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CORPORATE STEWARDSHIP REPORT


OGE ENERGY CORP. OVERVIEW OGE Energy Corp. (NYSE: OGE), headquartered in Oklahoma City, OK, is a domestic energy delivery company that includes electric transmission and distribution and energy services operations. OGE Energy is the parent company of Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company (OG&E), a regulated electric utility. OGE Energy also owns a 25.7 percent limited partner interest and 50 percent general partner interest in Enable Midstream Partners, a publicly traded master limited partnership it jointly controls with CenterPoint Energy. OGE Energy and its predecessor companies have been in business for more than 116 years.

Headquarters Location: Oklahoma

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C O RP ORATE S TEWARD SHIP R E PO R T

City, OK


VALUES

BELIEFS

Individual Safety and Well-being

We advocate attitudes and actions that promote individual safety, health and success.

Transparency

We operate our business openly and communicate in a clear, candid and timely manner.

Teamwork

We work together to achieve shared goals and objectives.

Respect

We treat others justly and consider their views in the decisions we make.

Integrity

We conduct ourselves in an honest, fair and trustworthy manner.

Public Service

We give our time and energy to better the communities where we live and work.

Live Safely

I protect myself and others from injury by constant engagement, always living safely.

Achieve Together

I reach out to others across the company so we can achieve more.

Shared Trust

I commit to acting in a manner that cultivates trust.

Value Diversity & Inclusion

I embrace the uniqueness of each individual to make us a stronger and more resourceful organization.

Take Charge

I am accountable to deliver our key results, mentor others and manage my career.

Unleash Potential

I get superior results by applying innovative thoughts and constant self–improvement.

Values Matter

I model OGE’s values in everything I do.

O GE

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ABOUT OG&E 84

tail electric e r cus 9 5 to 0,5 718,000

residential

95,907

commercial

16,810

Service Area

public authority

30,000 square miles

2,798

in Oklahoma and western Arkansas

≈2,500

of generation capacity

Total Generation Capacity: 7,831 MW C O RP ORATE S TEWARD SHIP R E PO R T

6,388

oilfield

252

street light

~55,500 circuit miles of distribution lines

~5,200 circuit miles

of electric transmission lines

10.1% wind

g

5.7% owned 4.4% purchased

10.3% renewable

0.02% solar

24.6% coal 65.2% natural gas

tion mix era en

OG&E’s 2018 electric power mix delivered to retail customers

4

industrial

employees

6,800 MW

ounts acc er m

OG&E serves approximately 840,000 customers in a 30,000 square mile service area in Oklahoma and western Arkansas. With about 6,800 megawatts of capacity, OG&E generates electricity using natural gas, low-sulfur coal and renewable resources.


ABOUT ENABLE MIDSTREAM Enable Midstream (NYSE:ENBL) is a publicly traded master limited partnership formed in May 2013 that owns, operates and develops strategically located natural gas and crude oil infrastructure assets serving major producing basins and markets.

GATHERING

PROCESSING

12,900 miles of gathering lines

14 major processing plants with approximately 2.5 billion cubic feet per day with construction on one new plant underway

TRANSPORTATION

STORAGE

≈7,800 miles of interstate pipelines (including Southeast Supply Header, LLC) with 8.4 billion cubic feet per day of transport capacity

85.0 billion cubic feet of natural gas storage capacity

≈2,200 miles of intrastate pipelines

O GE

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A MESSAGE FROM SEAN TRAUSCHKE

OGE Energy Corp. Chairman, President an For generations, OGE Energy Corp. has been the strongest partner for growth in every community we serve, laying the foundation for our communities to grow and prosper. We have always been the longterm thinkers, the partners who fight for a better future—whether it’s better schools, better healthcare, better job opportunities, or a better quality of life. We believe it’s our responsibility to do the right things, keeping rates low and service high, while growing the company for the benefit of our communities, shareholders and employees, whom we call members. We define our purpose in many ways­— each rooted in our values and beliefs: strengthening our communities, providing low rates, maintaining reliability, inspiring innovative new product offerings, and growing shareholder value. Our commitment to being an environmentally responsible company includes a robust renewable energy portfolio as well as complementary infrastructure to support renewable energy. Our Mustang Energy Center includes a 2.5 MW utility-scale solar farm and, to further support renewable energy, is equipped with quick-start combustion turbines capable of starting and putting electricity onto the system in less than 10 minutes. And we’re looking forward to bringing our nearly 10 MW Covington solar plant online in early 2018. Our company would not be complete without giving back to our communities. This is a hallmark of OGE, and I am so proud of the contributions to United Way and other organizations, as well as the thousands of hours our members spend volunteering to make our communities strong.

