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Darke Rural Electric Cooperative Official publication | www.darkerec.com

NOVEMBER JANUARY 2018

Veterans Day HONORING ALL WHO SERVED

ALSO INSIDE Warm, comforting root vegetables Thanksgiving tradition at the Golden Lamb Our 2018 Ohio-made gift guide


Thank You,

VETERANS Honoring all who served for our freedom!

ohioec.org/purpose


Adams Rural Electric Cooperative: Samuel Kimmerly Jr., Stephen Huff, Kenneth McCann, John Wickerham, William Wylie

Ohio Cooperative Living takes this opportunity to thank veterans working for the Ohio electric cooperative network for their service:

Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative: Jim Sowards, John Troester Butler Rural Electric Cooperative: Matthew Brown, Randy Hudson, Adam Osborn, Levi Tipton, Tom McQuiston, Ron Kolb Carroll Electric Cooperative: Dan Ryan, Jr. Consolidated Cooperative: Roger Stewart, Mike Bishop, Rob Brodin, Jon Todd, Don McCracken, Don Breece, Dick Miller The Energy Cooperative: Dan Dupps, Nelson Smith, Jack Schmidt, Dave Montgomery, Rusty Wheeler, Chris Miller, Travis Green, Mary Estep, Melissa Johnson, Brian Prince, Dennis Abram The Frontier Power Company: Scott Dunn, Matt Limburg, Larry Blair Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative: Darrin Thomas Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative: Tom Dierksheide Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative: Steve Asbury, Kurt Detterman, Steve James, Ken Conrad, Dave Tegtmeier, Dave Mann Logan County Electric Cooperative: Daniel Ashcraft, Tony Willis, Aaron Quinton

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING NOVEMBER 2018

Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative: Jim McConnell, Ray Croskey

INSIDE

Midwest Electric, Inc.: Jim Williams, Bob Barnt, Gary Knapke, Gary Profit

4

VETERANS AT THE CO-OP Ohio electric cooperatives know and value the traits that their employee-veterans bring to the job.

24 OHIO-MADE GIFT GUIDE We’ve scoured the state looking for those perfect locally produced gifts that will surely please everyone on your list.

30 LAMB FOR THE HOLIDAY The Golden Lamb restaurant in Napoleon has been serving Thanksgiving dinner longer than Thanksgiving’s been a holiday.

Cover image on most issues: Rene Weber, a Vietnam veteran and member of Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, stands solemnly at the Arlington National Cemetery amphitheater during the Honor Trip sponsored by HWEC. The photo was taken by Weber’s trip guardian, Cheryl Arwood.

Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative: Eugene Royer North Central Electric Cooperative: Rick Cook, Matt Feasel, Patrick Pifher North Western Electric Cooperative: Bob Carter, Richard Polter, Charles (Tom) Case Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative: Ryan Flint, John McMaster Pioneer Electric Cooperative: Jeb Friend, Georg Hohenstein, Curtis Schmidt, Jonathan Watkins, Bryan Zirkle, Ronald Clark, Terrence Householder South Central Power Company: Brian Cummings, Buzz Detty, Nathan Dupler, Joe Everhart, Dan Hill, Seth Householder, Bryan Johnson, Carl Payne, Bret Rice, James Rice, Billy Riffe, Lonnie Roberts, Thomas Sestito, Dan Smith, Phil Stringer, Tom Sunderlin, Brian Waddell, Alan Gabriel Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative: Ken Brubaker Union Rural Electric Cooperative: Dan Bosch, Ed Peper, Jeff Wilson, Jeff Reinhard, Bill D’Onofrio Washington Electric Cooperative: Bruce Swope, John Buckley, Gale DePuy, William Bowersock, Shawn Ray Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives/Buckeye Power: Craig Grooms, Jason McDermott Cardinal Power Plant: Darrell Boley, Scott Law, Lawrence Oliver, Steven Robinson, Eric West, Kris George, David Barcus, Brandon Bokunevitz, John Bonar, Ty Fonow, Scott Hand, Matthew Haynes, Ronald Hines, Matthew Hoagland, Michael Kalinkiewicz, David Keller, Jim Kenny, Tim McCain, Kirk Murray, Wally Perry, John Prokopakis, Matt Rainer, Chris Robinson, Justin Roski, James Simms, Charles Thompson, Ryan Ellis, Kevin Fritz, Bryan Long, Duane Ogilbee, Brian Rawson, Adam Sloan, Nick Vasey, James Bateman, Scott Blosser, Walter Eltringham, Guy Hill, Demetrius Lathon Fred Layman, John McDonald, Ryan Rose, Ronald Westfall Robert P. Mone Plant: Mike Yorkovich, Kevin Fletcher Greenville Generating Station: Andy Williams, Dan Garcia * We may have inadvertently omitted names from this list. Thank you to all veterans for your service!

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 1


UP FRONT

THANKFUL Almost daily, I find myself disappointed, even upset, with the words and actions of people in leadership positions — politicians, business executives, media talking heads — saying and doing things that range from annoying to just plain wrong. Perhaps you can empathize. But as I consider how to “fix” the problems, I soon realize how blessed we are with the system we have and with the people in our families, in our communities, at work, and behind the scenes who make everyday life great. That gratitude certainly extends to the electric cooperative community.

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

This month, I simply express my gratitude for: • Our constitutional form of government based on individual rights and freedoms, including our right to vote on November 6 for the people we think will best represent us • Our active-duty military and veterans who continue to defend our country and our freedom • The men and women working for Ohio’s electric cooperatives — the linemen, power plant workers, accountants, engineers, member service representatives, managers, and other professionals who work each day to keep your electricity safe, reliable, and affordable • Community volunteers who give to those in need • Your support and patronage as members of your electric cooperative Wishing all of you a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday.

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2018

I soon realize how blessed we are with the system we have and with the people in our families, in our communities, at work, and behind the scenes who make everyday life great.


November 2018 • Volume 61, No. 2

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Rebecca Seum Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Judd Bone, Colleen Romick Clark, Victoria Ellwood, W.H. “Chip” Gross, E.L. Hubbard, Patrick Keegan, Catherine Murray, Adam Specht, Bill Thornhill, Damaine Vonada, and Michael Wilson. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. It is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 8 POWER LINES MUTUAL AID: Crews from Ohio electric cooperatives answered

the call for help after Hurricane Florence drenched the South.

10 OHIO ICON CRIMSON CUP: The Columbus-based coffee roaster sources beans from 25 countries and roasts 250 tons of beans per year.

12 CO-OP PEOPLE OPERATION EVERGREEN: The Ohio Christmas Tree Association service project gives a holiday boost to overseas troops.

15 GOOD EATS ROOT OF THE MATTER: Humble root veggies spend the summer underground so they can bring comfort in the colder months.

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO

HONORED: Two Ohio electric cooperatives earn national

recognition for their work with veteran Honor Trips.

32 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE CRIME DOGS: ODNR has a few new officers in the field this hunting season to keep an eye — and nose — out for scofflaws.

36 CALENDAR

WHAT’S HAPPENING: November events and other things to do.

The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

38 MEMBER INTERACTIVE WE LOVE OUR VETERANS: Our readers honor their families and

friends who served, and instill respect in the next generation.

IN THIS ISSUE Bellefontaine (p.4, 23) Oxford (p.4) Millersburg (p.4, 23) Coshocton (p.4) Columbus (p.10) Newark (p.12) Lebanon (p.30) Paulding (p.23) North Baltimore (p.23)

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 3


POWER LINES

Stories of

SERVICE

Electric cooperatives across Ohio join the nation this month in honoring veterans of the U.S. armed forces — America’s courageous protectors, defenders, and heroes. Not only do the co-ops acknowledge veterans’ dedication to our country, but we are truly grateful for the unique strengths and noble characteristics they bring to the co-op family. We recognize all of our veteran-employees, and here, we talk to a few of them. BY VICTORIA ELLWOOD

Tony Willis Tree trimmer foreman, Logan County Electric Cooperative, Bellefontaine Tony Willis knew he was going to join the military — and specifically, the U.S. Marine Corps — when he was just 12 years old. “My two grandfathers both fought in the Battle of Guadalcanal in World War II,” Willis says. “They were both Marines but didn’t know each other. They only realized the connection when my parents got married.” Both grandpas had tact and discipline — qualities they passed on to Tony. Wanting to follow in their footsteps, he says, he joined the Marines via an early program while still in high school. He served 10 years, based in North Carolina and California.

Many of the skills Willis honed in the military are valuable today. “The things I carry into my job? My tact and having my bearings. My ability to communicate and not worry about the little stuff, and being really ready to work when at work. That’s important.” He says he loves being part of the community served by the co-op. “On the co-op line, we try to talk with everyone before we cut their trees,” he says. “We talk with them, not to them. We build relationships, and they know we’ll take care of them.”

4

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018

PHOTO BY MICHAEL WILSON

While at Camp Lejeune, he served in the Fleet Marine Force. “We were part of ‘the float’ with the U.S. Navy,” he says. “I’ve been in 24 countries, from the Mediterranean to the Caribbean, South America to North Africa. You never knew what to expect, but it was always exciting.”


