Valley's News Observer 9.29.22

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Rihanna to Headline Super Bowl LVI Halftime Show Page A3

CA Reparations Task Force LA Meeting’s Public Comments Get Heated

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Volume 37 Number 46

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Loved Ones Hope Public Can Help Locate Black and Missing Individuals By Stacy M. Brown NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent Daniel Robinson drove his 2017 Jeep Renegade west into the desert terrain on Tuesday, July 20, 2021, and no one has seen the Buckeye, Arizona, man since. Investigators discovered the car, described as blue-grey, about four miles from a worksite in a remote part of the desert where Robinson, 25, worked as a field geologist overseeing sites in the area. At 5’8 inches tall, Robinson is African American, weighs 150 pounds, and has short black hair. He has brown eyes. Police ask anyone with information to contact (623) 349-6400 or the Black and Missing Foundation at (877) 97-BAMFI. On September 21, 2022, Cayla Combs went missing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was last seen that morning near her residence in Marshall Shadeland. Her family described her as suicidal and possibly in possession of a firearm. They said Cayla drives a black 2018 Kia Sorento with Pennsylvania plate KZS4334. Combs, 27, is described as biracial with a light complexion. She stands 5’1 inches and has brown eyes and long black hair. Police ask anyone with information to call (412) 323-7141 or contact the Black and Missing Foundation. Tiffany Foster, 36, was last seen on March 1, 2021, at Lakeside Apartments in Newnan, Georgia. Her vehicle was located nearly an hour away in Fulton County with her personal belongings inside. Foster, who is Black, stands 5’2 inches and weighs about 220 pounds. She has hazel eyes and long black hair. Police ask anyone with information to call (770) 253-1502 or contact the Black and Missing Foundation. Family members said Robyn Austin might have suffered a mental health crisis when the 32-year-old Marine veteran disappeared on August 11, 2022, at the San Diego Veterans Center. Austin is described as biracial, stands 5’6 inches, weighs 135 pounds, and has brown eyes and medium-length brown hair. San Diego Police asked that anyone with information call (619) 531-2000 or contact the Black and Missing Foundation. Derrica and Natalie started the nonprofit Black and Missing Foundation in 2008 with a mission to bring awareness to missing persons of color and to provide vital resources and tools to missing person’s families and friends. As laid out in a 2021 HBO special, the foundation’s goal remains to educate the minority

Derrica and Natalie started the nonprofit Black and Missing Foundation in 2008 with a mission to bring awareness to missing persons of color and to provide vital resources and tools to missing person’s families and friends.

community on personal safety. At one point, statistics from the FBI and other sources noted that approximately 64,000 black women and girls were missing, despite that specific demographic accounting for a relatively small percentage of the U.S. population. Because of the efforts of the Wilson sisters, the Black and Missing Foundation has helped to find or bring closure to hundreds of cases involving missing persons of color. The Black and Missing Foundation also helps families immediately after they report a missing loved one. “Many times, the families don’t know how to file a police report, and often when they file the report, an officer

tells them that it could be a runaway situation or maybe drugs are involved,” Natalie Wilson said during an earlier interview. “We tell the families that they know their loved ones and know what’s not their behavior. So, we are there for the families to hold their hands or to listen.” Wilson said the foundation is a voice for the families, and everyone should have a role in bringing awareness to the plight of missing persons of color. “We have to help,” she said. For information about the Black and Missing Foundation or to donate, visit www.bamfi.org.

Get Early Start on Voter Registration

Secretary Weber is greeted by the president of the Jurupa Unified School District Melissa Ragole and Vice President of of the Riverside Unified School District Dr. Angelo Farooq.

Thursday, September 29, 2022

Man Pleads Guilty to Bringing Molotov Cocktails to Protest

SEATTLE (AP) – A Renton, Washington man has pleaded guilty to bringing 12 Molotov cocktails to a protest at the Seattle police union headquarters on Labor Day 2020. Justin Christopher Moore entered his plea to unlawful possession of destructive devices Thursday in U.S. District Court in Seattle, prosecutors said in a press release. He’s scheduled to be sentence on December 21, 2022. He faces up to 10 years in prison. According to the plea agreement, Moore made 12 gasoline devices and carried them to a protest march at the Seattle Police Officers Guild headquarters, prosecutors said. Police smelled gasoline and discovered the box in a parking lot. Investigators used video and information from other co-conspirators to confirm that Moore was the person carrying the box to the site, prosecutors said. A search of his home found “numerous items that are consistent with manufacturing explosive devices,’’ prosecutors said.

Lawsuit: Florida Discriminates Against Florida A&M

Cal Sec of State Weber Travels State Urging Youth to

Solomon O. Smith California Black Media As part of a broad civic education initiative, High School Voters Registration Week, California Secretary of State Shirley Nash Weber has been traveling across the state encouraging young people to register to vote. High School Voter Registration Week occurs

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in the last weeks of April and September and offers preregistration, mock voting trials, guidance for teachers and administrators, and other tools to help young people get an early start in voting. Advertising, speaking tours, and videos aimed at future voters are part of the arsenal Weber’s office is using to reach voters. At the legal voting age of 18, many young voters are in their first years of college or at the end of high school. Through volunteering and education, they are encouraged to participate in the process as early as possible. Last week, Weber spoke to students at John W. North High School in Riverside County as part of her statewide voting education tour. “California allows us to register students as early as 16, to preregister for voting,” said Weber. “We also allow those at 16 years old to work in the polls, so we want to encourage voting at every level.” On National Voting Registration Day, last Tuesday, Sept. 20, she was at Dodger stadium reaching out to citizens and encouraging them to register. The holiday was established by a non-partisan group in 2012, with the goal of increasing voter registration and recruiting volunteers to work at polling places. The National Association of Secretaries of State and the National Association of State Election Directors are among the organizations endorsing the holiday, according to their website. Weber is the first Black woman to hold the position of Secretary of State in California after being appointed by Gov. Gavin Newsom in 2020. She was sworn in on Jan. 29, 2021. Her office is responsible for more than accounting for the vote, preparing for elections and campaign filings. She is also responsible for business filings and the historical archives of the state. Weber is one of three Black women in the United States who are Secretaries of State. Tahesha Way of New Jersey and acting secretary of the commonwealth Leigh Chapman of Pennsylvania are the other two. All three are Democrats. Weber acknowledged the historic role of Black women in voting in an interview on NBC. “Black women in this country have always been sometimes ignored and yet counted on,” said Webber in an interview on NBC. “We’ve been a silent force for change. Everyone always knew you could count on the sister in the front row to get things done.” Weber has been an active proponent of protecting

voting rights and American democracy. On Sept. 28, she will be hosting a Voting Rights Town Hall at Sacramento State, where she will discuss the 1965 Voting Rights Act and how to further protect voting rights across the nation. Her advocacy for the vote comes from deeply rooted personal experiences. Growing up, she remembers that her grandparents and parents did not have right to vote during the era of Jim Crow in Arkansas. Her father moved the family to California where she received her PhD from the University of California Los Angeles by age 26. Weber was a four-term Assemblymember representing California’s 79th district and was the chair of the California Legislative Black Caucus in 2020. While Weber is pushing to include more voters in California, many places across the country have taken a different approach to voting rights. After the gutting of the 1969 Voting Rights Act in 2013, which no longer required some Southern states to seek federal approval of voting changes, many enacted new policies and laws that some deemed restrictive. The Brennan Center for Justice tracks some of the ongoing fights over voting rights and some of the methods used by states; closing polling places, requiring identification, gerrymandering, removing individuals from voter rolls and casting doubts on the legitimacy of the process, are a few of the complaints they follow. This year, 32 cases have been filed in fifteen states. Some of these legal complaints illustrate concerns that protections for the right to vote need to be strengthened. Campaign Legal Center v. Scott, No. 1:22-cv-00092 (W.D. Tex.), for example pointed to voting role purging enacted by then Texas Secretary of State John B. Scott. In the case, which Scott loss, the judge said it had “flawed results” which removed nearly 10, 000 voters from the rolls -- only 80 were ineligible. When visiting Southwestern College in South Bay, on Sept. 9, Weber spoke about the need to protect voting rights and the importance of inclusion and vigilance. She challenged students to find the “courage” to defend democracy with their votes. “We are helping people to understand that voting is power, that it is an equalizing power, and that every voter gets one vote,” said Weber. “I tell the students all the time do not give away your power … use your power to your best interest.”

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) – A group of Florida A&M University students sued the state’s university system Thursday claiming the historically Black university is underfunded and subject of discriminatory practices compared to other state institutions. The federal lawsuit filed in Tallahassee claims the state is violating the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by engaging “in a pattern and practice of intentional discrimination ... by maintaining a segregated system of higher education.’’ The lawsuit said the state takes years longer to complete infrastructure improvements at FAMU than at non-historically Black schools, duplicates programs at nearby Florida State University that discourage attendance at FAMU, doesn’t provide enough resources for student recruitment and retention and doesn’t do enough to recruit and retain a diverse faculty and staff. The state university system didn’t immediately respond to an email seeking comment from The Associated Press.

