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OHIO

AUGUST 2019

COOPERATIVE Adams Rural Electric Cooperative

State fair fun ALSO INSIDE Buckeye Power’s peaking plants The Great Lakes: Ohio’s inland seas A trip along the Shawshank Trail

Living


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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2019

INSIDE FEATURES 24 REPEAT? WHY NOT! A Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member faces a challenge from an unexpected source as he goes for his third straight grand championship at the Ohio State Fair.

28 MOO-VING EXPERIENCE How butter sculptures have become one of the Ohio State Fair’s most popular traditions.

32 “GET BUSY LIVING ...” Mansfield gets ready to host a legion of fans to celebrate the anniversary of a popular Ohio-made film.

34 TREETOP ADVENTURE Co-op members offer high-flying fun after a vacation inspiration.

Cover image on most issues: The Ohio State Fair is a place where young and old enjoy good clean fun and timehonored traditions. Photo courtesy of the Ohio State Fair.

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

Good

STEWARDS

O

hio’s Electric Cooperatives was gratified to see the Environmental Protection Agency finalize its work on the Affordable Clean Energy rule to further reduce carbon dioxide emissions, replacing earlier proposals with more sensible regulations. Electric cooperatives have long been not only willing, but eager, to be good stewards of the environment. Our seventh cooperative principle, “Concern for Community,” certainly extends to the land we work, our water supply, and the air we breathe. We are, in fact, quite proud of the Cardinal Power Plant and the work it’s been doing for more than 50 years providing the bulk of the electricity supplied to Ohio cooperative consumers. We’re proud of the fact that co-ops have invested more than $1 billion in the best technology available to vastly reduce the plant’s emissions of pollutants such as nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide — investments that have made Cardinal one of the cleanest generating plants of its kind in the world. The U.S. power industry as a whole has made enormous strides in dramatically reducing the environmental impact of providing our nation’s electricity supply. All regulated pollutants have steadily decreased over the past 20 years as we have transitioned to cleaner and more renewable energy sources. The amount of carbon dioxide emitted in producing all U.S. electricity has already declined 28% from 2005 levels. The Affordable Clean Energy rule allows us to build on the successes we have achieved from the environmental investments we’ve made at Cardinal and other power generation facilities. We will keep seeking ways to be still cleaner and even better stewards of the environment and better neighbors in the communities we serve. We continue to utilize solar energy, biofuel energy, hydropower, and natural gas (see more about our natural-gas-fired plants beginning on page 4) to complement what’s produced at Cardinal. Coal-burning plants will continue to be a valuable and necessary part of an “all-of-the-above” electricity supply that we depend on to be both reliable and affordable.

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Our seventh cooperative principle, “Concern for Community,” certainly extends to the land we work, our water supply, and the air we breathe.


August 2019 • Volume 61, No. 11

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

4 POWER LINES

At their peak: Buckeye Power’s peaking generators and the staffs who run them are ready to fire up at a moment’s notice.

Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Rebecca Seum Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Dava Hennosy Editorial Intern

Holmes-Wayne Electric: Tourism and an entrepreneurial spirit drive the economy in and around this eastern Ohio electric co-op.

Contributors: Celeste Baumgartner, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Lin Rice, Damaine Vonada, and Margie Wuebker.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

6 CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

8 OHIO ICON Grandpa’s Cheesebarn: Dedication to service and delicious specialty food make this a popular stop for travelers along I-71.

Cheryl Solomon American MainStreet Publications 847-749-4875 | cheryl@amp.coop The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

8

10 CO-OP PEOPLE

Cheers! Union Rural Electric members deliver fun and flavor at their combination winery and brewery.

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE For all advertising inquiries, contact

4

10

Inland seas: Toledo museum guides visitors through the history of the Great Lakes and its shipping industry.

15 GOOD EATS

Bar food: With these creative lineups, guests can dress up their meal any way they like.

12

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and important information from your electric cooperative.

37 CALENDAR

What’s happening: August/ September events and other things to do around the state.

15

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Dog days of summer: Readers show the ways that their pooches stay both cool and entertained during the heat of the day.

40

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


POWER LINES

AT THEIR PEAK

Buckeye Power's peaking generators fire up as soon as the need arises.

Small crews combine creativity and dedication at Greenville Generating Station. BY LIN RICE

BY LIN RICE

D

uring the year’s milder periods, a peaking facility like the Greenville Generating Station might go six weeks without spinning up to produce electricity for Ohio electric cooperative consumer-members.

stabilize things,” says Dave Richardson, plant manager principal. Richardson oversees operations at the Greenville plant in Darke County, along with the Robert P. Mone Plant, located about an hour away in Van Wert County.

However, when extreme heat or a disaster strikes, the plant answers the call. For example, when tornadoes caused devastation around Celina last Memorial Day, Greenville was online around the clock for the next three days.

Both facilities, fired by natural gas, are “peaking plants,” meaning that they are only brought online when the power grid is stretched to its limit. Those dog days of summer, when the AC’s on high in seemingly every household and business, or in the heart of winter is when facilities like Greenville typically see the most run time.

The really interesting part? For either extreme, it’s up to a crew of only four to make sure the power stays on. “That’s kind of our M.O.: When those really hot or really cold days hit, when emergencies happen, any time the grid is having issues, we’re here to pick up the slack and 4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019

“Ninety percent of the time, we’re like the fire department, in that we’re on call for when we’re needed,” Richardson says. “We can be on the grid in less than 30 minutes. During a hot stretch, like [June] through


September, typically we’ll run 15 to 20 days a month, but not necessarily for long starts. The runs can be an hour or can be what happened during the storm — 75 hours straight.” The Greenville plant contains four turbines, each with a nominal capacity of 50 megawatts (MW). All are capable of operating in synchronous condensing mode, allowing the turbine to supply or absorb reactive power. Richardson says the station is typically online between 500 and 1,200 hours a year. The Mone plant has three turbines rated for 175 MW each. “These turbines are really fast — they’re essentially jet engines, just like what you’d see hanging from the wing of a plane,” says Andy Williams, Greenville Station’s energy production supervisor. “We keep them in top condition so that they’re ready to start at any moment. Every morning, we go through and check the system, so that when the call comes to start them up, it’s literally only minutes until we have them online.” Keeping facilities like Greenville and Mone ready to run at a moment’s notice, or bringing them back online after repairs that are invariably needed, requires technicians comfortable with a variety of responsibilities. With only four people assigned to the stations, each person there must be ready to address electrical, mechanical, or computer issues at any moment. Self-reliance, dependability, creativity, and strong communication skills are all critical to maintaining and operating stations like Greenville and Mone, says Mike Yorkovich, energy production supervisor at the Mone plant. “We wear a lot of different hats,” Yorkovich says. “Keeping communications open among the crew is essential, so that you know what’s been worked on and what hasn’t. Sometimes you have to come in on a Thanksgiving afternoon — that’s just how it is. These guys are all very dedicated and proud of this place, like a home away from home. We’re essentially a family — everyone knows each other’s kids and wives, when their graduations or ballgames are coming up, all of that.”

“That’s kind of our M.O.: When those really hot or really cold days hit, when emergencies happen, any time the grid is having issues, we’re here to pick up the slack and stabilize things.”

When something significant does go wrong, it’s that sense of teamwork and creativity that’s needed to get back online quickly. For example, last year at the Mone plant, the crew discovered that the tip of a rotor blade had broken loose inside a turbine, causing significant damage within. But once the crew got the casing off, they discovered that a number of damaged vanes were wedged in place, making it impossible to finish the repair. At that point, it looked like they would have to pull out the entire rotor and ship it to South Carolina for repairs. “That night, our guys sat around the office trying to come up with a solution,” Yorkovich says. “Before long, Kevin Fletcher says, ‘Why don’t we just try a post driver?’” Using the simple farm tool, the vanes were freed in a matter of minutes and repairs could continue. “That small idea saved us, I’d say conservatively, at least a million dollars, and got the unit back online 30 to 60 days faster than it would have otherwise,” Richardson says. “That’s the kind of people we have working at these stations.” Opposite page: Nick Mascia, project engineer at Buckeye Power, uses a borescope to look for damage to a turbine at the Mone Plant. Top photo (from left): Chris Dunno, Kevin Fletcher, and Chad Jay go over schematics at the Mone Plant. Below: Engineers from General Electric use a post driver as an improvised way to fixone of Mone’s turbines.

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

H

olmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative (HWEC) sits proudly among beautiful rolling hills and amid the largest Amish population in the United States. With a service area located halfway between Cleveland and Columbus, HWEC provides electricity to more than 13,900 consumer-members, mainly in Holmes and Wayne counties. Although the cooperative is located in a rural setting, you don’t have to venture far to find a unique business atmosphere. Agriculture plays a key role, but manufacturing is also a fundamental driver to the local economy. Tucked on back roads are endless businesses in a variety of industries that have been established through a strong entrepreneurial spirit found in these counties. Industries range from automotive supplies to high-quality hardwood furniture to national-award-winning Guggisberg Cheese and famous Troyer’s Trail Bologna, just to name a few. The cooperative serves approximately 55% residential members and 45% businesses, with over 17,400 meters, which creates diverse electric distribution needs. Tourism plays a part in the area’s culture, as visitors from across the nation come to tour Amish Country. Holmes County is home to the Amish and Mennonite Heritage Center, and there’s almost no limit to the Amish-centered activities for tourists: touring the countryside, visiting an Amish home and farm, learning farming methods, shopping for Amish-made goods, and, of course, indulging in traditional Amish foods. The Amish people are known in particular for their hearty, homecooked meals and for their desserts, especially pies and chocolates. There’s more to the area than Amish Country, though. The nearby College of Wooster holds lectures, concerts, events, and exhibits in every discipline and has been home to the Ohio Light Opera for the past 40 years. The Mohican River runs through the co-op’s service territory and is one of the most popular places in the state for camping, canoeing, kayaking, and even ziplining. In recent years, a number of wineries have blossomed in the countryside, offering visitors yet another way to enjoy the picturesque terrain. The towns of Wooster, Millersburg, and Loudonville have benefited from downtown revitalization and offer unique artistic shops, boutiques, and restaurants, as well as weekend special events like ice carving, antiques festivals, free movie nights on the courthouse lawn, car shows, and arts and crafts festivals. Friendly and warm local residents in a diverse area offering a variety of leisure activities, businesses, and arts make this rural area a unique place to call home for a thriving and growing electric cooperative. HWEC staff are honored to serve the community and are committed to providing excellent service to all of their members.

Co-op Spotlight appears regularly in Ohio Cooperative Living to give a glimpse into the land and the people of Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives.