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C O RP ORATE S TEWARD SHIP R E PO R T


nd CEO We achieve high customer satisfaction through a partnership with our customers that we call “Positive Energy Together.” We serve more than 840,000 customers, each with unique interests, and we strive to meet their needs by listening to our customers and delivering a variety of programs and services. Knowing the importance of delivering reliable power and keeping our customers informed, we recently launched our customer outage communications program and made improvements in reliability and responsiveness. Whether it’s a small business owner, a retiree, a college student, or a parent who simply wants more opportunity for their children—anyone who has a stake in our communities has a partner in OGE. We want them to know that their goals are our goals. And that we wake up every day, working to get them there.

Chairman, President and CEO OGE Energy Corp.

O GE

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CORPORATE STEWARDSHIP OVERVIEW Our commitment to corporate stewardship begins with our belief that we’re only as strong as the communities we serve. It’s a balance of delivering reliable and affordable electricity to our customers and maintaining a culture of innovation and environmental stewardship that can serve the needs of our communities now and in the future. Public Service is one of the core values that underpins our efforts to grow the communities we serve. Each year, OG&E’s ad valorem payments, which are among the largest in our states, benefit our schools and communities. Our foundation donates millions of dollars to worthy causes, and our member donations place our United Way campaign among the top campaigns in our area. Members also spent more than 20,000 hours giving their time and energy to a number of nonprofit and civic organizations. Through smart energy policies, community involvement and innovative implementation of technology, we’re meeting the long-term needs of our growing economy and the everyday needs of the people we serve.

Meet Rae Rice, State Government Affairs Manager

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C O RP ORATE S TEWARD SHIP R E PO R T


P

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BUSINESS HIGHLIGHTS We have a history of innovation that includes being one of the first utilities in the nation to use smart grid technology. Today, we’re a leader in energy innovation, being the first utility in Oklahoma to offer wind power in 2003, executing the largest U.S. deployment of smart meters in 2012, and in 2017 ushering in a new era in energy technology with the opening of our Mustang Energy Center. Our Mustang Energy Center contains the first utility-scale solar farm in Oklahoma and quick-start combustion turbines capable of starting and putting electricity onto the system in under 10 minutes.

BUSINESS HIGHLIGHTS ⁄ Recognized as one of the 100 Most Trustworthy Companies in the Nation by Forbes magazine. ⁄ Assisted with restoration efforts in both Houston and Florida by sending 80 crew members to Corpus Christi, Texas area for Hurricane Harvey and close to 100 crew members to Florida for Hurricane Irma and earned our 12th Emergency Assistance Award from Edison Electric Institute. ⁄ Sent more than 100 crew members to Puerto Rico in an industry-led effort to restore power on the island.

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⁄ Dedicated our Mustang Energy Center, ushering in smarter energy infrastructure by replacing 1950s-era power generating units at the former Mustang Power Plant with modern, natural gas-fired units. ⁄ Received the Governor’s Water for 2060 Excellence Award for a low-volume wastewater reuse project at our Mustang Energy Center. ⁄ Recognized as the top contributor to the United Way of Central Oklahoma’s 2017 Pacesetter Campaign and other communities including Norman, Ardmore, Sapulpa, Kellyville, Pottawatomie County, Stillwater and Ft. Smith, AR.


Key Performance Indicators

EEI Emergency Assistance Award

for Harvey and Irma restoration, our 12th overall

$

INVESTED $616 MILLION in capital improvements to benefit our communities.