Adam Osborn Manager of safety and compliance Butler Rural Electric Cooperative, Oxford Adam Osborn spends his days making sure everyone at Butler REC is safe and secure. Osborn is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. He monitors safety, conducts field audits with linemen, and makes sure all work areas at Butler REC comply with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations and safety procedures. “The job is a great fit,” he says. “I take it real seriously, so everyone can go home safely at the end of the day.” Osborn, a native of Webster, Indiana, served in the Air Force from 2003 until 2007. He responded to emergencies alongside EMTs, fought wildfires, and served in Baghdad, Iraq.

PHOTO BY E.L. HUBBARD

Along with an eye to safety, he says the Air Force instilled skills — time management, attention to detail, organization — that he uses daily and that created a natural path to Butler REC. “I still have that drive for safety,” he says. “My background in hazmat and emergency response helped qualify me for this job.” As part of that job, he teaches CPR and first aid to all 11 linemen and 37 office employees at Butler. He’s frequently on the phone answering compliance questions and explaining safety issues, and he travels to local schools to provide safety demonstrations — showing, for example, what can happen if a balloon or kite touches a power line. “I enjoy coming to work every day; I’m very grateful,” Osborn says. “Butler feels like family — everyone meshes together and works well together.”

Steve James, Class A lineman Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, Millersburg Steve James grew up in Wayne County and now works around that same rural area as a lineman for the co-op. But in between? Let’s just say he wandered a little way from home.

PHOTO BY BILL THORNHILL

James served as a combat engineer in the U.S. Marine Corps, based at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, in the 1980s. He was part of “Operation Urgent Fury,” the U.S.-led invasion and liberation of the Caribbean island of Grenada. He also served in war-torn Beirut, Lebanon. Following his service, James was happy to return to the familiar hills of eastern Ohio, where he’s been a lineman for 13 years. The skills and character he built with the Marines have served him well. “I pretty much go by the idea that you do what’s needed to get a job done,” he says. “In the Marine Corps, whatever the orders were, you found a way to do it.” Perhaps the most treasured part of his job is his involvement in the HolmesWayne Community Honor Trips — taking the area’s WWII, Korea, and Vietnam veterans to visit the Washington, D.C., memorials that honor their service. “The part I really enjoy is talking with the veterans and learning about their experiences,” he says. “I want to hear their stories — ask what they did and just listen. A lot of times they hold that in, but I want to see them open up. Being I’m a little older vet, I think they tend to talk to me. They are the real deal.”

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 5


Scott Dunn, First-class lineman The Frontier Power Company, Coshocton Scott Dunn says his experience stationed with U.S. Marines security forces in remote areas of the Philippines in the late 1980s helped prepare him for a recent humanitarian trip he took with other Ohio co-op employees to isolated villages in Guatemala. “My military career helped me understand that impoverished country,” says Dunn, who was among a group of co-op workers who spent three weeks in Central America with Project Ohio. “These were very, very remote villages,” he says. “We installed electric power where they’ve never had electricity. We wired 140 ‘houses’ that were dirt-floor huts. We put lights in. We added electricity to the school.”

PHOTO BY JUDD BONE/J&S PHOTOGRAPHY

They even brought along shoes for the kids, who enjoyed the chance to play a little soccer with the co-op workers. The experience was undeniably rewarding. The kids, he says, “well, they were the best part of it.” Dunn served in the Marines for eight years. He spent seven months on the USS Saipan, an amphibious assault ship that sailed from Iceland and Norway to the Mediterranean. After he left the service, Dunn went to school to study law enforcement and later joined Frontier Power. His military background continues to play a role. “I brought a lot with me: patience and discipline and the ability to deal with a whole lot of things at once,” he says. “You don’t get too upset over spilled milk, as they say. There’s a lot more to life. I just love being outside and getting people’s lights back on.”

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POWER LINES

OHIO CO-OPS MOBILIZE Crews help fellow co-ops recover after Florence’s devastation BY ADAM SPECHT

F

ifty-four linemen from 12 Ohio electric cooperatives spent much of mid-September successfully assisting with power restoration to members of South River EMC and Lumbee River EMC in North Carolina, two cooperatives severely impacted by Hurricane Florence.

After the hurricane swept through, the crews departed Ohio with 14 bucket trucks and 12 digger derricks. When they arrived, South River had 30,000 of its 46,000 members without power, while Lumbee River had 35,000 of its 60,000 members in the dark.

Lumbee River’s outages were down to a manageable level, and Ohio’s crews were notified that evening that they would be released the following morning. Throughout the restoration effort, Ohio linemen were commended for their adherence to high safety standards. “Our guys were able to influence others in ways that could save a life down the road,” says Dwight Miller, director of safety training and loss control at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide service organization that coordinated Ohio co-ops’ efforts.

While the restoration process at South River was relatively brisk and straightforward, crews assisting Lumbee River faced considerable adversity as flooding in the area worsened. “The two themes were getting stuck and not being able to return on roads that you used just a couple hours ago,” says Trevor Lavy, safety and loss control instructor at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. “It wasn’t uncommon to take two to three times longer to return to the co-op than it took to originally get to the job site.” Additionally, Lumbee River’s smart-meter systems were also initially offline, which created difficulty obtaining precise numbers and locations of outages. By the Ohio crews’ second day on the job, South River’s outage number was reduced to 3,766, while Lumbee River’s was at 10,964. In addition to the difficulties created by flooded roads, fuel scarcity created a significant hurdle, with many stations running out of diesel and some only able to accept cash because of widespread internet outages. Ohio crews assisting South River were released after the third day, with only 160 members awaiting restoration. Meanwhile, work continued at Lumbee River, with temperatures in the mid-90s paired with high humidity. By the end of the fourth day of work, 8

Crews from Piqua-based Pioneer Electric Cooperative survey and repair damage in the area served by South River Electric Membership Cooperative in North Carolina. The crews were among more than four dozen workers from Ohio helping to restore power after Hurricane Florence brought heavy rain, high wind, and devastating flooding to the region.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018

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Location: In addition to its headquarters and roasting and training facilities on Alum Creek Drive in Columbus, Crimson Cup Coffee and Tea owns and operates two coffee shops in the city’s Clintonville and Upper Arlington neighborhoods plus another inside the Greater Columbus Convention Center. The company also has a fourth location in the Akron suburb of Tallmadge. Provenance: Founder and president Greg Ubert quit his first job after college to start Crimson Cup Coffee and Tea in 1991. “One of the big drivers for me was having a really good cup of coffee in San Francisco,” says Ubert. “I thought that if I liked the taste of great coffee, others would enjoy it, too.” After moving back to his hometown of Columbus, Ubert launched his specialty coffee business with one roaster in a one-room office. At the time, specialty coffee aficionados were concentrated on the East and West coasts, and Ubert soon found himself teaching customers “from the grounds up” about how maintaining superior standards at each step from beans to brewing yields superior cups of coffee. “Our vision was establishing meaningful relationships locally and globally, whether they were with new coffee shop owners or with farmers in South America,” Ubert says. Significance: Crimson Cup is a multifaceted international business that imports and roasts coffee, develops and distributes coffee enhancers such as syrups and mixes, and not only educates but also nurtures coffee entrepreneurs through a franchisealternative program based on Ubert’s book, Seven Steps to Success: A Common-Sense Guide to Succeed in Specialty Coffee. The company has also garnered numerous awards, and in 2016, it was named Roast magazine’s Macro Roaster of the Year. “I’m especially proud of that honor because it’s like winning the Super Bowl of the coffee industry,” Ubert says. Currently: Crimson Cup sources coffee beans from about 25 countries and annually roasts some 500,000 pounds of coffee beans. Besides its Ohio operations, the company supplies coffee to more than 350 customers in other states and

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018

countries, including independently owned coffee shops, restaurants, grocers, colleges and universities, and food service businesses. Certified by the Specialty Coffee Association (SCA), Crimson Cup’s Innovation Lab in Columbus offers SCA-approved tutorials for both professional coffee crafters and consumers. Its programs include cupping and roasting courses, as well as classes such as “Espresso at Home” and “Coffee Education: Seed to Cup.” It’s a little-known fact that: The three outstanding coffees that helped Crimson Cup earn its prestigious Roaster of the Year award were Ethiopia Biftu Gudina, Kossa Kebena, and the company’s exclusive Wayfarer Blend espresso. Crimson Cup Coffee and Tea Worldwide Headquarters, 700 Alum Creek Drive, Columbus, OH 43205. For additional information about Crimson Cup’s Ohio locations, educational programs, products, and ordering information, call 888-800-9224 or visit www.crimsoncup.com.


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NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 11


CO-OP PEOPLE

Cheer

FOR TROOPS

The Ohio Christmas Tree Association provides holiday spirit to those serving abroad BY DAMAINE VONADA

V

alerie Graham, executive director of the Ohio Christmas Tree Association (OCTA), counts among her managerial responsibilities assisting tree farmers across the state with Operation Evergreen, an annual service project that gives fresh-cut Christmas trees and decorations to overseas military units. The project helps to bring a bit of home to soldiers who can’t be with their families at the holidays, and Graham says it’s one of the most rewarding aspects of her position. An independent administrator for several agricultural organizations, Graham is a member of Newark-based The Energy Cooperative who lives with her husband and their five daughters on a 200-acre livestock farm near Frazeysburg. She works out of a home office and handles everything from OCTA’s paperwork and communications to processing Operation Evergreen donations. Every November, Graham also participates in Operation Evergreen’s packing day, when all the Christmas trees grown and donated by OCTA members are transported to the Ohio Department of Agriculture in Reynoldsburg. After the evergreens pass inspection, a legion of volunteers — including adults on their lunch hours, as well as youth and school groups — readies the trees and their decorations for shipment. “We get busloads of kids who come to put ornaments in bags,” says Graham. “They wear Christmas hats and have lots of fun doing it.”