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019


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OHIO ICON

Grandpa’s CHEESEBARN Ashland

BY DAMAINE VONADA

“We typically have about 120 different cheeses for sale and offer samples, so customers can try before they buy,” says Albers. Ohio Swiss, made at a small local creamery, is the bestselling cheese, but Grandpa’s also carries imported cheeses, such as Whiskey Cheddar from Ireland and Espresso Bella Vitano, a coffeecoated dessert cheese from Italy. A culinary complement to Grandpa’s Cheesebarn, Sweeties Chocolates annually produces more than 20,000 pounds of fudge, plus house-made caramels and nonpareils. Its signature treats include dipped pretzels, a chocolate-and-peanut butter buckeye pizza, and jumbo turtles handmade with Sweeties’ own caramel and freshly roasted pecans and cashews.

Provenance: Grandpa’s Cheesebarn began in 1978, when Dick and Vera Baum (aka Grandpa and Grandma), their daughter, Ronda, and her husband, Richard Poorbaugh, converted an old barn sitting on several acres of farmland into a store specializing in cheeses. They later added a second shop called Sweeties Chocolates that sells fudge and candies made from Ronda’s recipes. Grandpa’s granddaughter, Mistie Ankenman, also operates two satellite stores — Best of Grandpa’s Cheesebarn and Sweeties Chocolates —near Interstate 77 in Norton and at Summit Mall in Fairlawn. Significance: Because of its focus on products and service, Grandpa’s Cheesebarn is one of Ohio’s leading specialty food and gift retailers and is a popular destination for travelers on I-71. “Grandpa’s has stayed in business for 41 years because we never cut corners on quality and have great employees who really take care of customers,” says Christian Albers, the marketing director. Currently: Grandpa’s Cheesebarn contains two floors of goodies that range from homemade ice cream and cookies to snacks and baking mixes. While customers crave the in-house café’s old-fashioned hot dogs and deli sandwiches, the store is best known for its phenomenal selection of cheese.

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019

Grandpa’s Cheesebarn and Sweeties Chocolates, 668 U.S. Highway 250 E., Ashland, OH 44805. For more information, call 419-281-3202 or visit www.grandpascheesebarn.com.

Top left: Grandpa Dick Baum still visits the cheesebarn every week. Right: Family members (top, from left) Ronda Poorbaugh, Karla Snyder, (bottom from left) Grandpa Dick Baum, Grandma Vera Baum, and Richard Poorbaugh have expanded the business over the years to include a variety of savories and sweets.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GRANDPA'S CHEESEBARN

Location: On U.S. 250, about 4 miles east of Ashland and a half-mile from Interstate 71.

It’s a little-known fact that: Although he turned 90 in June, Grandpa Baum still comes to the cheesebarn every week. “He makes sure everybody is working hard and that all the cheeses are out,” says Albers.


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AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   9


CO-OP PEOPLE

CHEERS!

Dale and Tonya Mabry deliver fun and flavor at Dalton Union Winery and Brewery. STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

W

hat’s in a name? Dalton Union Winery and Brewery’s name is packed with meaning. Owners Dale and Tonya Mabry liked “Dalton” because it’s a portmanteau word, combining three letters from their first names, while “Union” alludes to their relationship and location. “The two of us are a union,” says Tonya, “and we’re in Union County.” The Mabrys live in a rambling stone house northwest of Marysville, where they’re members of Union Rural Electric Cooperative. Both were raised near Bellefontaine, and they met at a campground when they were kids. Dale, who grew up helping his grandfather make wine, was a wine hobbyist for decades, and the homemade Riesling that he and Tonya presented to people at Christmas always got rave reviews. Since they also enjoy hosting parties and family reunions, the couple decided to turn part of a barn on their 10-acre property into a tasting room. “The winery got started because we liked making wine and enjoying that wine with our families and friends,” says Dale. “If a wine wasn’t enjoyable, it didn’t make the cut.” They opened their winery to the public in August 2015, and it was an immediate success. Their flavorful wines and flair for hospitality were such

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019


a winning formula that within three months, the Mabrys needed to expand. Carving more space out of the barn, Dale built a spacious “tasting house” complete with a handsome stone fireplace for cozy winter gatherings and an outdoor patio for summertime sipping. “A large portion of our customers come from Columbus and love sitting on the patio,” says Tonya. “People comment that it is so quiet out here in the country, and they like seeing all the stars at night.” Although open only on Friday and Saturday, Dalton Union Winery and Brewery is such a popular destination that it was chosen the 2018 Tourism Business of the Year by the Union County Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Our growth was unexpected and unreal, and we really have to try to keep up with it,” says Dale. In fact, he and Tonya have left their former occupations — respectively, technology project management and data center support — to operate the winery. “Four years ago, we would have said there’s no way we’d now be doing this full time,” Tonya says. “It’s been just wonderful for us.” Dalton Union’s diverse wines range from sweet to dry and are made on-site using select juices purchased from as far away as California, Argentina, and Australia. Their signature white wine — Summertime — balances the flavors of Riesling grapes and green apples, while bestseller Black Horse is an off-dry red containing pinot noir and black cherry. Hula Sunrise, a wine cocktail served year-round, blends white wines with coconut, lime and pineapple juices, and grenadine. “It’s like a vacation in a glass, and gives people a great excuse to drive here,” says Tonya.

Top, Tonya Mabry pours a glass of Dalton Union’s own Charisma red table wine; below, Dale Mabry dispenses a beer from one of the 12 taps in the tasting house.

Dalton Union offers live entertainment every Saturday night, and from April through October, food trucks supplement the charcuterie trays served in the tasting house. Customers also are welcome to bring their own food or to order pizza from local shops. “Dale and I love hosting others and getting together with people,” says Tonya. “Now we get to do that every Friday and Saturday.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF DALTON UNION WINERY AND BREWERY

The Mabrys also produce mead made with honey from a nearby bee farm and hard ciders in seasonal flavors such as rhubarb, pumpkin spice, and lemon-berry. Because they want nonwine drinkers to fully participate in the Dalton Union experience, they’ve also added an in-house brewing system. Dale focuses on using local grains for Dalton Union’s handcrafted beers, and he is especially proud of 43040, a golden ale whose name came from Marysville’s ZIP code. “With locally grown barley and hops, it’s 100% Marysville from seed to glass,” he says.

Dalton Union Winery and Brewery, 21100 Shirk Road, Marysville, OH 43040; 937-645-5889; www.daltonunion.com.

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


Seas

WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

INLAND

Toledo museum guides visitors through the history of the Great Lakes. STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

I

t was more than 60 years ago, and I was just 6 years old, rubbernecking from the back seat of my parents’ red-and-white 1950s-era Ford Fairlane. As we neared our destination, my father remarked into the rearview mirror, “We should be able to see it soon …”

We crested a hill, and I caught my first glimpse. On that perfect summer day, the shimmering blue-green water before me shone as thousands of laser points. But it was not the sparkle that impressed me — I had seen light dance on water before. Rather, it was the sheer size of the lake itself, a vastness that I had no idea existed. Not only did water stretch as far as I could see from east to west, it also ran all the way to the northern horizon and disappeared! That first glimpse of Lake Erie — my first of any of the Great Lakes — thrilled me back then as it does today. Each time I see big water, something in my gut twinges, tightens. I, like millions of others, am somehow inexplicably drawn to the Five Sisters. You’ll experience a similar sense of awe while visiting the National Museum of the Great Lakes in Toledo. “Our mission is simple,” says John McCarty, chief operating officer. “It’s to preserve and make known the history of the Great Lakes.” On display are more than 500 historical photographs, 250 artifacts, and 45 stateof-the-art interactive exhibits. A good way to begin a tour is by viewing the sevenminute introductory film, The Great Lakes: A Powerful Force, in the museum’s theater. Chronicling the history of the lakes over hundreds of years, the movie explains their ongoing role in America’s economy and as a perennial playground for millions of people. 12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019


The museum is sectioned into five galleries: Maritime Technology, Exploration & Settlement, Expansion & Industry, Safeguard & Support, and Shipwrecks & Safety. It’s that last category that seems to hold the greatest intrigue for most people.

The museum building itself is not large — just 11,000 square feet — but not all of the museum is indoors.

“The Great Lakes have experienced more than 8,000 shipwrecks throughout the years, more per surface square mile than any other body of water on earth, and resulting in countless lives lost,” says McCarty.

Just a few steps from the main entrance, docked along the southeast bank of the Maumee River, is the Col. James M. Schoonmaker, a 617-foot ore freighter first launched into the Detroit River in 1911. At the time, it was the largest and most elegant ship operating on the Great Lakes. A century later, it was moved to her nowpermanent berth to become a museum ship.

The most dangerous time of year is fall, when giant autumnal air masses from the north and south collide over the lakes, creating their own weather — at times even producing hurricane-force winds. Freshwater mariners have a term for such violent storms: “The Witch of November.”

This year, the Schoonmaker is joined by a second boat, the 106-foot tug Ohio. Built in 1903, the Ohio started service on the lakes as a fire tug for the Milwaukee Fire Department. In the early 1950s, it began making long hauls across the lakes towing various vessels, as well as engaging in ice-breaking and salvage operations.

It was just such a storm on Lake Superior in November 1975 that took down the 729-foot freighter Edmund Fitzgerald and its entire 29-man crew. An interactive video-display terminal at the museum allows visitors to guide a submersible to the remains of the wreck and view it from various angles.

Although the National Museum of the Great Lakes is open year-round, the Schoonmaker and Ohio may only be boarded for tours May through October. A museum brochure suggests wearing “sensible” shoes.

W.H. “Chip” Gross (whchipgross@gmail.com) is a member of Consolidated Cooperative and is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor. Learn more about the museum at www.inlandseas.org.

