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Your
 Journey
 To
The
Top

Free
Air
Pistol
Training
Tips By
Jukka
Lahti/AirPistolTraining.com Version
1/July
1st
2009


AirPistolTraining.com

2

by Jukka Lahti

Table
of
contents

1.
Introduction
‐
Why
Should
You
Read
This
Guide?


page
3

2.
My
story
‐
Shooting
Since
1989
page
4


 
 


3.
The
Most
Important
Thing
‐
Be
Organized
page
7 
 3.1
Build
a
Training
Schedule
page
7 
 3.2
Keep
a
Training
Diary
page
8

4.
What
Kind
of
Pistol
You
Need?
page
9

5.
Physical
Fitness
‐
Not
to
Be
Overlooked
page
10


 
 
 
 


6.
Basic
Techniques
‐
Back
to
Fundamentals
page
11 
 6.1
Stance
page
11 
 6.2
Grip
page
12 
 6.3
Aiming
page
13 
 6.4
Pulling
The
Trigger
page
13

7.
Mental
Aspects
‐
Think
And
Don’t
page
15

8.
Now
What?
page
16


 
 
 


Please
feel
free
to
comment
on
anything
I’m
saying
in
this
little
book.
I
have
 barely
scratched
the
surface
but
I
will
make
additions
to
this
book
and
I
will
 write
more
in
the
future.
So
every
comment,
wish
or
question
is
valuable
to
 me.
You
can
send
them
to
jukka@airpistoltraining.com.

Thank
you
for
reading!


AirPistolTraining.com

3

by Jukka Lahti

1.
Introduction
‐
Why
Should
You
Read
This
Guide? This
guide
is
for
anyone
who
wants
to
improve
their
air
pistol
scores.
 You
won’t
find
any
magic
tricks
or
gimmicks
since
there
really
aren’t
 any
that
will
consistently
produce
better
results. If
you’re
after
instantaneous
improvements,
this
is
not
for
you.
But
if
 you
really
want
to
know
what
it
takes
to
start
shooting
better
and
 maybe
reach
540
or
550
or
even
higher
scores
at
some
in
the
future,
 read
on.


AirPistolTraining.com

4

by Jukka Lahti

2.
My
story
‐
Shooting
Since
1989 My
name
is
Jukka
Lahti.
Don’t
worry
if
you
can’t
pronounce
it.
Very
 few
people
in
the
world
do
since
there
is
only
about
five
million
of
us
 Finns.
 So,
I
was
born
in
Finland
and
started
shooting
when
I
was
12
years
old.
 My
dad
bought
me
a
cheap
Gamo
air
rifle
for
my
birthday.
Together
 we
would
shoot
in
our
backyard
to
targets
pinned
on
a
wall
of
this
old
 barn. I
was
immediately
hooked
with
this
new
pass
time
activity
and
about
a
 month
later
I
beat
my
dad
on
10
shot
competition.
That
got
him
 thinking
and
after
another
month
he
took
me
to
a
local
shooting
 range.
There
were
mostly
old
geezers
there
but
I
just
liked
to
shoot
so
 I
didn’t
care.
 The
first
two
sessions
I
spent
shooting
with
Feinwerkbau
air
rifle
but
 then
I
got
my
hands
on
a
Walther
CO2
pistol
(CP1
if
I
remember
 correctly)
and
that
was
it.
The
first
three
shots
hit
the
wall,
but
after
 that
I’ve
missed
a
target
once.
(That
happened
years
later
when
my
 Walther
LMP1’s
trigger
system
had
a
malfunction.) The
first
year
I
shot
only
at
our
home
range,
but
the
next
year
I
started
 to
attend
competition.
Boy
was
that
exciting! A
couple
of
times
I
finished
last
and
my
scores
were
way
below
my
 skill
level.
Soon,
when
I
started
to
feel
more
at
home
standing
on
the
 line
side
by
side
with
other
competitors,
my
scores
improved
fast. I
won
for
the
first
time
that
same
winter
and
my
dad
took
me
to
a
 shooting
camp
for
youngsters.
There
I
learned
a
bunch
of
technical
 stuff
but
the
most
important
thing
I
got
out
that
week
was
this:
 If
you
want
to
improve
your
scores,
you
can’t
”just
shoot”.
You
 have
to
practice. For
the
next
couple
of
years
I
kept
practicing
and
went
to
several
 training
camps
organized
by
The
Finnish
Sport
Shooting
Federation.
 In
1993,
after
I
had
broken
the
national
junior
record
for
50
m
pistol,
I
 was
invited
to
the
Finnish
national
junior
team. I
was
on
the
team
for
a
few
years
and
my
scores
kept
getting
better.
At
 the
age
of
16
I
shot
565
points
in
air
pistol
and
a
year
later
I
improved
 to
569.
For
most
shooters
those
are
results
they’ll
never
achieve. Then
two
things
happened.
First
our
national
team
coach
gave
me
 some
very
bad
advice
and
then
I
was
introduced
to
spinning
records.
 My
scores
went
down
and
with
them,
my
motivation.
I
started
my
 career
as
a
DJ
and
put
my
Hämmerli
air
pistol
away.