Mustang Energy Center

⁄ McClain and Redbud power plants ranked among the nation’s top 20 performers by Power Engineering Magazine. – I n the category of gas combined-cycle generators, Redbud Power Plant, located in Luther, ranked 13th. – McClain Power Plant in Newcastle ranked third in gas combined-cycle capacity factors and ninth in gas combined-cycle heat rates–two critical factors in evaluating plant performance. ⁄ Signed an agreement with the City of Oklahoma City to bring new LED streetlights with advanced options to two of the city’s major tourism districts, the Adventure District and the Innovation District.

⁄ Named 2016 Corporation of the Year by the Southwest Minority Supplier Development Council. ⁄ Continued advancing our supplier diversity effort by spending over $30 million with 112 diverse suppliers in 2017, representing close to 3 percent of our total managed spend. ⁄ Featured smart technology at the Internet of Things showcase, hosted by the U.S. House Committee on Energy & Commerce in Washington, D.C. ⁄ $3.6 million added to local tax base annually through our new Mustang Energy Center

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ENVIRONMENT Preserving our natural resources is important to the quality of life of those living in our communities. Therefore, we continually take steps to protect our environment while at the same time delivering safe, reliable and reasonably priced power. That’s why we use the word “balance” when describing our environmental efforts. We accomplish this through a number of key initiatives: Fuel Diversity – Our base load generation profile balances the long-term volatility of natural gas with the stability of coal prices to provide more stable electricity costs to our customers. Adding renewable energy to our mix helps keep fuel costs low, delivers a clean supply of energy and responds to customer expectations.

Technology Innovation – When OG&E began operations in Oklahoma in 1902, electricity was an emerging technology. We’ve continued to value innovation while balancing investments in new technology, such as renewable energy and our nationally-recognized smart grid program, with the impact that development will have on our customers. As new technology becomes viable, cost effective and accessible, we’ll evolve to meet the needs of those we serve.

Educational and Community Outreach – We seek to increase awareness about environmental stewardship through charitable giving, partnering with local education and stewardship organizations and helping increase public awareness of environmental issues.

Customer Outreach – We assist our customers in reducing their environmental footprint by offering energy efficiency programs and renewable energy options.

Compliance – We’re committed to complying with all government-established environmental standards and constantly strive to improve environmental performance.

Meet Usha Turner,

Director Environmental Affairs & Federal Public Policy

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Our commitment to fuel and technological diversity has allowed us to reduce emissions while maintaining reliability and low rates for our customers. FUTURE PROJECTION

50,000

SO2

30,000,000

45,000

CO2

25,000,000

35,000

20,000,000

30,000 15,000,000

25,000 20,000

10,000,000

15,000 10,000

NOX Short Tons of CO2

40,000

Tons of SO2 and NOX

T

Key Performance Indicators

5,000,000

5,000 0 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

0 2019

As we progress, we’ll continue this commitment to a less emissions-intensive generation fleet from where we are today.

840 MW of renewable energy (purchased and owned) in generating fleet

1.5 million tons of ash

diverted from landfills (2012 – 2016) through the sale of 81 percent coal ash to concrete and cement industries

Return over 98 percent of the freshwater used for our process back to its source

Conserve an average of 2 billion gallons of freshwater at Redbud and McClain power plants each year O GE

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ENVIRONMENT

ENVIRONMENTAL HIGHLIGHTS ⁄ Installed new, quick-start combustion turbines at Mustang Energy Center that are up to 70 percent lower in emissions, including those that contribute to ozone in urban areas, reduce water needs at that location by more than 40 percent, enhance grid reliability and offer a significantly improved ability to respond to intermittent energy resources, like wind and solar. ⁄ Invested more than $700 million in emissions control improvements at Muskogee and Sooner power plants. These efforts will drop emissions by over 50 percent for NOX, 80 percent for SO2 and 80 percent for mercury.

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⁄ Reduced nearly 340 tons of NO 500,000 tons of CO² emissions programs for businesses and resi

⁄ Debuted Oklahoma’s first conv charging station at the OnCue E

⁄ Repurposed 54 percent of wast for items such as landscape timb other products since 2013.

⁄ Weatherized almost 15,000 hom than 23,000 home energy audits an estimated 240,000 MWh of


T

Ox, 750 tons of SO² and s through energy efficiency idential customers.

venience store EV Express in Yukon, OK.

te distribution poles bers, retaining walls and

mes and conducted more s which have resulted in f energy saved since 2011.

