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Published By Driven LLC, Keri Wanner & Yarrum Design LLC, Denise Sanzo Cal4Wheel............................................................................. 7 Steve Egbert Off-Road Business Association 1701 Westwind Drive #108 Bakersfield, CA 93301 661.323.1464 Fax 661.323.1487

One Voice.............................................................................. 8 Alexis Nelson

ORBA Board Members

Outstanding Ambassador Jeff Slavins .................................. 14

Chairman: Greg Adler, Transamerican Auto Parts

SEMA in 60.......................................................................... 25 Keri Wanner

Treasurer: Mark Turner, Daystar

Friends of Uhwarrie ............................................................ 33 Robin Touw, Social Media Director

Secretary: Lindsay Hubley, Family Events

Move Over Motorcross‌ USA BMX is Set to Arrive............ 29 Ben Janin

Member: Brad Franklin, Yamaha Motorsports USA Member: Stuart Gosswein, SEMA Member: Kurt Miller, Enthusiast Network

Positive Outlook for Outdoor Recreation in 2016, American Recreation Coalition .......................................... 12

Hug a Snowmobiler............................................................. 40 Steve Egbert SEMA Update ...................................................................... 46 Stuart Gosswein & Eric Snyder Our Members ...................................................................... 53 Send future contributions to keri@driven2pushboundaries.com

Member: Jim Chick, Bestop, Inc. ORBA Staff President & CEO: Fred Wiley 661.323.1464 fwiley@orba.biz Office Manager / Accounting: Deborah Burgess 661.323.1464 dburgess@orba.biz

Cover photo: Jake Forstall Photography


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OUR MISSION STATEMENT

ORBA is a nonprofit association of off-road related business owners who have united to preserve the sport of off-road recreation in an environmentally responsible manner.

WHAT WE DO

ORBA proactively protects recreation access and opportunities by ensuring that America’s families are not arbitrarily denied the right to responsibly recreate. ORBA provides leadership in addressing land use issues by advancing policies that conserve the environment while at the same time providing off-road recreation opportunities. We are a professional trade association composed of off-road related businesses united to promote common goals that support the prosperity and growth of the off-road industry. ORBA makes decisions and takes actions that maintain and expand off-highway vehicle recreation opportunity. ORBA works closely with its partner organizations on local, state and federal issues that have potential impacts to the off-road industry. We are dedicated to making it possible for the OHV industry to have a voice in land use issues. Many industries have trade associations that protect their interests. The off-road business industry has ORBA! Send future contributions to keri@driven2pushboundaries.com

CONTRIBUTORS Editorial: Alexis Nelson, NOHVCC, ORBA, Scott Jones, BF Goodrich, SEMA, Polaris, Ben Janin, Maine Snowmobile Association, American Recreation Coalition, CA4WDA, Steven Marlenee. Photography: Jake Forstall Photography PAGE 3


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Is 2016 a year of change? By Fred Wiley When looking into your crystal ball, do you see change or more of the same old thing? We do know one thing, we’re going to have a new administration. Will the new administration manage in the same way or chose a different direction? Are they going to listen or ignore the facts? What and how will new policies be developed and implemented? These questions just scratch the surface, but are an important part of change in leadership/ administration. How do we address change? Are we going to set back and see what we get, or be a part of what it takes to create positive change? The Off-Road Business Association (ORBA) is not going to be take a passive position with the future of motorized recreation on public land. For several years, ORBA has worked to position ourselves to be an important part of any change with the transition from one administration to another. We have identified and outlined a process and how we will play a key role in developing that policy. The Utah Canyonlands Draft language Chairman, Congressman Rob Bishop and Congressman Jason Chaffetz, have been released and they are asking for input and comments before final language is introduced. They are insisting that the bill language will protect and insure that future closers will have equal areas to replace any loss of protected use. As you can see there is plenty of work to do. The most important aspect of any change, is participation. If you want change, don’t leave it up to someone else. Take the time, know the issues, show-up and do your part. We cannot over emphasize the importance on educated participation. Fred Wiley President/CEO Off-Road Business Association 661-323-1464

