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OHIO

FEBRUARY 2020

COOPERATIVE Adams Rural Electric Cooperative

Cooper’s hawk Predators at the birdfeeder ALSO INSIDE WiNUP: Empowering women in utilities Ohio and ‘America’s noble experiment’ Doing chili the Cincinnati way


Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives: No two of us are identical, but we all have the same calling — serving consumer-members in the communities we call home. We’re your friends and neighbors. You power us, and we power you. Learn more about what powers your local cooperative at ohioec.org/purpose.


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2020

INSIDE SPECIAL FEATURE:

HEALTHY LIVING 28 CHANGING COURSE One woman’s journey to healthy living started from the inside out.

FEATURES 10 FOLLOWING THE GLASS TRAIL Southeastern Ohio glassmaking spots make for a fun, fascinating day trip.

24 DRY STATE Ohio played a huge part in “America’s noble experiment.”

32 MAKING IT CINCY-STYLE The long, tasty tale of Cincinnati’s signature spicy stew. Cover image on most issues: Ohio Cooperative Living Outdoors Editor Chip Gross captured this image of a Cooper’s hawk as it waited for a meal at his birdfeeder. See the story in Woods, Waters, and Wildlife on page 8.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

Taking action M

ore than we like, the will and whims of government affect your electric cooperative’s costs and operational decisions. Federal and state elected officials and their appointed regulators set laws and rules that govern a range of issues, including regional electric markets, grid access, environmental impacts, employment laws, and taxes and fees, all of which affect the cost and reliability of your electric service. Government relations and advocacy are an essential part of the job of managing an electric cooperative. Even though many issues are determined in noncontroversial, bipartisan fashion, each initiative must pass through the legislative and regulatory process sausage grinder. That’s why Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide association for the Ohio co-op network, has staff dedicated to building and maintaining strong relationships with elected officials. It’s also the reason that electric cooperatives constantly encourage our members to take political action — that includes not only voting, but also making your voices heard by the government officials who can address your concerns. Sometimes, it takes the influence of tens of thousands of co-op members. Co-op members can support a common mission by joining the Action Committee for Rural Electrification’s consumer-based affiliate, ACRE Co-op Owners for Political Action. The result of that chorus of voices can be deafening. Take, for example, the inclusion of the RURAL (Revitalizing Underdeveloped Rural Areas and Lands) Act in the recently passed federal spending bill (which enjoyed the bipartisan support of every Ohio senator and congressional representative). The RURAL Act reverses a change that threatened co-ops’ tax-exempt status when we accept government grants for things such as broadband development, helping sister cooperatives during emergency situations, or even co-ops’ own disaster recovery needs. That tax-exempt status is crucial for enabling co-ops to provide electricity as affordably as possible. Coop members demonstrated, once again, what can happen when rural America unites to speak with a collective voice to officials who know that they’ll be held accountable when the next election comes around. Please consider supporting your electric co-op’s political action efforts through the Co-op Owners program. Also, the Ohio primary election is coming up fast — remember to vote on March 17.

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO’S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

Electric cooperatives constantly encourage our members to take political action — that includes not only voting, but also making your voices heard by the government officials who can address your concerns.


FEBRUARY 2020 • Volume 62, No. 5

MORE INSIDE Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Rebecca Seum Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Dava Hennosy Editorial Intern Contributors: Alicia Adams, Jodi Borger, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Sarah Jaquay, Catherine Murray, James Proffitt, and Lisa Templeton Rigoni. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact

Cheryl Solomon American MainStreet Publications 847-749-4875 | cheryl@amp.coop The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member

DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES

WiNUP: The professional organization has encouraged career development for women in the utility industry for nearly a century.

6 CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

Adams Rural Electric Cooperative: The southern Ohio co-op serves an area with a long, rich history and an abundance of natural beauty.

4

8 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Dinner guest: The Cooper’s hawk is a common sight as it looks for its next winter meal — often at your birdfeeder.

8

12 CO-OP PEOPLE

Family of flight: The Champaign Air Museum and its restoration of a WWII-era B-17 bomber spring from one family’s infatuation with aviation.

15 GOOD EATS

Old faves with a new twist: From

12

pizza to pie, some standby fare gets a fresh look with new flavors.

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and information from your electric cooperative.

37 CALENDAR

What’s happening: February/March events and other things to do around the state.

15

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Coming up roses: Everyone’s favorite Valentine’s flower takes center stage in our members’ photos.

40

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


POWER LINES

EMPOWERING Closing in on its first centennial, the WiNUP organization encourages women’s career development in the utility industry. BY REBECCA SEUM

J

anet Rehberg, director of cooperative development at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, began her electrical industry career as an engineer with AEP, designing the underground electrical systems for new housing developments. She advanced her career through several different positions and a cross-country move before a friend told her about an opening with Buckeye Power, Ohio’s generation and transmission cooperative that provides power to its member cooperatives and nearly 400,000 consumer-members. Janet has never looked back. “I feel like I found my niche,” she says. “I love everything the co-ops stand for. I love the people here, I love what I do, and I love working with the cooperatives.” Holly Huffman, communication support specialist at Indiana Electric Cooperatives (IEC), began her career in public relations. She worked for an agency for a while, as well as in the real estate industry, before a position opened up in the marketing department at Wabash Valley Power Alliance. “I didn’t know anything about the industry or what cooperatives were,” she says. “I just knew the electric company kept the lights on.” After eight years, she transitioned to her role at IEC, where she works with member cooperatives to produce content for Indiana’s cooperative-member magazine. She also writes articles, manages social media, keeps the website updated, and more. Engineering and public relations are two fields that don’t usually have much overlap. Although their careers began very differently, Rehberg and Huffman’s paths converge through WiNUP, the Women’s International Network of Utility Professionals. The organization brings together women in the utility industry, whether they be engineers, editors, accountants, IT specialists, or writers. WiNUP empowers and encourages women through three

4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020

missions: professional development, networking and mentoring, and recognition and visibility. Regardless of how different their day-to-day working lives might be, the women share a common goal.

“Empowering women since 1923” The organization originated in 1923, when seven women from New York attended the annual meeting of the Society for Electrical Development. In a sea of male colleagues, they came together and found common ground in their shared experience of being women working in the electricity industry. They soon formed the Electrical Women’s Round Table, with a mission to provide growth and development to their members. Over the years, the organization grew, spreading to other states and spawning new chapters. In 1999, the organization evolved into its current form and name. As a whole, the organization has over 600 members, and Ohio boasts the largest chapter enrollment at over 150 women. The success of the Ohio chapter is in no small part a result of Rehberg’s efforts. When she moved to Ohio and joined the local chapter, membership was stagnant at about 40 participants. When she became chapter chair, her goal was to double the membership in the first year. When she accomplished that, she set herself a goal to double the membership again — and succeeded. Chapters hold monthly meetings where they bring in industry experts to talk about utilities and affiliated companies in order to expand knowledge beyond current roles and into the rest of the industry. They also hold workshops that fulfill their missions, such as teaching about building a personal brand, tips for avoiding toxic workplaces, and practicing mindfulness techniques. Members network while learning improv or line dancing. They give back to their community through service projects, including holding clothing


WiNUP members gather at their most recent national conference.

drives for disadvantaged men and women who are reentering the workforce, and planting flags on the Ohio Statehouse lawn to honor the lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001. Each year, one of the chapters hosts the annual conference, offering valuable sessions and networking opportunities to attendees. As WiNUP’s international president in 2019, Huffman introduced a new event for last year’s conference in Denver — a session for new members to meet each other and get acclimated to the larger event, making sure that they get the most out of their conference experience. “It’s about putting your leadership skills to the test, networking, and learning from others,” she says.

Future leaders When Rehberg became international president of WiNUP in 2014, she asked the membership to vote to make STEM education for girls their national

philanthropic platform. Now each chapter contributes in some way to STEM education. For example, the Columbus chapter held a speed networking event where girls presented their STEM projects to WiNUP members, moving from one group to the next every time the bell rang. WiNUP members have also gone to elementary schools to talk about their careers and have taught young women about dressing professionally and interviewing techniques. “We’re developing our future energy leaders,” Rehberg says. One of the most important parts of WiNUP is the mentoring program. Women are thoughtfully paired with executives in their field or outside of their field, depending on their skills and the direction they want for their career. Later in their careers, Rehberg says, they’ll become mentors themselves. “They get help to grow, then help develop others and give back.” REBECCA SEUM is associate editor of Ohio Cooperative Living.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

L

argely serving Adams County, but spilling over the borders to four surrounding counties, Adams Rural Electric Cooperative serves over 7,500 members in southern Ohio. The majority of Adams REC’s consumermembers are residential, but they also serve commercial businesses like Hanson Aggregates Eagle Quarry, one of the largest producers of sand, rock, and gravel; and Murphin Ridge Inn, a popular bed-and-breakfast in Amish country. With 1,300 miles of distribution lines, Adams REC’s territory stretches across an area that is rich in history and nature.