AirPistolTraining.com

5

by Jukka Lahti

A
couple
of
years
ago,
2005
to
be
exact,
I
remembered
again
how
 much
fun
it
was
to
shoot.
I
joined
a
shooting
club
and
started
to
go
to
 the
range
every
now
and
then.
Since
I
used
to
be
in
the
national
team,
 I
just
couldn’t
keep
it
at
that.
I
wanted
to
shoot
well. I
practiced
a
couple
of
months
and
went
to
a
competition
to
my
old
 home
town.
Boy,
it
was
embarrassing.
I
shot
543
and
my
old
club
 mates
were
asking
if
there
had
been
something
wrong
with
my
 weapon. I
told
them
absolutely
not,
it
was
all
me.
AS
IT
USUALLY
IS. After
the
competition
I
went
home
and
started
to
do
some
research.
I
 read
at
least
half
a
dozen
books,
browsed
all
I
could
find
on
the
 internet
and
read
through
all
my
notes
from
national
team
training
 camps. As
a
result
I
developed
a
training
schedule
for
myself
for
the
next
 three
months.
And
you
know
what.
Three
months
later‐almost
to
the
 date‐I
shot
this
in
an
official
match: 


Figure
1
(P‐HA
is
my
club,
Ilmapistooli=air
pistol,
Y
means
the
competition
was
open
to
anyone,
I
finished
8th
 and
Finaali=final)

As
you
can
see,
I
shot
575
in
qualification
round
and
then
my
first
final
 in
men’s
class
was
a
complete
disaster.
Simply
because
I
hadn’t
shot
a
 final
since
my
junior
years. The
next
week
I
shot
577
and
everything
looked
really
good,
but
then
I
 hurt
my
arm
when‐believe
it
or
not‐I
was
changing
tires
to
my
car.
 Rest
of
the
season
went
pretty
much
overboard
although
I
did
manage
 a
few
560‐565
scores. On
summer
time
I
tried
to
shoot
50
m
pistol,
but
my
arm
got
upset
 and
I
haven’t
really
been
shooting
much
since.
Instead
I
have
started
 one
business
and
right
now
I’m
in
the
middle
of
starting
a
new
 company.
 As
you
can
imagine,
I
have
quite
a
lot
on
my
plate
right
now
so
you
 might
be
wondering
why
I’m
spending
time
on
this
book.
I
have
a



AirPistolTraining.com

6

by Jukka Lahti

simple
answer
for
you.
I
love
this
sport.
I
love
that
I’m
good
at
it
and
I
 love
when
other
people
are
too. I’m
writing
this
so
could
have
fun
at
the
range
every
time
and
that
you
 can
enjoy
making
your
buddies
angry
when
you
always
beat
them.
I
 love
to
win
and
I
bet
you
do
too!
So,
let’s
get
on
with
it.