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THE CEO OF “4 WHEEL PARTS” GOES UNDERCOVER TO MEET THE EMPLOYEES WHO KEEP HIS COMPANY ON THE RIGHT TRACK, ON “UNDERCOVER BOSS,” FRIDAY, FEB 5

“4 Wheel Parts” – Greg Adler, President and CEO of 4 Wheel Parts, the global leader in truck, Jeep, SUV and off-road tires, wheels, lift kits and accessories, goes undercover to meet the employees who keep his company on the right track, on UNDERCOVER BOSS, Friday, Feb. 5 (8:00-9:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network. During the boss’s undercover mission, the pressure rises when he is tasked with mounting massive tires on a Jeep.

Dear friends, I am excited to share the news about the airing of 4Wheel Parts on Undercover Boss. My journey was a once in a lifetime experience and I hope it plays well on national TV. The show airs on CBS, Feb 5th at 8pm (most time zones) with a viewership of over 7 million. The media blitz will gear up starting next Monday Feb 1st, but feel free to share this as you wish. Thanks, Greg

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Colorado Parks and Wildlife is reviewing a resolution opposing wolves in Colorado. by Scott Jones

There are efforts again being directed towards looking at possible reform of the Endangered Species Act, including efforts being facilitated by the Western Governors Association that I recently participated in. I think the Western Governors Association should be commended for starting these discussions as any discussion of reform or revision of the Endangered Species Act is often surrounded by vigorous responses from a lot of parties. It is my position that there are a lot of areas where the Act could be reformed to function far better and with less impacts to activities that do not related to protecting a species that is actually at risk. I don’t think there are is a lot of support for completely doing away with the Act, as everyone agrees that a species truly at risk should be protected and helped towards recovery. While there is a lot of discussion around the Act and its effectiveness, probably one of the most surprising positions being taken has been Colorado Parks and Wildlife looking at a resolution opposing the reintroduction of wolves in Colorado. Many in Colorado would vigorously support such a position. I think it speaks volumes to the act that wildlife managers are opposing the reintroduction of a species on the list and this type of a position provides a large amount of hard evidence that there are serious problems with the Act. Maybe the lynx reintroduction of almost 15 years ago in Colorado still has left too bad a taste in many people’s mouths as those efforts never impacted the status of the lynx on the ESA but have resulted in a lot of ongoing issues and conflicts for wildlife managers. The fundamental problems with the Act that lead wildlife managers to even look at these types of positions simply must be addressed.