4th Defendant Pleads Guilty in White Supremacist Attack SEATTLE (AP) – A fourth defendant has pleaded guilty in federal court to a hate crime for beating a Black DJ unconscious at a bar in Washington state in 2018. Jason Stanley, of Boise, Idaho, entered the plea in U.S. District Court in Seattle on Wednesday. He is one of four men from across the Pacific Northwest prosecuted for punching and kicking the DJ at a bar in Lynnwood, north of Seattle, while yelling racist slurs. The defendants were members of white supremacist groups marking what they refer to as “Martyr’s Day,’’ an annual gathering honoring a white supremacist who died in a shootout with federal agents on nearby Whidbey Island in the 1980s. They went to a bar where they made Nazi salutes on the dance floor, started a confrontation with the DJ and beat him unconscious while yelling racial slurs. They also attacked two biracial people who tried to intervene on the DJ’s behalf. “Violent, hate-driven conduct that has no place in our society today,” Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division said in a news release. “The Department of Justice will continue to use every resource at its disposal to fight white supremacist violence.’’ Stanley, 46, also pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI when he initially claimed he wasn’t in the state at the time of the attack. Daniel Dorson, of Corvallis, Oregon; Randy Smith, of Eugene, Oregon; and Jason DeSimas, of Tacoma, Washington, previously pleaded guilty to hate crime and false-statement charges. None has yet been sentenced. The hate crime charge carries up to 10 years in prison. Stanley is due to be sentenced by Judge Richard Jones on Jan. 6.

Michelle Obama Plans 6 City Book Tour NEW YORK (AP) – Michelle Obama plans a sixcity tour this fall in support of her new book, “The Light We Carry: Overcoming in Uncertain Times,’’ beginning mid-November in Washington. D.C. and ending a month later in Los Angeles. Obama will open at the Warner Theatre in Washington on Nov. 15, the publication date for her book. She will then travel to Philadelphia’s The Met, Atlanta’s Fox Theatre, the Chicago Theatre and San Francisco’s Masonic, before closing at the YouTube Theater in Los Angeles. “Becoming’’ was a near-instant million seller and went on to sell more than 10 million copies worldwide, making it the most popular book in modern times written by a former White House resident. As with “Becoming,’’ Obama will speak at each city with guest moderators, to be announced later. Oprah Winfrey, Tracee Ellis Ross and Sarah Jessica Parker were among those who joined her for “Becoming.’’ In partnership with Live Nation, Obama will also set aside tickets at each venue for a select number of community members. Fans can begin registering from Wednesday through Sept. 26 through Ticketmaster’s Verified Fan Platform, https://verifiedfan.ticketmaster.com/michelleobama. Any unsold tickets will be available to the general public starting Sept. 30.


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The Valley’s News Observer

World & Nation

Thursday, September 29, 2022

Biden Student Debt Forgiveness Plan Begins, Not Ends States Must Increase Funding, Hold More Bad Actors Accountable By Charlene Crowell President Joe Biden’s recent student debt cancellation announcement elicited a diverse range of reactions– some congratulatory, others critical, and still others that seem unsure what to make of the unprecedented multi-billiondollar effort. Predictably, long-time education and civil rights advocates spoke to the need for additional reforms, while others wondered about cancellation’s impact on an already troubled economy. Families struggling with the rising cost of living and deepening student debt –have only a few months to make household budget adjustments before loan payments resume in January. The good news is that of the 43 million people affected by the executive action, 20 million borrowers will have all of their debt cancelled. Many of these borrowers incurred student loans but dropped out of school, left with thousands in debt and lower earnings due to the lack of a degree. Another 27 million people from working class backgrounds who received Pell grants are assured of up to $20,000 in debt relief. But these actions do not resolve the structural mismatch between the still-rising costs of college, limited family financial means to contribute to that cost, and the availability of financial aid other than interest-bearing loans. “We’ve all heard of those schools luring students with a promise of big paychecks when they graduate only to watch these students be ripped off and left with mountains of debt,” stated President Biden on August 24. “Well, last week, the Department of Education fired a college accreditor that allowed colleges like ITT and Corinthian to defraud borrowers…Our goal is to shine a light on the worst actors so students can avoid these debt traps.” It seems like a perfect time for the Department of Education to clean house of all the bad higher education actors -- especially costly for-profit institutions that promise a lot but deliver little, and accreditors that fail to do their jobs. On August 30, following President Biden’s announcement, the Department of Education took action against another defunct for-profit: Westwood College. This trade school lured unsuspecting students into costly debt from January 1, 2002 through November 17, 2015 when it stopped enrolling new borrowers in advance of its 2016 closure. The Department found widespread misrepresentations about the value of its credentials for attendees’ and graduates’ employment prospects. “Westwood College’s exploitation of students and abuse of federal financial aid place it in the same circle of infamy occupied by Corinthian Colleges and ITT

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Technical Institute,” said Under Secretary James Kvaal. “Westwood operated on a culture of false promises, lies, and manipulation in order to profit off student debt that burdened borrowers long after Westwood closed.” Now, 79,000 Westwood borrowers will benefit from $1.5 billion in debt cancellation, thanks to the Department. Changes to Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program rules will allow borrowers that would not otherwise qualify, to receive credit for past periods of repayment. Interested borrowers and their families can get more information on the program’s information page, but they must act by October 31. Details on the time-limited offer are available at:https://studentaid.gov/announcementsevents/pslf-limited-waiver. But individual states must do their part as well. Across the nation, state revenues are flush with surpluses. “I don’t think there’s been a time in history where states are better equipped to ride out a potential recession,” said Timothy Vermeer, senior state tax policy analyst at the Tax Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank. “A majority, if not all, of the rainy-day funds are in a really healthy position.” Additionally, and according to the 2021 edition of the annual State Higher Education Finance (SHEF) report, short-changing higher education funding at the state level will likely lead to worse, not better results. The report tracks enrollment trends, funding levels and distributions of state institutions. “Generous federal stimulus funding protected state revenues and directly supported higher education, reducing states’ need to cut funding during the pandemic and short economic recession,” states the report’s news release. “However, sharp declines in student enrollment and net tuition and fee revenue signal continued upheaval for public higher education revenues.” Federal stimulus funding during the pandemic boosted state education appropriations, but only 8.9 percent of state aid to public institutions in 2021 went toward providing student financial aid, according to SHEF. And without federal stimulus funds, state education appropriations would have declined by one percent in 2021 if full-time enrollment had held constant, according to the report. “States vary in their relative allocations to higher education,” states the report. “Public institutions in some states remain primarily publicly funded, but a growing proportion have become primarily reliant on student tuition and fee revenue over the last two decades.” The report notes that while federal stimulus and relief funds are helpful, they cannot be a replacement for longterm state investments, because stimulus funds are timelimited and often restricted in their use. If we want to end the student debt trap, now is the time for citizens to challenge states to use their tax revenue to do more for their own constituents. Charlene Crowell is a senior fellow with the Center for Responsible Lending. She can be reached at Charlene. crowell@responsiblelending.org.

Predictably, long-time education and civil rights advocates spoke to the need for additional reforms, while others wondered about cancellation’s impact on an already troubled economy.

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Only time can tell whether Queen Elizabeth ll’s son, King Charles III, will be able to successfully reconcile those issues as well. (Photo: Prince Phillip, Queen Mother, Cecilia Kadzamila, Queen Elizabeth, and Dr. Hastings Kamuzu Banda, prime minister and later president of Malawi.)

Death of Queen Elizabeth Ignites Debate on British Colonialism By Lauren Victoria Burke NNPA Newswire Contributor With the death of Queen Elizabeth II at 96, tributes and reflection have been broadcast and written on. Her length of time in the spotlight was a contributing factor. Queen Elizabeth’s time as the reigning monarch of England was 70 years and 214 days. It was the longest reign of any British monarch. Elizabeth had become a fixture in popular culture and a constant in the lives of many in Great Britain, whether in the background or as a much seen figure in the news. But with Elizabeth’s death came a discussion around the meaning of the monarchy and whether history can separate the individual from what they represent in the position they hold. Many viewed Queen Elizabeth as a grandmotherly figure who transcended politics and was a symbol of continuity in a rapidly changing world. But for individuals whose families endured hardships under British colonial rule the moments around the Queen’s death could not pass without critique. Some viewed Elizabeth as a sovereign ruling over all of the decisions made by England, even before 1952 when Elizabeth took the throne. “I heard the chief monarch of a thieving raping genocidal empire is finally dying. May her pain be excruciating,” wrote Professor Uju Anya on twitter as news

of the Queen’s death overtook the airways and social media. “If anyone expects me to express anything but disdain for the monarch who supervised a government that sponsored the genocide that massacred and displaced half my family and the consequences of which those alive today are still trying to overcome, you can keep wishing upon a star,” wrote Professor Anya added in a second message. Carnegie Mellon issued a relatively rare rebuke of a Professor from an institution they’re employed at. Even rarer: Twitter removed Anya’s first message from the platform. Many questioned the precedent for that and wondered what twitter rule was violated. “We do not condone the offensive and objectionable messages posted by Uju Anya today on her personal social media account. Free expression is core to the mission of higher education, however, the views she shared absolutely do not represent the values of the institution, nor the standards of discourse we seek to foster. Carnegie Mellon University, a private research university based in Pittsburgh. “Today, there is a great controversy for this statement for survivors of British colonial rule. Her university publicly chastised this statement. Benjamin Franklin refused to address British demands for compensation for American Tories recounting the atrocities of the British,” wrote economist William Spriggs on Sept. 8.