AirPistolTraining.com

7

by Jukka Lahti

3.
The
Most
Important
Thing
‐
Be
Organized You’ve
probably
tried
all
kinds
of
tricks
you’ve
read
about
in
some
 magazine
or
you’ve
heard
from
other
shooters.
If
you’re
seriously
 trying
to
better
your
scores,
forget
about
all
of
them. Why?
Because
shooting
is
precision
sport
where
the
tiniest
error
can
 make
a
huge
difference.
To
eliminate
those
errors
you
have
to
drive
 your
shooting
process
into
your
muscle
memory.
 Your
shooting
has
to
be
an
automated
performance
that
you
don’t
 have
to
think
about.
You
should
be
able
to
produce
a
perfect
shot
two
 minutes
after
you’ve
get
out
of
bed.
In‐order‐to
produce
that
kind
of
 level
of
automation
you
have
to
practice
the
correct
technique
over
 and
over
again.
Thousands
and
thousands
of
times. By
now
understand
of
course
what
I
mean
when
I
urge
you
to
forget
 all
the
trick
they
tell
you.
That’s
right,
every
time
you
try
something
 new,
you
brake
up
the
process
of
building
the
automation.
Your
 muscle
memory
has
to
start
almost
from
scratch. Being
organized
means
that
at
the
beginning
of
a
new
season
you
start
 from
the
fundamentals.
 First
you
go
over
your
equipment,
what
needs
to
be
tweak,
repaired,
 adjusted.
Usually
you
have
to
at
least
work
your
handle
a
bit.
Check
 your
eye
sight,
if
there’s
any
changes,
deal
with
it.
(It’s
better
for
pistol
 shooter
not
to
see
clearly
very
far.
Sights
have
to
be
sharp
but
not
the
 target.) Then
you
go
over
your
stance
and
grip.
This
is
the
time
to
make
any
 changes
you
might
have
thought
about
last
season.
After
this
phase
 you
don’t
modify
your
equipment
or
change
your
stance
and
grip
 unless
it
is
absolutely
necessary!

3.1
Build
a
Training
Schedule A
training
schedule
is
an
ideal
way
to
be
organized.
In
the
schedule
 you
define
when
you
do
what:
when
you
train
your
physics,
when
you
 train
technique,
when
you
have
competition
like
training,
when
are
 the
competitions
and
when
you
rest. In
each
technical
training
session
you
should
concentrate
on
one
 single
thing
(stance,
grip,
aiming,
pulling
the
trigger
and
even
smaller
 things
inside
these
procedures).
You
should
also
set
goals
for
each
 session.
 The
goal
has
nothing
to
do
with
scores,
but
it
has
everything
to
do
 with
the
right
process.
You
want
to
determine
how
much
 improvement
you
want
to
see
in
one
session.


AirPistolTraining.com

8

by Jukka Lahti

Your
training
schedule
is
a
road
map
from
first
level
to
second
or
third
 or
fourth.
On
general
level
you
plan
it
for
the
next
six
or
even
twelve
 months.
Then
you
make
more
detailed
plan
for
the
next
two
or
three
 months
and
on
each
week
or
day
you
can
adjust
your
plan
if
you
see
it
 necessary. In
the
beginning
of
a
season
you
should
always
concentrate
on
the
 fundamentals
before
you
start
doing
any
new
stuff
you’ve
planned
for
 the
season.
If
you
run
into
difficulties
during
the
season,
you
should
 go
back
to
the
basics.