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National Advocate

The Egbert Center for By Steve

Biological Diversity based in Tucson, Arizona, is a nonprofit membership organization with National Advocate approximately 625,000 members and online activists, known for its work protecting endangered species through legal action, scientific petitions, creative media and grassroots activism. The Center has offices and staff in New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, California, Oregon, Illinois, Minnesota, A laska, Vermont, The Center Biological Diversity based in in Tucson, Arizona, is a nonprofit membership This picture was moving around Facebook during Florida andfor Washington, D.C. what do we the off-road recreation community to matchorganization the number with of approximately 625,000 members and online activists, December and and what a fitting sentiment for many of known for its work protecting endangered species members resources? through legalofaction, scientific creativeyour media and grassroots activism. The Center has offices us. I now many youalland verypetitions, much value If you were to put the Arizona, nations off-road groups together we could notMinnesota, match theACDB membership and staff in New Mexico, Nevada, California, Oregon, Illinois, laska, Vermont, and friendship. We most certainly would not become resources. It is not because we dodo notwe have enough users, In the state of California alone percent andnot Washington, D.C. a what in off-road recreation community to match the 14 number of of friendsFlorida if I had I not bought Jeep on million anthe April California households enjoyed riding two OHVs, spending $7.7 billion on OHV equipment and members and resources? afternoon backvehicles, in 2003.and I still have the same (for to the California economy. This shows that there is transport contributing $1.1 billionYJ directly Ifnot you were to put all the nations off-road groups together weusers couldtonot CDB membership and all of you with Toyotas-that’s one with the square a lack of available funds but there is an apathy among thematch issuesthe OHV recreation faces. resources. It is not because we do not have enough users, In the state of California alone 14 percent of headlights) and have added a TJand as three well to my Cal4Wheel has one employee contractors working on $7.7 behalf of those 14 percent of California California households enjoyed riding two million OHVs, spending billion on OHV equipment and garage.households I joined my local club, Lock and Low and thoughand ourcontributing actual membership is considerably If we economy. could only This get an additional transport vehicles, $1.1 billion directly to theless. California shows that there is few years later Clovis percentage of the Independent households, we Four wouldWheelers be able to more effectively represent our community. not a lack of available funds but there is an apathy among users to the issues OHV recreation faces. through the clubs and the many events, trail projects We alwayshas need help to effectively communicating work on we behalf do, information about our events and Cal4Wheel one employee and three contractors working of those 14 percent of California and volunteering with the association have gainedthe information on the Win-a-Jeep program. If you have the opportunity to spread the word that our group households though ourWe actual membership is considerably less. If we could get an additional long lasting friendships. make and maintain these friendships withonly a common passion for the and others of like ushouseholds, need help from our community, please be an advocate for our us so we can continue percentage the we would be able to more effectively represent community. adventures four wheeling affords us. As we start a new year I hope to continue to make new friends, advocating for recreation as we have for over 55 years. and strengthen friendships built overcommunicating time. It seems a fitting time to thankabout all ofourmy fellow We always need help to effectively the work we do, information events andvolunteers that make up ourongreat association. I guess point to to this is that times when you start information the Win-a-Jeep program. If you the havewhole the opportunity spread the some word that our group and others us need help from our community, be an advocate for us soThat we can continue something inyou; lifelike it can grow into something veryplease positive and unexpected. day in April 2003 I did Thank advocating for recreation as but we have for over not know what would happen it turned out55toyears. be such a big part of my life to come. Starting with

something small can grow into a great thing that can be very valuable. Try something new it might just work out to be something that is important to you, though there may be a bump or two in the road. Thank Steve you; Egbert

We willPresident soon gather Rancho Cordova at our annual convention to look back over the past year and (559) in 936-3030 recognize our accomplishments and look forward to successes and challenges for the upcoming year. We willSteve be giving Egbert away this year’s Win-a-Jeep, Mini Moto that has been a great project built by GenRight Off Road. I want to thank Tony Pellegrino for all his support and the tremendous donation his President (559) 936-3030 company and all the other sponsors has made. I have to also thank Steve Gardiner for taking on the task of Win-a-Jeep Chairman, it is his efforts and commitment that have made the Win-a-Jeep project such a success. I hope to talk to one of you Feb 20th after Tony pulls the winning ticket. Good Luck. Winter Fun will be complete when this issue comes out but this year there is Winter (Snow) to have fun in. Hope to see many of you in May at Hollister Hills for the Molina Ghost Run or at Hi Desert Round-up, come on an Adventure with Us, or consider helping out it may just start a grand adventure for you.