Serpent Mound and surrounding nature In northern Adams County lies Serpent Mound, an internationally known effigy mound in the shape of a snake with a curled tail. Though its age is debated, the National Historic Landmark was built by ancient American Indian cultures centuries ago. Adams REC is home to the Edge of Appalachia Preserve, one of the most biodiverse natural areas in the Midwest. The system contains 11 unique preserves, including Ohio Brush Creek and Lynx Prairie. With 20,000 acres to explore, visitors can see rugged woodland, waterfalls, and more than 100 rare plant and animal species.

Historical highlights Adams REC is proud to have hired the first woman cooperative general manager in the state of Ohio. The late Linda Gill was hired as a part-time clerk in 1983. She was promoted to accounting manager in 1985 and became general manager in 1993. She retired in 2003. Other items of historical significance in Adams County include the John T. Wilson Homestead, which once operated as a stop on the Underground Railroad for slaves escaping to freedom. It was also a recruitment and training spot for Civil War soldiers. Today, the site has been restored, a bed-and-breakfast has been added, and it’s been declared a National Historical Landmark. It also hosts Adams County Heritage Days every September. This piece of history might sound like something out of an old western movie, but it’s true: In 1853, Bentonville residents formed the Bentonville Anti-Horse Thief Society as a vigilante group to recover stolen horses and prosecute thieves. Today, the organization operates as a social club, and anyone across the U.S. can join this group with a one-time fee of $1. Co-op Spotlight appears regularly in Ohio Cooperative Living to give a glimpse into the land and the people of Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives.

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


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FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   7


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

J

ust about every winter, I receive a frantic email from an Ohio Cooperative Living reader that goes something like this: “Help! A hawk is attacking the songbirds at my birdfeeder! What should I do?” My response is invariably the same: “Relax and learn to appreciate what you’re seeing. Unlike most people, you have the privilege of a front-row seat to a natural event that happens every day in the wild: predation.”

Look who’s coming to

dinner

Winter birdfeeders are a smorgasbord of songbirds for the Cooper’s hawk. STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

It’s not the answer most want to hear, but the only alternative is to not feed birds. By choosing to feed, you congregate songbirds in numbers not normally found in the wild — and that, in turn, makes easy pickings for predators. The most common hawk seen in the Buckeye State at winter feeders is the Cooper’s hawk. Sleek, fast, and deadly, this member of the accipiter grouping of hawks is one of the stealth fighter jets of Ohio’s bird world. Feeding primarily on other birds, its short, broad wings and long, narrow tail equip it to pursue prey either on the wing through thick woodlands or on the ground through heavy brush. Cooper’s hawks are so aggressive they’ve been described as a velociraptor with wings. Of course, that doesn’t mean they are always successful in an attack — far from it. For instance, the Cooper’s hawk pictured to the left tried to snag a songbird from one of my birdfeeders last winter and missed. It then perched low in a nearby tree for the next two hours, sulking and allowing me to take this particular photo and many more. By the way, the hawk in the photo was not emitting its typical, fast caccac-cac-cac call when I snapped the picture. Rather, seemingly disgusted

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


with itself for letting breakfast get away, its open mouth was a bored yawn. Regardless, no other birds dared return to my feeders until long after the Cooper’s had winged off in search of prey elsewhere. Prey birds, including all of those at the right, seem to have an uncanny ability to know whom to fear. For instance, when an immature red-shouldered hawk — not nearly the bird predator a Cooper’s is — hung around near my feeders from time to time last winter in plain view, songbirds paid it little attention while going about their daily business. Cooper’s hawks are crow-sized birds — females are generally a little larger than the males, which is typical for birds of prey. Courtship between a pair can be a dicey affair. If the male doesn’t approach the female just right, he could end up as lunch. You don’t have to live in a rural area to see Cooper’s hawks. According to the latest Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas, the hawks’ expansion into urban areas has been among the most dramatic distributional changes seen in a North American bird in recent decades. I’m guessing at least part of the reason for that change is the increasing popularity of backyard birdfeeding. Predation at winter birdfeeders does not end at dark. I once had a screech owl fly in and perch on one of my birdfeeders just at dusk. Wondering what it was up to, I kept checking on the owl every hour or so during the evening by shining a flashlight beam through my home-office window. The bird was ultimately rewarded for its patience. A last check before I went to bed about 11 p.m. showed the small owl tussling with a flying squirrel that had made the mistake of gliding in from a nearby tall tree to chow down on some sunflower seeds. I had no idea that flying squirrels, being nocturnal, were visiting my birdfeeders after dark, but the screech owl certainly did. W.H. “CHIP” GROSS (whchipgross@gmail.com) is a member of Consolidated Cooperative and Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   9


glass trail

FOLLOWING THE

Southeastern Ohio’s glass history makes for a fascinating day trip.

BY ALICIA ADAMS; PHOTOS COURTESY OF MOSSER GLASS AND THE OHIO GLASS MUSEUM

C

indy Arent adjusts her white gloves and smooths the front of her apron over her 19th-century dress. Arent, a former schoolteacher and now museum director of the National Museum of Cambridge Glass in Cambridge, channels her inner educator to preserve the history of one of the country’s most successful glassware manufacturers, whose sales reached around the world. Her enthusiasm is palpable as she greets visitors to the museum. “Are you ready?” she asks a tour group. After an enthusiastic “Yes!” she’s off — and thus begins a delightful day trip dedicated to glass production around southeastern Ohio.

National Museum of Cambridge Glass The coal seams and sandstone deposits layered within the hills of eastern Ohio provided the perfect environment for the glassmaking industry to take root and flourish. The Cambridge Glass Company began operations in 1902, producing glassware until the plant closed in 1958. In 1982, the first museum of Cambridge Glass opened, brought to life by the sustained effort of an Ohio nonprofit group called the National Cambridge Collectors. Today, the museum offers a hands-on, interactive experience in the history of glassmaking: Visitors can create rubbings from etching plates that were used for glass production as well as handle the equipment and molds. The guided tours provide back stories on more than 8,000 glassware pieces. One full section is devoted to Hollywood’s use of the glassware in series

10  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


glassware that’s been featured on the Science Channel, in one of Katy Perry’s music videos, and at the White House. During a guided factory tour, visitors can get an up-close view of the artisans creating pressed-glass pieces. Mosser’s on-site retail store showcases a selection of products, including items for everyday use and whimsical holiday pieces. While the glassware has been around for decades, it appears to be catching the eye of a new generation. “Millennials have become very interested in pretty much all of the opaque glass colors,” says Mindy Mosser. “They’ve also helped fuel the trend of tableware instead of the historic collectible trend.” Mosser Glass Company, 9279 Cadiz Road, Cambridge, OH 43725. Visit www.mosserglass.com for more information.

Ohio Glass Museum and Glass Blowing Studio such as The Good Place and Empire. Don’t miss the 1940s film produced by the company that follows the creation of glass dinnerware pieces from initial design to final product during a time before computer-aided design and mass automated production. National Museum of Cambridge Glass, 136 S. 9th St., Cambridge, OH 43725. For information, call 740-432-4245 or visit www.cambridgeglassmuseum.org.

Mosser Glass After Cambridge Glass closed, Thomas Mosser, whose father had been the Cambridge plant manager, decided to build a company of his own. He started producing what later became Mosser Glass in a chicken coop in his backyard. Today, Mosser Glass — still family owned — produces about 200,000 pieces annually, blending modern efficiency with traditional craftsmanship to create

Fairfield County has been home to numerous glass companies over the years, thanks to abundant supplies of sandstone and natural gas — for a time, businesses were given free natural gas as enticement to locate there. The first glass manufacturer began production in 1888, though perhaps the most successful one, the Hocking Glass Company (now Anchor Hocking), didn’t come along until 1905. The Ohio Glass Museum and Glass Blowing Studio celebrates the importance of glassware making in the region and beyond. Visitors wind through displays ranging from art to industrial to consumer products. A comprehensive 15-minute movie gives an overview of the history of local glass companies, including the still-operating Anchor Hocking. A gift shop, classes, and a chance to view an artisan blowing glass top off the visitor experience. Ohio Glass Museum and Glass Blowing Studio, 124 W. Main St., Lancaster, OH 43130. More information is available at www.ohioglassmuseum.org.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


CO-OP PEOPLE

FLIGHT PLAN

The Shiffer family is Champaign County’s “first family of aviation.” STORY AND PHOTOS BY JODI BORGER

O

f the more than 10,000 B-17 Flying Fortresses built during the World War II era, probably fewer than 10 of the iconic bombers are currently airworthy. A Pioneer Electric Cooperative family, with the help of their community and a host of volunteers, hopes to add one more to the list. The Shiffer family’s passion for aviation started decades ago. Jerry Shiffer and his sons, Eric and Dave, all private pilots, often supported local aviation projects. When a fully restored Flying Fortress, Liberty Belle, made a stop at Grimes Field Urbana Municipal Airport in July 2005, the Shiffers were among those who flew in the historic plane. They relished the experience. It wasn’t long after the Liberty Belle left Grimes Field that Tom Reilly, who had led restoration efforts on the plane

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020

and brought it to Grimes Field, contacted the airport looking for someone to lead another B-17 restoration project. The Shiffer family jumped at the chance. Unfortunately, Jerry would never see the project begin. On Nov. 29, 2005, the day the first B-17 parts were expected to arrive in Urbana, Jerry was flying solo to Montana for a ski trip when his plane crashed short of its destination. The family, including his wife, Leah; Dave and Eric; and their sister, Andrea, chose to push forward — not only in Jerry’s memory, but as a way to honor all those who fought to protect the United States. It was, perhaps, a bit more than they bargained for. “Parts were sent on a flatbed truck,” says Dave Shiffer. “It literally looked like someone had taken an airplane and chopped it up into pieces and smashed it all together.”