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


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GOOD EATS

BAR FOOD

Liven up a dinner party or family gathering by setting out a variety of ingredients and letting guests fix up their meal any way they like. RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHERINE MURRAY

BAKED POTATO BAR INGREDIENTS Baked potatoes Baked sweet potatoes Sour cream Pulled pork Broccoli Cheese sauce Shredded cheddar Chili Scallions Bacon bits Butter Black olives

Additional ingredient suggestions Chorizo BBQ chicken Chives Sauerkraut Parmesan cheese Avocado Salsa Roasted cauliflower Balsamic vinegar Cilantro Roasted Brussels sprouts Malt vinegar

Combo suggestions Broccoli + cheese sauce + shredded cheddar + bacon bits Chili + shredded cheddar + black olives + sour cream + scallions Baked sweet potato with roasted Brussels sprouts + balsamic vinegar + Parmesan cheese

Jalapeno slices

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   15


TACO BAR INGREDIENTS Ground beef with taco seasoning Black beans Refried beans Shredded lettuce Shredded cheddar Shredded pepper jack cheese Avocado Sour cream Black olives Pico de gallo Salsa verde Pickled red onion Jalapeno slices Flour tortillas Hard corn shells Tortilla chips Lime wedges

Additional ingredient suggestions Shredded chicken Chorizo BBQ jackfruit Mushrooms Pinto beans Pulled pork Chopped tomatoes Taco sauce Hot sauce Guacamole Queso Chopped white onion Jicama Cilantro Pineapple salsa Southwest corn Soft corn tortillas

Combo suggestions BBQ jackfruit + pickled red onion + pepper jack cheese + avocado Ground beef + refried beans + pico de gallo + southwest corn + queso Chorizo + black beans + pineapple salsa + lettuce + lime

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019


HOT DOG BAR INGREDIENTS Hot dogs Mustard Ketchup Relish Cole slaw Coney sauce Cheese sauce Chopped white onion Shredded cheddar Sauerkraut Corn chips Potato chips Banana peppers Jalapeno slices Hot dog buns

Additional ingredient suggestions Veggie dogs Bratwurst Sriracha  Stadium mustard Spicy brown mustard Scallions Grilled peppers BBQ sauce Buffalo chicken Pulled pork Bacon bits Blue cheese Cream cheese Green olives Black olives

Combo suggestions Beer bratwurst with chopped white onion + sauerkraut + stadium mustard Hot dog with grilled peppers + cheese sauce + corn chips + sriracha Hot dog with green olives + banana peppers + cream cheese

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


CHOCOLATE FONDUE INGREDIENTS Marshmallows Angel food cake Strawberries Pineapple chunks Maraschino cherries Bananas Kiwi slices Pretzels Apple slices Grapes Orange slices  Graham crackers Vanilla wafers

Additional ingredient suggestions Mini cream puffs Blackberries Sugar wafers Cheesecake Brownies  Shortbread Rice Krispies Treats Cookies Meringues

Combo suggestions Vanilla meringue + orange slice Marshmallow + graham cracker Strawberry + kiwi Banana + brownie

DEATH BY CHOCOLATE FONDUE Prep: 5 minutes; Cook: 7 minutes; Servings: 12–16 2 cups heavy cream 8 ounces premium milk chocolate (chopped or chips) 8 ounces premium dark chocolate (chopped or chips) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract Cut and arrange all dippers for fondue (fruit, cookies, cake, etc.). Fill bottom of a double boiler pot with water and place over high heat until water is boiling. If a double boiler pot is not available, use a heatsafe bowl over a pot of boiling water. Reduce to medium heat and add heavy cream to the top layer of double boiler (separate from the water). Once cream comes to a simmer, add chocolate 2 ounces at a time, whisking with a silicone whisk until smooth. Continue adding chocolate until all chocolate is melted. Whisk in vanilla extract. To serve, pour chocolate into fondue pot, lighting flame underneath to keep warm (or if electric, turn on low heat). Stir occasionally, taking care not to burn chocolate.

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019


ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES MESSAGE FROM THE GENERAL MANAGER

RAIN, WIND, MUDSLIDES, AND TREES

T

he 2019 spring and early summer season has been a very interesting and demanding one for Adams REC. So far, as I am writing this in late June, we are at about 15 inches above normal rainfall for the year. The combination of the heavy rains and strong winds has caused the ground Bill Swango GENERAL MANAGER to be so saturated in places that we have seen mudslides and uprooted trees.

for the linemen and right-of-way crews as they work in potentially very dangerous situations. We also appreciate the occasional note of thanks, kudos, and shout-outs that we receive to pass along to our employees. Just a reminder, school will be starting soon, so please watch out for the little ones! See you at the annual meeting on Aug. 24!

For instance, June 25 was one of the nicest days of the summer. No rain for an entire day, yet at about 11 p.m. that evening, some trees decided to uproot, slide down the hill, and take out a span of three-phase line that supplies State Route 781. These trees were far out of the right-of-way, but due to their size and their location on a hill, they caused an outage that lasted seven hours, as our crews worked through the night to cut up the trees and put the wire back up. This type of incident has been more common this year than any other I can remember. On several occasions, we’ve had to remove trees from the roadway just to get to an outage area. Not only has our cooperative been very busy, but the state and county highway departments and the township trustees have been as well. Several roads have been damaged and some have only one lane open for traffic. Property owners have also felt the effects. I have seen numerous private drives and lanes being repaired as I’ve been out in the communities. You, our members, have been very patient and understanding through it all. Rest assured that we work diligently to restore your power once a storm, trees, or mudslides cause an outage. Many times our crews have worked through the night in severely adverse conditions to get the power back on. We greatly appreciate the thoughts and prayers

AUGUST 2019 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  19


ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

This-n-That BY ALICE L. BAIRD

Come to your annual meeting Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019, is the date for this year’s annual meeting of the membership of Adams Rural Electric, which will be held during the day at Cherry Fork Community Center in Cherry Fork. Cherry Fork is located on State Route 136 between State Route 125 (at the Panhandle) and State Route 32.

Registration If you plan to attend, please send in the registration card that is attached in this issue of Ohio Cooperative Living magazine as soon as possible, so that we can get an attendance estimate to plan accordingly for the meal. When you note how many will attend, please include children age 17 and under who will be attending with you and will need a meal. There will not be child care provided. Registration will begin at 10 a.m. The business meeting will begin at 11 a.m., with lunch following the meeting. Once again, you can enjoy food prepared by JT’s Stovetop Bar-b-que. You will receive meal tickets upon registration. Meal tickets will be limited to two adults plus children. If you bring other guests, you will be able to purchase a meal for a fee.

Trustee election ballots Ballots must be postmarked by Aug. 16, 2019, to be valid. Members will be voting for one candidate in each of the three districts that are to be elected. We cannot accept the ballots at our office; they must be sent in the pre-addressed envelope to a local CPA (certified public accountant). The CPA will make sure all ballots are valid by checking for any duplication and making sure the ballots include the member’s signature. He will then be present at the meeting to announce the results of the voting. By participating in the voting process, you are letting your voice be heard.

Director responsibility One of the seven cooperative principles is “Democratic Member Control,” which means that cooperatives are

20  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2019

democratic organizations controlled by the members, who actively participate in setting policies and making decisions. The elected representatives, who comprise your board of directors, are accountable to the members. This principle of “one membership, one vote” allows you to express your ownership interest by voting for your trustees. 813250014 The Adams Rural Electric Cooperative, Inc. Amended Code of Regulations, Article IV, Section 1 states: “The entire business and affairs of the Cooperative shall be managed by a board of nine (9) trustees which shall exercise all of the powers of the Cooperative except such as are: by law, the Articles of Incorporation or this Code of Regulations conferred upon or reserved to the members”. It is the responsibility of the board of trustees to see that the cooperative remains financially stable in the midst of an economy that is fraught with uncertainties. The trustees must continually look ahead to anticipate the needs of the membership, such as the building of new substations, replacement of damaged or outdated equipment, lines, poles, etc. They must keep abreast of changing legislature, rising costs, and new technology in order to make decisions that will not only keep the cooperative financially viable, but also able to supply the best electric service possible to the membership. Each trustee is also a member/owner of the cooperative, therefore, he or she also has a personal interest in its management and growth. Any decision that is made by the board of trustees affects each of them in the same way as the rest of the membership. If you need information concerning the annual meeting, scholarship program, capital credits, calendar of events, or any other questions or comments, please feel free to contact me at the office. Just ask for Alice. See you at the annual meeting!


ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. BALANCE SHEET Years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 (Based on audited financial statements) ASSETS Total utility plant Less: accumulated depreciation Net utility plant Cash Investments Accounts receivable — electric sales Materials and supplies — electric Other deferred debits Other current and accrued assets TOTAL ASSETS

2018 $42,679,991 (13,570,737) 29,109,254 138,788 8,470,361 1,514,611 368,263 288,394 406,585 $40,296,256

$41,702,645 (12,600,059) 29,102,586 79,358 7,921,891 1,762,076 337,771 382,922 471,837 $40,058,441

$17,295,251 447,296 2,361,889 20,104,436

$18,251,367 344,260 2,400,297 20,995,924

19,844,945 346,875 $40,296,256

18,783,565 278,952 $40,058,441

LIABILITIES Debt — RUS,CFC, and FFB Obligations under capital leases Current and accrued liabilities TOTAL LIABILITIES Total margins and equity Non-operating margins TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

2017

ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS Years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 (Based on audited financial statements) INCOME: Operating Revenue Interest Other Revenue and Patronage Capital TOTAL INCOME

$15,870,706 $15,254,762 347,849 283,957 892,760 746,582 $17,111,315 $16,285,301

EXPENSES: Cost of Power $8,951,965 $8,548,067 Operations and Maintenance Expense 2,136,195 2,031,478 Administrative and General Expense 934,379 800,634 Consumer Accounting Expense 609,551 599,765 Customer Service and Sales Expense 44,793 47,350 Depreciation Expense 1,296,004 1,297,742 Tax Expense 511,000 466,063 Interest Expense 912,486 869,739 Miscellaneous Expense 9,434 8,504 TOTAL EXPENSES $15,405,807 $14,669,342 PATRONAGE CAPITAL AND MARGINS

$1,705,508

$1,615,959

(A complete copy of the audited financial reports is available upon request)

AUGUST 2019 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  21


ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

CALENDAR OF EVENTS August 2–4 Manchester River Days 2019, Manchester. Celebrate the founding of one of Ohio’s oldest villages. Queen pageant, bingo, baked good auction, rides, and entertainment. Fireworks on Aug. 4. Rain dates: Aug. 16 to 18. 937-779-7818. 3 12th Annual River Rats Boat & Jet Ski Poker Run on the Ohio River, Manchester. Pre-registration starting three days prior. To register, call 937-217-3000. 17 12th Annual Cowboy Copas Memorial Concert. 7 p.m. at the Jefferson Community Center in Blue Creek. Food will be served and a cake auction will be held. Contact Mary Fulton at 937-587-2043 or Lynne Newman at 937-587-3358. 24 Archaeology Day at Serpent Mound. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Celebrating Ohio’s rich American Indian legacies. Free with $8 parking fee. Rain or shine. For more information, go to www. arcofappalachia.org or call 800-752-2757. 24 Lorrie Morgan will perform at The Red Barn Convention Center. 7 p.m. Contact 800-823-9197 ext. 121. 24–25 2  019 Winchester Homecoming Festival. Hosted by Winchester Caramel Festival. Contact Patsy Roberts at 937-403-1315 or Shirley Naylor at 937-217-1633 or Jude Endicot at 614-266-0664.