Though there was discussion on many networks, starting with Roland Martin’s BlackStar Network, by the middle of the week, many watching the ceremonies as Elizabeth’s coffin traveled from Scotland to London reviewed her seven decades in the public eye differently. “She meant different things to different people,” said royal correspondent Zain Asher, who is British Nigerian, on CNN during the ongoing coverage. “Today, I paid my respects and signed a book of condolence at the British Embassy in Mogadishu — in memory of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. During this time of grieving, I extend my deepest sympathies to His Majesty King Charles III and the Royal Family,” stated the Prime Minister of Somalia Hamza Abdi Barre. As the days passed after the Queen’s death there appeared to be a general consensus that respect, historic analysis and ceremony can go hand and hand. Several of the Black royal watchers in journalism, such as Zain Asher, blended commentary on the impact of British colonial history, Elizabeth’s specific cultural connections and the complex issues around why some revere the monarchy while others do not. Only time can tell whether Queen Elizabeth ll’s son, King Charles III, will be able to successfully reconcile those issues as well.


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Entertainment

Rihanna to Headline Super Bowl Halftime Show Stacy M. Brown NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent Rihanna, who refused to perform during the 2019 Super Bowl halftime show because of her stand with Colin Kaepernick, has decided to headline the big event in February. Jay-Z’s Roc Nation and Apple music made the announcement on September 25, and Rihanna took to Instagram displaying an NFL football, signaling her appearance. The highly anticipated performance takes place at State Farm Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, on Feb. 12. Rihanna also is expected to soon drop new music. “Rihanna is a generational talent, a woman of humble beginnings who has surpassed expectations at every turn,” Jay-Z said in a statement. “A person born on the small island of Barbados who became one of the most prominent artists ever. Self-made in business and entertainment.” For the Barbadian beauty and multi-talented songstress, music is far from all in her phenomenal

portfolio. In 2021, Rihanna achieved billionaire status. In 2022, Forbes acknowledged that she’s the youngest self-made billionaire in America. The 34-year-old, who recently gave birth to her first child, ranked 21st overall in the latest Forbes list of billionaires. Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty line counts among the most popular in the world, is the only billionaire under 40 on Forbes’ list. Earlier this year, reports noted that Rihanna’s Savage X Fenty lingerie planned an initial public offering valued at about $3 billion. The megastar owns 30 percent of Savage X Fenty and 50 percent of Fenty Beauty, reportedly generating $550 million in revenue in 2020. The nine-time Grammy Award winner has stated that she intends to increase her philanthropic efforts around the globe. “My money is not for me; it’s always the thought that I can help someone else,” she told the New York Times

in 2021. “The world can really make you believe that the wrong things are priority, and it makes you really miss the core of life, what it means to be alive.” In 2021, Forbes estimated Rihanna’s net worth at $1.7 billion, trailing only Oprah Winfrey as the world’s richest entertainer. “A lot of women felt there were no lines out there that catered to their skin tone. It was light, medium, mediumdark, dark,” Shannon Coyne, co-founder of consumer products consultancy Bluestock Advisors, told Forbes about Rihanna’s successful beauty products. “We all know that’s not reality. She was one of the first brands that came out and said, ‘I want to speak to all of those different people.’” Born Robyn Rihanna Fenty on February 20, 1988, in Saint Michael, Barbados, the tantalizing starlet delivered hit after hit with songs like “Umbrella,” “Rude Boy,” and “Diamonds.” With over 100 million social media followers, Rihanna’s fans have pleaded with their idol to deliver new music.

But with her Fenty and Savage X Fenty business whitehot, Rihanna appears to have settled in as an entrepreneur and business magnate. Cutting deals with Puma in 2014, Dior in 2016, Fenty Beauty in 2017, Savage X Fenty in 2018, and Fenty Skin in 2020, Rihanna kept her business focused. Forbes writer Madeline Berg described Rihanna’s rise this way: “When Robyn Fenty, known to the world as Rihanna, launched Fenty Beauty in 2017, she sought to create a cosmetics company that made “women everywhere (feel) included.” A perhaps unintended consequence: The beauty line has helped her enter one of the world’s most exclusive ranks: Billionaire.” Berge concluded by providing commentary from Coyne, the consultant. “She is creating a brand outside of herself. It’s not just about Rihanna. Even if you don’t like her music, she’s created a real style in the fashion and beauty space.”

Documentary Explores History of Aylum for Black Patients By MICHAEL MARTZ Richmond Times-Dispatch PETERSBURG, Va. (AP) – When the American Psychiatric Association celebrated its 175th anniversary three years ago in San Francisco, it featured photographs of two Virginia mental institutions that contributed to its birth _ what are now Eastern State and Western State hospitals. The exhibition also featured two Virginia psychiatrists who led what were then called lunatic asylums _ Dr. John Galt at Eastern in Williamsburg and Dr. Francis Stribling at Western in Staunton _ and co-founded the Association of Medical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane, the forerunner of the national association. Former Virginia Mental Health Commissioner King Davis, a featured speaker, was struck by the absence of another state mental institution, now known as Central State Hospital near Petersburg. The hospital was founded in Richmond in 1870 as the world's first mental institution for Black people in a state that had also established the first state mental hospital in the nation at Eastern in 1773. “They had no idea,'' said Davis, even though the association awarded him its coveted Benjamin Rush Award for his work to preserve and digitize more than 800,000 records and 36,000 photographs documenting a century of the hospital's past. “You have to ask the question, why Virginia?'' he said at a recent reception hosted by the American Psychiatric Association Foundation at its headquarters in Washington, D.C. During the reception, the foundation saluted the archives project by showing a new documentary film, “Central Lunatic Asylum for the Colored Insane'' and giving tours of an exhibition of documents from the archives that has been on display since early February. The film _ written, directed and produced by Virginia Commonwealth University professor Shawn Utsey _ was to be featured in the seventh annual Afrikana Film Festival.

Utsey, a professor of counseling psychology and chair of African American studies at VCU, began work on the documentary in 2019 as a study of a hospital founded on racial separation during federal Reconstruction after the Civil War and maintained as a segregated institution for Black people until 1968. “I ran into King Davis and discovered all the work he had done,'' he said. “It made my work a lot easier.'' Davis, now professor emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin and a resident of Hanover County, makes an emphatic case for the importance of Central State in American history, not just as a psychiatric institution but as a critical condition for Virginia's readmission to the union in January 1870. The month before, Maj. Gen. Edward Canby issued an order as military governor of Virginia that required the state to establish a “temporary lunatic asylum'' for Black people, both those freed before the war and those emancipated through the Union victory. Gov. Gilbert Walker, whom Canby had appointed, accepted the requirement and established the Central Lunatic Asylum for the Colored Insane at Howard's Grove, a former Confederate hospital just outside of Richmond in Henrico County that the Freedman's Bureau had run as a general hospital for Black people after the war. “Why did it happen in Virginia and not anywhere else? Virginia didn't have a choice,'' Davis said in an interview. The military order chose to require the establishment as a separate asylum for Black people at the recommendation of Stribling, who had strongly opposed allowing racial integration at Western, as Galt had done on a limited basis for freed Black people at Eastern since 1840. Galt had died in 1862, and Stribling became chairman of the Virginia Asylum Commission under the federal military government. “Part of what (Canby) sought was a balance between the interests of the white population and the interests and needs of the Black population,'' Davis said. Central operated at Howard's Grove as an asylum for

mentally ill Black people, including those transferred from Eastern, until the state opened a new hospital in 1885 on the former Mayfield Plantation outside of Petersburg in Dinwiddie County. The new hospital, renamed Central State in 1894, operated as the only mental institution for Black people in Virginia until the end of racial segregation after passage of the Civil Rights Act 70 years later. (Piedmont Geriatric Hospital, based at Burkeville in Nottoway County, originally operated as a tuberculosis sanitarium for Black people until it became a state hospital in 1967.) For most of its history, Central State labored with fewer financial resources and less support than other state institutions. “Somehow the facility was still characterized as `the Black hospital,''' said Olivia Garland, who became the first Black director of Central State in 1985 under Gov. Gerald Baliles. Garland, a former state prison warden and administrator, recalled how soon after she arrived, three Black employees “peeped'' at her from the doorway, afraid to enter the director's office without being summoned. “'We just wanted to see you're really who you are,' “ she recalled them saying. When Dr. Ronald Forbes arrived in 2001 as the state hospital's first Black medical director, he said some separation remained between the mostly Black staff and mostly white administration, housed in a building employees nicknamed “the White House.'' “I was kind of an ambassador between the wards and the White House,'' Forbes said during an online town hall held by the psychiatric association in February in conjunction with the exhibition. However, he said, the employees, most of them Black residents of Petersburg and the surrounding area, made the hospital “poor with resources but rich in caring.'' “It was the Petersburg community coming over the walls at Central State,'' said Forbes, who retired in 2017 and now serves as vice chairman of the Friends of Central

State, a nonprofit organization led by Davis. Utsey said the role of the employees he featured in the documentary _ including Florence Farley, a former Petersburg mayor and psychologist at the hospital who recently died _ was transformative in “how they turned a bad situation into the illumination of the humanity of the patients.'' Davis had first encountered the history of Central State after moving from Massachusetts to Virginia in 1972 to become state director of mental health for 40 programs across Virginia that became community services boards. He set out to document the history after receiving a call in 2008 from Charles Davis, then director at Central State, who was concerned that the institution's historical records were in jeopardy of being lost. “The records were in jeopardy in part because of deterioration,'' said King Davis, who served as state commissioner for behavioral health services from 1990 to 1994 under Gov. Doug Wilder, the first elected Black governor in the country. Davis arranged with Central State and the Library of Virginia to digitize them, using about $150,000 he had raised from benefactors, including the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors and the University of Texas, where he was a professor of public policy research. The dilemma now is how and where to preserve the physical records. The collection is too large for the Library of Virginia, which has its own collection of Central State records, spanning 1874 to 1961. There also won't be room at the new Central State hospital that is expected to open on the Dinwiddie campus in 2025. The new hospital will feature a Legacy Wall in the lobby of its administration building to honor the institution's history. Davis hopes to create a repository for the archives, potentially using one of the older hospital buildings scheduled to be demolished. “Having space at Central would be fantastic if we can pull it off,'' he said.