⁄ Building a nearly 10-megawatt (AC) solar photovoltaic power plant in Covington, OK, which is anticipated to generate enough electricity to serve the needs of over 10,000 average Oklahoma homes. ⁄ Provided interactive learning on alternative energy and environmental conservation to more than 5,000 4th and 5th graders through our sponsorship of and participation in ScienceFest. ⁄ Distributed more than 183,000 loblolly pine seedlings at the Oklahoma State Fair.

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CUSTOMERS & COMMUNITIES We serve 276 cities and towns in Oklahoma and western Arkansas— from the Oklahoma City metro area, with a population of close to 1.5 million, to Aline, OK, with a population of nearly 215.

Each of these communities depends on us to provide reliable, affordable electricity. And they also expect us to be good community citizens. We’ve lived up to these expectations through our commitment to public service and our innovative approach to delivering products and services to fit our customers’ needs.

CUSTOMERS AND COMMUNITIES HIGHLIGHTS ⁄ Recognized as having some of the lowest rates in the nation. ⁄ The largest single payer of ad valorem taxes in Oklahoma, approximately $80 million annually, most of which goes to directly fund public education. ⁄ More than $1.5 million in grants contributed through the OGE Energy Corp. Foundation to support programs, organizations and institutions that enhance the quality of life and economic well-being of our communities. ⁄ Enrolled 997 customers in our solar power program, accounting for 2.46 of the available 2.5 MW of solar. Currently have 3,235 customers on the wait list for future solar availability, accounting for 11.43 MW of solar.

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⁄ Awarded $15,144,035 to custo for energy efficiency achieveme

⁄ Initiated an exclusive electric v for OG&E customers for the 201 with participating Nissan dealer purchase of 20 LEAFs during t Nissan brought in 18 LEAFs spe and sold the entire inventory in

⁄ E nrolled 122,461 business and SmartHours®, OG&E’s variable 119,172 smart thermostats an peak demand reduction since

⁄ Launched a customer notificat to inform customers of outage i email or phone notifications.


& S

Key Performance Indicators

153,844,180 kWh in energy savings to commercial and

residential customers since the inception of OG&E’s energy efficiency programs in 2010. This is equivalent to

removing 24,500 passenger vehicles from the roads, or the CO2 emissions from 12,883,521 gallons of gasoline, or the CO2 emissions from 12,350 homes’ energy use for one year

Meet Rose Royal,

Director Human Resources Compliance/Employee Relations

omers in incentives ents.

vehicle incentive of $10,000 17 all-electric Nissan LEAF rships, resulting in the the promotion period. ecifically for the promotion less than 3 weeks.

d residential customers in pricing program, installed nd achieved 157.4 MW the program began.

tion platform, myOGEalerts, information through text,

⁄ Raised $243,010 to the Salvation Army for utility bill assistance through our Lend-a-Hand program. The program is an opportunity for customers to help those in need by adding a few extra dollars to their utility bill payment. ⁄ Provided $30,000 in project funding for 153 teachers within our service territory through the Donors Choose program. Our efforts funded 182 projects in 89 schools, all of which had the majority of students from low-income households. ⁄ Contributed $125,000 to Allied Arts, an organization that supports arts and cultural organizations in central Oklahoma. ⁄ Donated 1,200 electric fans to agencies serving lowincome and elderly residents across our service area. ⁄ Donated 495,000 energy-efficient light bulbs to the Regional Food Bank for distribution to families in need. The program reached 123,750 families.

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ENGAGED WORKFORCE OG&E members are engaged with the company and our communities in a variety of ways—from supplying and delivering electricity to building innovative products and services to helping customers save money by using energy wisely. But ask any member to define our culture, and one word resounds: PRIDE. We’re proud that the energy we deliver gives people comfort, safety and security. We’re proud that we live and work in Oklahoma and western Arkansas and support the communities we serve. We’re proud of our strong record of low-cost, reliable power—24 hours a day, 7 days a week—and our ability to respond safely, effectively and efficiently when our communities face emergency situations such as severe storms or man-made disasters.