Capital credits retirements Capital credits refunded to the estates of Adams Rural Electric Co-op members for June 2019 totaled $22,095.59. Estates paid in 2019 to date total $109,860.83. In case of the death of a member of Adams Rural Electric, contact Kacee Cox or Alice Baird at 937-544-2305 or 800-283-1846. ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. CONTACT

937-544-2305 | 800-283-1846 www.adamsrec.com

PLEASE CALL IN YOUR OUTAGES Do not use e-mail or Facebook, as they are not continuously monitored. If you experience an outage, please call the office at 937-544-2305 or 1-800-283-1846. If you post on Facebook, or e-mail your outage information, it could delay the restoration time. E-mails and Facebook are not continuously monitored, especially in the evenings or on weekends.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Donald C. McCarty Sr. President

Charles L. Newman Vice President

Kenneth McCann Secretary

OFFICE

4800 St. Rte. 125 P.O. Box 247 West Union, OH 45693 OFFICE HOURS

Mon.–Fri., 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

Stephen Huff Blanchard Campbell William Wylie M. Dale Grooms William Seaman John Wickerham

PAY YOUR BILL AT 800-809-6352 We provide three convenient ways to pay: online, by phone, or directly from your bank account. Failure to receive your bill in no way relieves you from paying it. If you don’t receive your bill, contact the office before the due date and we’ll issue another one.

22  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • AUGUST 2019

Erika Ackley Jacob Alexander Alice Baird Kayla Bowman Nathan Colvin Kacee Cox Joan Drummond Joyce Grooms John Hayslip David Henry Steve Hoop

Samuel Kimmerly Dave Kirker Rodney Little Dave McChesney Johnny Moles Kristina Orr David Ralston Zachary Rowe Dewayne Sexton Mike Whitley

Bill Swango General Manager

HIDDEN NUMBER BILL CREDIT Pay at these collection stations: First State Bank — Georgetown, Hillsboro, Manchester, Peebles, Ripley, Seaman, West Union, and Winchester. National Bank of Adams County — 218 N. Market St., West Union.

Find your account number in the Adams REC local pages (the four center pages of this magazine), then call our office, and you will receive a $20 credit on your electric bill. You must call by the end of the month in which your account number appears. Your call affirms permission to publish your name as a winner in an upcoming issue of Ohio Cooperative Living.


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REPEAT?

WHY NOT!

Butler Rural Electric member is gunning for a third straight grand championship at the state fair. BY CELESTE BAUMGARTNER

“A

bility is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude and want determine how well you do.” Those words, adorning a motivational sign in the Butterfield family’s barn near Oxford, Ohio, have been undeniably effective. Matt Butterfield’s 280-pound market barrow, named “Repeat,” was grand champion at the 2018 Ohio State Fair. The pig was so named because Butterfield’s previous pig, “Hollywood,” was grand champion at the 2017 fair. It was only the second time that someone had won back-to-back Ohio State Fair grand championships with pigs. Showing at the Butler County and Ohio State fairs is a family affair for the Butterfields, who are members of Butler Rural Electric Cooperative. Nicole and Mark Butterfield, their son, Matt, and daughter, Lauren, are all involved in the kids’ 4-H projects. In 2017, after Matt won the first championship, the family joked that maybe he would win a second. His grandmother, Patricia Butterfield, suggested naming one of the pigs Repeat, just in case. They pinned the name on the one for which they had the highest hopes and were rewarded for their optimism with win number two. The same conversation came up again this year, and Grandma

Butterfield said, “We don’t want a ‘Three-Peat.’ But how about ‘Why Not?’” The name stuck. Matt won’t make too much of the name before the competition because he doesn’t want to be overconfident. He likes winning, but even more, he likes the hard work and the fun of preparing for the fair and the fact that the whole family is involved. But will he try for another win? “Anybody would want to,” he says. “We have fun with it. It’s a family thing. It teaches you a lot, and your family is together, so that’s what matters most to me about it.” Mark and Matt bought Hollywood and Repeat from Moyer Show Pigs. Though the pigs had different sires, they had several similarities. This year, the Butterfields bought seven pigs from Moyer, a few more than usual. Matt graduated from Talawanda High School last spring, so this is his last year as a part of 4-H. Lauren is also going to show pigs and sheep this year. The Butterfields look for structure when they select their pigs. “There’s one that looks nice to us,” Matt says. “I walk all of them a couple of times, and he looks the best. He walks square; he’s got a good structure on his body; he has a lot of muscle, and when he puts his head up, it emphasizes how his body looks. He looks close to what the past two (Hollywood and Repeat) were.” Besides hard work and fun, doing well at the fair involves a lot of planning. Matt and Lauren’s dad, Mark, is the expert on feed, Matt says. Mark helps his kids decide what their animal’s final target weight should be. They want the animal to grow at a certain rate of gain, Mark says, because growing too fast causes structural issues. The Butterfields adjust the protein, fat, and lysine levels in the feed, relative to how the barrow is developing. “At the beginning, when we buy them in March, we weigh them every week. We’re adjusting the feed every three weeks maybe,” Mark says. “Once we get close to the fair, we’re adjusting the feed maybe every two to three days. We chart them and graph their average daily gain. Starting in late June, we weigh them every day. We monitor their growth rate, their rate of gain, and compare that to what we’re targeting.”

24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019


Matt has an added challenge this year, beyond the target weight. Lauren, a couple of years younger than him, has won five grand championships at the Butler County Fair, most for showing sheep. This year she’ll be showing barrows at the Ohio State Fair — competing against Matt. Whatever the outcome, Matt is already moving into his next phase. He’ll attend the University of Northern Ohio, studying diesel technology and agribusiness, in the fall. He’s farming 361 acres of his own this year with a goal of turning that into 2,000 acres someday. He’s got the motivation to do it.

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


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Ohio zip codes turn up silver for residents Sealed Vault Bags full of heavy silver bars are actually being handed over to the first Ohio residents who find their zip code listed in today’s publication and call before the 7 day order deadline ends to claim the bags full of valuable silver NATIONWIDE – Operators at the National Silver Hotline are struggling to keep up with all the calls. That’s because Silver Vault Bags loaded with a small fortune of .999 pure Silver Bars are now being handed over to everyone who beats the 7-day order deadline. “It’s like a modern day Gold Rush. Ohio residents will be hoarding all the silver bars they can get their hands on for the next 7 days. This comes as no surprise after the standard State Minimum set by the Federated Mint dropped 42%, going from $50 per bar to just $29 making these Silver Vault Bags a real steal,” said Mary Ellen Withrow, the emeritus 40th Treasurer of the United States of America. “As executive advisor to the private Federated Mint, I get paid to deliver breaking news. And here’s the best part. This is great news for Ohio residents because it’s the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint,” said Withrow. The only thing residents need to do is find the first 3 digits of their zip code on the Distribution List printed in today’s publication. If their zip code is on the list, they need to immediately call the National Silver Hotline before the 7-day order deadline ends. Residents who do are cashing in on the record low State Minimum set by the Federated Mint. This is a real steal for residents because each Silver Vault Bag loaded with 10 Ohio State Silver Bars is normally set at $500 which is the standard $50 per heavy half ounce bar State Minimum set by the Federated Mint. But here’s the good news. Residents who call today get the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint of just $290 for each Ohio Silver Vault Bag which is just $29 per bar as long as they call the National Silver Hotline at; 1-800-239-7648 EXT. FMM1914

before the deadline ends. Phone lines open at pre-

■ OHIO RESIDENTS CASH IN: It’s like a modern day Gold Rush. Everyone’s scrambling to get their hands on the heavy, Jumbo Silver Ballistic Bags pictured above before they’re all gone. That’s because residents who find the first 3 digits of their zip code printed in today’s publication are cashing in on the lowest ever State Minimum price set for the next 7 days by the Federated Mint.

Who gets the Silver Vault Bags: Listed below are the U.S. zip codes that get the Silver Vault Bags. If you find the first 3 digits of your zip code below immediately call: 1-800-239-7648 EXT. FMM1914

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26   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

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cisely 8:30 A.M. this morning and are expected to be flooded by Ohio residents looking to cash in on the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint to date. That’s why Ohio residents who find their zip code on the distribution list today are being urged to call immediately. Since this special advertising announcement can’t stop dealers and collectors from hoarding all the new 2019 Edition Ohio State Silver Bars they can get their hands on, the Federated Mint had to set a strict limit of three Jumbo Silver Ballistic Bags per resident – these are the bags everyone’s trying to get because they contain 10 individual Silver Vault Bags each. Everyone who gets these will feel like they just hit the jackpot. “Residents who want to cash in on the lowest ever State Minimum set by the private Federated Mint better hurry. That’s because in 7 days, the State Minimum for these heavy half ounce Ohio State Silver Bars returns to the normal State Minimum set by the Federated Mint of $50 per bar,” Withrow said. “We’re bracing for all the calls and doing the best we can, but with just hours left before the deadline ends, residents lucky enough to find the first 3 digits of their zip code listed in today’s publication need to immediately call the National Silver Hotline," Withrow said. ■

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: If you find your zip code on the distribution list printed in today’s publication read below then immediately call: 1-800-239-7648 EXT. FMM1914

I keep calling and can’t get through: Keep trying. Right now everyone’s looking to cash in on the lowest State Minimum ever set by the Federated Mint. In fact, tens of thousands of residents are expected to order up as many Silver Vault Bags as they can get their hands on before the deadline ends. That’s because the State Minimum set by the Federated Mint has been slashed from $50 per heavy half ounce to just $29 for the next 7 days. And since each Silver Vault Bag contains 10 valuable State Silver Bars for just $290 nearly everyone is taking at least three bags before they’re all gone. But all those who really want to cash in are taking the Jumbo Silver Ballistic Bags containing 100 State Silver Bars before the State Minimum set by the Federated Mint goes back up to $500 per Vault Bag. So if lines are busy keep trying. How much are the Silver Vault Bags worth: It’s hard to tell how much these Silver Vault Bags could be worth since they are highly collectible, but those who get in on this now will be the really smart ones. That’s because the State Minimum set by the Federated Mint goes back up to $500 per bag after the deadline ends. So you better believe that at just $290 the Silver Vault bags are a real steal for everyone who beats the deadline. Can I buy one State Silver Bar: Yes. But, the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint of just $29 per bar applies only to residents who purchase a Silver Vault Bag(s). That means only those residents who order a Silver Vault Bag(s) or the heavy, Jumbo Silver Ballistic Bag(s) get the $29 per bar State Minimum set by the Federated Mint. All single bar purchases, orders placed after the 7-day deadline and all non-state residents must pay the standard $50 per heavy half ounce Bar State Minimum set by the Federated Mint. Why is the State Minimum set by the Federated Mint so low now: Thousands of U.S. residents stand to miss the deadline to get the silver at the lowest ever State Minimum set by the private Federated Mint. Now all residents who find the first 3 digits of their zip code on the Distribution List printed in today’s publication are getting the Silver Vault Bags for themselves and all the solid .999 pure State Silver Bars found inside. The price for each Silver Vault Bag is normally set at $500 which is the standard $50 per bar State Minimum set by the Federated Mint, but residents who beat the 7-day deadline only cover the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint of just $290 for each State Silver Vault Bag which is just $29 per bar as long as they call the National Silver Hotline before the deadline ends at: 1-800-239-7648 EXT. FMM1914. Hotlines open at 8:30 A.M. FRONT VIEW

BACK VIEW INDEPENDENCE: 1776 signifies the year America declared independence proclaiming inalienable rights including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

SIGNIFICANT: Numbered in the order of which the state ratified the Constitution and was admitted into the Union.