Operation Evergreen was launched in 1995 at the suggestion of former OCTA Executive Director Rhea Dawn Smith. Its mission is bringing Christmas cheer to troops stationed far from home. “Her husband was a Marine, and she knew that OCTA could provide a network for military donations,” says Amy Galehouse of Doylestown’s Galehouse Tree Farms, the project’s veteran coordinator. That first year, Operation Evergreen sent 30 trees to U.S. forces in Bosnia, and in 2011, more than 300 went to personnel in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. This year, OCTA plans to supply about 100 Christmas trees and dispatch them to the Middle East by air freight on November 14. “If they’re shipped out on that date,” says Galehouse, “we know they’ll be in

12

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018


Kuwait by Thanksgiving and get distributed to different bases in time for Christmas.” Because they’re shipped in boxes measuring 12 inches by 12 inches by 84 inches, the Christmas trees must be between 51⁄2 and 6 feet tall, and the preferred varieties are white pine and fir, which hold their needles well and can be easily compressed to fit inside the boxes. A true Christmas present, each box comes complete with an Ohio-grown tree, 35 feet of garland, and 48 ornaments. Also tucked into the boxes on packing day are handcrafted holiday banners and “Merry Christmas” messages written and collected at local football games and other events. “Every year, OCTA exhibits a fully decorated Christmas tree at the Ohio State Fair,” says Graham. “We encourage people to stop by and sign letters for the troops.”

Although OCTA members donate the trees, all the decorations — purchased or handmade — are given to Operation Evergreen by individuals, Scouting and 4-H members, civic societies, churches, and nursing homes. “Making red-and-green paper chain garlands is very popular with school and youth groups,” says Graham. “It’s those homemade ornaments that really touch the heart.” While commercial carriers such as UPS and FedEx offer Operation Evergreen discounted rates, this year’s shipping costs will tally about $15,000, and OCTA relies on contributions to help with that expense. Says Graham, “We appreciate everybody who makes a donation, whether it’s $5 or the $150 needed to ship each Christmas tree.” For more information about Operation Evergreen, call Valerie Graham at the Ohio Christmas Tree Association (740-8283331) or Galehouse Tree Farms (330-607-4487). Also visit www. ohiochristmastree.org or www.galehousetreefarms.com.

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 13


14   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2018


GOOD EATS

THE

ROOT

OF THE MATTER

These humble veggies spend the summer growing and maturing underground, developing to their hearty and flavorful best, so they can bring comfort to the table when the weather turns cold.

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 15


SLICED BEET AND CARROT SALAD Prep: 15 minutes | Cook: 12 minutes | Servings: 4 1 medium yellow carrot 3 golden beets 1 orange, zested and juiced 3 red beets 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh ginger 2 teaspoons olive oil 3 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium orange carrot Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Keeping separate so colors don’t bleed, peel and thinly slice golden and red beets. Toss golden beets in a bowl with 1 teaspoon olive oil and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Repeat process with red beets. Place golden beet slices on one cookie sheet and red beet slices on another. Bake 12 minutes or until beets are tender. Remove from oven and set aside. Peel outer layer of carrots, then thinly slice at a slight angle, keeping carrot colors separate. On a serving tray or plates, alternately arrange red and golden beets, then top with alternating colors of carrot slices. In a small bowl, combine orange juice, orange zest, ginger, parsley, and olive oil. Whisk thoroughly, then drizzle over vegetables. Serve cold or at room temperature. Makes 4 main-dish or 8 side-dish servings. Per serving: 181 calories, 10.7 grams fat (1.5 grams saturated fat), 3.5 grams fiber, 21 grams total carbs, 3 grams protein

CREAMY MASHED ROOT VEGETABLES Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 20 minutes | Servings: 8 2 tablespoons butter 1 rutabaga or celeriac (celery root) 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 turnips 1/2 teaspoon pepper 2 parsnips 1/4 cup fresh chives, roughly chopped 2 Yukon Gold potatoes butter for topping 4 teaspoons finely grated horseradish (optional) Note: Any combination of white root vegetables will work with this recipe. 1/3 cup light sour cream Peel and cut all vegetables into ½-inch cubes. Place in a large pot and cover with 2 to 3 inches of water. Cover and boil until vegetables are mashable but not falling apart, about 20 to 25 minutes. Drain, reserving some cooking liquid (set aside). Add optional horseradish, sour cream, butter, salt, and pepper to vegetables and puree with a mixer. If mashed vegetables are too stiff, add some of the reserved cooking liquid until desired consistency is achieved. Top with butter and chives (if desired) and serve as a side dish, just like mashed potatoes. Per serving: 131 calories, 5.2 grams fat (3 grams saturated fat), 4 grams fiber, 20 grams total carbs, 2.5 grams protein

FENNEL AND PARSNIP ROASTED CHICKEN Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 45 minutes | Servings: 6 2 large parsnips, peeled, sliced into 1 tablespoon olive oil thick sticks 4-pound whole chicken 1 large leek, white and light green parts, salt and pepper sliced thin 2 large fennel bulbs, sliced lengthwise peel of one lemon, cut into wide strips ½-inch thick Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Heat one tablespoon oil in a large ovenproof skillet (like cast iron) on medium-high. Season chicken on both sides with salt and pepper and cook, breast side down, until golden brown, about 7 minutes. Use tongs to turn and brown the other side, being careful not to tear the skin. Remove skillet from heat and transfer chicken to a plate. In the same skillet, toss fennel, parsnips, leek, and lemon peel in oil and juices. Evenly distribute vegetables across the skillet and place chicken, breast side up, on top. Roast in oven until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the chicken thigh registers 165 degrees, 30 to 45 minutes. Transfer chicken to a cutting board and let rest 10 minutes before carving. Remove lemon peel before serving. Per serving: 698 calories, 25 grams fat (6.5 grams saturated fat), 7.5 grams fiber, 25 grams total carbs, 90 grams protein 16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2018


ROSEMARY ROOT VEGETABLE BEEF STEW Prep: 15 minutes | Cook: 3 hours | Servings: 8 15-ounce can crushed tomatoes 2 pounds beef stew meat, cut into large pieces 3 tablespoons rosemary salt and pepper 3 carrots 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 parsnips 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 small turnips 1 medium onion, diced 2 Yukon Gold potatoes 1 cup dry red wine 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour (optional) 4 cups beef broth Sprinkle salt and pepper over one side of the beef. Heat butter in a stockpot over medium heat and brown beef on all sides, about 7 minutes. Remove the beef from pan, add garlic and onion, and cook until softened, about 3 minutes.

Pour in wine, beef broth, crushed tomatoes, and rosemary and return beef to the pan. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a steady simmer for 1 to 2 hours, stirring occasionally, until the beef is tender and beginning to fall apart. If liquid level gets low, add more broth or water as needed. Wash (and peel, if desired) carrots, parsnips, turnips, and potatoes. Roughly chop and add to the stew. Continue to simmer until vegetables are tender and liquid is reduced, about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. If stew is too thin, remove ½ cup of cooking liquid from pot and stir in flour until all lumps have dissolved. Pour flour mixture into the pot and stir. Simmer for an additional 10 minutes to allow stew to thicken. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot. Per serving: 441 calories, 11 grams fat (4.5 grams saturated fat), 9 grams fiber, 42 grams total carbs, 40 grams protein

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 17


THE EFFICIENCY EXPERT

EFFICIENT

holiday lighting BY PAT KEEGAN

I

t’s a shame that holiday lighting can lead to higher energy bills, but the good news is that there are strategies to let you save money without dampening your holiday spirit.

One of the best ways to save energy is by using LED lights, which consume about 80 percent less energy than incandescent bulbs. An individual’s potential savings depends on several factors, including your electric rate and how many hours your holiday lights are turned on. We’ve seen a number of different estimated energy cost savings. One report said that replacing five strings of traditional incandescent outdoor lights with LED bulbs could lower your bill from about $14 to 22 cents. Another report said that replacing incandescent lights on a typical indoor tree with LED bulbs could lower your monthly cost from $15 to $2. The reason incandescent bulbs are so inefficient is that at least 90 percent of their energy is converted into heat, not light. LEDs, by contrast, convert virtually all their energy to light. That means up to 20 strings of LED lights can be linked together, whereas incandescent sets are typically limited to between three and five strings in a chain. The efficiency of LED lights also makes them safer because they generate so much less heat.

lights for 10 seasons is $122 for incandescent bulbs and $18 for LEDs. Plus, the LED lighting is more likely to last the full 10 seasons, meaning fewer trips to the store. There are other ways to cut energy expenses. You can use decorative solar light sets, which store energy during the day and release light during the night. Timers are also a good idea because they can reduce energy use, especially if you don’t always remember to turn the lights off before bedtime. Innovative decorating ideas can make your display more dynamic and interesting, which might help you get by with fewer lights. That could reduce energy costs and still keep your holidays bright. For maximum effect with the smallest amount of energy use, try distributing the lighting across a broader space. In the spaces between lights, add reflective ornaments and decorations to increase the effect of the lights and add interest. For more information on saving energy on holiday lighting, visit Pat Keegan’s website: www.collaborativeefficiency.com/energytips.