Opposite: The Champaign Lady, a work in progress, is the project that gave the Champaign Aviation Museum its start. Right: Volunteers meticulously work on the details of the Champaign Lady’s restoration. Below: Dave Shiffer poses with the B-17 in the museum’s hangar.

The Shiffers knew they couldn’t do the work all by themselves. So, in January 2006, they placed an ad in the Urbana and Springfield newspapers requesting volunteers to help. On the day of the first volunteer meeting, 30 people showed — and interest has only continued to grow. The family eventually decided to make the B-17 project, now known as Champaign Lady, part of a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, and the Champaign Aviation Museum was born in 2007. Located at Grimes Field, the museum showcases multiple World War II-era airplanes and paraphernalia. “All money for the museum comes from donations, most often from visitors, volunteers, and businesses,” says Dave Shiffer, who currently serves as the museum’s executive director. “Those who donate might have a dad, grandfather, or great-uncle who fought in WWII, especially those with a connection to someone who flew in a Flying Fortress.” Shiffer says the museum’s 110 volunteers are primarily from Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, and Kentucky — but some travel even farther. “We’ve had someone come from England for two weeks during the summer for his vacation, and someone from California brought a camper and stayed for a few weeks to work on the B-17,” says Shiffer. Although many of the museum’s dedicated volunteers have an aviation background or a connection to

someone who fought in WWII, it’s certainly not a requirement. “I thought it would be a neat project to help with,” says Ron Faulkner, another Pioneer Electric Cooperative member, who has been volunteering for six years. “I’ve never done anything with aviation, but it’s a fun project and I’m a people person, so I enjoy getting to know the other volunteers.” For Duane Engel, a Pioneer member and board trustee, the project has ignited his interest in updating his pilot’s license. Engel, who has been an active volunteer for more than a year, has been amazed by the connections he’s made with the other volunteers. “It’s like a big family — volunteers come from all over the place with a wide variety of backgrounds and interests,” Engel says. “I enjoy the people and the opportunity to rebuild history.” In 2010, the Shiffers decided to make sure the museum would continue to grow and evolve, so the organization formed an independent board of directors. The eight directors come from all around Ohio. Even with the shift to a board, though, Leah, Andrea, Eric, and Dave Shiffer remain involved, and as they hoped, the museum continues to expand. A capital campaign is underway to build a second hangar to provide additional space to contain all the WWII aircraft in one area. Nearly 10,000 individuals visit the museum annually. Shiffer refers to the Champaign Lady project as a labor of love, estimating that the B-17 project has another four to five years of work before it will be completed. “Not too many people get this close to these kinds of planes on a daily basis,” Dave Shiffer says. “I once had someone tell me, ‘You get to come out here and play with WWII airplanes — you’re living the dream.’” For additional information and videos detailing the Champaign Lady project, visit www.champaignaviationmuseum.org.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


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Old faves,

new twist

CAULIFLOWER “POTATO” SALAD Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 7 minutes | Servings: 6 1 large head cauliflower 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup celery, finely diced 2/3 cup mayonnaise 3 tablespoons red onion, finely diced 3 tablespoons dill pickle juice 1/2 cup dill pickles, finely diced 2 tablespoons yellow mustard 2 hard-boiled eggs, diced 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder chives, paprika, or sliced eggs 1/4 teaspoon celery seed for garnish 1/4 teaspoon paprika 11/2 teaspoons salt Cut cauliflower into 1/2-inch pieces. Fill a pot with 1 inch of water and 1 teaspoon salt. Place on stove and bring to a rolling boil. Add cauliflower and lower heat; cover and simmer 5 to 7 minutes, until fork tender. Strain and rinse with cold water. In a large bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, pickle juice, mustard, garlic powder, celery seed, paprika, salt, and pepper. Stir the cauliflower, celery, onion, dill pickles, and diced egg in with the dressing. Garnish with hard-boiled eggs, additional paprika, or chives. Chill until ready to serve.

Change just an ingredient or two for a reimagined look at some old favorites.

Per serving: 152 calories, 105 grams fat (2 grams saturated fat), 12 grams total carbohydrates, 2.5 grams fiber, 4 grams protein.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   15


ORANGE MERINGUE PIE Prep: 20 minutes | Cook: 35 minutes | Chill: 3+ hours | Servings: 8 11/4 cups graham cracker crumbs 1/2 cup cornstarch (about 6 ounces) 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup sugar 11/2 cups orange juice 1/3 cup unsalted butter, melted 1/2 cup water 3 large egg yolks 2 tablespoons grated orange zest 1 cup sugar

2 tablespoons lime juice 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 3 large egg whites 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar 6 tablespoons sugar

To make crust, combine graham cracker crumbs, 1/4 cup sugar, and 1/3 cup melted butter in a medium bowl. Press into bottom and up the sides of a 9-inch pie plate. Bake at 375 F for 8 minutes or until lightly browned. Set aside to cool. For the filling, beat egg yolks in a medium bowl and set aside. In a saucepan, combine 1 cup sugar, cornstarch, and salt. Slowly whisk in orange juice and water until smooth. Cook and stir over medium heat until thickened and bubbly. Reduce heat, stirring 2 minutes longer. Take pan off heat and gradually stir 1 cup hot filling into the bowl with the beaten egg yolks. Return all to the pan, stirring constantly. Bring to a gentle boil, stirring 2 more minutes. Remove from heat; stir in lime juice, orange zest, and 1 tablespoon butter. Pour hot filling into pie crust. For the meringue, beat egg whites with a mixer until foamy. Add cream of tartar, then beat on medium speed until soft peaks form. Gradually beat in sugar 1 tablespoon at a time on high until stiff peaks form. (Test by turning the beater upside down. If the peak doesn’t wilt when returning beater to an upright position, then it’s ready.) Spread meringue evenly over hot filling, sealing edges all the way to the crust. Bake at 350 F for 12 to 15 minutes or until meringue begins to lightly brown. Cool on a wire rack for 1 hour before serving. Per serving: 425 calories, 15.5 grams fat (8 grams saturated fat), 70 grams total carbohydrates, 1 gram fiber, 4 grams protein.

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


WHITE RUSSIAN TIRAMISU Prep: 35 minutes | Cook: 10 minutes | Chill: 5+ hours | Servings: 9 6 egg yolks 1/3 cup coffee liqueur (such as Kahlua) 3/4 cup sugar 1/3 cup vodka 2/3 cup milk 7-ounce package ladyfingers 11/4 cups heavy cream (24 cookies) 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon unsweetened 1 pound mascarpone cheese cocoa powder 1/2 cup strong coffee, room temperature In a medium saucepan, whisk together egg yolks and sugar until well blended. Whisk in milk and cook over medium heat, whisking constantly until mixture reaches a boil, then for 1 more minute. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. Cover tightly and chill in refrigerator for 1 hour. In the meantime, remove mascarpone cheese from refrigerator and let it come to room temperature. With a mixer, beat heavy cream and vanilla extract until it resembles whipped cream. Make sure it’s not at all runny, but don’t overbeat or it’ll turn into butter. In a small bowl, combine coffee, coffee liqueur, and vodka. Remove egg yolk mixture from refrigerator and whisk in mascarpone until smooth. Arrange ladyfingers flat in the bottom of a 9 x 9-inch dish. Drizzle ladyfingers with coffee mixture. If liquid starts to collect in the bottom of the dish, drain some of the excess or your tiramisu won’t maintain its shape when cut. Spread half of the mascarpone mixture over ladyfingers, then half the whipped cream over that. Repeat layers and sprinkle top layer of whipped cream with cocoa. Cover and refrigerate 4 to 6 hours. Cut into 9 squares and serve cold. Per serving: 386 calories, 18 grams fat (10 grams saturated fat), 37 grams total carbohydrates, 0.5 grams fiber, 11 grams protein.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


PITA PIZZA Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 12 minutes | Servings: 4 1 cup light sour cream 16 Kalamata olives, cut in half 2 teaspoons minced garlic 1/4 cup sliced red onion 1/2 teaspoon salt 12 banana pepper rings 1/4 teaspoon pepper 4 ounces feta 4 large, thick pitas (not 1 medium tomato, pocket pitas) diced small 1 pound cooked gyro meat small cucumber (cut in half (lamb or grilled chicken) and sliced thin) In a small bowl, combine sour cream, garlic, salt, and pepper. Lay pitas flat on two cookie sheets. Spread a liberal amount of sour cream sauce on top of each pita. Evenly spread meat, olives, onion, and banana peppers and feta on top. Place in oven at 425 F for 7 to 12 minutes, until pita is toasted and cheese is lightly browned on top. Cut each pita into 4 triangles and top with tomatoes and cucumbers. This recipe is great for families — each individual can choose their own toppings. Pitas can be used to make Italian pita pizzas, Mexican pita pizzas, and Reuben pita pizzas. Per serving: 626 calories, 29 grams fat (15 grams saturated fat), 45 grams total carbohydrates, 3 grams fiber, 44 grams protein.