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PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO: 2022 192283 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SPACE ORGANIZING at 846 S. Broadway Apt. 1002, Los Angeles, Ca. 90014 County: Los Angeles Mailing: PO Box 17793, Los Angeles, Ca. 90014 REGISTERED OWNERS(S): VIANDA HILL, 846 S. Broadway Apt. 1002, Los Angeles, Ca. 90014 The business is conducted by: an Individual SIGNED: VIANDA HILL, Owner The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A This statement filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles County on: Aug 30, 2022 DEAN C. LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk By: C. MAFFITT Deputy NOTICE: IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2014, THE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY THE AFFIDAVIT OF IDENTITY FORM. This statement expires on Aug 30, 2027 LOS ANGELES BAY NEWS OBSERVER (E) PUB: Sep 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022 ������������������������������� FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO: 2022 196620 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: VALENTINO’S PIZZA ARLETA at 8717 Woodman Avenue, Unit A, Arleta, Ca. 91331 County: Los Angeles Mailing Same REGISTERED OWNERS(S): JACOB DIAB, 20181 Via Galileo, Porter Ranch, Ca. 91326 The business is conducted by: an Individual SIGNED: JACOB DIAB, Owner The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: 8/2022 This statement filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles County on: Sep 6, 2022 DEAN C. LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk By: A. SUAREZ Deputy NOTICE: IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2014, THE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY THE AFFIDAVIT OF IDENTITY FORM.

The Valley’s News Observer

Thursday, September 29, 2022

Legal Notices PUBLIC NOTICE This statement expires on Sep 6, 2027 LOS ANGELES BAY NEWS OBSERVER (E) PUB: Sep 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022 ������������������������������� FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO: 2022 196282 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ONE NIGHT ONLY / ONE NIGHT ONLY GRIP AND ELECTRIC / ONE NIGHT ONLY GRIP AND LIGHTING / ONE NIGHT ONLY GRIP AND ELECTRIC RENTALS / ONE NIGHT ONLY GRIP AND LIGHTING RENTALS / ONO GRIP AND ELECTRIC / THE WHITE BUFFALO / WHITE BUFFALO / THE LITTLE WHITE BUFFALO at 723 Myrtle Ave, Inglewood, Ca. 90301 County: Los Angeles Mailing Same REGISTERED OWNERS(S): DIEGO PATINO, 723 Myrtle Ave, Inglewood, Ca. 90301 The business is conducted by: an Individual SIGNED: DIEGO PATINO, Owner The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: 8/2022 This statement filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles County on: Sep 6, 2022 DEAN C. LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk By: A. GARCIA Deputy NOTICE: IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2014, THE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY THE AFFIDAVIT OF IDENTITY FORM. This statement expires on Sep 6, 2027 LOS ANGELES BAY NEWS OBSERVER (E) PUB: Sep 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022 ������������������������������� SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): 20CHLC28232 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): JONATHAN BASS, DEMANDADO) an individual; and Does 1-100, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): UHG I, LLC DEMANDANTE) NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days, Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

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may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien NOTE for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte. ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 9425 Penfield Ave Chatsworth, CA 91311 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Michael Raichelson/SBN 174607; Sarah Jane Reynolds/SBN 299510; Luis Duenas/SBN 271873; Martin Weingarten/SBN 201906 PERSOLVE LEGAL GROUP, LLP 9301 Corbin Ave Ste 1600 Northridge, CA 91324 Telephone: 818-534-3100 Fax: Date (Fecha): November 23, 2020 Sherri R. Carter Executive Officer

/ Clerk of Court (Secretario), by S. Marji, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served.

NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022

�������������������������������

20CHLC13266 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): Andre Goodman, an individual; and Does 1-100, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): Persolve Legal Group, LLP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days, Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien NOTE for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte. ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 9425 Penfield Ave Chatsworth, CA 91311 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Michael Raichelson/SBN 174607; Sarah Jane Reynolds/SBN 299510; Luis Duenas/SBN 271873; Martin Weingarten/SBN 201906 PERSOLVE LEGAL GROUP, LLP 9301 Corbin Ave Ste 1600 Northridge, CA 91324 Telephone: 818-534-3100 Fax: Date (Fecha): May 21, 2020 Sherri R. Carter Executive Officer / Clerk of Court (Secretario), by M. Morales, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served.

lows: Present name RUDIK YENGIBARYAN Filed a petition with this court Proposed name SAMUEL STAVROS THE COURT ORDERS: that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted if no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: Nov 10, 2022 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept: F49 Room: The address of the court is: Same as noted above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county The Valley’s News Observer Date: September 9, 2022 DAVID B. GELFOUND JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT SHERRI R. CARTER EXECUTIVE OFFICER/CLERK OF COURT Petitioner: Rudik Yengibaryan 9910 Mason Ave Chatsworth, Ca. 91311 Phone: (818) 281-5779 E-Mail Address: Rudik91203@gmail. com IN PRO PER The Valley’s News Observer (E) PUB: Sept 22, 29, Oct 6, 13, 2022

LOS ANGELES NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022 Order to Show Cause Hearing is set for 11/23/2022 at 8:30 A.M. in Department F43. LOS ANGELES NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022

������������������������������� SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): 20NWLC29788 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): Zheqi Dai, an individual; and Does 1-100, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): DNF Associates, LLC NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days, Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien NOTE for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte. ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 12720 Norwalk Blvd Norwalk, CA 90650 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Michael Raichelson/SBN 174607; Sarah Jane Reynolds/SBN 299510; Luis Duenas/SBN 271873; Martin Weingarten/SBN 201906 PERSOLVE LEGAL GROUP, LLP 9301 Corbin Ave Ste 1600 Northridge, CA 91324 Telephone: 818-534-3100 Fax: Date (Fecha): November 23, 2020 Sherri R. Carter Executive Officer / Clerk of Court (Secretario), by E. Armenta, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served. LOS ANGELES

Order to Show Cause Hearing is set for 10/10/2022 at 8:30 A.M. in Department A. LOS ANGELES NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022

������������������������������� SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): 21VECV01649 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): Zhirayr Barsamyan, an individual; and Does 1-100, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): Persolve Legal Group, LLP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days, Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien NOTE for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte. ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 6230 Sylmar Ave Van Nuys, CA 91401 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Teresa Straley/SBN 248299; Chris Stefan/SBN 257516; Luis Duenas/ SBN 271873 PERSOLVE LEGAL GROUP, LLP 9301 Corbin Ave Ste 1600 Northridge, CA 91324 Telephone: 818-534-3100 Fax: Date (Fecha): December 1, 2021 Sherri R. Carter Executive Officer / Clerk of Court (Secretario), by A. Salcedo, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: SERVED: You are served. LOS ANGELES NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022

Order to Show Cause Hearing is set for 10/4/2022 at 8:30 A.M. in Department T. LOS ANGELES NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022

SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): 20NWLC31366 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): Jong Kim, an individual; and Does 1-100, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): Persolve Legal Group, LLP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days, Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien NOTE for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte. ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 12720 Norwalk Blvd Norwalk, CA 90650 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Michael Raichelson/SBN 174607; Sarah Jane Reynolds/SBN 299510; Luis Duenas/SBN 271873; Martin Weingarten/SBN 201906 PERSOLVE LEGAL GROUP, LLP 9301 Corbin Ave Ste 1600 Northridge, CA 91324 Telephone: 818-534-3100 Fax: Date (Fecha): December 7, 2020 Sherri R. Carter Executive Officer / Clerk of Court (Secretario), by J. Mascarenhas, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: SERVED: You are served. LOS ANGELES NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022 Order to Show Cause Hearing is set for 12/7/2022 at 8:30 A.M. in Department A. LOS ANGELES NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022

������������������������������� SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso):

Order to Show Cause Hearing is set for 10/31/2022 at 8:30 A.M. in Department F43. LOS ANGELES NEWS OBSERVER (PLG) PUB: Sept 15, 22, 29, Oct 6, 2022

������������������������������� ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER 22CHCP00317 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA-LOS ANGELES 9425 Penfield Ave Chatsworth, Ca. 91311 Branch Name: Chatsworth Courthouse PETITION OF: RUDIK YENGIBARYAN TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: RUDIK YENGIBARYAN for a decree changing names as fol-

������������������������������� ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER 22VECP00511 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA-LOS ANGELES 6230 Sylmar Ave Van Nuys, Ca. 91401 Branch Name: Van Nuys Courthouse East PETITION OF: SARKIS SARKISYAN TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: SARKIS SARKISYAN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name SARKIS SARKISYAN Filed a petition with this court Proposed name SAMUEL SHAW THE COURT ORDERS: that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted if no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: Nov 4, 2022 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept: NWA Room: 510 The address of the court is: Same as noted above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county The Valley’s News Observer Date: September 19, 2022 VIRGINIA KEENY JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT Petitioner: Sarkis Sarkisyan 7011 Liberty Dr. Van Nuys, Ca. 91405 Phone: (818) 302-2222 E-Mail Address: Sarkissarkisyan@ yahoo.com IN PRO PER The Valley’s News Observer (E) PUB: Sept 29, Oct 6, 13, 20, 2022 ������������������������������� FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO: 2022 202470 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: D1D2 PRODUCTIONS / NO DICE YES DICE ENTERTAINMENT at 3438 W 43rd Ste 80, Los Angeles, Ca. 90008 County: Los Angeles Mailing Same REGISTERED OWNERS(S): DIRON D. THOMAS, 3438 W 43rd Ste 80, Los Angeles, Ca. 90008 The business is conducted by: an Individual SIGNED: DIRON D. THOMAS, Owner The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: 9/2022 This statement filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles County on: Sep 14, 2022 DEAN C. LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk By: A. GARCIA Deputy NOTICE: IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUBDIVISION (a) OF SECTION 17920, A FICTITIOUS NAME STATEMENT GENERALLY EXPIRES AT THE END OF FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE ON WHICH IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY CLERK EXCEPT, AS PROVIDED IN SUBDIVISION (b) OF SECTION 17920, WHERE IT EXPIRES 40 DAYS AFTER ANY CHANGE IN THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 17913 OTHER THAN A CHANGE IN THE RESIDENCE ADDRESS OF A REGISTERED OWNER. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION. EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2014, THE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY THE AFFIDAVIT OF IDENTITY FORM. This statement expires on Sep 14, 2027 LOS ANGELES BAY NEWS OBSERVER (E) PUB: Sep 29, Oct 6, 13, 20, 2022 �������������������������������


Thursday, September 29, 2022

The Valley’s News Observer A5

Features

Prop 30 Debate Splits CA Democratic Party Edward Henderson California Black Media The debate surrounding Proposition (Prop) 30 is causing division between the California Democratic Party and Gov. Gavin Newsom. Prop 30 calls for a 1.75% raise on income taxes for people earning over $2 million annually. It is projected that the tax could generate around $5 billion annually. A majority of the funds would go towards programs helping people buy electric cars and install charging stations. Twenty percent of funds would go towards CalFire staffing and wildfire prevention/response programs. Newsom is arguing that Prop 30 would disproportionately benefit one company, Lyft Inc. He is featured in a new television ad to spearhead efforts promoting a NO vote. “Prop 30 is being advertised as a climate initiative,” Newsom says in the ad. “But in reality, it was devised by a single corporation to funnel state income taxes to benefit their company. Put simply, Prop 30 is a Trojan horse that puts corporate welfare above the fiscal welfare of our entire state.” Lyft has given more than $15 million to support the measure, including funding for signature-gathering to get it on the ballot. It plans to exclusively use electric vehicles by 2030. This declaration follows California’s efforts to rein in the emissions of transportation companies like Lyft and Uber. The California Air Resources Board adopted a rule last year that would require those companies to cut 90% of their emissions by 2030. The Governor along with the “NO” camp believe that Lyft is trying to use Prop 30 funding to help lower their costs as they transition to employing only electric-powered vehicles. The California Clean Air Coalition, which has been running the political campaign in support of Prop. 30, responded to Newsom’s ad with the following statement: “Prop 30 is supported by the American Lung Association, California state firefighters, and California Democratic Party because it will prevent catastrophic wildfires and reduce the tailpipe emissions polluting our air and threatening the health of our families. It is disappointing that the Governor would side with the California Republican Party and a handful of San Francisco billionaires who would rather kids breathe toxic, polluted air than pay their fair share.” Assemblymember Tina McKinnor (D–Inglewood), member of the California Black Legislative Caucus (CBLC), is supporting Prop 30. She cites air quality as the number one concern prompting her decision. “I know how this air quality affects my district. On a

More Democratic leaders are coming out to support Prop 30, while Gov. Gavin Newsom is campaigning against it. (NBC Bay Area)

personal note, I raised my children in Lawndale, and we were right off the 405 freeway. My sons grew up with really bad nosebleeds. Both of them had asthma … I know we need cleaner air … Back in the day it was good to buy a

house off the freeway but now not so much. We’ve since learned how it pollutes the air and how bad it is for people who live out there … We got to think about our kids, and their quality of life in the future. We can’t have children

living in that kind of pollution.” On Nov. 8, California voters will decide the ultimate fate of Prop 30.

Black Youth Mental Health: Will Our Kids Be Alright?

Rhea Boyd and Jade Davis Special to California Black Media Partners We are living in unusual and challenging times, when despair and despondency have replaced hope as a more common, and perhaps as the more acceptable lens, through which too many of us view the future. In the wake of widespread disease, mass loss, economic instability, climate breakdown, police violence, erosion of bodily autonomy for women and girls, violence towards transgender and non-binary communities, and an actual insurrection, no wonder many have lost hope. Our kids are no exception. Nationally, there has been a concerning rise in reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness among teens. Suicidal thoughts and attempts are up. And hospitalizations for mental health crises for children and youth are at an all-time high. These trends pre-date the pandemic and have only worsened over recent years. In this, California is no exception. In 2019, almost 1 in 3 adolescents experienced serious psychological distress. Suicide rates remain worrisomely high. And California ranks 43rd in the nation for providing screenings that could identify children and youth who are suffering and in need of support. By a number of measures, Black children and youth in California are particularly in need of the types of support that unfortunately, few are finding. Black children in California are most likely to report serious emotional But these problems, that now burden our children, are not entirely new. Their current needs expose past oppressions, unvanquished by time. Just as their new struggles reveal older foes, unchallenged by the status quo. And so, the work to address the mounting mental health challenges our children now face - and Black children are too often left to face without adequate support - must begin with confronting systems of oppression and challenging the status quo. Thankfully, the model we, as a state, must follow from those most impacted, particularly Black communities, who have long imagined and worked to realize, a loving path to mental, physical and emotional well-being. These folks, including Black children and youth, are building on the rich legacy of social activism, mutual aid, and intergenerational bonds in communities of color, that can and should be brought to bear as California considers how best to support young people’s mental health and wellbeing. For example, the thoughts and dreams of young Black people, should be used to guide the apportionment of Gov. Newsom’s recent multi-billion dollar investment in youth behavioral health. The promise of these investments, alongside some major changes in Medicaid policy, have created an enormous opportunity to shift how the state shows up for our kids and how our kids can show up for each other. Placing billion-dollar investments in Bay Area institutions like Ryse’s Community

If California were to take seriously the aspirations of young Black people in reshaping our state’s behavioral health programs, it might also lead to the uplifting of the students and parents of color who have called for Police Free Schools in Oakland and Los Angeles. The racial inequities in exposure to policing, judicial scrutiny, and incarceration for children of color are enormous in California and contribute to and compound the barriers to learning and mental health in under-resourced schools. Finally, to address the state’s crisis of children’s mental health, it is important that caregivers and youth be positioned to intervene on behalf of their family or friends who are struggling. That positioning might include an expansion of Guaranteed In short, the possibilities to respond to the crisis affecting our children’s social and emotional wellbeing are only limited by the confines of our collective imagination. And there are those among us, particularly in the Black community, who have been busy imagining, for generations. If, we, as a state, collectively, choose to turn to those folks, especially our kids of color who are disproportionately impacted, and work alongside them to create a new future together, our kids will be more than alright. They can thrive. About the Authors Rhea Boyd, MD, MPH is a pediatrician, public health advocate and Director of Equity and Justice for the California Children’s Trust. Jade Davis is an administrative assistant for the California Coalition for Youth (CCY) and a member of the California Children’s Trust’s Youth Advisory Board. She is currently attending Grand Canyon University to get her master’s in Business Administration.


