" LCD Display • Battery Included

$129

Customer Rating

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OIL-FREE RAPID PUMP 3 TON STEEL AIR COMPRESSORS HEAVY DUTY LOW PROFILE A. HOT DOG FLOOR JACK • Weighs 73 lbs. ITEM 69269/97080 shown B Customer Rating B. PANCAKE NOW ITEM 61615/60637 95275 shown

$2

SAVE 70%

9

$ 98

COMPARE TO

BLUE HAWK

MODEL: BG8X10-Y

4

$ 99

ITEM 69115/69121/69129/69137/69249/877 shown

• Air delivery: 0.6 CFM @ 90 PSI SAVE 1 CFM @ 40 PSI 59% $ 62 COMPARE TO PORTER-CABLE MODEL: PCFP02003

$139

$

189

$

COMPARE TO

SUPER COUPON

$

249 SAVE $ 109

Blade sold separately.

Customer Rating

$

17

1699

64 SAVE ITEM 5889 DEWALT MODEL: DW1369 84% 62281/61637 shown *20589373 * 20589373

COMPARE TO

$

99

MODEL 1800

SUPER COUPON

18" x 12" ULTRA-LIGHT, CRUSH PROOF MOVER'S DOLLY WEATHER-RESISTANT Customer Rating • 1000 lb. capacity LOCKABLE CASE • Exterior dimensions: NOW

10

SAVE 54%

ITEM 63098/60497/61899 63095/63096/63097/93888 shown

11

ITEM 64264/64266/64879/64881 61282/62326/61253 shown

MODEL: 25521

*20573692 * 20573692

9-3/16" L 7-1/2" W 4-1/2" H

$9

99

99

$7

COMPARE TO

PELICAN

$

34

89

MODEL: 1150

$99 SAVE 106

$

$

$

COMPARE TO

SHELTER LOGIC

205

99

MODEL: 23522

11999

ITEM 63054 62858 shown

COMPARE TO

WARN $ 99

699

MODEL: 96820

Customer Rating

$

$4

39999 $299

SAVE 50%

ITEM 64045/64046/63770 shown

9

$ 99 ITEM 69955/64284/42292 shown

*20641501 * 20641501

*20641513 * 20641513

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 4/21/19.

2899

SAVE 65%

ITEM 61910/62447/93068 shown

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

Item 42305 shown

YOUR CHOICE

SUPER COUPON

$9999 $

TYPE ITEM SAE 69043/63282/42304 MODEL: HCW10PCSAE METRIC 69044/63171/42305

COMPARE TO

HUSKY

6.5 HP (212 CC) OHV HORIZONTAL SHAFT GAS ENGINE NOW

99

$

17

97

11999

SAVE $230

ITEM 60363/69730 ITEM 69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

COMPARE TO

HONDA

$

32999

MODEL: GX200UT2QX2

*20639952 * 20639952 LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

SUPER COUPON

AUTOMATIC 26" x 22" SINGLE BANK BATTERY FLOAT EXTRA DEEP CABINETS lbs. CHARGER • Weighs 174 CE

99

$

MODEL: SFA600

9 PIECE FULLY POLISHED COMBINATION WRENCH SETS

SUPER COUPON

NOW

vFIRST ALERT

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

99

1499

COMPARE TO

SUPER COUPON

*20637386 * 20637386

NOW

$

*20608855 * 20608855

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

SAVE $ 400

$999

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

*20622736 * 20622736

Customer Rating

NOW

*20605493 * 20605493

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

• Weighs 83.65 lbs. • 21" L x 10-1/8" H

99

WIRELESS SECURITY ALERT SYSTEM

Customer Rating

NOW

*20614717 * 20614717

12,000 LB. TRUCK/SUV WINCH

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

7

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 54%

ITEM 62434, 62426, 62433, 62432, 62429, 64178, 64179, 62428 shown LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

$ 99 SAVE 66%

ITEM 64550 Case contents and 63518 shown locks not included.

$499

*20574466 * 20574466

10 FT. x 20 FT. PORTABLE CAR CANOPY

$5

SAVE $ 99 71% 14

NOW

NOW

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

COMPARE TO

MODEL: HDFDOLLY

COMPARE TO

VALEO $ 02

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

$999

SUPER COUPON

99

20"

MODEL: T830018Z

29 PIECE TITANIUM DRILL BIT SET

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

$

9799

5

$ 99

NOW

*20583058 * 20583058

BUFFALO TOOLS $ 65

14999

Customer Rating

ITEM 69684/61970/61969 shown

Customer Rating

TEQ $

SUPER COUPON

• Laser guide

MODEL: TSS120L

5699

$

COMPARE TO

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

99

RYOBI

99

Customer Rating

9 $799

SAVE $ 70

*20573158 * 20573158

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

99

$39

98

*20563814 * 20563814

12" DOUBLE-BEVEL SLIDING COMPOUND MITER SAW NOW

YOUR CHOICE

SUPER COUPON

MECHANIC'S GLOVES

Customer Rating

A

*20550355 * 20550355

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trencher/backhoe, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/19.

