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OHIO CITY NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN GUIDELINES STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING #2 JANUARY 23, 2019


TONIGHT’S CONVERSATIONS SCHEDULE UPDATE – LISTEN & ADAPT

PROCESS INTENTION – EDUCATE & EMPOWER COMMITTEES – CONNECT & DIRECT COMMUNITY OPEN HOUSE – MANY VOICES & THEMES AFFORDABILITY & DENSITY – COMPARE & DEFINE WORK SESSION – VALUE STATEMENT & WORKING DEFINITION

REPORT OUT – SHARE & COMMENT NEXT STEPS – COMMUNITY OPEN HOUSE #2 (1/30/2019)


FRANKLIN CIRCLE HISTORIC GUIDELINES NEW DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES

ZONING UPDATE RECOMMENDATIONS


OUTREACH STRATEGY RESIDENTS NEED CROSS-SECTION

• LONG-TIME • NEW • OWNERS • RENTERS

COMMUNITY MEETINGS

STEERING COMMITTEE STAKEHOLDERS • INSTITUTIONS: CMHA, CLEVELAND CLINIC, ST. IGNATIUS • BUSINESS OWNERS & OPERATORS: CROSS-SECTION OF COMMUNITY • DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY: BUILDERS, LANDLORDS, ETC.

FOCUS GROUP CONVERSATIONS

PRIMARY OUTREACH

CITY OF CLEVELAND • PLANNING COMMISSION • BOARD OF ZONING • ECONOMIC & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

FORMAL REVIEWS


OUR FIRST MEETING

PIVOT & SLOW DOWN


CITIZEN EMPOWERMENT The goal should be to get to the point of cocreation with the local neighborhood.

Citizen Control

Degrees of Citizen Power

Delegated Power Partnership Placation

Too often, the community is informed of its issues & needs, rather than being asked what those issues and needs are‌

Degrees of Tokenism

Consultation Informing Therapy

Degrees of Non-Participation

Manipulation 6


Value Stream: Planning Department Process 1.0 Understand Community Needs

2.0 Planning

3.0 Regulation

4.0 Advocacy

Key Activities

Key Activities

Key Activities

Key Activities

• Conduct research and analysis

• Engage community (inform & listen)

• Develop design concepts

• Ensure plans meet regulatory & design guidelines

• Conduct community education / outreach

• Consult with stakeholders (CDC’s, City departments, Council members, other organizations)

• Prepare / update plans (including Citywide Plan)

• Maintain & Update zoning codes • Designate Landmark status

• Advocate for plans & regulations • Facilitate implementation of plans and regulations 7


OVERALL PROJECT SCHEDULE

PLANNING

ENGAGEMENT

MILESTONES & ANTICIPATED COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MARCH

Kick Off Meeting

Steering Committee & Community Meeting (12/6)

Steering Committee & Community Meeting (1/31)

SubCommittees & Focus Groups

Steering Committee & Community Meeting (3/6)

S

S

Existing Guidelines Analysis

* *

Stakeholder Interviews & Research

S

*

Project Re-Focus & Process Adapt

Case Studies, Research, Process Review

S

*

Sub-Committee Report out, reviews, work sessions

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

Sub-Committees & Focus Groups, City of Cleveland

Steering Committee & Community Meeting (TBD)

SubCommittees & Focus Groups, City of Cleveland

Final Steering Committee & Community Meeting (TBD)

S Initial recommendations as directed by SubCommittees

Steering Committee Meeting Community Meeting / Presentation

*

Test ideas & Initial Recommendations

S Refine

*

Report Draft / Finalize


COMMITTEES 1. HISTORIC GUIDELINES OUTLINE, TOPICS, DESIGN REVIEW PROCESS 2. AFFORDABLE HOUSING FINALIZE DEFINITION, STRATEGIES, ETC. 3. TRANSPORTATION / MOBILITY CIRCULATION, PARKING, AMENITIES