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES MESSAGE FROM THE GENERAL MANAGER

Four tips for winter safety

I

t’s no surprise that winter months bring increased potential for fire risks and electrical safety hazards. During the coldest months, consumers are using additional electrical devices and appliances, like space heaters, electric blankets, and portable generators.

The National Fire Protection Association estimates that 47,700 GENERAL MANAGER home fires occur each year in the U.S. due to electrical failure or malfunction. These fires result in 418 deaths, 1,570 injuries, and $1.4 billion in property damage annually. This winter, safeguard your loved ones and your home with these electrical safety tips from the Electrical Safety Foundation International.

GENERATOR SAFETY TIPS

Bill Swango

1. Don’t overload outlets. Overloaded outlets are a major cause of residential fires. Avoid using extension cords or multioutlet converters for appliance connections — they should be plugged directly into a wall outlet. If you’re relying heavily on extension cords in general, you may need additional outlets to address your needs. Contact a qualified electrician to inspect your home and add new outlets. 2. Never leave space heaters unattended. If you’re using a space heater, turn if off before leaving the room. Make sure heaters are placed at least 3 feet away from flammable items. Please note that space heaters take a toll on your energy bills. If you’re using them throughout your home, it may be time to upgrade your home heating system. 3. Inspect heating pads and electric blankets. These items cause nearly 500 fires every year. Electric blankets that are more than 10 years old create additional risks for a fire hazard. Inspect your electric blankets and heating pads — look for dark, charred, or frayed spots and make sure the electrical cord is not damaged. Do not place any items on top of a heating pad or electric blanket and never fold them when in use. 4. Use portable generators safely. Unfortunately, winter storms can cause prolonged power outages, which means many consumers will use portable generators to power their homes. Never connect a standby generator into your home’s electrical system. For portable generators, plug appliances directly into the outlet provided on the generator. Start the generator first, before you plug in appliances. Run it in a well-ventilated area outside your home. The carbon monoxide it generates is deadly, so keep it away from your garage, doors, windows, and vents.

N

ever connect a standby generator into your home’s electrical system. There are only two safe ways to connect a standby generator to your equipment:

Stationary generator: An approved generator transfer switch, which keeps your house circuits separate from the electric co-op, should be installed by a professional.

Portable generator: Plug appliances directly into the outlet provided on the generator. Set up and run your generator in a well-ventilated area outside the home. Make sure it’s out and away from your garage, doors, windows, and vents. The carbon monoxide generated is deadly. Use a heavy-duty extension cord to connect electric appliances to the outlet on the generator. Start the generator first, before connecting appliances. Source: SafeElectricity.org

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

This-n-That Have a plan Do you remember the ice storm in 2009? We lived in town, but our power was one of the first to go out because of a tree down somewhere. We toughed it out for a while, then decided to go to a motel. After we got showers, we settled in to watch TV with Pepper, our little Chihuahua, who is always shivering, even in the summer. Then about 7:00, guess what? The power went out. I figured that if I was going to be cold, I could do that at home, so we packed up and went home. We finally made the decision to go to our daughter’s house the next night. We ended up there a couple of days with six adults, four children, three dogs, and an African grey parrot who talks more than I do. My point is that if your power goes out and if you are like we were, with no backup heat such as a fireplace, wood stove, or a generator, you should have a plan to go somewhere until your power comes back on. If you choose to, or must, stay in your home, know the signs of hypothermia, which include shivering, drowsiness, mental confusion, and clumsiness. Keep an eye on family members, especially the elderly, for any of these symptoms and call or have someone to call 911 if you feel they are in danger.

Thank you to Adams crews “The crews that work for Adams Rural Electric don’t just clear rights-of-way or clean up from storms. They came to our residence a few months ago. Wind blew so hard that it blew a tree on the line and tore up the line and transformer. The linemen came out and cut the tree and changed the transformer. “We are so thankful for the men who do the hard work for all of us who are on Adams REC. Thank you, from Linda and Gaylen Richard.”

20  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2020

BY ALICE L. BAIRD

If your power goes out, first check your circuit breakers to make sure the problem is not within your home. Then, if possible, check to see if your neighbors’ power is also out. Then call the office at 937-544-2305 or 800283-1846 to report the outage. After business hours or on holidays, you may get the answering service, but they will contact the dispatcher at once to start the process of restoring your power. Remember to always call in your outages. Email and Facebook are not continuously monitored. If you post on Facebook or email your outage information, it could delay the restoration time. In the case of widespread outages, we work as quickly as possible to restore power to the greatest number of people first and work our way to the individual outages. Please be patient while we do our best to get to you. Each member is important to us, and we don’t want anyone to be cold or in the dark. 420002602

Reminder Keep in mind that the office will be closed on Presidents Day, Feb. 17. If you need information concerning the capital credits, scholarships, or any other questions or comments, please feel free to contact me at the office by phone at 937-544-2305 or email at aliceb@adamsrec.com.


ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Stopping scams for better service Consumers urged to help fight fraud

O

ur increasingly connected world is giving scammers more opportunities to prey on unsuspecting consumers, and local authorities, utilities, and other businesses are working overtime to keep people informed. Increased vigilance and reporting can help prevent you, your family, or your business from being victimized. “The Federal Trade Commission has been hearing about scammers impersonating utility companies in an effort to get your money,” says Lisa Lake, a federal consumer education specialist. “Your reports help us fight these scams.” Electric cooperatives are among the businesses and consumer organizations supporting Utilities United Against Scams (UUAS). The international consortium of electricity, natural gas, water and sewer providers, and trade and industry associations is sharing information on payment scams, identity theft, sales, and service schemes. Imposter scams are the most common type of fraud reported to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), according to UUAS officials. “Impersonators call homes and small businesses demanding payment for supposedly delinquent bills and threatening to terminate service.” The frequency of the incidents picks up during peak heating and cooling seasons, in part because consumers are most concerned when temperature extremes increase the urgency of maintaining utility service. Variations on the scam are also becoming more common. Rather than making an initial claim that a consumer owes an outstanding balance, some scammers are now claiming an overpayment is the reason for a telephone call to a consumer. They will make contact in an attempt to get banking information so they can process a refund.

“Never give banking information over the phone unless you place the call to a number you know is legitimate,” says Lake. There has also been an uptick in door-to-door scams by people claiming to represent utility providers like your electric co-op. Representatives knock or ring the doorbell and offer to replace or repair a meter or other device, or solicit personal information to sign a consumer up for programs that could reduce their energy bills. They may try to charge you for the phony service, sell you unnecessary products, collect personal information for use in identity theft, or simply gain entry to steal valuables, officials say. High-pressure demands are a common tactic in many of the schemes. Urging immediate decisions or actions, like immediate payment, particularly by a specific option like a gift card, wire transfer, cellphone, or third-party computer app, should raise serious concerns. Utility-connected scams are common, because utility services are so common. Lighting, heating, water, and sewage services are all essential to modern living, so any threat of service disconnections can provoke a lot of anxiety. Your first defense is personal awareness of your account status, including knowing whether balances are up to date. This is becoming more important as scammers use more automatic dialers or robocalls to phish for potential marks. “If the caller insists you have a past-due bill, that’s a big red flag,” says Lake. “Contact the utility company directly using the number on your paper bill or on the company’s website. Don’t call any number the caller gave you.”

FEBRUARY 2020 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  21


ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Average Prices for Residential Electricity 2018 figures, in cents per kWh U.S. Average: 12.9¢ per kWh Adams Rural Electric Cooperative will be closed Feb. 17, 2020 in observance of Presidents Day. In case of emergency, please call 937-544-2305 or 800-283-1846.

WA 9.8¢ OR 11¢

MT 11¢ ID 10.2¢

NV 11.9¢

UT 10.4¢

CA 18.8¢

AZ 12.8¢

Capital credits retirements Capital credits refunded to the estates of Adams Rural Electric Cooperative members for December 2019 totaled $12,166.92. Estates paid in 2019 to date total $212,217.70.

ND 10.3¢

WY 11.3¢ CO 12.2¢ NM 12.7¢

SD 11.6¢ NE 10.7¢ KS 13.4¢

OK 10.3¢ TX 11.2¢

CONTACT

937-544-2305 | 800-283-1846 www.adamsrec.com 4800 St. Rte. 125 P.O. Box 247 West Union, OH 45693 OFFICE HOURS

Mon.–Fri., 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

IA 12.2¢ MO 11.3¢ AR 9.8¢ LA 9.6¢

MI 15.5¢

PA 13.9¢ IN OH IL 12.8¢ 12.3¢ 12.6¢ WV VA KY 11.2¢ 11.7¢ 10.6¢ NC TN 11.1¢ 10.7¢ SC 12.4¢ GA AL MS 12.2¢ 11.5¢ 11.1¢

ME 16.8¢

NJ: 15.4¢ DE: 12.5¢ MD: 13.3¢ DC: 12.8¢

FL 11.5¢ HI 32.5¢

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Donald C. McCarty Sr. President

Charles L. Newman Vice President

Kenneth McCann Secretary

OFFICE

WI 14¢

AK 21.9¢

In case of the death of a member of Adams Rural Electric, contact Kacee Cox or Alice Baird at 937544-2305 or 800-283-1846.