3.2
Keep
a
Training
Diary If
you’ve
just
started
shooting
and
plan
to
attend
only
one
 competition,
you
don’t
need
a
diary.
However,
if
you
plan
to
continue
 shooting
a
bit
longer,
you
can
benefit
greatly
from
keeping
a
training
 diary. The
basic
reason
to
keep
a
diary
is
that
you’ll
see
what
work
and
what
 doesn’t.
When
you’re
having
difficulties
at
some
point,
you
can
go
 back
to
your
diary
and
see
what
have
you
done
in
similar
situations.
 Diary
also
helps
you
to
construct
your
training
schedule. In
the
diary
you
put
the
gold
facts
about
your
practice
sessions:
time
 spent,
shots
fired,
location,
time
of
day,
weather
etc.
In
addition
you
 write
down
a
few
lines
on
how
the
sessions
went,
how
did
you
feel
and
 if
there
is
something
you
should
do
differently
on
the
next
session. Your
diary
is
part
of
your
practice
session.
You
start
your
practice
by
 reading
your
notes
from
the
latest
session
and
you’re
not
finished
until
 you
have
written
down
facts
and
feelings
from
this
session.


AirPistolTraining.com

9

by Jukka Lahti

4.
What
Kind
of
Pistol
You
Need? When
you’re
aiming
for
acceptable
results,
you
have
to
have
a
real
 competition
pistol.
If
your
pistol
looks
anything
like
those
in
the
 movies,
forget
it.
Your
weapon
has
to
have
at
least
adjustable
rear
 sights,
grip
size,
grip
angle,
trigger
pressure
and
trigger
location. At
the
moment
I
have
a
Steyr
LP10
which
I
like
very
much.
There
are
 several
other
manufactures
that
produce
weapons
for
the
top
athletes.
 You’ve
probably
heard
names
like
Anschütz,
Benelli,
Feinwerkbau,
 Morini,
Tesro
and
Walther.
(If
I
left
some
out,
feel
free
to
let
me
 know.) Go
to
a
dealer
who
is
specialized
in
competition
firearms
and
try
them
 out.
As
long
as
the
weapons
you’re
considering
are
built
according
to
 the
rules
of
ISSF
you
can
choose
just
about
any
make
you
like.
 All
new
air
pistols
operate
with
compressed
air
which
produced
the
 most
consistent
pellet
velocity
and
they
have
high
grade
barrels.
So
 they
will
be
straight
shooters
as
long
as
you
use
high
grade
 ammunition
(H&N
or
RWS
high
quality
pellets).
Until
you
reach
 scores
of
570
and
above
you
don’t
have
to
think
which
ammunition
 will
suite
best
for
your
weapon. Ii
would
be
better
if
you’d
had
a
chance
to
try
a
weapon
you’re
 interested
in
for
a
couple
of
weeks.
There
is
a
phenomenon
that
 appears
almost
every
time
you
buy
a
new
pistol
or
try
someone
else’s
 gun:
you
get
great
results
with
it
right
out
of
the
gate.
 This
has
probably
something
to
do
with
the
fact
that
you
concentrate
 on
the
fundamentals
when
you’re
shooting
with
a
strange
weapon.
In
 a
couple
weeks
this
phenomenon
will
fade
and
you
can
evaluate
the
 pistol
by
it’s
true
merit.


AirPistolTraining.com

10

by Jukka Lahti

5.
Physical
Fitness
‐
Not
to
Be
Overlooked When
I
talk
about
physical
fitness
I’m
not
just
referring
to
the
muscles
 in
your
pistol
arm.
Of
course
you
have
to
have
certain
amount
of
 muscles
to���be
able
to
raise
your
pistol
and
hold
it
steady
for
4‐10
 seconds
80‐90
(men)
or
60‐70
(women)
times
during
a
competition. If
you
have
been
shooting
regularly
one
or
two
years,
this
shouldn’t
be
 a
problem
for
you.
You
need
however
be
in
fairly
good
physical
 condition
to
manage
a
two‐hour
competition
without
getting
tired. The
first
place
where
physical
fatigue
shows
is
your
brains.
When
your
 brains
don’t
function
fully,
you
won’t
be
able
to
aim,
grip
or
pull
the
 trigger
the
way
you
should. You
understand
of
course
this
level
of
fitness
isn’t
very
hard
to
 achieve,
but
you
need
to
exercise
regularly
to
maintain
required
level. Strength
in
your
arms
and
shoulders
is
important
when
improving
 stability
of
your
weapon
when
aiming.
That’s
why
you
should
do
some
 weight
lifting
but
not
during
competition
season.
Reason
for
this
is
 that
when
your
muscles
grow
they
momentarily
lose
their
sensitivity.
 In
other
words
you’ll
lose
your
touch. You’ll
always
benefit
from
tight
core
muscles
ie.
strong
abs
and
back.
 They
will
stabilize
your
stance
and
ease
the
pressure
on
your
shoulders
 and
legs.
If
you
need
major
workout
to
improve
your
core
muscles
I
 suggest
you
do
it
off‐season.