COMMUNITY MEETING #1 SUMMARY & FEEDBACK

December 6, 2018 at Franklin Circle Church 118 Community Members in attendance


COMMUNITY PRIORITIES TOP NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTERISTICS

Neighborhood Diversity Shopping, Restaurants, Entertainment, etc. Neighborhood Character Sense of Community Affordable Housing Access to Public Transportation Safety Parks and Green Space Proximity to Downtown Well-rounded Neighborhood Mixture of Housing Types Proximity to Lake Historic Assets Supportive Services Ability to Age in Place Educational Options Highway Access


STATIONS 1 - 3

OHIO CITY STICKER BOARDS “I live in Ohio City because…” Walkability Ohio City’s central location People and Neighbors Sense of Community and social services Diversity Ohio City’s historic character

“My favorite place in Ohio City is…” West Side Market Carnegie West Library ‘My House’ Bop Stop Phoenix Coffee Edgewater Park

“When I brag about Ohio City, I talk about…” Walkability People and Neighbors Dining Sense of Community and social services Diversity West Side Market Ohio City’s central location


STATION 4

OBSERVATIONS

NEIGHBORHOOD OUTLOOK “What will keep you in Ohio City for 5 years?”

Housing Options

Neighborhood Character

Transit & Mobility

“What will keep you in Ohio City for 15 years?”

Retail & Dining

Neighborhood Character

Housing Options

“What will keep you in Ohio City for 30 years?” Neighborhood Character

Housing Options

Public Services

Central location Vibrant local businesses Caring and close-knit community Neighborhood’s historical and architectural character

Declining diversity Expensive dining & retail Safety of walking/ biking paths Rise in property taxes

Mixture of housing typologies Availability of affordable housing Parking for residents


AFFORDABLE HOUSING


DIVERSE ENVIRONMENT

MIXTURE OF PRICE

HOUSING OPTIONS


HOW IS AFFORDABILITY DEFINED AMONGST ORGANIZATIONS? HUD - U.S. DEPT. OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT “In general, housing for which the occupant(s) is paying no more than 30 percent of his/ her income for gross housing costs, including utilities. Please note that some jurisdictions may define affordable housing base on other, locally determined criteria, and that this definition is intended solely as an approximate guideline or general rule of thumb.” ULI - URBAN LAND INSTITUTE “Non-market-rate, i.e., subsidized housing available only to citizens meeting certain legally defined criteria – primarily associated with income. Because of the cost of capital plus the high costs of land and construction in many areas, housing prices are higher than lower-income individuals can afford to pay. Therefore, a public and/or private source must provide a subsidy to make housing affordable to this population.”

STRONG TOWNS.ORG Strong Towns differentiates between these two definitions of affordable housing by defining them as Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing and Subsidized Affordable Housing, respectively.


OHIO CITY HOUSING IN COMPARISON According to the 2016 US Census, Ohio City’s Median Income is $41,694 (Census Tract 1036.02). Utilizing the 30-percent-of-income standard, affordable housing in Ohio City would lie somewhere equal to or less than $12,500 for yearly gross housing costs (rent and utilities). MONTHLY HOUSING EXPENSES =

$1,042 $1,042

According to the 2016 US Census, Cleveland’s Median Income is $27,551. Utilizing the 30percent-of-income standard, affordable housing in Cleveland would lie somewhere equal to or less than $8,200 for yearly gross housing costs (rent and utilities). MONTHLY HOUSING EXPENSES =

$689 $689

According to the 2016 US Census, Cuyahoga County’s Median Income is $46,601. Utilizing the 30-percent-of-income standard, affordable housing in Cuyahoga County would lie somewhere equal to or less than $14,000 for yearly gross housing costs (rent and utilities). MONTHLY HOUSING EXPENSES =

$1,165 $1,165


WHAT IS AN APPROPRIATE WAY TO DEFINE AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR OHIO CITY? IS THE 30-PERCENT-OF-INCOME STANDARD AN APPROPRIATE GOAL?