Aside from their energy efficiency, LED lights can last longer — around 200,000 hours or more, which is about 25 times longer than incandescent lights. The bulb is more durable because it is made of an epoxy instead of glass. The drawback of switching over to LED lights is the upfront cost. Incandescent bulbs can be purchased for 19 to 50 cents each, while a replacement LED will likely cost $1 or more. However, one report we ran across showed the estimated cost of buying and operating standard C-9

18

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018

You may be able to simplify your outdoor decorations to save energy and still have a dramatic effect.


DARKE RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

TRUSTEE ELECTION PROCEDURES As a member of Darke Rural Electric Cooperative, Inc., you are a part owner of your electric utility. In late February and early March, you can express your ownership interest by exercising the cooperative principle of “Democratic Member Control,” which means each member gets a vote. For the second year in a row, cooperative members will vote by mail or online for their board of trustees. The results of the election will be announced at the annual meeting on March 14, 2019.

• District 1: Mississinawa, Allen, and Brown townships in Darke County

The election process begins when the board appoints a nominating committee. The committee selects qualified candidates to run for a position on the board of trustees.

• District 5: Harrison and Butler townships in Darke County

All trustees are members of the cooperative and must reside in the district that they represent. Trustees hold office for three-year terms. There is no limit on the number of terms served by a board member. If you are a qualified member of the cooperative from districts 1, 3, or 5 and wish to be considered for nomination, please contact the Darke REC office, and your name will be referred to the nominating committee. The governing body of the cooperative is a sevenmember board of trustees. The board meets each month to review and renew policies, make business decisions concerning the cooperative, review financial statements, and approve all patronage capital credit payments.

• District 2: Wabash, Patterson, York, Wayne, and Richland townships in Darke County • District 3: Jackson, Washington, and Greenville townships in Darke County • District 4: Liberty, Neave, VanBuren, and Twin townships in Darke County

• District 6: Jefferson, Monroe, and Jackson townships in Preble County • District 7: Harrison, Washington, and Twin townships in Preble County

You must vote online or mail in your ballot for it to count. No voting will occur at the annual meeting.

The cooperative’s service territory is divided into seven districts. Each district has one trustee that is elected by the cooperative members. The districts are as follows:

Annual Meeting

Mark your calendar for the 2019 Darke REC Annual Meeting Thursday, March 14

New Location — Romer’s Catering 118 E. Main St., Greenville, Ohio For further updates, be sure to read your Ohio Cooperative Living magazine

NOVEMBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


DARKE RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES ENERGY FYI

TIPS FOR PURCHASING NEW APPLIANCES When shopping for new appliances, there are two price tags you should consider:

1.

Purchase price of the appliance (think of this as a down payment)

2.

Cost to operate the appliance over its lifetime (how much energy the appliance uses)

PRICE

$$$

That second price is important because you’ll be paying for the appliance’s energy use for the next 10 to 20 years. • Look for the ENERGY STAR® label. ENERGY STAR-qualified products exceed the federal minimum standards for efficiency and quality. • Carefully review the EnergyGuide label on the appliance. The label provides information about how much energy an appliance uses compared to similar models. • Once you choose your make and model, compare prices. Keep in mind that many retailers will match a lower price offered by competitors. • Recycle or sell your old appliance. Ask the retailer if they’ll pick up your old appliance, or you can sell it yourself. Either option is better than the landfill!

20

OHIO Source: COOPERATIVE LIVINGof •Energy NOVEMBER 2018 Department

U.S. Government

Federal law prohibits removal of this label before consumer purchase.

Clothes Washer Capacity Class: Standard

ACME Corporation Model: ABC123FFF*** Capacity: 12.3 Cubic Feet

Estimated Yearly Energy Cost (when used with an electric water heater)

$15 $10

Cost range of similar models

92

$71

kWh

Estimated Yearly Electricity Use

Your cost will depend on your utility rates and use. • Cost range based only on standard capacity models. • Estimated operating cost based on six wash loads a week and a national average electricity cost of 12 cents per kWh and natural gas cost of $1.09 per therm.


YOUTH PROGRAMS

High school seniors Are your parents members of Darke Rural Electric Cooperative? Darke REC invites you to participate in the 2018 Scholarship Contest. We will award five scholarships totaling $6,000 (one for $2,000 and four for $1,000) to graduating high school seniors whose parents reside on cooperative lines. The top recipient of the Darke REC contest will qualify to participate in the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives

Scholarship Contest to be awarded a scholarship between $1,250 and $3,650. Applications will be available in December on the darkerec.com website or in the school guidance office. Watch for more details in next month’s Ohio Cooperative Living.

High school sophomores and juniors You could win the trip of a lifetime! Enter to participate in the Washington, D.C., Youth Tour June 14–20. Applications available in the co-op office or on the darkerec.com website in December.

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 21


DARKE RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

WARNING: Avoid third-party payment websites Darke Rural Electric Cooperative urges members to avoid using third-party websites when making payments. Many websites, such as Doxo.com, accept payments for hundreds of businesses. These websites make payments electronically or by check on a member’s (or customer’s) behalf. Most of them charge users to send payments. Please be aware that sites like these are using the cooperative’s logo and information but are NOT affiliated in any way with Darke Rural Electric Cooperative. Payments made through these sites are not guaranteed — they may not arrive on time, may not be applied to the account properly, and could result in late fees or disconnections. Please do not use third-party sites when making a payment to the cooperative. If paying online, use our SmartHub website or the SmartHub app, available for Apple and Android devices.

The office will be closed Nov. 22–23 for Thanksgiving. Darke Rural Electric Cooperative has an abundance of things to be thankful for, including our members! For emergency service, please call 800-776-5612.

CONTACT 800-776-5612 937-548-4114 WEBSITE www.darkerec.com MAIN OFFICE 1120 Fort Jefferson Ave. Greenville, OH 45331 OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday 7:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

22

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Matt Webster, President Tod Carroll, V.P. Michelle Marker, Sec./Treas. David Coons Robert Godown Neal Siefring Steve Vanzant GENERAL MANAGER/CEO Ted Holsapple

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION? Email your ideas to: bethd@darkerec.com Your electric bill is due the 10th of each month. If you do not receive your bill, it is your responsibility to contact the office before the due date. PAYMENT OPTIONS: office, nightdrop, online, phone, or MoneyGram.


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

Honor trips earn 2 co-ops national awards Two Ohio cooperatives have earned the National Cooperative Purpose Award for their support of “honor trips” for local veterans. The award, given by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, honors meaningful contribution to the community that exemplifies the purpose of co-ops. It was presented at the NRECA regional meetings in Columbus. Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, based in Millersburg, raised more than $67,000 through employee payroll deductions and other workplace activities to send 48 veterans and their guardians to Washington, D.C. Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative in Paulding raised more than $170,000 through electric bill contributions, raffles, and other events. Those funds allowed 475 veterans to make the trip. At Holmes-Wayne Electric Co-op, the trips “created a culture of service” among its 38 employees, according to HWEC’s Robyn Tate. “The trips brought healing to many veterans carrying decades of deep emotional wounds and were a fresh reminder that as a cooperative, we provide more than electricity,” says Tate. “We have the privilege, the honor, and, I feel, the obligation to make a difference by reaching out and caring for individuals in our community.”

Hancock-Wood program helps partners upgrade lighting Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative, based in North Baltimore, has provided rebates through its Commercial and Industrial Lighting Program to two of its members to help offset the cost of upgrading their lighting systems. Elmwood Local Schools upgraded its facilities to LED lighting as a more energy-efficient option for the district and received a $30,000 rebate. Keystone Foods, a global food company, upgraded its old inefficient incandescent lighting to LED and received a $15,000 rebate through Hancock-Wood’s program. Several electric cooperatives around the state offer such rebates. Both business and individual members can ask at their local co-op to see if rebates are currently available for lighting upgrades.

Logan County chamber honors Petty, co-op The Logan County Chamber of Commerce named General Manager Rick Petty and his 20 employees at Logan County Electric Cooperative the county’s entrepreneur and business of the month for September. Eighty-two years after it first brought power to the area, Logan County Electric Cooperative currently serves 4,620 consumermembers and maintains 679 miles of lines.

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 23


2018 Holiday Make your list and check it twice. Then check out our annual selection of Ohio items that are ideal for Christmas gifting.