ADAMS RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.

MN 13.1¢

VT: 18¢ NH: 19.7¢ MA: 21.6¢ RI: 20.6¢ NY CT: 21.2¢ 18.5¢

Stephen Huff Blanchard Campbell William Wylie M. Dale Grooms William Seaman John Wickerham

Residential Average Price (cents per kilowatt-hour) Over 12.5¢ Under 10¢ 10¢ to 12.5¢ Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration Numbers rounded to nearest tenth of a cent

Erika Ackley Jacob Alexander Alice Baird Jennifer Baughey Nathan Colvin Kacee Cox Joan Drummond Brett Fawns Joyce Grooms John Hayslip David Henry Steve Hoop

Randy Johnson Samuel Kimmerly Dave Kirker Rodney Little Dave McChesney Kristina Orr David Ralston Cody Rigdon Zachary Rowe Dewayne Sexton Mike Whitley

Bill Swango General Manager

PAY YOUR BILL AT 800-809-6352 HIDDEN NUMBER BILL CREDIT We provide three convenient ways to pay: online, by phone, or directly from your bank account. Failure to receive your bill in no way relieves you from paying it. If you don’t receive your bill, contact the office before the due date and we’ll issue another one.

22  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • FEBRUARY 2020

Pay at these collection stations: First State Bank — Georgetown, Hillsboro, Manchester, Peebles, Ripley, Seaman, West Union, and Winchester. National Bank of Adams County — 218 N. Market St., West Union.

Find your account number in the Adams REC local pages (the four center pages of this magazine), then call our office, and you will receive a $20 credit on your electric bill. You must call by the end of the month in which your account number appears. Your call affirms permission to publish your name as a winner in an upcoming issue of Ohio Cooperative Living.


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DRY STATE

Ohio played a huge part in “America’s noble experiment.” BY SARAH JAQUAY; PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE HISTORY CENTER & MUSEUM AT THE WESTERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY

“I

f [Howard Hyde Russell] could see what’s in his house now, he’d be spinning in his grave,” quips Nina Thomas, the lively and knowledgeable local history manager of the Westerville Public Library. She’s referring to the ironic fact that the former residence of the founder of the Anti-Saloon League (ASL or the League) is now a fraternity house near the campus of Otterbein University in charming Westerville, Ohio. This year marks the centennial of the Volstead Act, which enforced the ban on the “manufacture, sale, or

transportation of intoxicating liquors” pursuant to the 18th Amendment. On Jan. 16, 1920, Americans had to give up most of their spirits, wine, and beer, except for whiskey and brandy prescribed for medicinal purposes and sacramental wine used for “religious purposes.” Many Americans are aware of Prohibition’s unintended negative consequences: It turned ordinary citizens into criminals, created a sharp divide between observers and flouters, and gave rise to criminal syndicates that controlled every aspect of bootlegging, from its

To watch a video with more information on Ohio’s role in the Anti-Saloon League, visit www.youtube.com and search “Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives.”

24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


manufacture to pricing and distribution. Prohibition’s consequences, however, were more complex than that. The era (1920–1933) brought more freedom for women and led to more integrated entertainment venues and accessibility to jazz; plus, the dry movement led directly to the imposition of federal income taxes. Ohioans might be surprised to discover the crucial role the Buckeye State played in passing the 18th Amendment and the outsized influence the Ohio-based ASL exercised

in making the “dry movement” a national phenomenon. History buffs can head to the Westerville Public Library to view the informative exhibition, “Prohibition: Expectation vs. Reality,” currently on display in the building that was once the League’s headquarters. Although axe-wielding women smashing up saloons made better press, the ASL’s singular focus and application of “pressure politics” at every level of government is regarded as the primary reason the 18th Amendment was ratified.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


League’s de facto head once its goal became a constitutional amendment. A tireless advocate, he was the “dry boss” who controlled politicians and legislators at every level. When the federal government wouldn’t support a national ban because 40% of its revenues came from alcohol taxes, Wheeler played a prominent role in the passage of the 16th Amendment, instituting the federal income tax. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the exhibit is Prohibition’s long-lasting cultural effects: Women began organizing around other political issues, including suffrage; speakeasy owners started hiring African American musicians, thus opening some of the earliest integrated entertainment venues where audiences were first exposed to jazz; and even NASCAR racing can trace its origins to moonshiners, who designed faster cars to outrun the feds. The League and its leaders have been forgotten. But 100 years ago, they persuaded the nation to embark upon what was originally dubbed “America’s noble experiment.”

The dry movement began in the 1820s, before what many historians agree was the apogee of alcohol consumption. According to the exhibit, the average intake in the 1830s was a whopping 7 gallons per person per year (today, it’s about 2.34 gallons). Several factors contributed, including the lack of proper drinking water. The ill effects of so much alcohol consumption spawned a national temperance movement. The initiative, Thomas says, “took a break during the Civil War, but afterwards, many abolitionists joined the temperance movement. It was the new social movement to be part of.” Howard Hyde Russell was an attorney who attended the seminary at Oberlin College. Russell and other Oberlin temperance reformers formed the Ohio Anti-Saloon League in 1893. The Ohio ASL successfully lobbied the legislature to enact a “local option” allowing towns to vote themselves dry. Russell believed their methods could work on a national level. So Russell and other state delegates met in 1895 and created the American AntiSaloon League that eventually moved to Westerville. How did this relatively small group of Ohioans spread the dry movement nationally? The League printed voluminous literature, including newspapers, posters, and other mailings, and stayed constantly on-message. “They were single-issue focused,” Thomas says. “They had no official opinion on women’s suffrage or any other prominent issue of the day” because the League was only concerned with electing politicians who would vote against alcohol. Another secret weapon was Wayne Wheeler, an Oberlin graduate who worked as an ASL organizer while attending Western Reserve Law School. Wheeler became the

26   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020

“Prohibition: Expectation vs. Reality” on display at the Westerville Public Library, 110 S. State St., Westerville, through the end of 2020. Visit www.westervillelibrary.org for more information.


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HEALTHY LIVING

CHANGING course One woman’s journey to better health started from the inside out. BY LISA TEMPLETON RIGONI

W

hen I was younger, I was the girl who hated physical education, didn’t play sports, and ate a steady diet of junk food. Because I was young, I had no health concerns or weight issues. How things change. As I got older, I gained weight. I was tired all the time. Though I tried to make light of it — at 5 foot 2 and 174 pounds, I’d say things like, “I’m not overweight, I’m undertall” — I guess the joke was on me. Eventually, the scale tipped closer to 200 pounds than the 126 still on my driver’s license. My husband, Mike, a physical education teacher and a basketball coach at the time, was in a similar boat. When Mike and I met, he was active, playing softball, and later, he played men’s recreational basketball until his legs and ankles got the better of him. His weight had increased, and that led to surgeries on his knee and ankles. He was benched for a while and when he returned to the basketball court, he was overweight and run-down, often with barely enough energy to get through the day.

28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020

We ate fast food. Most of our meals came from a box, a bag, the freezer, or a drive-through. It was mostly processed food, full of sugar and fat, and it was easy and cheap. We loved it.

Ready for change I realized later that the big, bulky shirts and stretchy pants I wore didn’t just hide those extra pounds; I added layers to help cover my sadness, anger, resentment, food addiction, and more. Finally, my husband began seeing a new doctor, who had a fresh approach. The doctor asked him directly, “Are you leading by example?” referring to how he was living in front of his students and players — those he was teaching and coaching toward healthy lifestyles. That question clicked in his head, and his transformation began that night. He joined a gym and cleared our kitchen of junk food, replacing it with healthier, whole foods. We started eating at home — more salads, fruits


and vegetables, lean meat — and even when we ate fast food, Subway became his choice. There was no magic formula or pill. It was hard work, discipline, and an intentional new mindset.

growing. Insurance costs continue to rise, in general, but add obesity-related diseases to the mix — strokes, asthma, heart attacks, and other cardiovascular diseases, to name a few — and the cost increases even more.

Reality check

Change your mindset

That single question was his reality check. As hard as it was to swallow, so are the national statistics. The U.S. has one of the highest rates of obesity in the world. According to reports from the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 40% of adults (almost 94 million) and 18.5% (13.7 million) of children and adolescents in this country are obese.

It doesn’t have to be that way. Some months after Mike stepped up to make changes — but before I did — we were at dinner with my coworkers when someone asked him how much weight he had lost. I was busily chatting with someone else when I heard him respond, “About 50 pounds.” I spun around, shocked. “You’ve lost 50 pounds?” He just smiled. I knew he had made changes, but seeing him every day, I hadn’t truly noticed the physical results.