Key Performance Indicators

United Way of Central Oklahoma Community Partner

20,000 volunteer hours

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Contributed $1.2 million to the United Way Pacesetter Campaign, which includes funds from special events, rallies and company match of $.50 on the dollar.


EMPLOYEE HIGHLIGHTS Established the OGE Renewable Energy Scholarship and paid internship for MBA candidates at the University of Oklahoma. Provided wellness incentives to 1,642 members and their spouses for taking physicals and 1,761 members and their spouses who pledged to be tobacco-free. Launched our Healthy Together initiative, providing members with incentives, information and tips for improving their overall health and wellness. Continued to create a culture in which all members are empowered to speak up to share their ideas or raise concerns through our anonymous MPowerline. Continued providing scholarships of up to $5,000 per year for under-represented students pursuing STEM disciplines at Oklahoma State University. Invested more than $130,000 in educational assistance for 54 members pursuing undergraduate and graduate degrees. Continued our commitment to achieving a more diverse and inclusive workforce: ⁄

19.5 percent of new hires were women

29 percent of new hires were minorities

Close to 26 percent of all professional and management hires were minorities (26.5 percent) or women (28.5 percent)

38 percent of new hire engineers were either women or minorities

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SAFETY

“Live Safely” is a core value and belief at OGE, and we’re committed to achieving an incident-and-injury-free workplace for our members as well as a safe environment for our customers and communities. We believe that even one accident is too many, and we take steps to make sure that all our members, wherever they work, return home safely each day and that our customers have the knowledge and information they need to stay safe around electricity.

Key Performance Indicators BACK-TO-BACK SAFEST YEARS ON RECORD:

2016 & 2017

! 80 %

Stay Safe Together

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C O RP ORATE S TEWARD SHIP R E PO R T

Reduced recordable incidents by 80 percent in the last 10 years


SAFETY HIGHLIGHTS Celebrated our safest year on record in our 116-year history with an 88 percent reduction in recordable incidents in 2017. Reduced incidents resulting in days away from work or restricted work days by 84 percent in the last 10 years (2007 v. 2017) Reduced at-fault vehicle incidents by 63 percent since 2000 Delivered more than 450 4th Grade Electrical Safety presentations to schools in our service area, reaching more than 13,500 students. OG&E employees worked incident-and-injury-free through all local storm events and during mutual assistance for hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

OGE OSHA Recordable Incidents 2007 - Present 592 Injuries Avoided, 2008 - Present 32

40

50

53

62

68

65

66

76

76

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

Injuries Avoided

95

63

55

45

42

33

27

30

29

19

19

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

OSHA Recordable Incidents O GE

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Quantitative Information for Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company (OG&E) Baseline 2005 Actual

Current Year 2018 Actual

Future Year 2020 Position

Portfolio 1

Owned and operated Nameplate Generation Capacity at end of year (MW)

1.1

Coal

2,569

2,568

1,549

1.2

Natural Gas

3,659

4,355

4,983

1.5.4

Solar

0

12.2

12.2

1.5.5

Wind

0

449

449

18,420,159

8,865,927

6,582,736

2

Owned and operated generation for the data year (Gross MWh)

2.1

Coal

2.2

Natural Gas

8,058,819

12,250,071

15,636,515

2.5.4

Solar

NA

25,920

31,623

2.5.5

Wind

NA

1,365,002

1,430,316

$249

$574

$575

3

Investing in the Future: Capital Expenditures, Energy Efficiency (EE), and Smart Meters

3.1

Total Annual Capital Expenditures (nominal dollars)

3.2

Incremental Annual Electricity Savings from EE Measures (MWh)

NA

196,475

--

3.3

Incremental Annual Investment in Electric EE Programs (nominal dollars)

NA

$44

--

3.4

Percent of Total Electric Customers with Smart Meters (at end of year)

NA

100%

100%

80,786

97,685

96,075

4

Retail Electric Customer Count (at end of year)

4.1

Commercial

4.2

Industrial

4.3

Residential

9,420

2,771

3,073

630,736

725,440

730,330

21,058,644

13,993,793

13,101,188

0.795

0.622

0.553

21,169,100

14,065,496

13,169,905

0.799

0.625

0.556

Emissions 5

GHG Emissions: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (CO2e)