DENSITY


WALKABILITY

TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

SHORT NORTH, COLUMBUS

SHADYSIDE, PITTSBURGH


CASE STUDY

SHADYSIDE, PITTSBURGH

Where boutiques, shops and galleries mingle with national retailers in a neighborhood of tree-lined streets, historic homes, hip events and delicious restaurants. This East End neighborhood includes beautifully restored Victorian mansions alongside modern homes and condos with three major corridors – Ellsworth Avenue, Walnut Street and S. Highland Avenue – and is conveniently located about six miles from Downtown.


CASE STUDY

SHADYSIDE, PITTSBURGH

Walnut Street A small commercial corridor comprised of both local businesses and national retailers. Development consists of adaptive reuse and historic renovation of existing buildings along street as well as small infill projects. The street is narrow and small scale but still maintains a consistent storefront, making it ideal for pedestrians and community events.

Ellsworth & S. Highland Avenues With larger streets and a more diverse environment, Ellsworth and S. Highland Avenues are home to small business, large retailers, corporate offices and residential development. The built environment is more varied along these corridors, with adaptive reuse and renovation projects living alongside infill development and new construction.

S. HIGHLAND AVE

S. HIGHLAND AVE

ELLSWORTH AVE

ELLSWORTH AVE


HOW IS DENSITY DEFINED AMONGST ORGANIZATIONS? HUD- U.S. DEPT. OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Density: “The average number of dwelling units or persons per gross acre of land, usually expressed in units per acre, excluding any area of a street bordering the outside perimeter of a development site.”

ULI- URBAN LAND INSTITUTE Density: “In real estate, building bigger or taller buildings on a given amount of land increases the project’s density. For example, if your block is 80,000 square feet, a one-story building covering only 20,000 square feet of ground is less dense that a one-story building covering all 80,000 square feet. Similarly, a one-story building covering 20,000 square feet is less dense that a ten-story building covering 20,000 square feet.” These definitions give us an understanding of objective density – a statistical indicator providing population, housing, employment figures, etc. for a given surface of land. This statistic does not help us understand an area’s perceived density – how an individual experiences density on a physical and psychological level. Measurements of objective density do not consider context and make it difficult to make a subjective statement about density – i.e. whether a given area has high density or low density.


PERCEIVED DENSITY IN OHIO CITY

MEDIUM DENSITY – MAIN AVENUES

HIGH DENSITY – MAJOR THOROUGHFARES

LOW DENSITY – RESIDENTIAL STREETS


WHAT IS AN APPROPRIATE WAY TO DEFINE DENSITY FOR OHIO CITY? WHERE AND HOW DO WE CONSIDER DENSITY AMONGST DIFFERENT AREAS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD?


ZONING


Easy to build under current code

Clark Ave Difficult to build under current code


The spectrum of built form Auto-centric

Contemporary Suburban

Walkable

Mid-Century Strip Centers

Contemporary Design Standard in Lakewood

Contemporary Design with Minimized Parking

Traditional Urban


Typical retail area under normal conditions Streetscape Improvements: Lighting, trees, awnings, and crosswalks

Build up instead of out

Higher Density, Mixed-Use, Pedestrian Friendly District: Promoting activity, employment, convenience, and a sense of safety

BUILDING ON STRENGTHS


GROUP DISCUSSIONS: DEFINE THE FOLLOWING FOR OHIO CITY TO BE SHARED AT THE NEXT COMMUNITY OPEN HOUSE :

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

DENSITY


THANK YOU

REPORT OUT: PLEASE SHARE YOUR GROUP’S VALUE STATEMENT PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN UP FOR COMMITTEES WHAT OTHER TOPICS WOULD YOU LIKE US TO COVER AT THE NEXT MEETING? (ZONING TERMS / PROCESS, ETC.?) NEXT PUBLIC MEETING: JANUARY 30TH URBAN COMMUNITY SCHOOL

Profile for Ohio City Incorporated

Neighborhood Vision Presentation  

Neighborhood Vision Presentation  

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