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at SEMA The One Voice movement is gaining more ground with an increased awareness of our mission and the need for a unified voice in OHV recreation. In November, we had a By Alexis Nelson productive and successful onsite meeting that took place in the ORBA lounge during the SEMA Show. ORBA members and representatives from the OHV community participated in a dynamic and interactive discussion where we focused on refining our purpose, what we want to accomplish, and established our rules of engagement. These are our guiding principles on how we are going to work together in achieving goals and making well informed decisions. The core of the meeting was to convey the importance of applying the One Voice concept and turning it into action providing long lasting benefits to the OHV community and industry. It’s about connecting grassroots to business and taking a proactive approach in identifying long term solutions that are based on following a detailed plan and executing decisions in a timely manner. The meeting participants identified a wish list of projects that they would like One Voice to address; a few of the projects are already in motion thanks to ORBA and partnering organizations. We will begin reviewing this list with the regional entities, prioritize and evaluate each topic, and assign responsibility based on local resources. Below is a snapshot of the projects that we will begin reviewing: Public Land – Policy & Planning • Planning Rule Changes • Closures & decommissioning of roads and trails • Special Use Permits • Insurance • Lack of consistency between districts and forests • FS/BLM Firefighting funding • Reopening closed roads • Environmental groups applying pressure to federal agencies to categorize subspecies of plants and animal habitats

User Group Collaboration • Building positive networks • Turnover of Agency employees & user group representatives affects line of communication • Identifying the right people to continue the movement National Policy & Legislation • National Monument Designations • Endangered Species Act • Consumer Product Safety Commission Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles rule making • Two distinct populations of Greater Sage Grouse • Forest Planning Process • Wilderness designation & Wilderness Study Area’s PAGE 8


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National Policy & Legislation • National Monument Designations • Endangered Species Act • Consumer Product Safety Commission Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles rule making • Two distinct populations of Greater Sage Grouse • Forest Planning Process • Wilderness designation & Wilderness Study Area’s Specific Projects & Initiatives • BLM Las Vegas & BLM Carson District Resource Management Plans • Bonneville Salt Flats • Gold Ridge OHV Access (pushed for National Monument designation) OHV Organization & Education • Fund raising & grant applications • Irresponsible users & education • Establishing OHV Protections • Trail development, funding, repair, and Insurance • Need for legal representation • Working with FS Personnel

Private Land Issues • Loss of access & leases because of OHV use • Timber companies charging fee for access and use Specific Projects & Initiatives • BLM Las Vegas & BLM Carson District Resource Management Plans • Bonneville Salt Flats • Gold Ridge OHV Access (pushed for National Monument designation)

ORBA has made the commitment to share resources and dedicate staff members to ensure we keep the momentum flowing. Over the next couple of months, we will be engaging members that are in their respective regions and connecting them with like-minded enthusiasts and professionals to implement the recently developed structure and let the fun work begin! Much of this work is connecting the right people with common interests and the willingness to get things done. If you are interested and willing to be part of the One Voice movement, please contact Alexis Nelson. Until next time, Happy Trails! One Voice is a non-profit national association committed to promoting the rights of motorized enthusiasts; improve advocacy in keeping public and private lands open for responsible recreation through strong leadership, advocacy, and collaboration.