24

Amish Country Soap Co., Berlin

Baum Pottery, Lebanon

Using family recipes dating back 250 years, Shane and Tracy Cultice make handcrafted artisan soaps with all-natural ingredients and certified essential oils that yield wonderful scents as well as therapeutic benefits. Dirty Boy, a pumice bar soap infused with coffee grounds, is ideal for farmers, gardeners, mechanics, and other folks who get their hands extra dirty. The company’s deliciously scented holiday soaps include Pumpkin Crunch, Warm Roasted Chestnuts, and Peppermint Bark. 866-687-1724; www.amishcountrysoapco.com

At their home’s pottery studio and gallery, Mike and Karen Hughes have a neat working relationship: He throws all of his functional pottery pieces on a wheel; she helps with everything else. Hughes is a rare potter who makes dinner and salad plates, and his work reflects techniques he learned during an apprenticeship in England. Baum Pottery’s bestselling Cracker Tray is a beautiful and versatile dish that can be used for serving and baking or as a planter and centerpiece. claytree@hughes.net; www.baumpottery.com

Castle Noel Ornaments, Medina

Handwoven Wonders, Wilmington

Ohio artist Mark Klaus loves Christmas so much that he created Castle Noel, a year-round attraction in downtown Medina that features enchanting store-window displays and his outstanding collection of costumes and props from beloved Christmas movies. Klaus also designs and sculpts exquisitely detailed Christmas ornaments. Available in a tasteful bisquewhite, the ornaments depict fanciful fairies and jolly “Santa Klaus” figures. They’re sold online and in Castle Noel’s gift shop. 330-721-6635; www.castlenoel.com

Inspired by nature, Carol Tedrick uses a variety of different looms to produce meticulously finished wares with original hand-dyed patterns and fabric combinations that range from rugs and towels to placemats and Navajo wedge weave bracelets. While Tedrick’s log cabin pattern rugs and custom bed scarves are her best-sellers, she also makes wine bottle gift bags in a red-and-green plaid that’s unabashedly merry and bright. 937-725-1445; www.etsy.com/shop/HandwovenWonders

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018


Ohio-made

gift guide BY DAMAINE VONADA

Homestead Furniture, Mt. Hope

JustPerfect Vinegar Company, New Albany and Kent

Owned by Ernest and Barbara Hershberger, Homestead Furniture is an Ohio Amish country destination known for making fine, custom-designed furniture, but it also crafts laser-cut puzzles at its spacious showroom store on State Route 241. The distinctive oak puzzles depict the lower 48 states, as well as the individual states of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and they’re handsome enough to double as conversation pieces or home décor. 866-6744902; www.homesteadfurnitureonline.com

What makes J.P. Rousseau’s apple cider vinegar and Chambourcin vinegar so special? He procures less-than-perfect ciders and wines from orchards and wineries throughout Ohio, then turns them into superior vinegars with flavors that are, well, just perfect. Based in New Albany, his family-owned business makes its products at a facility in Kent, and it’s one of the few vinegar companies using the submerged generator process. www.etsy.com/shop/JustPerfectVinegar; www.facebook.com/JustPerfectVinegar

Margaret L. Bickenheuser, Maker and Purveyor of Fine Baskets, Springfield

Quarry Hill Orchards, Berlin Heights

Master basket-maker and history buff Margaret Bickenheuser specializes in historical designs inspired by baskets once used in everyday life. She welcomes custom orders and has crafted miniature baskets as small as a finger and oversized enough to hold an entire person. Bickenheuser is also adept at seat-weaving and makes German-style shaved wood Christmas ornaments and decorations. 937-964-8511; www.facebook.com/MLBasketShop

What could be prettier than a box brimming with ripe, red apples? What could be tastier — or healthier for your friends and family — than the Crimson Crisp, Honeycrisp, Melrose, or any of the other apple varieties homegrown by the Gammie family near the shores of Lake Erie? www.quarryhillorchards.com

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 25


2018 Holiday Shore Society, Lakewood

Steubenville Popcorn Company, Steubenville

Rachael Koenig combines her graphic design skills with her love of Lake Erie for Shore Society, a business with stylish products that celebrate Ohio’s picturesque lakefront and the pleasures of its boating-swimming-fishing lifestyle. Shore Society’s “Lake Erie” script sweatshirts and tees are printed in Cleveland, and its ever-popular “Cooler by the Lake” speckle-patterned ceramic mugs make great stocking stuffers. rachael@shoresociety.com; www.shoresociety.com

Made from a recipe developed by the enterprising Nelson family, Steubenville popcorn contains a secret ingredient and is so tasty that customers say it’s the best popcorn they’ve ever had. The company’s imaginatively named and flavored offerings include Christmasy Nutcracker Sweet and Elfnog, patriotic Uncle Sam’s Cinnamon and The Pursuit of Happiness caramel, and a Cardinal Crunch and Beautiful Ohio Blend that are sure to please every true Buckeye. 740-275-4714; www.steubenvillepopcorn.com

Stitching Sabbatical, Amelia

Sub Rosa Tea, Sandusky

At Stitching Sabbatical, embroidery artist Michelle Staub creates custom animal portraits framed in embroidery hoops and accented by charming flowers and greenery. Staub works only on commission and amazes pet owners with her attention to detail and ability to create realistic portraits out of reference photos and thread. hello@ stitchingsabbatical.com; www.stitchingsabbatical.com

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018

Sub Rosa owner Joy Skarupa specializes in organic, loose-leaf tea that includes green tea grown in Japan, red tea from South Africa, and black tea from Sri Lanka. Green Walnut and Schizandra Berry are her best-selling tea blends, and Skarupa also offers devices for steeping in hot or cold water. 866-398-9584; www.subrosatea.com


Ohio-made

Swittens, Oxford Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member Pat Gifford elevates the sewing circle to a whole new level at Swittens, the home-based business and workshop where family and friends help her transform gently worn clothing and thrift shop finds into upcycled mittens and other woolly creations. Along with warm and cuddly ski hats, scarves, and ear warmers, Swittens’ unique products include a popular “Fringe Scarf” fashioned from cashmere mufflers; pillows, purses, and totes constructed from vintage blankets; and cuffed Christmas stockings made from plaid Pendleton skirts. 513-255-5416; www.swittens.com

gift guide

Tuft Woolens, Portsmouth Lanolin from sheep’s wool is the key ingredient in the skin-conditioning bath bars and soaps produced in their home studio by the husband-and-wife team of Martha Tremblay and Jeff Cohen. The couple’s signature Sock Wash makes garments feel super soft, and it can be used to hand-launder all types of woolens. info@tuftwoolens.com; www. tuftwoolens.com

Twisted River Coffee Roaster, Dayton

Winans Chocolates and Coffees

Using a 100-year-old coffee roaster, Dan Clayton roasts small batches of the best beans he can find. The result is smooth coffee without bitterness, and customers have told him they like the taste so much that it doesn’t need cream. While Twisted River’s signature Trinity Blend contains three light-roast coffees from three different regions, it also produces a rich and flavorful holiday blend. twistedrivercoffee@gmail.com; www.twistedrivercoffeeroaster.com

A fourth-generation company operated by Laurie and Joe Reiser, Winans operates several retail stores near Dayton, but produces all its chocolates and coffees at its combination flagship store-candy factory-roastery in Piqua. While customer favorites include Winans House Blend coffee and peanut butter-filled chocolate Buckeyes, you can’t go wrong with the Celebrate Ohio gift basket. The state-shaped basket sports a festive red bow and is filled with Buckeyes, wetzels (chocolate-covered pretzels), and other delightful chocolates. 937-773-1981, www.winanscandies.com

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 27


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NOVEMBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   29

9/26/18 2:42 PM


Gather ’round THE TABLE

Thanksgiving is a venerable tradition at the Golden Lamb BY DAMAINE VONADA

Pumpkin pie may rule on Thanksgiving, but at Lebanon’s Golden Lamb, Sister Lizzie’s Shaker sugar pie gives it serious competition. The cream-style pie, a perpetual customer favorite, is based on a recipe that was accidentally discovered after Robert and Virginia Jones purchased the Golden Lamb in 1926. “The Joneses found the handwritten recipe inside a Shaker cabinet they got at a yard sale and gave it to their chef,” says General Manager Bill Kilimnik. “They liked it, and patrons liked it so much that Shaker sugar pie has lived on at the Golden Lamb ever since.” Considering the Golden Lamb’s history dates to 1803, though, the recipe seems like a modern addition. The Golden Lamb is Ohio’s oldest continually operated business and also holds at least the unofficial state record for consecutive years serving Thanksgiving dinners. The staff has dished up Thanksgiving spreads every year since at least 1870, when Congress officially made Thanksgiving Day a federal holiday. “President Lincoln declared a national day of Thanksgiving in the 1860s,” notes Kilimnik. “The Golden Lamb obviously was open and serving dinners on that day too.” For many people, going to the Golden Lamb for Thanksgiving has evolved into a tradition. “About 50 percent of our Thanksgiving dinner guests have eaten here for multiple years,” says Kilimnik. “We have fourth and fifth generations of families coming throughout the holiday season.” This year, he expects between 1,450 and 1,650 guests on Thanksgiving Day, plus many more who prefer to observe the holiday on the preceding Wednesday or the following Friday and Saturday. “Altogether, we’ll 30

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018

prepare more than 2,000 pounds of turkey and at least 30 gallons of turkey gravy,” Kilimnik says. The Golden Lamb’s multicourse Thanksgiving dinners always begin with the signature relish platter, which is served family style and features house-made specialties such as pimento cheese and pickled watermelon rind. Subsequent courses are a la carte, and diners choose from three different entrees — oven-roasted turkey with all the trimmings, carved beef tenderloin accompanied by seasonal vegetables and cabernet jus, and a vegetarian dish such as mushroom ravioli that gives a modern twist to the Golden Lamb’s traditional fare. The folks at the Golden Lamb pride themselves on procuring fresh, locally sourced ingredients, and the kitchen makes virtually everything from scratch. Stock for their turkey gravy starts with bones and is cooked for two days, while cranberry sauce is made from a tried-and-true recipe that includes whole berries, cinnamon sticks, and orange peel. “Our cranberry sauce tastes so good,” says Kilimnik, “it’ll make your socks go up and down.” Lebanon was a newly platted town when Jonas Seaman started the Golden Lamb as a “house of public entertainment” in 1803. A Shaker community soon sprouted nearby, and thanks to Lebanon’s location on a stagecoach route between Columbus and Cincinnati, the Golden Lamb thrived as a travelers’ hotel and restaurant. After a fire in the 1930s, the Joneses needed to refurnish the Golden Lamb’s guest rooms on a shoestring budget, so they began buying old, unwanted items that had been made and used at the Shakers’ failed settlement.