HISTORIC 13 STARS: Each star represents one of the original 13 Colonies arranged in a circle to symbolize the perpetuity of the union as depicted in the “Betsy Ross” flag.

■ SILVER HITS ROCK B O T T O M : Ever yone’s

scrambling to get the Silver Vault Bags each loaded with 10 solid .999 pure Silver State Bars before they are all gone. That’s because the standard State Minimum set by the private Federated Mint dropped 42%, going from $50 per bar to just $29, which is a real steal.

ONLY EXISTING: Silver bars struck with the double forged state proclamation.

LOWEST EVER: State minimum set by the Federated Mint drops to just $29.

VALUABLE: Solid .999 pure fine silver. PHOTO ENLARGEMENT SHOWS ENGRAVING DETAIL OF SOLID HALF OUNCE STATE SILVER BARS

FEDERATED MINT, LLC IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, A BANK OR ANY GOVERNMENT AGENCY. IF FOR ANY REASON WITHIN 30 DAYS FROM SHIPMENT YOU ARE DISSATISFIED, RETURN THE PRODUCT FOR A REFUND LESS SHIPPING AND RETURN POSTAGE. THIS SAME OFFER MAY BE MADE AVAILABLE AT A LATER DATE OR IN A DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION. NO SALES TO RESIDENTS IN ORANGE COUNTY, CA. OH RESIDENTS ADD 6.5% SALES TAX. FEDERATED MINT 7600 SUPREME AVE. NW, NORTH CANTON, OH 44720 ©2019 FEDERATED MINT

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   27


MOO-ving experience How butter sculptures have become one of the Ohio State Fair’s most popular traditions. BY MARGIE WUEBKER

T

he five sculptors know how important their role is. Within their capable hands is a tradition that some will experience for the first time this year and others perhaps the fiftieth time — one that thousands of people look forward to every year. “The butter sculpture display is one of the most loved traditions of the Ohio State Fair,” says Jenny Hubble, senior vice president of communications for the

American Dairy Association Mideast, which represents dairy farmers in Ohio and West Virginia. “Ohio’s dairy farmers are proud to support it.” The tradition began in 1903, when Ohio State University and dairy processors in the Buckeye State sponsored butter-sculpting contests at the fair.

28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019


T. Shelton and Company, distributor of Sunbury Cooperative Creamery Butter, is credited with turning in the first butter cow and calf. Additional themes have been added in ensuing years. The American Dairy Association Mideast picks something that is nonpolitical and noncontroversial, optimistic, and with broad audience appeal. The five-member technical sculptor team includes lead sculptors Paul Brooke and Alex Balz of Cincinnati, Tammy Buerk of West Chester, Erin Swearingen of Columbus, and Matt Davidson, a Sidney dairy farmer. The mural in the display is painted by Cincinnatibased artist Ted Hendricks. Brooke and Balz spend a week planning the display and building the wood and steel frames or armatures to support the butter’s weight. The team spends 400 hours sculpting in Columbus, roughly a week before the fair opens. They go through nearly 2,200 pounds of butter in the process. The beloved butter cow and calf are always part of the display. Other butter sculptures have honored astronauts Neil Armstrong and John Glenn, aviators Orville and Wilbur Wright, and Ohio’s top sports teams. The sculptors slice the butter, which comes in 55-pound blocks, into manageable loaves and layer it onto support frames. They wear gloves and multiple layers of clothing while they work in a large, 46-degree cooler. “It hardens on the frames like a stick of butter straight out of the refrigerator,” Brooke says. “At that point, it’s like working with clay, although we really have to exaggerate the detail because butter tends to be more translucent and doesn’t reflect light like other materials.” There is no waste — the butter used in the process is already past its expiration date, and once the fair is over, it’s recycled and refined into an ingredient used for animal feed, tires, and cosmetics, among other things. Sculptures are on display in the Dairy Products Building at the state fair from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. through Aug. 4. Ohio State Fair butter sculptors work diligently to finish their creations before the opening of the fair.

COOPERATIVE CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST Ohio Cooperative Living magazine is looking for photos from Ohio and West Virginia electric cooperative members to use in its 2020 cooperative calendar. We’re interested in seasonal scenes from each month of the year. If your images are chosen for publication, amateur co-op photographers could earn $100 or more.

RULES • One photo entry per member. • High-resolution, color, digital images only. • No prints, slides, or proof sheets — no snail mail! Send submissions by email attachment only to photo@ohioec.org. • Photo format must be horizontal and capable of filling an 8 x 11inch image area. • Include an explanation of the photo — the where, what, when — as well as who took the shot. • Include your name, address, phone number, and the name of your co-op. • Shots featuring people who can be identified within the photo must be accompanied by a signed publication release.

Deadline for submission: Aug. 16 photo@ohioec.org

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   29


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“GET BUSY LIVING OR GET BUSY DYING” Either way, get to Mansfield August 16 –18 for The Shawshank Redemption’s 25th anniversary celebration.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

W

hen The Shawshank Redemption was released in 1994, no one predicted the movie would make Mansfield, Ohio, a tourist destination for fans. Filmed almost entirely in and around Mansfield, the prison drama stars Tim Robbins as Andy Dufresne, a banker wrongly convicted of murdering his wife and her lover, and Morgan Freeman as Ellis “Red” Redding, the resourceful inmate who befriends him. Its core themes of hope and friendship so profoundly affected audiences that Shawshank not only ranks first on the IMDb list of all-time favorite movies, but also is one of the “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant films” selected for the prestigious National Film Registry. Because Shawshank devotees from around the world make pilgrimages to the movie’s locations, the Destination Mansfield–Richland County tourism bureau created the

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Shawshank Trail, a self-guided tour that includes the Ohio State Reformatory – which famously “portrayed” Shawshank State Prison — and 15 other stops. “The Shawshank Trail is unique,” says Jodie Snavely of Destination Mansfield–Richland County. “No other place has as many filming sites.” This August, Mansfield is celebrating The Shawshank Redemption’s 25th anniversary with special activities and tours at the trail sites. Aficionados of the beloved movie can view props, such as Andy’s secret tunnel; meet numerous cast members — including Bob Gunton, aka Warden Norton — at various events; and retrace Andy’s and Red’s unforgettable odyssey locationby-location. Here's a glimpse of what visitors will experience along the way:


Pugh Cabin at Malabar Farm State Park Andy’s wife, Linda, meets with her lover inside this cabin in Shawshank’s opening scene, while Andy sits outside in his 1946 Plymouth and fingers a revolver and a bottle of bourbon. Actors Renee Blaine (Linda) and Scott Mann (Linda’s lover) will sign autographs here during the 25th anniversary celebration.

Ohio State Reformatory, Mansfield Opened in 1896, this massive prison is a local landmark and a grim reminder of the 150,000 inmates who served time within its stone walls. Thanks to Shawshank, it’s also something of a shrine for fans who love to tour Warden Norton’s office, visit the set used for paroled prisoner Brooks Hatlen’s hotel room, and pose with life-sized cutouts of Andy, Brooks, and Red.

Brooks’ Bench, Central Park, Mansfield Played by the late actor James Whitmore, Brooks ran the prison library where Andy worked. Unable to assimilate into society after his parole, Brooks spends a lot of time sitting on the bench at the park to feed the birds. Pugh Cabin

The Bissman Building, Mansfield (Drive-by only) It once housed a wholesale grocery and supplied bootleggers, but in Shawshank, this downtown building set the scene for the newspaper office and the façade for the hotel where Brooks hanged himself.

The Bissman Building

Wyandot County Courthouse, Upper Sandusky The beautiful courtroom where Andy’s trial was filmed can be seen only when court is not in session. During the 25th anniversary weekend, re-enactors wearing Shawshankera costumes will greet visitors, and period automobiles will be displayed on the courthouse lawn.

Brooks’ Bench

Shawshank Woodshop, Upper Sandusky The former Stephan Lumber Company provided the backdrop for the iconic scene in which Andy defiantly plays opera music that enchants prisoners who are supposed to be working. The building’s fine collection of old machinery includes the saw that Red used.

Shawshank Woodshop

Andy’s Tunnel

Now home to a retail shop, the building doubled as the Trailways Bus Station where Red broke parole and embarked on the journey that reunited him with Andy at the end of the movie.

The Shawshank Redemption 25th Anniversary Celebration Although most Shawshank Trail sites are free or request donations, the Ohio State Reformatory charges admission for tours, and some anniversary events — including the Renaissance Theatre’s screening of The Shawshank Redemption — require tickets. For information about purchasing tickets and a complete schedule of events and cast appearances, visit www.shawshanktrail.com. Learn about lodging, dining, and other Mansfield attractions at www.destinationmansfield.com.

Bob Gunton, aka Warden Norton

COURTESY OF DESTINATION MANSFIELD

Revivals 2 Thrift Store, Ashland

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   33


TREETOP ADVENTURE

Co-op members offer high-flying family fun after vacation inspiration. BY DAVA HENNOSY; PHOTOS COURTESY OF TREE FROG CANOPY TOURS

J

ody Christiansen was into trees, and he enjoyed finding ways to get other people into them as well.

In 2004, he discovered his dream. He and his wife, Anna Lee, took their family on a trip to Costa Rica to celebrate daughter Madison’s high school graduation and his completion of chemo treatment for lymphoma. Jody, an avid recreational tree-climber, took an interest in a zipline experience they had while they were there. “He thought the zipline was a really unique way (to get people up in among the trees),” says Madison Christiansen. “After that trip, he had the bug to build a zipline.” The result is Tree Frog Canopy Tours in Glenmont, in the heart of Mohican country, where thrill-seekers have a chance to sweep through some of Ohio’s most beautiful scenery on one of the only dual-cable canopy zipline tours in the state. When Jody’s lymphoma returned for a second time at the end of 2009, says Anna Lee, “my husband had a lot of time on his hands, and so he was investigating (the possibility of creating a canopy tour) online. We found a company, Bonsai Design out in Grand Junction, Colorado, that we consulted. They came, they searched out two areas that we had picked out, and this is the one they chose. They designed the course and built it.”