AirPistolTraining.com

11

by Jukka Lahti

6.
Basic
Techniques
‐
Back
to
Fundamentals Shooting
with
air
pistol
is
really
pretty
easy.
You
take
your
stance,
 your
take
a
firm
grip,
you
aim,
you
aim
and
you
follow
thru.
Doing
it
 exactly
the
same
way
80
times
in
a
row
is
a
bit
harder.
 Here
are
four
major
things
you
should
concentrate
on
when
trying
to
 improve
your
scores.

6.1
Stance It
all
starts
with
how
you
stand.
Your
stance
has
to
be
solid,
 comfortable
and
exactly
the
same
for
each‐and‐every
shot.
There
are
 different
perspectives
on
stance
and
the
way
top
athletes
stand
has
 changed
over
the
years. In
the
old
days
almost
everybody
stood
their
chest
facing
the
target.
 Nowadays
almost
no‐one
does
that
anymore.
Instead,
almost
 everybody
stands
in
way
that
their
shoulders
are
aligned
with
the
 shooting
line.
There
is
a
good
reason
for
this. You
see,
when
you
are
standing
in
90°
angle
against
the
target,
there
 are
bigger
muscles
in
your
neck,
back,
chest
and
sides
helping
your
 arm
to
hold
the
pistol.
Bigger
muscles
means
more
power
and
more
 stable
arm. There
is
sort
of
a
trend
among
the
top
shooters
to
have
their
both
feet
 in
90°
angle
with
the
target
and
only
about
30
cm
apart
(figure
2).
I
 find
this
kind
of
positioning
tiresome
since
it
causes
tension
in
pelvis,
 thighs
and
calfs.

Figure
2

Another
negative
aspect
of
this
kind
of
stance
is
that
you
have
to
turn
 your
head
90°
to
be
able
to
aim.
This
causes
tension
in
the
neck
which
 can
weaken
blood
flow
to
your
brain
and
thus
disturb
your
eyesight. I
recommend
you
don’t
do
like
those
guys
but
put
your
feet
a
bit
more
 apart.
Shoulder
width
is
good.
Then
you
take
your
rear
leg
a
few



AirPistolTraining.com

12

by Jukka Lahti

centimeters
forward
and
finally
turn
your
feet
slightly
inside
out
 (figure
3).

Figure
3

This
makes
your
stance
more
relaxed
and
easier
to
maintain.
The
 stance
is
also
more
stable. Otherwise
you
should
stand
straight,
maybe
arch
you
back
just
a
little
 bit,
keep
your
left
shoulder
(right,
if
you’re
shooting
with
your
left
 hand)
relaxed
and
right
hand
in
your
trouser
pocket. Of
course
these
are
just
guidelines.
Remember
that
you
have
to
feel
 comfortable
in
your
stance
about
two
hours.
Don’t
make
it
something
 that
starts
to
bother
you
in
the
middle
of
a
competition.