Today, the Golden Lamb anchors downtown Lebanon and is a historical gem that offers guests an incomparable experience: fine dining and unique lodging against the backdrop of a priceless collection of those Shaker antiques and artifacts. During its 200-plus years, the Golden Lamb has hosted a bevy of U.S. presidents and notables — including John Quincy Adams, Charles Dickens, and Ronald Reagan — as well as untold numbers of everyday travelers, businessmen, tourists, and Sunday drivers hungering for their famous chicken dinners. Robert and Virginia Jones’ family still owns the Golden Lamb, and their remarkable furnishings range from an original stagecoach bench to the simple wooden cabinet that once held the recipe for the Shaker sugar pie that is now a musthave at the Golden Lamb’s Thanksgiving feasts. The Golden Lamb, 27 S. Broadway, Lebanon, OH 45036. For information about lodging, dining, and Thanksgiving reservations, call 513-932-5065 or visit www.goldenlamb.com.

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 31


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

CRIME DOGS

Ohio Division of Wildlife forms a K-9 program to help in the field STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

A

s hunting seasons open this fall, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Wildlife will have five more wildlife officers patrolling the state’s woods, fields, and marshes. Unlike the other 100 or so state wildlife officers, the new recruits will have cold, wet noses and wagging tails; they’re K-9s. For the first time in its nearly 70-year history, the Ohio DNR has joined more than 20 other state conservation agencies in employing K-9 officers. During the past year, five dogs and their handlers have been trained and assigned — one per wildlife district.

Selected for the specialized duty were veteran state wildlife officers Jeremy Carter, Josh Elster, Chris Gilkey, Jason Keller, and Matt Leibengood. Their furry partners are Finn, Mila, Mattis, Scout, and May, respectively — three German shepherds and two Labrador retrievers. All five dogs are less than 2 years old and were purchased with donations from the Division of Wildlife’s many conservation partners and sponsors. “The dogs were trained to detect six different scents — gunpowder, waterfowl, turkey, deer, and fish, as well as ginseng,” says Gilkey. Ginseng is a highly regulated plant that grows wild in the eastern U.S., including Ohio, and its roots are frequently dug illegally, out of season, by poachers. “The temptation is the root’s high market value — anywhere from $300 to $900 per dried pound,” Gilkey says. “These dogs will be a great tool in helping us win the fight against ginseng poaching in Ohio, as well as against fish and game poachers in general.” For instance, in an illegal road-shooting case during this year’s spring turkey-hunting season, Mattis helped locate two shotgun shell wads and the wounded turkey. “He located the first wad, which had been in the pouring rain, within five minutes, and he found the second wad 15 minutes later,” Gilkey says. “Mattis also had one apprehension where his mere barking made the suspected poacher give up and comply with my commands.” Mattis was born and raised in Germany, so Gilkey has to speak to the dog in German to give it commands. The new K-9s will assist other law enforcement agencies as well. For instance, just a month after graduation, Carter and Finn were called to the location of an alleged assault, and Finn located crucial evidence within only a few minutes of arrival.

ODNR cruisers are specially equipped to transport K-9 officers.

32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2018

The Division of Wildlife also looks to capitalize on the public relations value of the dogs. “Most everyone loves dogs,” says Gilkey, “so we plan to use the K-9 officers as a way to make contact with those people who may not necessarily hunt or fish, including school kids. The dogs will give us many opportunities to tell our story of what we do as a state agency in managing Ohio’s wildlife.”


K-9 officer Mattis in various stages of training: top, with ODNR officers Chris Gilkey and Jeremy Carter (in the “bite suit”); top inset, with Gilkey tracking in the snow; and demonstrating his training by lying down when he detects potential evidence.

According to Gilkey, wildlife law enforcement is statistically the most dangerous law enforcement job in the world, mainly because most wildlife officers work alone much of the time, with any potential backup many minutes and miles away. “But now with Mattis, I have backup with me full time,” he says. “If I’m away from my vehicle and have left my dog inside, and I become involved in a life-threatening situation — an altercation with a poacher, for instance — I can push the deploy button on a pager on my belt and the doors to my vehicle swing open. The dog is then trained to immediately track me by scent and come to my aid, protecting me from an assailant, if necessary. That’s a very comforting feeling.” W.H. “Chip” Gross (whchipgross@gmail.com) is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor.

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 33


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NOVEMBER 2018 CALENDAR NORTHWEST

NOV. 3–4 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima, Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $5. www. tristategunshow.org.

$2. Take a ride on a quarter-scale locomotive through our festive decorated property, see operating model trains, and meet Santa and Mrs. Claus (on select days). 419-423-2995 or http://nworrp.org.

NOV. 7–10 – “Angels in the Attic” Crafts Show, Ross Historical Ctr., 201 N. Main Ave., Sidney, Wed.–Fri. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. $2. Thousands of handmade items from 30 local artists and crafters. Free refreshments and lots of door prizes. 937-498-0616.

NOV. 24 – Blaze of Lights, 154 N. Main, Bluffton, 3–9 p.m. Free. Kick off the holiday season with a parade, beautiful lights, and, of course, Santa! Parade starts at 5 p.m.; lights are switched on at 7 p.m. 419-369-2985 or www.explorebluffton.com/event.

NOV. 9–10 – Buckeye Farm Antiques Annual Swap Meet, Shelby Co. Fgds., 655 S. Highland Ave., Sidney, Fri. 8 a.m. till dark, Sat. 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Tractor parts and related items, crafts, and antiques. 419302-6017, 937-726-2485, or www.buckeyefarmantiques.com.

NOV. 24 – Shop Small Saturday, downtown Sidney, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Support local downtown businesses. Giveaways while supplies last. See website for more details. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. NOV. 24–25 – “Crafts for Christmas” Craft Show, Lucas Co. Recreation Ctr., 2901 Key St., Maumee, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission and parking. Fine handmade juried crafts, gifts, and holiday decorations. Also collecting donations for Toys for Tots. 419-842-1925 or www.toledocraftsmansguild.org.

NOV. 2 – First Friday, downtown Sidney. Participating shops and restaurants stay open later, with many offering a discount. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

NOV. 9–11, 16–17 – John Paulding Historical Society’s Festival of Trees, 600 Fairground Dr., Paulding. Free. Over 50 beautifully decorated trees and three buildings full of decorations to get you in the Christmas mood. This year’s theme is “Gingerbread House Christmas.” Call for times. 419-399-8218.

NOV. 2–4 – Holiday Open House, Wapakoneta. Free carriage rides Saturday from 12 to 5 p.m. Boutiques, chocolate and coffee shops, interior designers, floral shops, and other stores help with decorating and gift giving ideas. 419-738-2298 or casachic@bright.net.

NOV. 10 – Lima Symphony Orchestra: “American Elegance,” 133 N. Elizabeth St., Lima, 7:30 p.m. $10–$30. Featuring iconic pieces by Bernstein, Copland, and Gershwin that brilliantly capture the American spirit. 419-222-5701 or www.limasymphony.com.

DEC. 1 – Christkindlmarkt: A Christmas Fair with German Flair, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 203 E Mansfield St, New Washington, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Free admission. Handmade crafts and ornaments, teacher gifts, Christmas cookies and sweet treats, hot lunch and drinks, entertainment. 419-492-2182 or www.facebook.com/stjnw.

NOV. 3–4 – Homespun Holiday Art and Craft Show, Stranahan Great Hall, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission and parking. Jump-start your holiday shopping with handmade crafts and gifts. Also collecting household/food items to benefit Cherry Street Mission Ministries. 419-842-1925 or www.toledocraftsmansguild.org.

NOV. 16 – Winter Wonderland Parade, 109 S. Ohio Ave., Sidney. Court square decorations and lights, Reason for the Season at 6:30 p.m., parade with Mr. and Mrs. Claus at 7:30 p.m. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

DEC. 1 – Christmas of Yesteryear, downtown Sidney, afternoon and evening. The historic downtown is all lit up for your enjoyment, with horse and carriage rides, shopping, and dining. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

NORTHEAST

NOV. 10 – North East Train Society Model Train Show, Highland Heights Community Ctr., 5827 Highland Rd., Highland Hts., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 12 free. All-gauge show, with new and old trains to buy, sell, or trade. See operating layout in O gauge, HO scale, and N scale. 440-357-8890 (Jim Wendorf), wendorf@ cvelimited.com, or www.northeasttrainsociety.com.

NOV. 23–DEC. 30 – North Pole Express, 12505 Co. Rd. 99, Findlay, Fri. and Sat. 5:30–9:30 p.m., Sun. 5:30–8:30 p.m. Adults $3, children

NOV. 10 – Olde Stark Antique Faire, Stark Co. Fgds., Exhibition Bldg., 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Antiques and collectibles. Free appraisals. 330-794-9100 or find us on Facebook. NOV. 11 – Fort Laurens Veterans Day Ceremony, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Patriot includes honor and color guard, keynote speaker, and lunch provided by Friends of Fort Laurens. 330-874-2059 or www.fortlaurens.org. NOV. 1–4 – Corn Maze, Beriswill Farms, 2200 Station Rd., Valley City, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Test your sense of direction in this 5-acre maze. 330-350-2486 or http://beriswillfarms.com. NOV. 2–4, 9–11 – Historic Zoar Hotel Tours, 198 Main St., Zoar, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $10. Guided tour includes all three floors and a long history of the building. Reservations required. 800-262-6195 or www.historiczoarvillage.com. NOV. 3 – Buckeye Book Fair, Fisher Auditorium, Shisler Conference Ctr., 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. $2. Nearly 100 Ohio writers, illustrators, and photographers will showcase their newest books and sign copies for readers. 330-2622103, buckeyebookfair@gmail.com, or www.buckeyebookfair.com. NOV. 3 – “Building a Model Railroad,” Lakeland Community College, AFC Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Free. Learn the basics of layout framing, laying track, wiring of layout, transformer wiring, and scenery. 440-256-8141 (Bob), promoday@mcr5.org, or www.mcr5.org. NOV. 10 – “Christmas by the River” Craft Show, Black River Education Ctr., 257 Co. Rd. 40, Sullivan, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Sponsored by the Black River Academic Boosters. Contact Joanne Maslanka at 419-736-3304 or jmaslanka@blrv.org.

WEST VIRGINIA

NOV. 16 – Window Wonderland, downtown Wooster, 7–9:30 p.m. Free. Decorated windows, Santa descending from a rooftop, hot chocolate, lights, music, and more! 330-262-6222 or www. mainstreetwooster.org. NOV. 16–17 – Season’s Splendor Arts and Crafts Show, Fisher Auditorium, Shisler Conference Ctr., 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission and parking. Lunch available. 140 booths showcasing handcrafted merchandise, including floral designs, Santas and seasonal décor, jewelry, wooden and fabric items, glass block and wine bottle lights, candies, stained glass, handwoven baskets and rugs, candles, and soaps. 330-682-2926. NOV. 17 – Fort Laurens Winter Encampment, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5. Parade and encampment demonstrations celebrate the 240th anniversary of the march from Fort Pitt to Fort Laurens. 330-874-2059 or www.fortlaurens.org. NOV. 17 – Thanksgiving Dinner with Abraham Lincoln, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, 3:30–6 p.m. $20–$45. 330-666-3711 ext. 1720, halereservations@wrhs.org, or www.wrhs.org/events. NOV. 17–18 – Rocky River Fall Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Memorial Hall (next to the Rec. Ctr.), 21016 Hilliard Blvd.,

NOV. 19–DEC. 31 – Christmas Fantasy Light Show, Krodel Park, Point Pleasant, 6–9 p.m. 304-675-3844. NOV. 23–DEC. 28 – Celebration of Lights, Morris Park, Fairmont, Fri.–Sun., 6–10 p.m. Suggested donation of $10 per car. See over 420 holiday light displays in this drive-through tour. 304-366-4550 or www.celebrationoflightswv.com.

36   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  NOVEMBER 2018

Rocky River, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. This large show will feature artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. www. avantgardeshows.com/events. NOV. 20–JAN. 7 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Free. Over 150 unique, life-size nutcrackers in an outdoor display with lights and music. Market booths open on weekends. 740-283-1787 or www. steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. NOV. 24 – The Handmade Market, Painesville Railroad Museum (NYC Painesville Depot), 475 Railroad St., Painesville, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission. Quality handmade arts and crafts. Hamburgers and hot dogs available for a small donation. Also a bake sale and Chinese auction. 440-655-4455, PRRMevent@att.net, or www.painesvillerailroadmuseum.org. NOV. 30 – Holiday Market on the Farm, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, 3–7 p.m. A one-of-a-kind all-Ohio shopping experience. Features products handcrafted at Hale along with other Ohio and holiday brands. Also Ohio-themed wine and beer tastings. www.wrhs.org/events. DEC. 1 – Christmas Down on the Farm, Tis the Season and Schrock’s Heritage Village, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Berlin, noon–5 p.m. Bring the family out for a sleigh ride and enjoy the sights and sounds of the holidays. 330-893-3604 or www.schrocksvillage.com. DEC. 1–2 – Dalton Holidays Festival, Dalton High School, Sat. 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Free admission. Parade Sat. at 2 p.m., craft show, pageant, contests, Mrs. Claus Pantry, food, and more! 330-933-7083 or www.daltonfestival.org. DEC. 1–2 – The Nutcracker, produced by Holmes Center for the Arts, West Holmes High School, 10909 St. Rte. 39, Millersburg, 2 p.m. 330-473-2879 or www.holmescenterforthearts.org. DEC. 1–2 – Christmas in Zoar, 198 Main St., Zoar. $8, under 13 free. Musical entertainment, horse-drawn wagon rides, juried craft show, and tours of decorated museum buildings. Church service and tree lighting ceremony Saturday only. 800-262-6195 or www. historiczoarvillage.com.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/ website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

NOV. 3 – Oakthorpe Church Craft Fair, 6075 Oakthorpe Rd., Thornville, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Hand-quilted items, handmade cards, candies, wood crafts, wreaths, Christmas and fall decor, Jamberry, candy, jellies and salsas, plants, and much more. Baked goods and lunch served all day! 740-475-7708.

CENTRAL

NOV. 8 – First Drafts Book Club, Combustion Brewery & Taproom, 80 W. Church St. #101, Pickerington, 7–8 p.m. Featured book is This Is How It Always Is by Laurie Frankel. Age 21 and over. 614-837-4104 ext. 233 or www.pickeringtonlibrary.org/event. NOV. 10 – Veterans March and Ceremony, Canal Winchester, 10 a.m. March begins at Frances Steube Community Ctr., 22 S. Trine St., and ends at Stradley Place, 36 S. High St., for the ceremony. Free pancake breakfast for veterans and their families at the Community Ctr., 8–10 a.m. 614-834-9915 or www. canalwinchesterohio.gov. NOV. 1–4 – Friends of the Pickerington Public Library Book Sale, 201 Opportunity Way, Pickerington. A variety of books in many genres, DVDs, CDs, vinyl albums, and games. 614-837-4104 ext. 221 or www.pickeringtonlibrary.org. NOV. 2 – Diamond Rio, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 8 p.m. $30–$48. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. NOV. 3 – “Dinner with the Presidents,” Harding High School, 1500 Harding Hwy. E., Marion, 5:30–8:30 p.m. $26 single, $47 couple. Presented by Marion County Historical Society. Step back in time to meet and dine with different presidents from U.S. history. 740-387-4255 or www.marionhistory.com.

SOUTHEAST

NOV. 11 – Model Train Show and Swap, Mount Sterling Community Ctr., 164 E. Main St., Mount Sterling, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission; donations accepted. All scales welcome. Live working layouts and swap meet vendors welcome. 614-332-2944 or www.mountsterlingcc.org. NOV. 15–DEC. 29 – “Experience the Magic,” Robbins Hunter Museum, 221 E. Broadway, Granville, Wed.–Sat., 1–4 p.m. Free. Seven Christmas trees dressed and ready to dazzle you for the holiday season. 740-587-0430 or www.robbinshunter.org. NOV. 17 – Wildlife at the Library!, Pickerington Public Library, 201 Opportunity Way, Pickerington, 1–2 p.m. Free. Meet three animal ambassadors from the Ohio Wildlife Center for an

educational experience that the whole family will love. 614-8374104 ext. 233 or www.pickeringtonlibrary.org/event. NOV. 18 – Fall Harvest Festival of Bands, Makoy Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard. $10–$20. Sponsored by the Central Ohio Hot Jazz Society. 614-558-2212, www.cohjs.org, or www.facebook. com/COHJS. NOV. 18 – Holiday Artfest, Welcome Center, 205 N. 5th St., Zanesville, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Thirty local artisans and craftspeople will offer unique handmade gifts. Talented local musicians provide entertainment. Timmy’s Meltdown Gourmet Grilled Cheese Truck will be on site to curb your appetite! www.artcoz.org. NOV. 18 – Zanesville Handbell Festival, Grace United Methodist Church, 516 Shinnick St., Zanesville, 7 p.m. Local handbell choirs perform individually and together to usher in the holiday season for the community. Freewill offering collected to cover expenses. www.facebook.com/thursday-musicclub-190108687674933 or www.thursdaymusic.org. NOV. 30–DEC. 2 – Christmas at the Palace: The Gift of Family, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./ Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $12–$22. This annual holiday show features local talent in song and dance, instrumental solos and group numbers, heartfelt vignettes, silly sketches, and more. 740383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. DEC. 1 – High School Holiday Choir Festival, Secrest Auditorium, 334 Shinnick St., Zanesville, 7:30 p.m. Six local high school choirs perform individually and together as a group. kim.tatman@mvesc.org or www.secrestonline.com. NOV. 11 – Veterans Day Parade, Cambridge, 10 a.m. Includes a performance by the Cambridge City Band. 740-439-9180.

NOV. 3 – Movie Night: The Nightmare Before Christmas, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7 p.m. $5. www. majesticchillicothe.net.