The CDC estimates if things don’t change by 2030, half of U.S. teenagers and a third of kids between 6 and 11 will be overweight or obese. Poor health also has a surprising effect on the economy. According to the CDC, an obese person in America incurs an average of $1,429 more in medical expenses every year than those who are not obese. More than $147 billion is spent on those added medical expenses annually within the U.S., and that number keeps

How did he do it? He changed the way he thought. He made better food choices and added exercise. Healthy starts from the inside out. It starts with small steps and changing your thought patterns. Start by writing down your health goals. Make them SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-based (e.g., I will lose 15 pounds by Easter, or exercise three to five days a week). I grudgingly started going to the gym with him, but only in a neighboring town so I wouldn’t run into people I knew. I was afraid I’d make a fool of myself.

Author Lisa Rigoni and her husband, Mike, underwent quite a physical transformation after both decided to do something about their fitness level. Lisa lost about 40 pounds and says she has kept it off since becoming a certified fitness trainer, while Mike lost more than 70 pounds.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   29


Staying fit as an adult can pay off for future generations when kids see the example their parents set by being active and eating healthy.

Are you ready to move forward? The best thing to do is just to start — start now — and remember to believe in yourself. If you think you can, you’re right. If you think you can’t, you’re right. Believe you can make a change, develop a plan, and go get it.  LISA TEMPLETON RIGONI is a certified fitness trainer who has a passion for fitness and life balance. She can be reached at lrigoni@ prwithpurpose.net or through her website — LisaTempletonRigoni.com.

I was sure I would fly off a treadmill, drop a dumbbell on my head, or do something worse. What we worry about or envision as obstacles often get in the way of what is possible.

Rewards for healthy living Soon, I began enjoying my workouts and made healthier food choices and created good habits. I lost more than 40 pounds and have kept it off. My energy levels climbed. My attitude shifted from negative to positive. Suddenly, I was an example of good physical health, and people at the gym started asking for my help.

30   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


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CHILI Cincy Style The southwest corner of Ohio’s unique brand of spicy stew has a long history. STORY AND PHOTOS BY JAMES PROFFITT

F

act is, no one remembers the day those foreigners invaded Cincinnati — they don’t teach it in the history books — but that influx of folks from Greece and the Macedonian region early in the 20th century has left its tasty marks on the region. Those marks take the form of a small army of chili parlors — but not just any chili parlors: They serve it “Cincinnati style.” There are more than 200 such shops in the region, and the star of the show at each is the soupy, spicy concoction that, despite the name, bears little resemblance to what most Americans consider chili. Further, it’s tough to guess what’s in the chilis because no one wants to talk recipes.

The original Steve Martin has operated Empress Chili in Alexandria, Kentucky, for 35 years. “Empress is the original,” he says. “It all started in 1922 with brothers Tom and Jeff Kiradjieff; they were Macedonians. Empress is the best.” Martin says a three-way with a cheese coney is the most popular order at his parlor. When asked if there are specific ingredients that set Empress’ chili apart, however,

32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020

Empress Chili was the original Cincinnati-style chili shop, first opened in 1922.

he’s mum. “There are,” he says slyly, “and I can’t tell you what they are because it’s a secret.” The Kiradjieffs began ladling their special meat sauce, originally made with lamb in the old country but with beef in America, in front of the Empress Theater (the marquee read: Empress Burlesk Pictures) in downtown Cincinnati — thus the name. Others followed, like Greek-born Nicholas Sarakatsannis, who founded Dixie Chili in 1929; Nicholas Lambrinides, another Greek, who founded Skyline Chili in 1949; and Jordanian-born Dave, Charlie, Frank, and Basheer Daoud, who founded Gold Star Chili in 1965. The list goes on. But for Martin, owning the first Greekrecipe parlor in Cincinnati means Empress has earned the title: the first edition of a Cincinnati tradition.


Maria Papakirk spends six days a week at Camp Washington Chili — and never stops moving. The parlor, below, is busy pretty much all day, every day (except Sunday), and has been since before it moved from its original location.

of some combination of onions, beans, and cheese. Rumors of cinnamon, cloves, and dark chocolate haunt conversations among folks who try making their own, but whatever’s inside, it definitely doesn’t resemble the hearty, thick chilis common across the rest of the nation. Cincinnati-area chili connoisseurs, of course, wouldn’t have it any other way. Maria Papakirk’s been operating Camp Washington Chili, another family-run single-location chili parlor, for more than 20 years, after taking over from her father. The former corporate attorney says making chili beats practicing law, hands down. Continued on page 35

“Once you get out of this area, some people don’t perceive it as a chili because they’re used to country-style chili, with beans and tomatoes in it, and different spices,” Martin says. “It’s just a matter of informing people that it’s a Greekstyle chili and not a country chili.”

The Cincinnati difference Cincinnati-style chili is unquestionably unlike its many cousins. The super-thin base is made with finely shredded ground beef, served over a bed of spaghetti, and topped with your choice

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   33


CINCINNATI-STYLE CHILI In 2000, Camp Washington won an “America’s Classics” award from the prestigious James Beard Foundation. The foundation lists the following recipe for Camp Washington Chili: 1 tablespoon hot chili powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 2 tablespoons olive oil

3 yellow onions, finely chopped (about 3 cups) 6 garlic cloves, minced (about 2 tablespoons) 1 tablespoon coarse salt, or more to taste 2 pounds lean ground beef Two 28-ounce cans crushed tomatoes 2 beef bouillon cubes, or 1/4 cup beef demi-glace

In a small bowl, stir together the chili powder, cumin, oregano, dry mustard, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, and nutmeg. Set aside. Heat the oil over medium heat in a large pot. Sauté the onions and garlic until soft, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the spice mixture and salt and stir until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the beef and stir thoroughly to combine. Continue stirring until the beef is lightly browned, 7 to 10 minutes. Add the tomatoes and bring the mixture to a gentle simmer. Add the bouillon cubes and stir. Simmer, covered, for 2 to 3 hours, until the chili is very thick and fragrant. Season with additional salt and spices if desired.

34   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


The Weirich family of Cincinnati digs in to a meal at Camp Washington, while Denny Ortlieb and a friend chow down at Empress Chili.

Continued from page 33

“It’s so much more fun than being stuck in an office and dealing with other people’s problems all day long,” she says. “I grew up around the business, and during high school, I was a cashier and would make orders.”

No slowing down Camp Washington is open 24 hours through the week, closing only on Sundays — “for a break,” Papakirk says. “Honestly, I think we’d go insane. It’s the one day my cellphone is quiet and I can sleep.” The current Camp Washington building is a modern, art deco affair that stands a couple hundred feet from where the original site opened in 1940. A city road project forced the move about 20 years ago, and while people still wax nostalgic about the “old” Camp Washington, they happily patronize the new one. In Cincinnati, it’s not about the building, location, or decor. It’s about the chili. Camp Washington’s No. 1 seller is the cheese coney. “For sure, all the way. We sell over a thousand a day,” Papakirk says. “With onions. Because that’s the way.” William Newton, a business analyst, actor, and frequent customer, stands at the counter waiting for his lunch order: some cheese coneys and a pint of chili with beans. “I’ve been eating here since the old building, when I was a kid,” he says. “My stepfather used to take me here when I was little because I always chose Camp Washington for lunch. So now here I am working just a block away. It’s like a dream come true.”

Cincinnati chili cheat sheet • Two-way: spaghetti topped with chili • Three-way: spaghetti topped with chili and cheese • Four-way: spaghetti topped with chili, onion, or beans, and cheese • Five-way: spaghetti topped with chili, onions, beans, and cheese • Don’t forget the little bowl of oyster crackers on the side! • Coney: bun, hot dog, chili, onions, and mustard • Cheese coney: bun, hot dog, chili, onions, mustard, and cheese • Chili sandwich: bun, chili, mustard, and onions • Chili cheese sandwich: bun, chili, mustard, onions, and cheese

JAMES PROFFITT is a freelance writer from Marblehead who refuses to share his own recipe for Cincinnati-style chili.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   35


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2020 CALENDAR

FEBRUARY/MARCH COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

NORTHWEST

FEB. 19 – Riverdance: 25th Anniversary Show, Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $40/$60/$75. 419-224-1552 or www.limaciviccenter.com. FEB. 22 – Shelby County Bicentennial Ball, Historic Court House, 100 E. Court St., Sidney, 8 p.m.–midnight. $75/person. Closing event for the Bicentennial. Glamorous evening with heavy hors d’oeuvres, live music, historical displays, and valet parking. 937-6586945 or www.sidneyalive.org. FEB. 28 – The Choir of Man, Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $24–$59. It’s a party. It’s a concert. It’s a pint-filled good time set in a working pub that combines hair-raising harmonies, high-energy dance, and live percussion with foot-stomping choreography. 419-224-1552 or www. limaciviccenter.com. NORTHEAST