A6

The Valley’s News Observer

Features

Thursday, September 29, 2022

All nine Task Force members were present on the first day of the two-day meeting. Sept. 23, 2022. (Antonio Ray Harvey/CBM Photo)

CA Reparations Task Force LA Meeting’s Public Comments Get Heated

Antonio Ray Harvey California Black Media LOS ANGELES - The nine member California Task Force to Study and Develop Reparations Proposals for African Americans convened in Los Angeles at the California Science Center for its tenth meeting on Sept. 23 and Sept. 24. The meeting opened with comments from the public with speakers passionately delivering their views on what reparations should look like. Many focused their comments and opinions on who should and should not receive reparations. The opposing views created tension among those in the audience on an issue that the task force resolved months ago. “I think it’s a good thing. We have a lot of passion in our community and reparations speak to the core of what makes Black Americans. I wouldn’t expect any less,” said Chad Brown, a member of the National Assembly of American Slavery Descendants (NAASDLA) and Coalition of a Just and Equitable California (CJEC). “This is the process. I expect a lot of passion. It’s passion directed at finding solutions,” Brown told California Black

Advocates of reparations debate the issue of eligibility outside of the Wallis Annenberg Building in Los Angeles while the Caformina Task Force For Reparations holds a meeting inside. Sept. 24, 202. (Antonio Ray Harvey/CBM Photo)

Cheryce Cryer provides her thoughts about reparations and shares issues she had trying to access a community listening session run by one of the anchor organizations. Kevin Cosney. Sept. 24, 2022. (Antonio Ray Harvey/CBM Photo)

Media.” The temperature in the room rose when Kevin Cosney, associate director of the California Black Power Network (CBPN), addressed the task force members and said that a majority of the members made a “problematic” decision in excluding people such as Africans enslaved in the Caribbean, Native Americans, and persons from the continent of Africa. “We encourage this task force to be transparent, bold, gracious, expansive, and unified in its work of diverse opinions,” Cosney told the task force. “The fact that you prematurely rushed on eligibility is problematic and disrespects the community’s voice. We would like you to reconsider and take this into account.” Cosney’s CBPN and Brown’s CJEC are two of seven “anchor organizations,” selected across the state to host “community listening sessions” in conjunction with the task force. The nonprofit California Black Power Network describes itself as a “growing, united ecosystem of Black empowering grassroots organizations” collaboration to

change the lived conditions of Black Californians “by dismantling systemic and anti-Black racism.” CJEC is a state-wide coalition of organizations, associations, and community members united for reparations for the descendants of enslaved Black American men and women. California Secretary of State Shirley Weber who authored the task force legislation, Assembly Bill (AB) 3121 in 2020 while serving in the Assembly – has taken the position that compensation should be limited to African Americans who are descendants of Africans enslaved in the United States. “Reparations are designed to repair and heal the damages done to Africans for 400 years who (suffered) through Jim Crow (laws),” Weber said last January. “Reparations are for those who are descendants of slavery. Their ties are permanently severed from their homeland and their ability to return to Africa is almost impossible. We are truly Americans.” Last March the task force voted 5-4 that lineage will determine who will be eligible for reparations over race. Task Force chairperson Kamilah Moore, vicechair Amos Brown, pastor of Third Baptist Church in San Francisco, and president of his local NAACP branch; University of California-Berkeley professor Jovan Scott Lewis; San Diego City Councilwoman Monica Montgomery-Steppe, and Sen. Steven Bradford (D-Gardena) voted in approval of lineage. Eligibility is determined by an individual being African American, “the descendant of a (person enslaved as chattel) or the descendant of a free-Black person living in the United States prior to the end of the 19th century,” Moore said. Attorney Don Tamaki, Assemblymember Reggie Jones-Sawyer (D-Los Angeles), Los Angeles-based attorney Lisa Holder, and Loyola-Marymount professor Cheryl Grills, voted in favor of race. AB 3121 established the task force with a “special consideration” of those who are descendants of persons enslaved in the United States. Starting with the Atlantic Slave Trade, chattel slavery was sanctioned in the U.S. from 1619 to 1865. “We agree that there should be special consideration for those that trace their lineage back to Slavery,” Cosney said. “But we also know and understand that the system

California Task Force For Reparations members Dr. Jovan Scott Lewis, left, and San Diego City Councilwoman Monica Montgomery-Steppe, right, listen to public comment at California Science Center in Los Angeles. Sept. 23, 2022. (Antonio Ray Harvey/CBM Photo)

of white supremacy affects everyone who is Black on this planet and in this country.” Members from CJEC and CBPN moved their heated discussion outside of the facility after making their comments. But, the conversations cooled off with smiles and gestures of mutual respect for opinions. Brown said the eligibility issue is settled but he is not at odds with debating the merits of the decision the task force made who oppose it. He “stands on” the fact that Black families were impacted by slavery and “those families, descendants, are owed reparations.” “Reparations are not something that is a cure. It is not something meant to change the minds of people,” Brown said. “Reparations are meant to repair a special community that has been impacted by slavery, Jim Crow, convict leasing, mass incarcerations, and the throughline of slave ships and chains.” The next Task Force in-person meeting is scheduled for Oakland in December 2022 followed by San Diego in January 2023 and Sacramento in February 2023.

A New Kind of Hope Lives Here By Amanda Mahan Chief Communications Officer Operation New Hope Research has found that 70 million people in the United States have criminal records. Of that number, 63 percent are no longer in jail, on probation, or on parole, yet roughly 27 percent of these ex-offenders remain unemployed due to their criminal records. This disproportionate statistic to the overall unemployment rate confirms the realization that the challenge of finding work for the formally incarcerated can be a daunting task. Evidence indicates that ex-offenders have substantially lower probabilities of being hired than members of other disadvantaged groups – such as welfare recipients, high school dropouts, unemployed people, and those with “spotty” work histories – who do not have a criminal record. Dionne Barnes-Proby, a researcher at the non-profit, nonpartisan think tank the RAND Corporation, has studied how to improve employment outcomes for ex-offenders. “People transitioning from incarceration to employment face many challenges,” says Barnes-Proby, “from limited education, skills, and work history to stigma and employers’ fears about criminal behavior and reincarceration.” Barnes-Proby led a study of the Sacramento Probation Department employment program Career Training Partnership (CTP), which offers career and life skills training and a comprehensive support team, to analyze how these combined elements can positively affect program participants and identify remaining challenges. RAND’s research of the CTP program suggests that combining education, vocational training, and job placement with staffing agencies or reentry programs, local employers, and union relationship building can yield positive results. At Operation New Hope (ONH), we understand that people returning from incarceration face a multitude of barriers, with employment, transportation, and housing being three of the most reported obstacles. Without these necessities, people often feel less connected to their environments, creating communities that experience

higher rates of crime, unemployment, and recidivism. ONH supports life and job skills training for people with a history of involvement with the criminal justice system and places them in employment that offers a sustainable quality of life. People like Kendall McCoy, a convicted felon, can attest to the effectiveness of the nonprofit’s mission. For months, McCoy had tried unsuccessfully to navigate a wary job market with limited skills. At the not-so-subtle urging of his probation officer, he reluctantly showed up at the facilities of ONH. He found we offer family reunification services, a galaxy of job training and employer partnerships, mental and emotional therapy, and other wraparound services. As it turned out, working with his probation officer was a tremendous benefit. For McCoy, it was important that ONH’s program qualified him to make a sustainable living wage while paying restitution and court costs, making the decision not to consider illegal sources of income that much easier. RAND’s study revealed that securing employment at a livable wage is one of the most significant challenges facing ex-offenders. Career training can be a way to obtain a hand-up, not a handout. Josh Martino, a partner and board member at ONH, says he’s hired several ex-offenders in his businesses. He realized that hiring employees through ONH’s “Ready4Work” program cut down on time, hiring costs, and his concerns as an employer. He appreciated that employment candidates had been thoroughly vetted and came with a qualified endorsement. To make training programs more successful, RAND suggests removing obstacles to participation, for example, by providing transportation or helping ex-offenders address driver’s license issues. Providing a subsidy or stipend may also help participants offset costs and increase their chances of completing the program. ONH understands the importance of providing support to the ex-offenders and continues to work every day to build a stronger community by creating opportunities to realize second chances and reduce recidivism.

Evidence indicates that ex-offenders have substantially lower probabilities of being hired than members of other disadvantaged groups – such as welfare recipients, high school dropouts, unemployed people, and those with “spotty” work histories – who do not have a criminal record.


Thursday, September 29, 2022

The Valley’s News Observer A7

Local

Tec Leimert 2022- Black to the Future By Ricky Richardson Contributing Writer (Los Angeles, Ca.) – The Universe and the Metaverse were in alignment over Leimert Park Village on Saturday, September 24, 2022. Several hundred people were in attendance for Tec Leimert Conference, from 10:00am-6:00pm. “Black to the Future” was theme for this year’s conference. Tec Leimert welcomed a diverse crowd of entrepreneurs, innovators, tech enthusiasts, creatives and students to the annual conference to learn new pathways toward monetization in an environment of constant change brought on by technological innovation. The conference had to pivot over to a different location along Leimert Boulevard, Leimert Plaza Park and Regency West. No problem, the team at Tec Leimert, a non-profit organization created a wonderful technology zone where thought leaders, influencers and industry experts were able to discuss the latest and newest innovations in entertainment, technology and digital economy. Attendees to the conference began the day with a hearty breakfast at Los Angeles Urban League’s young professionals brunch presenting a relevant and timely panel “Cultural Currency: Building Black Wealth Through L.A.’s Creative Economy” inside Leimert Plaza Park. Attendees walked a short distance to the South Stage to build on the conversion during the brunch. “Unlocking the Potential in Web 3.0” sponsored by BCG Digital Ventures. The panel was moderated by Ian Abbott of BCG Digital Ventures. The panelist consisted of Cheyon Satchell- Founder and CEO of BTS California, Metaverse/Web 3 Futurist, Courtney Olujobi- Blockchain Enthusiast/ Entrepreneur and Shantel Anderson- ReelMood, Creative Technology, and Television/ Media Producer. The audience

Courtney Olujobi and Aziza Shuler (Photo by Ricky Richardson)

Cultural Influencers powered by OPMG, Music Legends Fireside Chat with 1500 or Nothin. The conference also featured a reality arcade, and tournament, e-sports tournament, VIP Lounge and Black to the Future Photo booth.