6.2
Grip Are
you
squeezing
your
pistol
as
hard
as
you
can?
Well,
don’t.
The
 recoil
of
an
air
pistol
is
almost
nonexistent
so
you
don’t
need
to
use
 force
against
that. When
you
loosen
up
your
grip
a
bit
the
weapon
will
be
much
more
 settled,
no
trembling
that
comes
from
tense
muscle
in
your
hand.
 Loosening
also
helps
your
release
as
your
trigger
finger
will
be
more
 relaxed. I’m
not
going
to
give
you
any
percentage
of
how
hard
you
should
 squeeze
since
it’s
ultimately
a
question
of
personal
preference.
Do
a
 bit
of
testing
to
see
what
fits
for
you
and
then
stick
with
it. The
pressure
produced
by
your
middle
finger,
ring‐finger
and
little
 finger
has
to
be
directed
directly
backwards.
That’s
why
don’t
squeeze
 at
all
with
your
fingertips. Always
remember
to
check
that
your
pistol
is
centered
between
the
 web
of
your
thumb
and
your
forefinger.
The
position
of
your
hand
 should
be
exactly
the
same
every
time
you
shoot.
This
is
very
 important
since
a
small
change
in
your
grip
will
cause
surprisingly
big
 changes
on
target.


AirPistolTraining.com

13

by Jukka Lahti

In
order
to
be
able
to
grip
your
gun
exactly
the
same
way
every
time,
 you
have
to
adjust
your
handle
in
a
way
it
fits
your
hand
almost
like
a
 glove.
Use
a
knife,
file
and
sandpaper
to
make
room
for
your
muscles
 and
putty
to
fill
gaps
between
your
hand
and
the
handle. Or,
you
can
buy
a
tailored
handle.
Remember
thought,
that
your
hand
 is
a
living
thing
and
it
won’t
stay
the
same
year
after
year.
That’s
why
 you
have
to
check
at
least
once
every
year
how
your
hand
and
handle
 fit
together.

6.3
Aiming If
you’ve
been
shooting
for
a
while,
you
probably
know
how
to
aim.
I’ll
 explain
it
anyway
since
it
is
the
most
important
part
on
your
 technique.
It
is
so
obviously
relevant,
it
is
overlooked
by
many,
if
not
 the
majority
of
shooters. On
the
left
you
see
a
picture
of
what
you
should
see
when
you
aim.
 Your
front
sight
is
right
in
the
middle
of
the
notch
on
the
rear
sight
 and
their
top
edges
are
even.
Aim
under
the
target’s
black
center
so
 that
you
see
a
bit
of
white
between
your
sights
and
the
black
area. How
much
of
white
there
should
be
is
up
to
you.
If
the
space
is
too
 little,
you’ll
feel
uncomfortable.
If
the
space
is
too
big,
it’ll
be
more
 difficult
to
find
the
right
target
point
on
each
shot. There
is
one
fatal
mistake
many
shooters
make
when
there
aiming
and
 very
often
they
don’t
even
realize
it.
As
you
have
been
shooting
a
 while
you
get
used
to
it.
What
happens
then
is,
your
eyes
start
to
 wonder
away
from
the
sights.
 It’s
like
when
you
drive
certain
root
every
morning
to
get
to
work.
You
 don’t
have
to
think
when
to
turn
etc.
and
that’s
why
most
of
all
traffic
 accidents
happen
near
home
or
work.
You
stop
paying
attention. When
your
eyes
wonder
to
the
target,
you’re
not
making
sure
your
 sights
are
aligned
and
your
hits
will
be
all
over
the
target.
Most
 commonly
hits
will
be
low
since
usually
your
front
sight
will
start
to
 slug. You
have
to
focus
your
eyes
to
your
front
sight
through
the
whole
shot
 process.
If
you
don’t
do
this,
nothing
else
will
matter.

6.4
Pulling
The
Trigger How
you
pull
the
trigger
is
the
second
most
important
thing
in
pistol
 shooting.
Bad
trigger
technique
can
easily
take
50‐60
points
from
your
 score.