5.1

Owned Generation

5.1.1 5.1.1.1

Total Owned Generation CO2 Emissions (MT)

5.1.1.2

Total Owned Generation CO2 Emissions Intensity (MT/Gross MWh)

5.1.2

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (CO2e)

5.1.2.1

Total Owned Generation CO2e Emissions (MT)

5.1.2.2

Total Owned Generation CO2e Emissions Intensity (MT/Gross MWh)

5.2 5.2.1

Purchased Power Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

5.2.1.1

Total Purchased Generation CO2 Emissions (MT)

NA

7,568,505

NA

5.2.1.2

Total Purchased Generation CO2 Emissions Intensity (MT/MWh)

NA

0.603

NA

5.2.2

22

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (CO2e)

5.2.2.1

Total Purchased Generation CO2e Emissions (MT)

NA

7,619,720

NA

5.2.2.2

Total Purchased Generation CO2e Emissions Intensity (MT/MWh)

NA

0.607

NA

C O RP ORATE S TEWARD SHIP R E PO R T


PARENT COMPANY: OGE Energy Corp. OPERATING COMPANY(S): OG&E BUSINESS TYPE(S): Vertically Integrated Investor-Owned Utility STATE(S) OF OPERATION: Oklahoma, Arkansas STATE(S) WITH RPS PROGRAMS: None REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT: Regulated REPORT DATE: 11/07/19 Comments, Links, Additional Information, and Notes

Source of historical capacity data in this section: annual SEC Form 10-K Natural gas capacity includes 100% of the capacity for the two plants in which OG&E owns an interest and is the operating partner (McClain and Redbud) See additional notes 1, 2, and 3 below

Historical data in this section contains gross generation, generally as measured by 40 CFR 75 continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) See additional note 4 below See additional note 3 below

Millions of dollars: annual SEC Form 10-K Source: 2018 Oklahoma Demand Programs Annual Report, and Arkansas Energy Efficiency Program Portfolio Annual Report Millions of dollars; 2018 Oklahoma Demand Programs Annual Report, and Arkansas Energy Efficiency Program Portfolio Annual Report

Source for historical values in this section: annual SEC Form 10-K; source for 2020 projections: 2015 OG&E Integrated Resource Plan

Source of historical emissions data: EPA Air Markets Program records of monitored emissions Data in this section includes 100% of emissions for the two plants in which OG&E owns an interest and is the operating partner (McClain and Redbud) Rates in this section are per gross MWh, including renewables

OG&E both sells power to and purchases power from the SPP market, so purchased power emissions presented here have an indeterminable degree of doublecounting 2018 emissions in this section derived as: total purchased MWh from FERC Form 1 multiplied by EPA eGRID emission factor eGRID emission factor not available for 2005 or 2020

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Baseline 2005 Actual 5.3 5.3.1

Current Year 2018 Actual

Future Year 2020 Position

Owned Generation + Purchased Power Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

5.3.1.1

Total Owned + Purchased Generation CO2 Emissions (MT)

NA

21,562,298

NA

5.3.1.2

Total Owned + Purchased Generation CO2 Emissions Intensity (MT/MWh)

NA

0.615

NA

5.3.2

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (CO2e)

5.3.2.1

Total Owned + Purchased Generation CO2e Emissions (MT)

NA

21,685,216

NA

5.3.2.2

Total Owned + Purchased Generation CO2e Emissions Intensity (MT/MWh)

NA

0.619

NA

NA

39,809

--

5.4 5.4.1 6 6.1 6.2

Non-Generation CO2e Emissions Fugitive CO2e emissions of sulfur hexafluoride (MT) Nitrogen Oxide (NOx), Sulfur Dioxide (SO2), Mercury (Hg) Generation basis for calculation

Total

Nitrogen Oxide (NOx)

6.2.1

Total NOx Emissions (MT)

34,390

9,444

8,937

6.2.2

Total NOx Emissions Intensity (MT/Gross MWh)

0.0013

0.0004

0.0004

6.3

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)

6.3.1

Total SO2 Emissions (MT)