The Disney Takeover and Tec Leimert Team members (Photo by Ricky Richardson)

learned about cryptocurrencies, to NFT’s, smart contracts

Ian Abbott, Cheyan Satchell, Courtney Olujobi and Shantel Anderson (Photo by Ricky Richardson)

and blockchains. The panel provided an overview of these products and advised people to check with a professional financial advisor/planner. On the North Stage, Carl Brogan, the creator and Executive Producer of Myster Giraffe gave a presentation. Myster Giraffe elevates storytelling by utilizing cutting edge technology to achieve the previously impossible to amplify marginalized voices and breathes new life into pop cultures from all aspects old and new. Work Hard, Game Harder in partnership with Riot Games presented this panel moderated by Khleo Thomas. The panelists Alexandra Heard, Riot Games Recruiter, Lydia Elle, Microsoft, SR. Program Manager and Seth Smith, Riot Games, Senior Game Designer presented tips to landing a career in the thriving field on gaming. All eyes were focused on the North Stage for the panel entitled “The Disney Takeover.” The panel shared their long-term strategy and exciting news of what’s next on the horizon in the areas of parks, media, and consumer products that will propel and continue to long legacy of Disney impact. Tec Leimert conference attendees participated in L.A. Carl Bogan (Photo by Ricky Richardson)

The Healing Power of Music:

Mourning Loss, Celebrating Life & Embracing Love Street Festival By Ricky Richardson Contributing Writer (Los Angeles, Ca.) – Leimert Park Village hosted Reimagine’s Loss, Life and Love Street Festival, Saturday, September 24, 2022. The free community event was held on the People’s Street, consisted of a multigenerational lineup of musicians, poets, speakers, from gospel to jazz to hiphop. It was a good day in the neighborhood to enjoy this event in a loving and supported environment to expand your mind and your sense of shared humanity, on a beautiful day in the Greater Los Angeles area. Medusa served as Emcee, with Linafornia on deck of the ones and twos. The program got underway with a land acknowledgement and a Native American Blessing performed by Michael Whitehorse Avila. Oshea and Melanie recited an original poem for the occasion and acknowledged the presence of two local cultural legends, Ben Caldwell of KAOS Network and Mama Nene, followed by a performance of S.H.I.N.E Muwasi, traditional West African drumming, dancing and singing. Attendees were invited to place flowers on the alter in remembrance of love ones who have transitioned. The theme for Loss, Life and Love Street Festival was “finding strength and beauty in the hard parts of life.” The musicians explored loss and strength through a series of performances. The first half of the show focused on Leimert Park neighborhood using music to connect to those who have come before, exploring how we are tied together through the generations. “The pastures are clothed with flocks; the valleys are also covered over with corn; they shout for joy; they also sing” (Psalm 65:13) “Make a joyful noise unto God, all ye lands... All earth shall worship thee (Psalm 66:1, 4) Notable pianist and musical director Kenneth Crouch, of South LA, paid tribute to his late uncle, the gospel legend Andraé Crouch, accompanied by a choir to channel Andraé’s soulful songs into the present, for an old fashion Holy Ghost celebration. The group performed many of Andraé’s classic hits “This is Another Day,” “Jesus is Lord,” “Take Me Back,” “Can’t Nobody Do Me Like Jesus,” “We Are Not A Shame,” and “Soon and Very Soon.” Poet and Spoken Word Artist Ashley Wilkerson recited a deep, powerful, original spoken word piece entitled “Brown Hands.” Angela Overton offered up positive, inspiring affirmations, words of encouragement as it relates to health, disparity and hope. Harold “Stemsy” Hunter made a special appearance to perform in Leimert Park, at the Loss, Life, & Love Street

Roger Guenveur Smith and Ben Caldwell (Photo by Ricky Richardson)

Kenneth Crouch Gospel Choir (Photo by Ricky Richardson)

the crowd vibing while these amazing musicians rocked the stage on the following songs “Joy & Pain,” “Everybody Love the Sunshine,” “Golden,” “Tell Me Something Good” featuring Mookie Brewster and Indira Khan, yes, ladies and gentlemen, the daughter of Chaka Khan. The group continued with “Life is What You Make It,” “One Love,” “Footsteps in the Dark,” and “It Was a Good Day” to name a few. The closing ceremony featured a relevant and timely

poem recited by Anthony Brewster, followed by a solemn performance by Marcus L. Miller on percussions and Michael Whitehorse Avila on flute, that offered attendees a time for reflection of the day’s program. The music components of this unique festival were produced by Leimert Park’s Phillip “Fish” Fisher, who initially gained recognition as the anchor of the band Fishbone in 1980’s, and long-time L.A. event producer Leigh Ann Hahn. The two gave closing remarks.

Harold “Stemsy” Hunter and Terrace Martin (Photo by Ricky Richardson)

Festival. This was his first show in Leimert Park in over two decades. He dedicated his set to the late great Pharaoh Sanders who transitioned, Saturday, September 24, 2022. Stemsy teamed up with Terrace Martin, multi-instrumentalist, singer and record producer, to performed “Song for My Father,” by Horace Silver, followed by “Ceora” by Lee Morgan. The second half of the show, Leimert Park’s black musical history continues to weave a tapestry that brings together themes of loss, life and love through songs. The House of Vibes AllStars Collective: Black Loss, Life, Love & Abundant Joy, was on full display throughout their set. The all-star band of local talents, led by Anthony Brewster cranked up the voltage to close out the day on a celebratory and festive note. The supercharged, high-octane set featured Supernatural MC, Medusa, I. Khan, Georgia Anne Muldrow, Phillip Fisher, Debloi, Blvk H3ro, Louis King and T-Smidy. I’m sure that you can visualize Marcus L. Miller and Michael Whitehorse Avila (Photo by Ricky Richardson)


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The Valley’s News Observer

Local

Thursday, September 29, 2022


Thursday, September 29, 2022

The Valley’s News Observer A9

Sports

Walter Camp Honors Hooker and Wood Hendon Hooker #5 of Tennessee led the Vols to big SEC win (Photo: UT Athletics)

By Earl Heath Contributing Sports Writer Two college football players showed up big time this week and a couple earned National honors from the Walter Camp Foundation as Players of the Week. Hendon Hooker of Tennessee was selected on the offensive side while Zaylin Woods of Middle Tennessee State was the defensive standout. Hooker showed his skills in front of more than 100,000 at Neyland Stadium by leading the Volunteers 38-33 SEC-opening victory over No. 20 Florida. The red-

shirt senior completed 22-of-28 passes for 349 yards and a pair of touchdowns. He made it happen with his legs too, gaining 112 yards on the ground and punching in another score. “Its great to be out there competing with my brothers,” said Hooker. “If you need to get the job done you should get it done.” In total the Vols (4-0, 1-1, he logged 461 yards of total offense and became just the second player in program history to accumulate 300 yards passing and 100 yards rushing in the same game. VFL Joshua Dobbs, who was present for the win, is the only other quarterback

Zaylin Woods (7) of Middle Tennessee State was WCFF Defensive player of the Week (Photo: MTSU athletics)

to post such numbers, doing it twice in his Tennessee career. Hooker becomes just the seventh Vol to earn Walter Camp Player of the Week acclaim and is the first to do so since linebacker Darrell Taylor won defensive honors on Nov. 10, 2018. Hooker is the first UT offensive player to capture the award since Dobbs did it on Nov. 20, 2016, following a win over Missouri. Meanwhile Woods and his teammates were making a big statement with their on ACC powerhouse Miami. Wood played a major role in the Blue Raiders’ upset win at No. 25 Miami to lead a defensive unit that wreaked

havoc on the Hurricanes all day, with the 45-21 win over Miami The redshirt sophomore turned in a career-best 2.0 sacks to go with 2.0 TFLs, a fumble recovery and his second career interception that he returned 15 yards for a touchdown. The Redshirt sophomore from is just the third player in school history to win the Walter Camp National Player of the Week award and the first since Nov. 23, 2008 when running back Phillip Tanner grabbed the honor. The other winner was free safety Damon Nickson in 2006.