AirPistolTraining.com

14

by Jukka Lahti

When
shooting
you
try
not
to
move,
but
you
have
to
move
your
index
 finger.
If
you
move
it
violently,
you’ll
move
your
whole
hand
and
your
 weapon. You
have
to
squeeze
the
trigger
very
steadily
and
slowly
but
yet
with
 determination.
In
my
opinion,
pulling
the
trigger
must
be
unconscious
 action
that
just
happens.
The
release
has
to
be
a
”surprise”. As
for
the
other
fingers,
it
is
equally
or
even
more
important
that
the
 movement
of
your
trigger
finger
is
directed
straight
backwards.
It’s
 simple:
if
you
pull
the
trigger
to
the
right,
your
hits
will
be
on
the
 right. By
adjusting
the
trigger
and
trigger
pressure
you
can
make
the
 squeezing
process
easier
for
yourself.
Minimum
pressure
your
trigger
 has
to
take
without
a
release
is
500
g.
By
sharing
this
weight
for
 example
evenly
between
the
first
and
second
stage
of
trigger
travel
you
 can
smooth
the
trigger
movement. Placement
of
your
trigger
is
a
question
of
personal
preference.
You
 should
place
the
trigger
so
that
you
can
pull
it
without
your
index
 finger
touching
any
other
part
of
the
weapon.


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15

by Jukka Lahti

7.
Mental
Aspects
‐
Think
And
Don’t Shooting
is
one
of
those
sports
where
what
happens
in
your
head
is
a
 lot
more
important
than
what
you
do
physically.
Huge
amount
of
 books
have
been
written
on
psychological
training
for
athletes
and
it
 will
benefit
you
to
read
at
least
a
few. At
this
point
I
will
say
that
to
reach
good
scores,
you
have
to
think
a
 lot.
To
reach
great
scores
you
have
to
learn
not
to
think. It
means
that
when
you
practice,
you
have
to
think
all
the
time
about
 what
you
are
doing.
You
have
to
do
things
consciously.
When
you’re
 competing,
you
have
to
clear
your
head
completely
and
trust
your
 muscle
memory
to
do
the
job. This
is
THE
ONLY
WAY
you
can
reach
high
scores
and
it
is
the
only
 way
you
will
constantly
reach
your
potential
in
competitions. Shooting
is
a
sport
where
you
truly
have
to
just
do
your
best
and
then
 check
the
score
board
how
you
did.
You
can
force
a
ten
every
now
and
 then,
but
you
can’t
do
it
all
the
time.
You
don’t
have
any
control
on
 what
your
competitors
are
doing.
You
don’t
know
how
they
are
doing
 or
at
least
you
shouldn’t.
 If
during
a
competition
you
start
calculating
what
your
result
would
 be
”if
I
continue
this
way”,
you’re
doomed.
If
you
start
following
your
 competitors
during
a
competition,
you’re
doomed.
If
you
think
about
 what
you’re
going
to
do
in
the
final,
you
won’t
get
there.
YOU
HAVE
 TO
DO
YOUR
OWN
THING!


AirPistolTraining.com

16

by Jukka Lahti

8.
Now
What? As
I
said,
shooting
with
air
pistol
is
quite
easy.
You
can
make
it
 difficult
if
you
begin
to
think
you’re
good
enough
to
ignore
the
 fundamentals.
 Start
again
right
now!
Stop
what
you’re
doing
and
start
improving
 your
physical
fitness.
Go
cycling,
jogging
or
do
long
walks.
Do
some
 weight
lifting
and
work
your
core
muscles.
Do
this
for
two
months. During
that
phase
you
have
time
to
adjust
your
weapon
so
that
when
 you
go
to
the
range
it’ll
be
ready. When
you
start
practicing
with
your
gun,
start
with
your
stance,
then
 your
grip,
then
aiming
and
then
trigger
technique.
Think
about
what
 you
do
in
practice
and
then
have
fun
in
competitions.
Be
organized
 and
soon
you’ll
beat
your
buddies
every
time
you’re
shooting
together. Have
a
great
time!


 
 
 


Please
feel
free
to
comment
on
anything
I’m
saying
in
this
little
book.
I
have
 barely
scratched
the
surface
but
I
will
make
additions
to
this
book
and
I
will
 write
more
in
the
future.
So
every
comment,
wish
or
question
is
valuable
to
 me.
You
can
send
them
to
jukka@airpistoltraining.com.

Thank
you
for
reading!


Air pistol