40,236

18,351

5,470

6.3.2

Total SO2 Emissions Intensity (MT/Gross MWh)

0.0015

0.0008

0.0002

240.5

28.0

54.9

0.000009

0.000001

0.000002

6.4

Mercury (Hg)

6.4.1

Total Hg Emissions (kg)

6.4.2

Total Hg Emissions Intensity (kg/Gross MWh)

Resources 7

Human Resources

7.1

Total Number of Employees

2,544

2,292

--

7.2

Total Number on Board of Directors/Trustees

10

10

--

7.3

Total Women on Board of Directors/Trustees

1

2

--

7.4

Total Minorities on Board of Directors/Trustees

0

1

--

7.5

Employee Safety Metrics

7.5.1

Recordable Incident Rate

2.51

0.58

--

7.5.2

Lost-time Case Rate

0.75

0.12

--

7.5.3

Days Away, Restricted, and Transfer (DART) Rate

1.68

0.23

--

7.5.4

Work-related Fatalities

0.00

0.00

--

8

Fresh Water Resources

8.1

Water Withdrawals - Consumptive (Billions of Liters/Gross MWh)

0.00000142

0.00000108

0.00000074

8.2

Water Withdrawals - Non-consumptive (Billions of Liters/Gross MWh)

0.00000516

0.00000270

0.00000224

65%

87%

--

9 9.2

Waste Products Percent of Coal Combustion Products Beneficially Used

ADDITIONAL NOTES 1 - coal capacity for 2020 accounts for the 2019 conversion of coal-fueled Muskogee units 4 and 5 to natural gas 2 - gas capacity for 2020 accounts for the 2019 conversion of coal-fueled Muskogee units 4 and 5 to natural gas and the 2018 addition of natural gas-fueled combustion turbines at the Mustang Energy Center

24

3 - solar capacity and generation includes approximately 2.5 MW at the Mustang Energy Center (online in late 2016) and approximately 10 MW at the Covington Solar Farm (online in early 2018)

4 - 2020 coal and gas generation is based on projection Mustang Energy Center combustion turbines at permitte

5 - 2020 projections account for the addition of SO2 emi conversion of Muskogee units 4 and 5 to natural gas

6 - In 2016, OG&E installed mercury emission monitoring


Comments, Links, Additional Information, and Notes

OG&E both sells power to and purchases power from the SPP market, so purchased power emissions presented here have an indeterminable degree of doublecounting 2018 CO2 and CO2e emissions in this section sums owned + purchased power above Rate in this section derived as: (summed emissions in preceding row) divided by (total actual MWh purchases from FERC Form 1 plus OG&E MWh in 2018) Note that rates are approximate, as some portions of generation in the denominator are net MWh and some are gross MWh

Source: GHG emissions records as reported to EPA under the mandatory GHG Reporting Protocols (40 CFR Part 98, Subpart DD)

Rates are per gross MWh, including renewables

Source of historical emissions data: EPA Air Markets Program records of monitored emissions for OG&E-owned and operated facilities Rates are per gross MWh, including renewables

Source of historical emissions data: EPA Air Markets Program records of monitored emissions for OG&E-owned and operated facilities Rates are per gross MWh, including renewables See additional note 5 below

Source: EPA TRI records for OG&E-owned coal-fueled facilities Rates are per gross MWh, including renewables See additional notes 6 and 7 below

Source of employee count and Board composition: annual SEC Form 10-K

Source of historical safety metrics: filed OSHA 300a records

Source for historical data in this section: Oklahoma Water Resources Board - Annual Use Report for OG&E-owned facilities. Baseline data in this section is from 2008 See additional notes 8 and 9 below

Earliest baseline data is 2008

from the 2015 OG&E IRP and the 2018 addition of the ed fuel and emissions limits

ission control equipment at the Sooner facility and the

g systems

7 - the 2020 projection accounts for the 2019 conversion of coal-fueled Muskogee units 4 and 5 to natural gas 8 - note that the McClain and Redbud combined-cycle plants do not use fresh water, only recycled/reused water 9 - the 2020 non-consumptive use projection accounts for the retirement of legacy gas boiler units and the 2018 addition of natural gas-fueled combustion turbines at the Mustang Energy Center

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