34   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019

Construction started in May 2010, and Tree Frog Canopy Tours officially opened that August. It quickly became a family business, as Madison became a guide and gradually took over other responsibilities. “With my dad’s lymphoma returning at the end of 2009, the thought of moving home just sounded like a good idea,” Madison says. “Who doesn’t want to get out of the office and work outside up in the trees?” The Christiansens’ other daughter, Morgan, was also a guide for a season. The canopy tour is a 2½-hour ziplining experience with more than 4,000 feet of cable. Participants move through a total of seven ziplines, two sky bridges, and two rappels. On a dual-cable line, participants can expect a faster and smoother ride. Tours are made up of a maximum of eight participants and two guides. The ziplines range in length from 150 feet to 1,100 feet from tree platform to tree platform. The highest point on the tour is 120 feet high on the 735-foot zipline. Before starting on the first zipline, guides teach participants how to steer their bodies, how to pull themselves back up the line, and how to brake on the line. The longer ziplines have an extra brake at the end to slow participants down, if needed. The highest clocked speed at Tree Frog Canopy Tours is 51 mph.


Zipline Ohio A selection of other zipline tour operations in the Buckeye State: Common Ground Canopy Tours, Oberlin: 440-7072044. www.commongroundcenter.org Hocking Hills Canopy Tours, Rockbridge: 740-3859477, www.hockinghillscanopytours.com Lake Erie Canopy Tours, Geneva-on-the-Lake: 866601-1973, www.lakeeriecanopytours.com Markin Farms Zipline Adventures, West Liberty: 937465-0358, www.markinfarms.com Ozone Zipline Adventures, Oregonia: 513-932-3756, www.ozonezips.org Soaring Cliffs*, Rockbridge: 855-947-4386, www. soaringcliffs.com The Wilds Zipline Tours, Cumberland: 740-6385030, https://thewilds.columbuszoo.org/home/visit/ plan-your-visit/zipline-safari-tours Valley Zipline Tours, Lancaster: 740-654-3392, www. valleyziplinetours.com Zipzone Outdoor Adventures, Columbus: 614-8479477, www.zipzonetours.com *Soaring Cliffs sustained damage during autumn storms in late 2018 and will be closed during the 2019 season to rebuild and expand.

Becoming a zipline guide isn’t an easy task. To keep the tours as safe as possible, guides receive substantial training and must be recertified often. “They have to complete a 60-hour training and they learn everything there is to do to guide. They are recertified every month,” Anna Lee says. The tour doesn’t require any ziplining experience; people with no background and people who have been ziplining for years are welcomed. The only requirements are that participants must be at least 10 years old and weigh between 75 and 250 pounds. Tree Frog Canopy Tours continues Jody’s legacy of bringing people happiness by introducing them to the feeling of flying through the trees. “When my dad passed away in May 2016, my mom and I didn’t want to give up his dream, so we took over all operation,” Madison says. “She does all the behind-the scenes stuff, and I run the day-to-day operations. It was a lot to figure out and take over, but we think we make a pretty good team.” Tree Frog Canopy Tours, 21899 Wally Road, Glenmont, 44628; 740-599-2662, www.treefrogcanopytours.com.

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   35


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2019

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

CALENDAR

Unknown Soldier, and the Korean War Memorial. The only place privileged to display all four exhibits together outside of D.C.! http://fjfortfest.com or www.facebook. com/events/894891914200290. AUG. 17–18 – The Fantastic Tiffin Flea Market, Seneca Co. Fgds., 100 Hopewell Ave., Tiffin, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free admission and parking; handicap accessible. 250 to 400 dealers per show. 419-447- 9613, tiffinfleamarket@gmail.com, or www.tiffinfleamarket.com. AUG. 22–25 – German-American Festival, Oak Shade Grove, 3624 Seaman Rd., Oregon. $8/day; multi-day tickets available. Authentic German food, beer, and THROUGH OCT. 12 – The Great Sidney Farmers entertainment. www.germanamericanfestival.net. Market, 109 S. Ohio Ave.. Sat. 8 a.m.–noon. Fresh AUG. 24 – Barbershop Concert: The Men of produce, baked goods, jams and jellies, crafts, plants, Independence, Sauder Village, Founder’s Hall, 22611 St. and flowers. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. Rte. 2, Archbold, 1 p.m. Concert included with admission AUG. 15 – Summer Concert Series: Brooke Schooley to Historic Village: $12–$18, under 6 free. 800-590-9755 and Shane Jackson, Huber Opera House (side porch), or www.saudervillage.org. Hicksville, 7–9 p.m. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy music AUG. 24–25 – Ghost Town Spring Crafts and Antiques performed by local musicians. 419-542-6161, hixmayor@ Festival, 10630 Co. Rd. 40, Findlay, Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., defnet.com, or http://villageofhicksville.com. Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $4–$6, under 5 free. Family event AUG. 15–17 – Bucyrus Bratwurst Festival, downtown with crafts and antiques, live music, performances by Wild Bucyrus. Grilled brats and many other festival foods, plus West actors, food and beverages, and a 24-ft. climbing parades, fun contests, and free entertainment. 419-562wall and laser guns for the kids. www.facebook.com/ 2728 or www.bucyrusbratwurstfestival.com. Ghost-Town-Findlay-Ohio-1525098627787387. AUG. 15–17 – National Tractor Pulling Championships, AUG. 24–25 – Revolution on the Ohio Frontier, Fort 13800 W. Poe Rd., Bowling Green. Advance tickets Meigs, 29100 W. River Rd., Perrysburg, 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. $20–$40; additional for reserve seating. Kids 10 and $5–$10, under 6 free. See battle re-enactments and under free. 419-354-1434 or www.pulltown.com. weapon demos, visit army encampments, and learn what AUG. 16 – The Amazing Downtown Race, Sidney, 5:30 life was like in Ohio during the Revolutionary War. 419p.m. Teams race through downtown for a chance to win 874-4121 or www.fortmeigs.org. great prizes. Clue sheets passed out at 5:55 p.m. Teams AUG. 30–SEPT. 1 – Perch, Peach, Pierogi, and Polka of 4, must be age 21 and over; registration required. 937- Festival, downtown Port Clinton, Fri. 4–9:30 p.m., Sat./ 658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. Sun. 11 a.m.–9:30 p.m. $5/day, under 18 free. Lake Erie AUG. 16–18 – Bremenfest, Crown Pavilion, 2 W. Plum yellow perch sandwiches and dinners, pierogis, Polish St., New Bremen. Food, games, 5K and 1-mile Fun Run, sausage, peach cobbler, and polka music! Free polka car and motorcycle show, live music, parade, talent show, lessons on Sat. and Sun. at 4 p.m. 419-341-3743, 419-341and much more. http://bremenfest.com. 4776, or www.kofc1750.org. AUG. 16–18 – Fort Fest: A Salute to Our Military, 364 AUG. 30–SEPT. 2 – S.C.R.A.P. Antique Tractor Show, St. Rte. 190, Fort Jennings. In addition to re-enactments, White Star Park, 960 Twp. Rd. 60, Gibsonburg. $4 per military displays, Huey helicopter flights, and kids’ camp, day per person. Featuring International. Antique cars and this year’s festival features the Moving Wall (the traveling trucks, tractor pulls, flea market, entertainment, food, Vietnam Veterans Memorial) alongside the traveling farm demonstrations, and much more! 419-307-4265 or replicas of the World War II Memorial, the Tomb of the www.S-C-R-A-P-inc.org.

NORTHWEST

THROUGH OCT. 27 – Blennerhassett Voyage Package, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. $130 package includes one night of lodging for two at North Bend, plus two tickets for a sternwheeler ride to and from Blennerhassett Island, a wagon ride tour of the island, a tour of Blennerhassett Mansion, and passes for the Blennerhassett Regional History Museum. 304-643-2931, www.northbendsp.com, or www.blennerhassettislandstatepark.com. AUG. 16–18 – Parkersburg Homecoming Festival, Second St., Parkersburg. Free. Parade, half-marathon, arts and crafts, food concessions, live music, fireworks, Rubber Ducky Derby, and other fun activities. www. parkersburg-homecoming.com.

WEST VIRGINIA

AUG. 30–SEPT. 5 – Fulton County Fair, Fulton Co. Fgds., 8514 St. Rte. 108, Wauseon. www.fultoncountyfair.com. SEPT. 2 – Labor Day Parade, downtown Lima, 10 a.m. Lineup begins 9 a.m. Parade proceeds down Main Street to the Town Square. 419-222-6075 or www. visitgreaterlima.com. SEPT. 5 – Open Air Dinner, Tawawa Park, Sidney. Enjoy an elegant farm-to-table dinner on the park’s covered bridge. Reservations required. 937-658-6945 or www. sidneyalive.org. SEPT. 5 – Summer Concert Series: Open Mic Night, Huber Opera House (side porch), Hicksville, 7–9 p.m. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy music performed by local musicians. 419-542-6161, hixmayor@defnet.com, or http:// villageofhicksville.com. SEPT. 12–14 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Van Wert Co. Fgds., 1055 S. Washington St., Van Wert. Enjoy a whole weekend of bluegrass music at the Van Wert Bluegrass Festival, with jamming, stage shows, many vendors, good food, and lots of camaraderie. Vernon’s vending booth will be jam-packed with Martin guitars, Gibson banjos, mandolins, and fiddles. Our band, Appalachian Grass, will join us Fri. and Sat. for our scheduled stage shows. Contact Steve Scott at 419-594-2816. SEPT. 13–14 – St. Augustine Turtle Fest, St. Augustine Church Grounds, 722 Monroe St., Napoleon, Fri. 6 p.m.– midnight, Sat. 5:30–11 p.m. Free. Live music both days; Sat. features “Wally and the Beavs.” Food and beverages, beer, and our world-famous french fries. Silent auction, jewelry sale, 50/50, big ticket drawing. www.staugie.net. SEPT. 14 – Auglaize County Harvestfest, Auglaize Co. Fgds. (east gate entrance), 1001 Fairview Dr., Wapakoneta, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $2 admission, or $1 plus a canned good; under 10 admitted free. All proceeds go to Senior Services. Food, shopping, bluegrass/country and gospel music, arts and crafts, hay rides, health fair, kids’ activities ($2 donation). Car show 9 a.m.–1 p.m. ($10 entry fee). 419-394-8252.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec. org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.