NORTHEAST

THROUGH MAY 31 – “Tying the Knot: The History of Bridal Fashion,” McKinley Presidential Library and Museum, 800 McKinley Monument Dr. NW, Canton. Exhibit explores wedding fashions from the 1860s to the present day. Learn more about the history behind timeless wedding traditions such as the bouquet toss, wedding cakes, the engagement ring, the role of the best man, and more. 330-455-7043 or www. mckinleymuseum.org/events. FEB. 16 – Flea Market of Collectables, Medina County Fgds. Community Ctr., 735 Lafayette Rd. (St. Rte. 42), Medina, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $2. Early bird admission, 6–9 a.m., $3. A treasure trove of vintage items and collectables. 330-948-4300 or www.conraddowdell.com. FEB. 17 – Presidents’ Day Celebration, McKinley Museum, 800 McKinley Monument Dr. N., Canton, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Gallery tours at 11 and 1 p.m. Meet President McKinley at 12 and 2 p.m. Other activities scheduled throughout the day. 330-455-7043 or http:// mckinleymuseum.org. FEB. 21–MAR. 1 – Cleveland Auto Show, IX Center, One I-X Dr., Cleveland. $14, Srs./C. (7–12) $12, under 7 free. Indoor test drives, vehicle giveaway, classic car

FEB. 28 – Glass City Beer Festival, Stranahan Theater and Great Hall, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo, 7–11 p.m., VIP 6–7 p.m. $40–$60. Featuring over 40 craft breweries and more than 230 beers, new food vendors, and live music. The original and biggest beer festival in northwest Ohio. https://glasscitybeerfest.com. FEB. 29 – Burning Snowman Fest, Dock’s Beach House and Mr. Ed’s, 252 W. Lakeshore Dr. (St. Rte. 163), Port Clinton, 4–10 p.m. Say goodbye to winter with the burning of a giant snowman. Enjoy live entertainment and craft beers. All proceeds go to charity. See Facebook page for entertainment lineup and activities. 317-694-8566 or www.facebook.com/BurningSnowman. FEB. 29 – Glass City Wine Festival, SeaGate Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave., Toledo. Tasting sessions: 1–4 p.m., $27; 6–9 p.m., $32. VIP: 12–4 p.m., $37; 5–9 p.m., $42. Wine tasting, food, and shopping. 419-255-3300, www.eriepromotions.com, or www. toledo-seagate.com/events. MAR. 5 – Toledo Symphony Concert, Sauder Village, Founder’s Hall, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 7:30 p.m. Reservations required. 800-590-9755 or www. saudervillage.org. MAR. 6–8, 13–15 – Twelve Angry Jurors, Encore Theater, 991 N. Shore Dr., Lima, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Based on the Emmy Award–winning television movie. The life and death of one accused inner-city teen rests on the verdict of 12 sequestered jurors. It looks like

an open-and-shut case — until one of the jurors begins opening the others’ eyes to the facts. 419-223-8866 or www.amiltellers.org. MAR. 7–8 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima (2 miles east of Lima on St. Rte. 309), Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, free for members, under 18 free if accompanied by adult. Over 400 tables of modern and antique guns, edged weapons, and sportsmen equipment. 419-6470067 or www.tristategunshow.org. MAR. 8 – Lima Symphony: “A Pirate’s Life for Me,” Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $10–$35. A musical adventure featuring swashbuckling favorites that takes us on a mystical ocean-inspired journey. Conducted by Steven Jarvi. 419-224-1552 or www.limaciviccenter.com.

competition, and other features. See website for hours and schedule of events. www.clevelandautoshow.com. FEB. 22 – Brite Winter, West Bank of the Flats, 291 E. 222nd St., Cleveland, Sat. 3 p.m.–Sun. 1 a.m. Free; VIP packages available. Enjoy diverse musical acts, artwork, and fun outdoor activities. www.britewinter.com. FEB. 22 – Lake Erie Folk Fest, Shore Cultural Centre, 291 E. 222nd St., Euclid, 1–6 p.m. School program Fri. 10 a.m.; workshop for intermediate-level players Fri. 7–9 p.m. Free music workshops, community jams, dances, and performances on Saturday, followed by an evening concert ($15–$20). 216-289-8578, lakeeriefolkfest@ gmail.com, or www.lakeeriefolkfest.com. MAR. 1 – Olde Stark Antique Faire, Stark Co. Fgds., 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Explore the wide choice of antiques and vintage items offered by over 100 select dealers and collectors. 330-794-9100 or find us on Facebook. MAR. 7 – Train and Toy Show, hosted by KD Trains, Independence High School Fieldhouse, 6001 Selig Dr., Independence, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, under 12 free with paid adult. Free parking. New location with much more room! Model trains in all gauges and parts, vintage toys, new and old trains, operating layouts. Food and drink available. Contact Dennis Peffer: 216-642-0692 or kdtrains@att.net. MAR. 7–8 – Dave and Ed’s Super Auto Events ProFormance Swap Meet, Stark Co. Fgds., 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton, gates open at 8 a.m. both days. Single day $7, weekend pass $10, under 12 free. Ohio’s largest indoor/outdoor performance meet, featuring vendors selling circle track, drag, sprint, and street parts. 330477-8506 or www.autoevents.com. MAR. 7–8, 14–15 – Maple Syrup Festival, Malabar Farm State Park, 4050 Bromfield Rd., Lucas, 12–4 p.m.

Free, but donations appreciated. Experience our sugar camp with live historical demos, horse-drawn wagon rides, fiber art demos, walk-through tours, and food and maple products for sale. Bringing cash is recommended. 419-892-2784 or www.malabarfarm.org. MAR. 14–15 – Antlers and Anglers Sportsman’s Showcase, Ashland Co. Fgds., 2042 Claremont Ave., Ashland, Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Annual event celebrating the great outdoors, from hunting and fishing to hiking and water sports. www. armstrongonewire.com. MAR. 14–15 – Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Rocky River Memorial Hall, 21016 Hilliard Blvd., Rocky River, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Large show featuring artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Portion of proceeds benefits local nonprofit Wigs for Kids. www. avantgardeshows.com. MAR. 14–15 – Vintage Decoys and Wildlife Art Show and Sale, Holiday Inn, 15471 Royalton Rd., S​ trongsville, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 17 free. A venue for decoy collectors, competitive carvers, and wildlife/waterfowl artists. Exhibits, contests, auctions, and raffles; workshops and demos for all ages. 734-9342548, dwaneodcca@gmail.com, or www.odcca.net. MAR. 14–15, 21–22 – Maple Sugar Festival and Pancake Breakfast, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath. Breakfast served 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Adults $17, C. (3–12) $12, Members $5. After a hearty breakfast, head out into the Sugaring Camp to learn about tree tapping and the maple sugar process; see oxen demos; and view period arts and crafts demos such as glassblowing, blacksmithing, spinning, and weaving. www.wrhs.org/events.

MAR. 9 – Blue Man Group: Speechless Tour, Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. From $45. Featuring new and original compositions, acts, and instruments alongside iconic Blue Man Group moments. 419-224-1552 or www. limaciviccenter.com. MAR. 14 – Lima Irish Parade, downtown Lima, noon–1 p.m. Starts at Robb Avenue near St. Gerard School and travels south on Main Street to the Town Square. Get your green on and celebrate spring! To participate, call Kim Finn at 419-860-0072 or Kelly Stolly at 419-905-6652

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


2020 CALENDAR

FEBRUARY/MARCH Continued from page 37

CENTRAL

THROUGH MAR. 29 – “Chihuly: Celebrating Nature,” Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus, daily 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $12–$19, under 3 free. Exhibit featuring the Conservatory’s full collection of the bold and colorful glasswork of Dale Chihuly. 614-715-8000 or www.fpconservatory.org. FEB. 11, MAR. 10 – Inventors Network Meetings, Rev1 Ventures for Columbus, 1275 Kinnear Rd., Columbus, 7 p.m. Educational presentations and discussion about the invention process. Meetings held the 2nd Tuesday of each month. 614-470-0144 or www.inventorscolumbus.com. FEB. 16 – Fairfield County Antique Tractor Club Toy Show. Fairfield Co. Fgds., AAA Bldg., 157 E. Fair Ave., Lancaster, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Lunch served

SOUTHEAST

FEB. 15 – Great Backyard Bird Count, Burr Oak State Park, 10220 Burr Oak Lodge Rd., Glouster, 9:30 a.m.– noon. We’ll identify and count all the birds we see on a 1.5-mile hike. Data submitted helps scientists track changes in the abundance and distribution of birds, as well as birds’ migration patterns. Binoculars provided or bring your own. Meet at the nature center. 740-7673570 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/burroak. FEB. 20 – Cambridge Chamber of Commerce Annual Dinner, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge. 740-439-6688 or http:cambridgeohiochamber.com.