California Roll Call By Earl Heath Contributing Sports Writer California has produced some of the best prep players in the country. This is how some of them faired this past weekend. Tennessee wide receiver Bru McCoy (Mater Dei) enjoyed the best statistical game of his collegiate career in Saturday’s 38-33 win over No. 20 Florida. The USC and Texas transfer recorded a career-high 102 receiving yards and a touchdown. “There’s no better feeling. I think everybody let out a big sigh of relief after the end of the game. You celebrate,” McCoy told 247 sports. “You see the fans and how happy they are. Everybody in the locker room, the coaches and the staff all just soaked in the moment and enjoyed it the best we could. Right now is the time to be in the moment. The win vaulted the Vols to it’s first top-10 ranking since Oct.10, 2016. They moved up for a fourth consecutive week in both the Associated Press Top 25 and AFCA Coaches Poll, claiming eighth in the AP and ninth in the coaches. LSU quarterback Jayden Daniels (Cajon High-San Bernadino, California) threw for 279 yards on 24 of 29 passing in mostly in the first half. Early in the third quarter on a fourth-down play after scrambling for 16 yards, the Arizona State transfer was slammed to the ground by AJ Haulcy and Dion Hunter. He left the game with an injury

Rams Defeat Cards on the Road By Earl Heath Contributing Sports Writer In the NFL “a win, is a win, is a win”. You can say that about the LA Rams recent win over Arizona. It definitely was a case of bending a lot but not breaking. The defense gave up 365 yards of offense but limited the Cards (1-2) to four field goals in a 20-12 win. Rams head coach Sean McVay called it a ‘’strange’’ game. The Rams controlled most of the afternoon but didn’t cash in on some chances to put the game away. QB Kyler Murray went 37-of-58 passing for 314 yards while Marquise Brown caught 14 passes for 140 yards. The Cards (1-2) have lost seven of nine games dating to last season. Aaron Donald had six tackles two for losses including his 100th sack. Jalen Ramsey added two passes defended and a tackle for loss. Rams safety Nick Scott who had six tackles credited the defensive line with making the job easier for the secondary. ‘’Those guys did a great job of rushing with intensity and violence, but also making it tough for (Murray) to get out of the pocket,’’ Scott said. ‘’We knew if we could keep him in the pocket, we’d do our thing on the back end.’’ Matthew Stafford threw for 249 yards while completing 18 of 25 passes. Cam Akers and Cooper Kupp

both scored touchdowns. Akers finished the day with 60 yards on the ground and Los Angeles used a stellar defensive effort to beat the Cards for the 11th time in the past 12 games dating back to 2017. ‘’There are no style points in this game,’’ McVay said. ‘’But there are ways to play more complete games. That’s what we’re hunting.’’ LA’s offense had some good moments, but the win was largely due to its defense. Kupps TD rush was the first of his career. The Rams did good with special teams as they turned a blocked punt into an eventual field goal during the first quarter. Andy Lee’s punt was deflected by Michael Hoecht, and Los Angeles recovered at Arizona’s 35-yard line. Eight plays later, Matt Gay made a 22yard field goal for a 3-0 lead. Corner Derion Kendrick is being evaluated for a possible concussion. The rookie from Georgia led the team in tackles with nine. NEXT UP: The Rams are heading into a Monday night matchup against the rival San Francisco 49ers. The RAMS have lost their last three of their matchups against the Niners on the road, in a streak that dates back to 2019. Head coach Sean Mcvay is acutely aware of the challenges presented when playing the 49ers on their home turf.

Tennessee wide receiver Bru McCoy (Mater Dei)

and didn’t return. “Jayden strained his lower back, he could have went back in but there was no need at that time of the game,” Tiger head coach Brian Kelly said. “He was cleared by the doctors, so he’s good.” Zevi Eckhous (Culver City high) completed 19 oof 30 passes for 180 yards as Bryant University (Rhode Island) defeated Long Island University 31-29. It was the first win of the season for the Bulldogs (1-3) On the season Eckhous has gone 83 for 131 for 1030 yards and 7 TD’s. Quarterback DJ Uiagalelei (St John Bosco) completed 26-of-41 passes for a season-high 371 passing yards with a career-high five passing touchdowns. He also added 52 rushing yards on 14 carries. The effort helped the Tigers (4-0) defeat Wake Forest 51-45 in double overtime. It was Uiagalelei’s first 300-yard passing game of the season and the third of his career, pulling him with one of the career total of his position coach Brandon Streeter (four from 1996-99). It was Uiagalelei’s first 300-yard game since his career-high 439-yard effort at Notre Dame in 2020. He became the first Clemson quarterback to throw five touchdown passes in a game since Trevor Lawrence at Georgia Tech in 2020. Beaux Collins (St john Bosco) had 4 receptions for 60 yards. He was a teammate of Uiagalelei while playing for the Braves.


A10

The Valley’s News Observer

Local

Thursday, September 29, 2022

Black Music Action Coalition 2nd Annual Gala Honored Those Pushing The Culture Forward By: Philtrina Farquharson Contributing Writer The Black Music Action Coalition (BMAC) started in 2020 after an unfortunate series of racial injustices unfolded throughout the country. This advocacy organization consists of notable music industry executives, attorneys, and business moguls who joined forces to bring about change in the world and within the music industry. Since its inception, the BMAC Board and Executive Leadership Council (ELC) have launched a COVID Relief Fund for Black creatives and industry professionals, partnered with #BreathWithMe and produced a PSA demanding Racial and Economic Justice, and released the first Music Industry Report Card. This past weekend, BMAC held its second annual Music in Action gala at The Beverly Hilton. The event commemorated artists, executives, businesses, entrepreneurs, activists, and companies that utilized their platforms to effect social change over the past year. “I came here to celebrate Black people, Black art, and most importantly, the mission to protect Black art and protect ourselves,” said Kevin Liles, honoree, Co-founder, and CEO of 300 Records. Co-hosted by singer and BelAir actress Coco Jones and Kenny Burns, entertainment/ lifestyle/culture figure, the evening brought together more than double the guests as the inaugural year and was a memorable event for all. The gala kicked off with a moving speech by Willie “Prophet” Stiggers explaining why this much-needed initiative was put into action. “We knew that if there wasn’t an organization that would hold each other accountable, it would fall upon deaf ears… What we are experiencing tonight are individuals who decided to use their platform to go one step further.”, said Stiggers activist and co-founder of BMAC. Guests were then delighted with the soulful sounds of quartet WanMor, the first artists to be signed to Mary J. Blige’s new label, Beautiful Life Productions, and 300 Entertainment. “It’s a blessing to be signed to 300 Entertainment. “What a great feeling to have released our first song last week and It is doing very well. We are honored to be here and walk the Black carpet among icons,” said the quartet collectively. The most anticipated award of the night went to Rapper Lil Baby who was honored with the Quincy Jones Humanitarian Award. This award recognized Lil Baby’s work in his community through his Back to School Fest in Atlanta which provided over 3000 children with backpacks, school supplies, and haircuts. In addition to this outreach event, Lil Baby established a $150,000 scholarship entitled “My Turn” at his former high school to give less fortunate

children an opportunity to attend college. As he accepted his award, In his speech he emphasized the importance of unity saying, “It’s going to take all of us to stick together and stay together.” Bringing the crowd to their feet with a standing ovation in awe, honoree Brittany K. Barnett moved the crowd with her criminal justice work. She quit her job as a corporate lawyer to take a case surrounding a Black man who was confirmed to serve 16 life sentences for a non-violent drug offense. Barnett reflected on how it felt to be honored and invited, “I am so grateful and humble. This honor is an incredible feeling for people who are giants to me to be honored amongst them. Alot of times our work is behind the scenes, but it is a time to be celebrated”. Additional 2022 BMAC Honorees Included: Jon “Big Jon” Platt (Chairman and CEO of Sony Music Publishing) - Clarence Avant Trailblazer Award Kevin Liles (CEO of 300 Elektra Entertainment) - BMAC Social Impact Award Amazon Music (Tim Hinshaw, Rochelle Balogun, Josh Beas & Sierra Lever) - BMAC Social Impact Award The Recording Academy (CEO Harvey Mason Jr. and CoPresidents Valeisha Butterfield Jones & Panos A. Panay) BMAC Social Impact Award Nikole Hannah-Jones (Journalist), Brittany K. Barnett (Attorney and Author) & Joi Brown (Founder of Culture Creators) - BMAC Change Agent Award Congresswoman Maxine Waters - BMAC Icon Award David Ali (Music Manager) - BMAC BLACK: Future. Now. Award

(L) Kevin Liles (CEO of 300 Elektra Entertainment) recipient of the BMAC Social Impact Award with (R) award presenter Anthony Anderson (Actor). (Photo Credit: Getty Images for Black Music Action Coalition)

Shirley Halperin (Variety’s Executive Editor of Music) BMAC 365 Award Gail Mitchell (Billboard’s Executive Director, R&B/HipHop) - BMAC 365 Award Reflecting on how this initiative started which was built off of the anger and outrage of the preventable death of George Floyd, and seeing all of the positive progress that has been made for the Black community it shows that our community can come together and turn a negative into positive supporting Black generations to come. To learn more about upcoming BMAC initiatives, you can visit https://www.bmacoalition.org/initiatives.

Co-host of the night’s event, singer and Bel-Air actress Coco Jones and entertainment/lifestyle/culture figure Kenny Burns. (Photo Credit: Getty Images for Black Music Action Coalition)

NO ONE GETS A DIPLOMA ALONE. If you’re thinking of finishing your high school diploma, you have more support than you realize. Find teachers and free adult education classes near you at FinishYourDiploma.org. Lil Baby (GRAMMY® Award-winning rapper) receiving the Quincy Jones Humanitarian Award. (Photo Credit: Getty Images for Black Music Action Coalition)