Continued on page 38

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


2019 CALENDAR

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER

Continued from page 37

NORTHEAST

AUG. 25 – Railroad Memorabilia Show, Painesville Railroad Museum, Painesville Depot, 475 Railroad St., Painesville, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $5, C. (3–12) $3, Family $12 (max. 2 adults, 3 children). Railroad-related items from private collections; some items available for purchase. See Collinwood Engine 999. 216-470-5780 (Tom Pescha), prrm@att.net, or www.painesvillerailroadmuseum.org. AUG. 30–SEPT. 1 – Made in Ohio Arts and Crafts Festival, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, Fri. noon–5 p.m., Sat./Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $5–$7; 3-day pass, $10. Over 160 vendors selling Ohio-made products. Workshops available ($30 fee; register online). www.wrhs. AUG. 3–4 – Home and Garden Tour, 342 Union St., org/events/made-in-ohio-arts-crafts-festival-2-copy. Mount Pleasant, Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 1–5 p.m. AUG. 30–SEPT. 2 – Firelands Labor Day Festival, New $15, Stds. $7. Visit the unique homes and gardens in this London Recreation Park, 2 Blake St., New London, Fri. historic village. 800-752-2631. 6–11 p.m., Sat.–Mon. 7 a.m.–11 p.m. $4–$10, under 4 free. AUG. 18 – Northern Ohio Doll and Bear Show and Sale, Truck and tractor pulls, demo derby, ATV/motorcross, Holiday Inn, 15471 Royalton Rd., Strongsville, 10 a.m.–3 games, tournaments, and baking contest. 419-929-4091 p.m., early bird 9 a.m. Adults $5, kids admitted free; early or www.newlondonohio.com. bird $15. Antique, vintage, and modern dolls, old toys, AUG. 31–SEPT. 1 – Toronto Festival of the Arts, 3rd and bears, clothing, parts/supplies, ID/valuation, restringing, Market Sts., Toronto, Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. minor repair. 440-283-5839 (Eileen Green), phdofdolls@ Food, contests, fun, and lots of local art and crafts. www. yahoo.com, or www.dollshowUSA.com. focusintoronto.com. AUG. 19–25 – Lorain County Fair, 23000 Fairgrounds SEPT. 7 – Free Speaker Series: Darrell Markijohn, Zoar Rd., Wellington. Ohio’s second-largest county fair. 440Schoolhouse, 221 E. 4th St., Zoar, 11 a.m.–12 p.m. Free. 647-2781 or www.loraincountyfair.com. The acclaimed Civil War re-enactor will give a first-person AUG. 23–25 – Fair Fare, Lorain and West Virginia Railway, presentation of John Hunt Morgan, who brought the Wellington. Reduced-price train ride at the fair (approx. 45 Civil War to Ohio with his raid in July of 1863. https:// minutes). Tickets available at loading point on Fairgrounds historiczoarvillage.com. Road. Rides begin at noon and depart hourly, with last train departing at 7 p.m. on Fri./Sat. and 6 p.m. on Sun. 440-647- SEPT. 7–8 – Antiques in the Woods, Shaker Woods Grounds, 217 St. Rte. 7 (GPS users: 44337 County 6660 or www.lwvry.org. Line Rd.), Columbiana, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $8, under 13 AUG. 24–25, AUG. 31–SEPT. 2 – Great Trail Arts and free. No pets. Top-quality antiques and collectibles, Crafts Festival, Great Trail Festival Grounds, St. Rte. 43 classic car show (Sun.), tractor pulls, entertainment, between Malvern and Carrollton (GPS users: 6331 Canton and a Civil War encampment. 330-550-4190 or www. Rd., Malvern), 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Distinctive arts and crafts, antiquesinthewoods.com. living history, and period music. 330-794-9100 or www. SEPT. 7–8 – Old Construction and Mining Equipment greattrailfestival.com. Show, Harrison Coal and Reclamation Historical Park,

Ohio 519 between U.S. 22 and New Athens (GPS: 43672 Stumptown Rd., Cadiz), Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $3. Operating and static displays. 740-312-5385 or 330-618-8032, oldironshow@yahoo.com, or www. facebook.com/ocmes. SEPT. 7–8 – Ohio Antique Power Club Gathering, Harrison Coal and Reclamation Historical Park, Ohio 519 between U.S. 22 and New Athens (GPS: 43672 Stumptown Rd., Cadiz), Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $3. Antique tractors, engines, cars, trucks, and garden tractors are all welcome. 330-401-5129, ohioantiquepowerclub@yahoo.com, or www.facebook. com/ohioantiquepowerclub. SEPT. 7–12 – Wayne County Fair, Wayne Co. Fgds., 199 Vancouver St., Wooster. 330-262-8001 or www. waynecountyfairohio.com . SEPT. 9–22 – “Celebrate the Constitution” Exhibit, Historic Fort Steuben, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, Mon.– Sat 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free displays and activities commemorating our nation’s founding document. 740-283-1787 or www.oldfortsteuben.com. SEPT. 14 – Willard Train Fest, downtown Willard, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Model trains, planes, and cars; many layouts and vendors. 419-935-0495 or www.willardtrainfest.com. SEPT. 15 – Chagrin Valley Doll Show and Sale, Federated Church Family Life Ctr., 16349 Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Valley, 10 a.m.–3 p.m., early bird 9 a.m. Adults $4, under 13 free; early bird $10. Antique, vintage, modern, reproduction and art dolls, bears, toys, miniatures, parts/ supplies, books, furnishings. ID/valuation, restringing, minor repair. Door prizes. 440-283-5839 (Eileen Green), phdofdolls@yahoo.com, or www.dollshowUSA.com SEPT. 15 – Wellington Harvest of the Arts, 101 Willard Memorial Square, Wellington, 11 a.m.–4 p.m., rain or shine. Free admission and parking. A fundraiser for Herrick Memorial Library’s community programming. About 85 fine and folk art juried vendors. Lunch available in café. 440-647-2120 or www.wellingtonfriends.org.

SOUTHEAST

SEPT. 6–8 – Ohio River Sternwheel Festival, Front and Greene Sts., Marietta. Sternwheeler races, car show, pageant, 5K run, entertainment, and fireworks. 800-2882577 or http://ohioriversternwheelfestival.org. SEPT. 7 – The Jerusalem Experience, Living Word Outdoor Drama, 1–5 p.m. $10. Admission includes a pass to the day’s activities, 1–5 p.m., and to the evening’s drama performance as well. 740-439-2761 or www. livingworddrama.org. SEPT. 7–JAN. 5, 2020 – “Space: A Journey to Our Future,” Bossard Library, 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis. Free. Interactive exhibition as seen at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Presented in cooperation with NASA. www.bossardlibrary.org. SEPT. 8 – Grandview Cemetery Walking Tour, Grandview Cemetery, 300 Brookside Rd., Chillicothe, 1–5 p.m. $5. Tickets will be available the day of the tour; last tickets available at 3:30 p.m. www. visitchillicotheohio.com/events. SEPT. 9–15 – Guernsey County Fair, Guernsey Co. Fgds., Old Washington. $10. 740-489-5888 or www. guernseycountyfairgrounds.org. SEPT. 13–15 – Salt Creek Valley Festival, Main St., Richmond Dale, Fri. 5–10 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. Entertainment, craft vendors, food, and activities for the whole family. www. visitchillicotheohio.com/events.

THROUGH SEPT. 1 – Tecumseh!, Sugarloaf Mountain Amphitheatre, 5968 Marietta Rd., Chillicothe, 8 p.m. $15–$55. Witness the epic life story of the legendary Shawnee leader as he defends his sacred homelands in the 1700s. www.tecumsehdrama.com. THROUGH SEPT. 27 – Rise and Shine Farmers Market, 2135 Southgate Pkwy., Cambridge, Fri. 8 a.m.–noon. 740-680-1866. AUG. 17 – Cambridge Classic Cruise-In, downtown Cambridge, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 740-439-2238 or www. downtowncambridge.com. AUG. 17 – Crucifixed: Youth/Family Rally, Living Word Amphitheater, 6010 College Hill Rd., Cambridge, 1–6 p.m. $20 at the door. 740-439-2761 or www. livingworddrama.org.

38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019

AUG. 23–24 – Ross County Quilt Guild’s Annual Quilt Show, Tabernacle Baptist Church, 221 E. Main St., Fri. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Entries accepted Aug. 21 from 1 to 5 p.m. Show admission $5. There will be vendors and a raffle for a queen-size quilt. Call 740-773-0222, email cathywalker50@gmail.com, or visit www.facebook. com/RossCountyQuiltGuild for info. AUG. 24 – Food Truck Extravaganza, Adena Mansion and Gardens, 847 Adena Rd., Chillicothe, 5 p.m. Admission $3; free parking. A collaboration of local food trucks, vendors, and entertainment. www.adenamansion.com. AUG. 29–SEPT. 2 – Easy Rider Rodeo, Ross Co. Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe, Thur. noon–1 a.m., Fri.– Sun. 9 a.m.–1 a.m., Mon. 9 a.m.–noon. Daily $25–$30; weekend passes available. Races, biker games, stunt shows, bike shows, contests, great music, and thousands of your closest biker friends. http://easyridersevents.com. SEPT. 3–8 – Belmont County Fair, Belmont Co. Fgds., 45420 Roscoe Rd., St. Clairsville. General admission $10. A family tradition since 1849. www.belmontcountyfair.org. SEPT. 6–7 – Southern Ohio Storytelling Festival, Majestic Theatre Courtyard, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 10 a.m.–10 p.m. $5–$10. Free performances Thur. evening, Sept. 5. The festival focuses on the timeless art of spinning tales, featuring concert performances by several highly acclaimed and award-winning storytellers. www.sostoryfest.com.


SOUTHWEST

12 free. $20 for 9-day pass. 937-548-5044 or www. darkecountyfair.com. AUG. 17 – Annual Farm Toy Show, Highland Co. Fgds., 9447 Smart Rd., Hillsboro, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Sponsored by Southwestern Ohio Farm Toy Collectors Club. 937-3933215 or 937-393-1259 (Donald Kelley). AUG. 24 – Archaeology Day, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH73, Peebles, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission; $8 parking fee. Collections on display, archaeological lectures, and demonstrations of American Indian skills. http:// arcofappalachia.org/archaeology-day. AUG. 24 – Music at the Mound with Steve Free, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 1 p.m. Free admission; $8 parking fee. http://arcofappalachia.org/steve-free. AUG. 24 – Tour De Donut, downtown Troy. A fun, unique bicycle event, where your ability to eat donuts is just as important as your ability to ride your bicycle fast! Kick off the weekend on Aug. 23 with the Donut Jam in downtown Troy, 5–10:30 p.m. www.thetourdedonut.com. AUG. 24 – Tipp City Trans Am Cruise In, 6 S. 3rd St., Tipp City, 5–9 p.m. Free admission. Registration 5–7 p.m. ($10); awards and door prizes at 8:30 p.m. Dash plaques to first 250 entries. Open only to Firebirds, Formulas, Firehawks, Trans Ams, and GTAs. Trophies awarded. . www.homegrowngreat.com/event. AUG. 30 – Bluegrass Night at Fibonacci Brewing Company, 1445 Compton Rd., Cincinnati, 7–9 p.m. Free admission. An evening of lively bluegrass music performed by Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass.