by local 4-H club. Contact Doug Shaw: 740-4072347, stractorlover@sbcglobal.net, or www. fairfieldcountytractorclub.net. FEB. 21–23 – Robin Hood and His Merry Men, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion. Adult $19, child $12, under 13 free. Robin Hood, with the help of his merry men, robs from the rich, gives to the poor, and saves the fair Maid Marian. Directed by Emily Yaksic and performed by a cast of local youth, this comic retelling is fun for the whole family. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. FEB. 22–23 – Scott Antique Market, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker and Celeste Bldgs., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free; $5 parking. 800 exhibit booths. info@scottantiquemarket.com or www. scottantiquemarkets.com. MAR. 1 – Coshocton Bridal Expo, Lake Park Pavilion, 23253 St. Rte. 83, Coshocton, 12–3 p.m. Make your wedding dreams come to life! More than 30 vendors, including caterers, decorators, DJs, and much more! 740-622-4877 or www.visitcoshocton.com. MAR. 6–8 – Midwest Sports Spectacular, Crowne Plaza Columbus, 33 E. Nationwide Blvd., Columbus. Sports collector cards, vintage and new collectibles,

memorabilia, and autograph signings. https:// ohiosportsgroup.com. MAR. 7 – Columbus Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Makoy Event Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Large show featuring artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Portion of proceeds benefits local nonprofit Hope Hollow. www.avantgardeshows.com. MAR. 13–15 – All American Columbus Pet Expo, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. 12–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Includes the Pet Expo, All About Cats Expo, Bunny Hop Races, Dock Diving, Mega Pet Adoption, and much more! www.columbuspetexpo.com. MAR. 14 – Maple Tapping Festival and Pancake Breakfast, Charles Alley Nature Park, 2805 Old Logan Rd. SE, Lancaster. Breakfast served 8–11 a.m. ($5); festival 8 a.m.–noon (free). www.ci.lancaster. oh.us/281/Maple-Tapping-Festival. MAR. 15 – New Albany Symphony Orchestra: “O-H-I-O,” McCoy Community Ctr. for the Arts, 100 W. Dublin-Granville Rd., New Albany, 3 p.m. The symphony will be joined by the New Albany Symphony Chorus and other special guests. The program features “Beautiful Ohio” and other songs that are part of our state’s history. www. newalbanysymphony.net.

FEB. 20– The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute, Peoples Bank Theatre, 222 Putnam St., Marietta, 8 p.m. From $39. The Emmy Award–winning group is elevated far above every other Beatles tribute band due to their precise attention to detail, with uncanny, note-for-note live renditions of Beatles classics. www. peoplesbanktheatre.com. FEB. 28–29, MAR. 1, 6–8 – Beauty and the Beast, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge, Fri./Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. The classic story of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is a really young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. Featuring local talent. 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com. MAR. 5 – The Oak Ridge Boys, Peoples Bank Theatre, 222 Putnam St., Marietta, 8 p.m. From $54. www.peoplesbanktheatre.com. MAR. 7 – Statehood Day Celebration, various locations, Chillicothe, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Celebrate Statehood Day in the first capital of Ohio. Includes tours, exhibits, and a mock debate on becoming a state. 800413-4118 or www.visitchillicotheohio.com/events. MAR. 10 – Miller’s Automotive-Racers Swap Meet, Ross Co. Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe,

9 a.m.–4 p.m. $7, under 14 free. From restoration to racing: race cars, tools, hot rods, apparel, collectibles, go-karts, and more. Call or text 740-7012511 (Brian) or 740-701-3447 (Nate). MAR. 13–15 – Home, Garden, and Business Expo, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge. 740-439-7009, www.cambridgeohiochamber.com, or www. pritchardlaughlin.com. MAR. 14 – Fiber Artisans Fair, Campus Martius Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Learn about weaving, knitting, quilting, and more. Have your questions answered by experts or hobbyists in the fiber arts, or share your own techniques and suggestions. Many artisans will offer items for sale. 740-373-3750 or www. campusmartiusmuseum.org. MAR. 14 – The Leprechaun Chase: St. Patrick’s Day Run, starts from Yoctangee Park, Chillicothe, 9:30 a.m. Two distances: 2-mile run/walk (1 loop) and 4-mile run/walk (2 loops). Proceeds support the Hope Clinic. https://runsignup.com/Race/OH/Chillicothe/ MuddyLeprechaun4MileRunWalk.

WEST VIRGINIA FEB. 16–21 – Quilter’s Retreat, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. Enjoy the peaceful atmosphere of the park while working on some long-put-off quilting projects. Spend your days quilting and your nights relaxing by the fire in the lodge lobby. 304-643-2931 or www. northbendsp.com. FEB. 21 – The Buddy Holly Story, Capitol Theatre, 1015 Main St., Wheeling, 7:30 p.m.

38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020

$30–$50. A musical tribute to the brief, shining career of musical comet Buddy Holly, who died tragically at the age of 23. 304-233-4470 or www. capitoltheatrewheeling.com/event/broadway-at-thecapitol-presents-buddy.


SOUTHWEST

FEB. 7, MAR. 6 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Butler County Bluegrass Association, Community Ctr., 5113 Huston Rd., Collinsville, 7–9 p.m. Lively bluegrass music with lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Food available on site. 513-410-3625 or www.fotmc.com. FEB. 12, 19, 26; MAR. 4, 11 – Bluegrass Wednesdays, Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave. Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Enjoy a fine dinner and an evening of lively bluegrass music by Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Reservations strongly recommended. 513-385-9309, vinokletwinery@fuse. net, or www.vinokletwines.com/post/2018/09/30/ bluegrass-wednesdays-spaghetti-meat-balls. FEB. 21–23 – Miami County Home and Garden Show, Hobart Arena, 255 Adams St., Troy, Fri. 2–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $6, under 13 free. www.hobartarena.com. FEB. 22–23 – 20th Century Cincinnati, Sharonville Convention Ctr., 11355 Chester Rd., Cincinnati, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Preview starts Saturday at 9 a.m. $8 adult admission good for both days. Vintage

art, furnishings, lighting, jewelry, and apparel from the art deco, midcentury modern, and op/ pop eras. Over 70 vendors. 513-738-7256 or www.20thcenturycincinnati.com. FEB 22–23, 27; MAR. 1 – Cincinnati Home and Garden Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati. See website for times and schedule of events. $11 online, $14 at door. www. cincinnatihomeandgardenshow.com. FEB. 24 – Monday Music Festival: McIntyre Bluegrass Trio, Centerville Library, 111 W. Spring Valley Pike, Centerville, 6:30–8 p.m. Enjoy an evening of lively banjo, fiddle, and guitar with Vernon and Kitty McIntyre and guest Robert Campbell. 937-433-8091. FEB. 29, MAR. 1 – Dayton Off-Road Expo, Roberts Centre, 123 Gano Rd., Wilmington, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Jeeps, monster trucks, and more! Fun for the whole family. 877-428-4748 or www.daytonoffroadexpo.com. MAR. 5 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Miami Downtown Hamilton, 221 High St., Hamilton, 7–8:30 p.m. Free. An evening of lively bluegrass music with lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Good food for sale on site before the show at True West Coffee Downtown. vaughnjh@gmail.com or https:// miamioh.edu/regionals/arts-culture/miami-hamiltondowntown/index.html. MAR. 7 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Sterling Bluegrass Jamboree, 26 E. Main St., Mt. Sterling, 5:30 p.m. $10. Lively bluegrass music with lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Music kicks off

at 5 p.m. with the house band, Sterling Bluegrass Band. Food available on site. 614-323-6938, sterlingbluegrassjamboree@gmail.com, or www. sterlingbluegrassjamboree.com/upcoming-events. MAR. 7–8, 14–15 – Maple Syrup Festival, Hueston Woods, 6301 Park Office Rd., College Corner, 12–4 p.m. Begin with a hay ride at the beach. Enjoy a hike through the “Big Woods” and learn the art of maple syrup production, as well as the cultural and natural history of the area. No dogs or other pets allowed on the tour. Food, beverages, and maple syrup will be on sale throughout the day. 513-523-6347 or http:// parks.ohiodnr.gov. MAR. 15 – Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Oasis Golf Club and Conference Ctr., 902 LovelandMiamiville Rd., Loveland, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Large show featuring artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Portion of proceeds benefits local nonprofit Sweet Cheeks Diaper Bank. www.avantgardeshows.com. PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.

FEBRUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE 1

Coming up roses! 2

1. My father grew his favorite rose variety, Double Delight, which are very fragrant and beautiful. Rachel Blevins Consolidated Cooperative member

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2. I took this picture of a Rose of Sharon after a slight rain. Kellie Cosgrave

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Consolidated Cooperative member

3. I planted two beautiful knockout rose bushes in memory of my mother. Gayle Seymour South Central Power Company member

4. I love photography and the beauty it can capture in the simplest of things. Jill Ann Ladrick South Central Power Company member

5

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5. Love these blooms! Janice Thomas South Central Power Company member

6. My granddaughter, Alizah, stopping to smell the roses on her bike ride. Katie Grubba South Central Power Company member

7. This beautiful salmon-colored rose was a gift to me on Mother’s Day. The gift that keeps on giving! Tonya Moran

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South Central Power Company member

Send us your picture! For May, send “It’s not easy being green” by Feb. 15; for June, send “I want to ride my bicycle” by March 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec. org/memberinteractive — and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in the photos.

40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  FEBRUARY 2020


Need

Energy

Advice? Contact your electric cooperative Have questions about: • Energy efficiency? • Renewable energy? • Energy resources needed to expand or start your business? We’re here to support all of your energy-related projects. After all, co-ops were built by consumers like you and still exist today for the sole purpose of serving our communities.

ohioec.org/energy


Profile for Ohio Cooperative Living

Ohio Cooperative Living - February 2020 - Adams  

Ohio Cooperative Living - February 2020 - Adams