NOV. 16–17 – Salt Fork Gospel Jubilee, Salt Fork Lodge and NOV. 3 – Miller’s Automotive Swap Meet and Cruise-In, Ross Conference Ctr., Lore City. Free. Call 740-432-3787 or 740-439-2751 Co. Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $7; free for for room rates. women and for children 14 and under. Indoor/outdoor vendors, call NOV. 16–18 – Jingle Bell Weekend, 126 W. Second St., Waverly. Nate Miller at 740-701-3447 or Brian Miller at 740-701-2511. Luminary parade, quilt show, holiday craft show, beef and noodle NOV. 4 – Gingerbread House Class, Guernsey County Senior dinners, 5K run, and much more. www.piketravel.com/JingleBell. Citizens Ctr., Cambridge, 1–3 p.m. $15 per adult and includes up to NOV. 17 – Gingerbread House Workshop, The Castle, 418 Fourth two children ages 6 and up. 740-439-6681. St., Marietta, 10 a.m.–noon. $20 per kit, $5 helper fee. Reservations NOV. 6–16 – Wonderland of Trees, Southeastern Ohio Regional required by Nov. 13. 740-373-4180 or http://mariettacastle.org. Medical Ctr. (SEORMC), Cambridge. Visit SEORMC to vote NOV. 24 – Holiday Parade, Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, begins at 5 on your favorite holiday tree/decoration Nov. 6–15. Then enjoy p.m. 740-439-2238 or www.downtowncambridge.com. entertainment, silent and live auctions, a cash bar, and more at NOV. 1–JAN. 1, 2019 – Dickens Victorian Village, downtown NOV. 26 – Christmas Open House, John and Annie Glenn the gala on Nov. 16 at Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Cambridge. Stroll the streets to view scenes depicting life in 1850s Historic Site, New Concord, 5:30–8 p.m. 740-826-3305 or www. Highway. 740-439-8151 or www.seormc.org. England, featuring life-sized, handmade mannequins wearing real johnglennhome.org. vintage clothing. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. NOV. 7–DEC. 7 – Gingerbread House Contest and Display, DEC. 1 – Little Dickens Day/Cookies with Santa, Deerassic Park Guernsey County Senior Citizens Ctr., Cambridge, Mon.–Fri., 8:30 NOV. 1–JAN. 1, 2019 – Guernsey County Courthouse Holiday Education Ctr., Cambridge, 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Make a $5 donation to a.m.–3:30 p.m. Free admission. 740-439-6681. Light Show, Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. nightly. Four different light Secret Santa or bring a toy in exchange for a dozen sugar cookies NOV. 9 – First Capital Bourbon Dinner, Christopher Conference and music shows performed each evening. 800-933-5480 or www. that you can decorate on site! 740-435-3335 or www.deerassic.com. Ctr., 20 N. Plaza Blvd., Chillicothe. $75. Join the Scioto Society, dickensvictorianvillage.com. producers of Tecumseh!, for an evening of bourbon history, lore, and, DEC. 2 – National Road and Zane Grey Museum Holiday Open NOV. 3 – “Welcome to the Holidays” Craft Show, Sardis House, 8850 East Pike, Norwich, 1–4 p.m. 740-872-3143 or www. of course, sampling! www.tecumsehdrama.com. Community Center, 37184 Mound St., Sardis, 10 a.m–3 p.m. Over ohiohistory.org. 60 tables of crafts. Homemade food available on site. 740-213-5843 NOV. 10 – “Christmas in the Valley” Holiday Bazaar, Paint Valley High School, 7454 U.S. 50 W., Bainbridge, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free DEC. 1–2 – Holidays at Adena, Adena Mansion and Gardens, 847 or www.facebook.com/sardisohcc. Adena Rd., Chillicothe. www.adenamansion.com. admission. Homemade chicken and noodles, chili, desserts of the season, pictures with Santa, and a raffle. Find us on Facebook. Free admission. Enjoy dinner and an evening of lively bluegrass music. Reservations recommended. 513-385-9309 or www. vinokletwines.com.

SOUTHWEST

carriages, wagons, riders, or buggies. 937-548-4998 or www. downtowngreenville.org. NOV. 17 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Bluegrass Opry Barn, 9461 St. Rte. 66, Oakwood, 7 p.m. $10. 419-594-2816 or find Bluegrass Opry Barn on Facebook.

NOV. 9–10 – Springfield Swap Meet and Car Show, Clark Co. Fgds., Springfield, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. $8. 937-376-0111, info@ ohioswapmeet.com, or www.ohioswapmeet.com. NOV. 9–10 – Southern Ohio Indoor Music Festival, Roberts Convention Centre, 123 Gano St., Wilmington, noon–11 p.m., doors open at 10 a.m. One of the Midwest’s premier bluegrass events. 937372-5804 or www.somusicfest.com. NOV. 10 – Holiday Horse Parade, downtown Piqua, 7 p.m. Free. See horse-drawn carriages, hitches and riders, all outfitted with holiday lights, making their way down Main Street. A fun familyfriendly event. 937-773-9355 or www.mainstreetpiqua.com. NOV. 3 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Haddix Hall (next to Hunter’s Pizzeria), 4165 St. Rte. 122, Franklin, 6–8 p.m. $5. An evening of lively bluegrass with lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. haddixmusic@ yahoo.com or www.facebook.com/HaddixHall.

NOV. 10–12 – Veterans Day Sun Catcher Blow, Neusole Glassworks, 11925 Kemper Springs Dr., Cincinnati, 30-minute slots between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. For ages 5 and up. $35 but free for veterans; $20 per extra sun catcher made with veteran. Reservations required by phone or email: 513-751-3292 or neusoleglassworks@ hotmail.com.

NOV. 3 – Urban Loft Tour, downtown Urbana, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $15. Explore upper stories of historic buildings downtown. Tour includes loft apartments, office and commercial spaces, as well as the Urbana Gloria Cinema. See website for details. 800-791-6010 or www. ccpaurbanaohio.com.

NOV. 16–18 – Christkindlmarkt, Germania Park, 3529 West Kemper Rd., Cincinnati, Fri. 5–10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $3, under 13 free. The oldest and most authentic German Christmas Market in the Cincinnati region. http://germaniasociety. com/christkindlmarkt.

NOV. 7, 14, 21, 28 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m.

NOV. 17 – Hometown Holiday Horse Parade, S. Broadway, Greenville, 7 p.m. The lighted parade includes horse-drawn

NOV. 18 – Farm Toy Show, Champaign Co. Fgds., 384 Park Ave., Urbana, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $2. Contact Lowell Morningstar at 937-826-4201. NOV. 23 – Grand Illumination, downtown Troy, 5–8:30 p.m. Free. An artisan fair, “ ’Twas the Month Before Christmas” reading, carriage rides, music performances, and Santa’s arrival on a fire truck kick off the annual downtown Christmas tree lighting. www.troymainstreet.org. NOV. 24 – Hometown HoliDazzle Illuminated Parade and Festival, Main St., Wilmington, 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Parade at 7 p.m. www.hometownholidazzle.com. NOV. 24–25 – Old-Fashioned Christmas in the Country, 4872 Cincinnati Brookville Rd., Shandon, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.– 4 p.m. Free. Bring the whole family for this Christmas celebration in Ohio’s first Welsh settlement, offering horse-drawn carriage rides, homemade food, signature Welsh cakes, live Welsh harp music, and more. www.gettothebc.com/events/christmas-country. NOV. 24–DEC. 16 – Ornament Blow, 11925 Kemper Springs Dr., Cincinnati, 15-minute slots between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. $35. For ages 5 and over. Professional glassblowers teach you how to blow your own ornament from hot molten glass. Reservations required: 513-751-3292 or neusoleglassworks@hotmail.com.

NOVEMBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

WE LOVE

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • NOVEMBER 2018

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OUR VETERANS 3. David (Butch) Owen receiving the Veteran of the Year award, given by Skip Lowry of Homerville Boy Scout Troop 459 on Memorial Day 2018. Beth Grim

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Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

4. We recently visited Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., for the first time since I was there in 1971 for advanced infantry training. Roger Presnell Washington Electric Cooperative member

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5. My niece, Tammy R. Newbold, who is an employee at the VFW Post 3301 located in Carrollton, with Carl Miller, a World War II veteran, and Jack Stephenson, a Korean War veteran, as they place a wreath at the veterans monument at West View Cemetery in Carrollton. Ray Newbold

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Frontier Power Company member

6. This is me at the Cam Ranh Bay Air Base, Vietnam, in 1968 or 1969. Roger Peacock South Central Power Company member

7. My dad, Bud Berry, is a proud Navy vet! Here he is celebrating his 70th birthday. Pamela Morris Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

8. This is my dad, Roy Hill, enjoying some grandpa time at the Coshocton County Fair last year with my daughters, Riyyah (wearing sunglasses) and Elly (wearing hat). Tessa Robison

THANK YOU

Veterans THANK YOU

Veterans THANK YOU

Veterans

1. I work to instill in my grandchildren the importance of honoring our military veterans. Each year I photograph my grandson, Isaiah Blevins, wearing his grandfather’s uniform as he looks at Papa’s photo. Papa served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. Rachel Blevins Consolidated Cooperative member

2. This is my favorite veteran: my grandfather, Don Kelly. He is 95 years old and was a Marine in WWII. He is standing with his great-grandchildren, Merek, Cade, MaKenna, and Tess. Diana McClure Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative member

Frontier Power Company member

9. Veterans Day Program 2017 at Black River School in Sullivan, Ohio. Brock Martin, in the center, is with his grandfather, Jim Knapp, on the left, and his great-uncle, George Roberts, on the right. George Roberts Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

10. My father, Frank (“Sarge”), at 91 on his last Veterans Day before passing away. He was so proud to have served in WWII. Bobbie Singleton Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative member

NOVEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 39


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Ohio Cooperative Living - November 2018 - Darke  
Ohio Cooperative Living - November 2018 - Darke