Food and beverages available for purchase. 513-8321422 or http://fibbrew.com. AUG. 31–SEPT. 2 – Fort Rowdy Gathering, Covington Community Park, 140 W. Broadway St., Covington, Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–7:30 p.m., Mon. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Experience what life was like in a small, bustling village in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Cross the footbridge and enter the mountainman encampments of old. 937-473-5439 or www.fortrowdy.org. SEPT. 6 – Bluegrass at Vinoklet Art and Wine Festival, 11069 Colerain Ave.. Cincinnati, 7 p.m. Free admission and parking. Opening night features Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Ticketed activities include wine tasting, food booths, and beer vendors. Enjoy an evening of dancing, singing, shopping, and having fun in one of the most beautiful places in Cincinnati! 513-385-9309, vinokletwinery@fuse.net, or www.vinokletwines.com. SEPT. 6–8 – Clinton County Corn Festival, Clinton Co. Fgds., 958 W. Main St., Wilmington. $4, under 12 free; weekend pass $7. Featuring Case and related companies. Corn Olympics, antique tractor pulls, horse pulls, antique cars and trucks, hit and miss engines, steam engines, demos, food, crafts, quilt show, and more. 937-383-5676 (Dale Mayer) or www.cornfestivalonline.com. SEPT. 12–15 – Old Timers Days Festival, 123 N. Main St., Peebles, Thur. 6–10 p.m., Fri./Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission. Street fair with craft and vendor booths, 5K run, car show, grand parade, and Lions Club baked goods auction. Inflatables, contests, kids’ events, pet parade, and local bands. 937-587-3749 or https://oldtimersdaysfestival.yolasite.com.

market is also open every Wed. 4–7 p.m. at North 3rd Street. www.zanesvillefarmersmarket.org. THROUGH OCT. 27 – Rock Mill Weekends, Stebelton Park at Rock Mill, 1429 Rockmill Place NW, Lancaster, every Sat. and Sun. 12–4 p.m. Free. Tour the restored 1824 gristmill, walk on the iconic Rock Mill Covered Bridge, and enjoy Hocking River Falls. 740-681-7249 or www.fairfieldcountyparks.org. AUG. 11–17 – Muskingum County Fair, Muskingum Co. Fgds., 1300 Pershing Rd., Zanesville. Information and schedule available at www.muskingumcofair.com. AUG. 14, 30, SEPT. 4, 14 – Lorena Sternwheeler Dinner Cruise, Zanesville, 6–8 p.m. $35. Board at Zane’s THROUGH AUG. 31 – Music Machine Trail, uptown Landing Park located on the west end of Market Street. Marysville. Twelve different vintage coin-operated music Reservations required at least 48 hours in advance. machines, ranging in age from 107 years old to newly Children’s menu available. 800-743-2303 or www. built in 2015, on display at a variety of businesses. Trail facebook.com/LorenaSternwheeler. guide available at participating businesses, or online at AUG. 16–17 – Carroll Community Festival, downtown www.visitunioncountyohio.org/music-machine-trail. Carroll. Free admission. Parade Sat. at 10 a.m. www. THROUGH SEPT. 7 – Ohio Annual Art Exhibition, carrollareahistoricalsociety.weebly.com. Zanesville Museum of Art, 620 Military Rd., Zanesville, AUG. 16–18 – Fairfield County Antique Tractor Club Wed., Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Thur. 10 a.m.–7:30 p.m. Tractor and Truck Show, Fairfield Co. Fgds., 157 E. Fair www.zanesvilleart.org. Ave., Lancaster. Free admission and parking. Featuring THROUGH SEPT. 15 – “Blooms and Butterflies,” Allis Chalmers and hit-miss engines. All makes welcome. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus, Flea market, craft show, demos, and field games. Kiddie 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Hundreds of colorful butterflies fly freely tractor pull and antique tractor pulls Sat.; garden tractor in the Pacific Island Water Garden, a tropical haven filled pulls Sun. Pancake breakfast Sat. morning. 740-304-4170 with bright nectar blooms. Daily butterfly releases at 1 and (Geb Bader) or 740-407-2347 (Doug Shaw). 3 p.m. 614-715-8000 or www.fpconservatory.org. AUG. 16–18 – Coshocton Sunflower Festival, THROUGH OCT. 26 – Delaware Farmers Market, N. Coshocton KOA, 24688 Co. Rd. 10, Coshocton, Fri. 4–9 Sandusky St. (between William and Winter), Delaware, p.m., Sat./Sun. 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Tickets must be purchased Wed. 3–6 p.m., Sat. 9–12 p.m. 740-362-6050 or www. online; discounts available. The 4-acre field features mainstreetdelaware.com/event/farmers-market. 44 varieties of sunflowers, along with live music, kids’ activities, vendors, and special events. 740-502-9245 or THROUGH OCT. 26 – Zanesville Farmers Market, www.coshoctonsunflowerfestival.com. Muskingum Co. Fgds., 1300 Pershing Rd., Zanesville, every Sat. 9 a.m.–12 p.m. June through September, the AUG. 25 – Pedals, Pipes, and Pizza, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 3 p.m. We’re turning

back the hands of time as we celebrate the marvels of the theatre’s Mighty Wurlitzer Organ with organist Dave Calendine. $18 includes pizza. 740-383-2101 or www. marionpalace.org. AUG. 31 – Vendor and Craft Fair, Lancaster Campground, 2151 W. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Sponsored by Fairfield County Genealogical Research Library. Numerous vendors, bake sale, and refreshments. 740-653-2573. SEPT. 5–7 – Marion Popcorn Festival, downtown Marion, 11 a.m.–midnight. Free admission. Parade Thur. 6 p.m. Concerts, rides, games, arts and crafts, 5K run/walk, food, and, of course, popcorn for all! 740-387-FEST (3378) or www.popcornfestival.com. SEPT. 6–7 – Lithopolis Honeyfest, Columbus St., Lithopolis, Fri. 3–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Honey tasting, honey bake-off, queen and princess contest, demos and bee education, mead competition, honey beer garden, free kids’ crafts, and much more. 614-8297355 or www.lithopolishoneyfest.com. SEPT. 7 – Duck Derby and Horse Show Open House, 2795 N. Moose Eye Rd., Norwich, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Raffles, silent auctions, food, kids’ farm experience. Benefits Breaking Free Therapeutic Riding Center. 740-607-8425 or www.breakingfreeriding.org. SEPT. 8 – American Primate Educational Sanctuary Fundraiser, 8380 Kennedy Rd., Blacklick, noon–4 p.m. $7. (Rain date: Sept. 15.) Meet and feed the white-handed gibbon apes, an endangered species. Fun for all ages, with games, crafts, and balloon artist. apesohio.weebly.com. SEPT. 13–15 – Country Living Fair, Ohio Village, 800 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Advance tickets $13–$30; after Sept. 12, $18–$40. Antiques, vintage items, handcrafted goods, art, home decor, and so much more. https://www.countryliving.com/life/a4125/countryliving-fair-columbus.

THROUGH AUG. 27 – Movies in the Park, The Park at Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty, 8–11 p.m. Free. www.liberty-center.com. THROUGH SEPT. 13 – Sculptures on the Square, Prouty Plaza, downtown Troy. Twenty Seward Johnson sculptures and other works of art by regional artists. 937-339-5455. THROUGH SEPT. 26 – Uptown Music Concert Series, Uptown Park, Oxford, every Thur. 7–9:30 p.m. Free. 513523-8687 or www.enjoyoxford.org. AUG. 9 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Oxford Community Ctr., 10 S. College Ave., Oxford, 7:30–9 p.m. Free. Lively bluegrass music and entertaining novelty songs. 513-524-8506, info@oxarts.org, or www.oxarts.org. AUG. 16–24 – The Great Darke County Fair, Darke Co. Fgds., 800 Sweltzer St., Greenville. $7, under

CENTRAL

AUGUST 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Dog Days of Summer 1

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3 4 1. Our grandson, Jackson, playing with Hans under the apple tree. Kathy Jefford South Central Power Company member

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2. Kole Lemley and his cousin, Willow Huston, sitting on the bank of the pond watching Remington the black Lab. Phyllis Levy South Central Power Company member 3. Our son, Pierce, and our dog, Ryder, taking a break on a hot summer day! Amie Bassett South Central Power Company member

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4. This was a puppy who hitched a ride in a backpack, too tired to hike! Michelle Wittensoldner Frontier Power Company member 5. Charlie the beagle enjoying a fresh ear of corn, right out of the garden! Jamie Wagner Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative member 6. Our sweet grandson, JC, checking out the tadpoles near the edge of the lake, while our beloved dog, Macy, keeps a close watch. Chris and Christine Starr Carroll Electric Cooperative members 7. Three pups patiently waiting for their owner to take them out for a day on Lake Erie. Lorie Wilber Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

Send us your picture! For November, send “Thankful” by Aug. 15; for December, send “Silent Night” by Sept. 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/ memberinteractive — and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in the photos.

40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  AUGUST 2019

8. Oti sunning himself on the dock by the pond. What a life! Mary DeBolt Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative member


ENTER TO WIN A $100 ELECTRIC BILL CREDIT!* Bring your completed entry form to the Ohio Cooperative Living booth in our Education Center on Wheat Street at the 2019 Farm Science Review.

Name: Electric co-op name: Email address:

*Must be an Ohio electric cooperative member to enter and win. Must be original entry form — no photocopies.

FARM SCIENCE REVIEW September 17–19, 2019

This major agricultural show sponsored by The Ohio State University draws more than 130,000 people every year. It’s a fun, educational event for farmers and non-farmers alike. STOP BY OUR BUILDING Using energy wisely is important on the farm and at home. You’ll find exhibits and information on ways you can save energy and money in the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Education Center.

ohioec.org/energy


Profile for Ohio Cooperative Living

Ohio Cooperative Living - August 2019 - Adams  

Ohio Cooperative Living - August 2019 - Adams