SUPER COUPON ®

NOW

99

MODEL: MT-1210

Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/19 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.

SUPER COUPON

7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" ALL PURPOSE/WEATHER RESISTANT TARP

ITEM*

16

*20554832 * 20554832

*Snap-on PT850 stated specs

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

PROSKIT $ 72

ITEM 98025/30756/63604 63758/63759/69096/90899 shown

20% OFF ANY SINGLE

COMPARE TO

Snap-on PT850

$ PRICE 59995 *20563334 * 20563334

$

99

ITEM 62891

7 FUNCTION DIGITAL MULTIMETER

149 99

NOW

SAVE $ 469

4.4 LBS.

ANY PURCHASE

SUPER COUPON

YOUR CHOI

$239 $

99

Customer Rating Item 64431 shown Item 64162 shown

SNAP-ON

MODEL: KRA4008FPBO

• Wireless, tool-free and easy installation

Customer Rating ng

99 299 $

SAVE 1,425 COMPARE TO $1,665

200 LUMENS LED SUPER BRIGHT FLIP LIGHT

4

$ 49 ITEM 64432 64431/64434 64433/64163/64162

Item 64433 shown

NOW

$299

COMPARE TO

PROMIER $

6

MODEL: SW-SWITCH-12/24

SAVE 50%

ITEM 64189/64723/63922 shown

*20643587 * 20643587

*20644694 * 20644694

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 4/21/19*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

JANUARY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

NEW YEAR’S

Cheers

Our children, Adam, Olivia, and Evan, enjoying a night with friends watching the ball drop. Michelle and Matt Seger

Our golden retriever, Scout, couldn’t stay awake to watch the ball drop last New Year’s Eve. Bethany Thompson

Pioneer Electric Cooperative members

South Central Power Company member

My son, Dylan, and his two younger cousins, Deacon and Sophie, having fun at my sister’s house on New Year’s Eve! Amy Happenny

My daughter, Nevada Warner; her cousin, Rozlyn Meyer; and their best friend, Emma Robb, celebrate with sparkling cider at their third New Year’s Eve sleepover. Lori Warner

South Central Power Company member

South Central Power Company member

Send us your picture! For April, send photos of “Mud Season” by Jan. 15; for May, send “Sensory Overload” by Feb. 14. Upload your photos at www.ohioec. org/memberinteractive and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in your photos.

40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2019


5 1 2 3

quick tips to save energy during winter Seal air leaks and insulate well to prevent heat from escaping and cold air from entering your home.

4

Lower your water heater temperature. The Dept. of Energy recommends using the warm setting (120 degrees) during fall and winter months.

Open blinds and curtains during the day to allow sunlight in to warm your home.

5

Close blinds and curtains at night to keep cold, drafty air out.

68

Set your thermostat to 68 degrees during cold weather.

ohioec.org/purpose


Specializing In Post Frame Buildings Call Toll Free (855) MQS-3334

• Free Estimates

www.mqsstructures.com

40’x60’x12’ • Garage/Hobby Shop

Delivery Fees May Apply

STRUCTURES, LLC Installed

30’x40’x10’ • Garage/Hobby Shop

•2-10x10 Garage Doors

•2-9x8 Garage Doors

•1-3’ Entry Door

•1-3’ Entry Door

•Sof�it/Wainscot Optional

30’x60’x12’ • Storage Building

Installed

•Sof�it Optional

24’x32’x10’ • Garage/Hobby Shop

•1-60’ Sidewall Open •5-12’ Bays •3’ Overhang On Front

30’x36’x10’ Horse Barn with 8’ Lean-to

Installed •10’ Split Slider w/Windows •1-3’ Entry Door •3-4’x7’ Dutch Doors •Sof�it Optional

Installed

Installed •2-9x8 Garage Doors •1-3’ Entry Door •Sof�it Optional

30’x48’x16’ • Drive Thru RV Storage

Installed •2-12x14 Garage Doors •1-3’ Entry Door •Sof�it/Wainscot Optional

Ohio Cooperative Living - January 2019 - Firelands  
Ohio Cooperative Living - January 2019 - Firelands