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POSITIVE OUTLOOK FOR OUTDOOR RECREATION IN 2016 Washington, D.C. (October 29, 2015) – Outdoor recreation leaders report good sales and activities for 2015 and expectations of still stronger activity in 2016, according to a new report from the American Recreation Coalition, Outdoor Recreation Outlook 2016. Americans spend more than $650 billion annually on equipment ranging from skis and tents to RVs and boats and on services ranging from fishing licenses to zip lines, supporting millions of jobs in manufacturing, sales and service. And renewed interest in outreach and promotion by federal land and water management agencies – based around the National Park Service’s Centennial Celebration – is creating new opportunities for Americans everywhere to enjoy their great outdoors. A core strength of outdoor recreation in America is the lure of America’s public lands and waters covering nearly one third of the nation’s surface. Best known is America’s National Park System with 408 units, ranging from world-renowned destinations to small historic sites. Visitation is on the rise, up to 3.66% from 2014 levels, with 8.7 million more visits for the year to date. Key to this rise is the National Park Service’s first major promotional campaign in 50 years – Find Your Park – as well as the Every Kid in a Park initiative, aimed at providing four million fourth graders and their guests an experience on public lands and waters throughout the school year. Collectively, America’s State Parks hosted more than 740 million visitors in 2014, an increase of more than 12 million from the preceding year. State park visitation trends continue at record levels. State parks now report an inventory of more than 217,000 campsites, of which about one-third are seasonal. Of the nearly 60 million overnight visitors to state parks in the past year, over 50.3 million were campers. Vehicle sales remain strong. According to the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA), the market for RVs has maintained its strength and sales of new units in 2015 will rise to more than 370,000 units. This will mark a sixth consecutive yearly increase. Looking further out, forecasts for 2016 RV sales remain favorable with total shipments expected to surpass this year’s estimate to finish at more than 380,000 units. Recreation Outlook Recreational use of on- and off-highway motorcycles, ATVs, and ROVs is also growing. The industry contributes nearly $109 billion in direct spending to the U.S. economy annually and over 1.5 million jobs. Nearly 30 million Americans ride motorcycles on and off roads, and ATV ridership is some 35 million annually. KOA – the nation’s largest private campground system – reports a very strong year across the board, with both occupancy and registration revenue showing increases. ACTIVE Network, the organization that manages recreation.gov – the unified means for making reservations on all federal lands – reports that reservations increased 19% – to 4.4 million in 2015, up from 3.7 million in 2014. Recreation.gov recorded more than 22 million visits, an increase of 31.25%, and a 28.15% increase in users, with nearly 12 million in 2015. Use fees also increased 12% over 2014 levels. Federal reservable facilities increased from 3,079 to 3,205 over the same period. PAGE 12


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Fishing remains one of the most popular lures to the great outdoors. According to the 2015 Special Report on Fishing released by the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF) and the Outdoor Foundation, the sport continues to grow, with 2.4 million newcomers who tried fishing in 2014 alone. Forty-six million Americans – 15.8% of the U.S. population ages six and older – participated in fishing last year and those numbers are expected to keep growing with RBFF’s new “60 in 60” initiative, which aims to achieve 60 million anglers ages 6 and older by 2021. New boat sales continue to steadily recover but still remain below pre-recession highs. With an estimated 6% growth expected in 2015 and another potential 6% growth in 2016, the industry would be poised to return to near pre-recession levels of 250,000 new boats sold, including power, sail and personal watercraft. Ski boats, outboard boats, jet drive boats and personal watercraft are showing the strongest gains in 2015. Marinas continue to build momentum post-recession. The push to improve comes from the call from boaters for marinas to be resort and destination locations instead of just places to store and repair boats. Boaters want pools, clubhouses, nearby restaurants and activities, as well as clean, comfortable accommodations for weekend visits. More marinas than ever are offering boat rentals, water toy rentals, event services and cabin, campground and RV park services. The U.S. bike industry is enjoying another solid, steady year of sales. Total U.S. retail dollars generated by retail sales of bicycles, accessories, and related equipment are expected to exceed $7 billion this year – a figure that includes sales of used bikes. Unit sales are expected to total about 18 million. According to a study commissioned by PeopleForBikes, 103 million Americans rode a bike at least once in 2014. Bike riding in large U.S. cities has doubled in the last 15 years. Safer bike infrastructure and the onset of bike-sharing systems (in at least 70 U.S. cities) are key factors in this growth, a trend that is expected to continue. According to the America Outdoors Association, revenues for whitewater rafting, kayaking and paddlesports are up significantly over 2014, with lower gas prices fueling family travel. Most outdoor recreation activities and cabin rentals saw higher demand. Revenues for aerial adventures (zip lines and aerial adventure parks) have flattened out as the number of parks have proliferated. The International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association (ISMA) is very optimistic about the 2015-16 season. Snowmobile sales in the U.S. and Canada for 2015 increased 6% compared to 2014. And the sales of manufacturer-branded parts, clothing and accessories increased 5% from last year. The number of miles ridden increased 9% over last year. U.S. ski areas tallied an estimated 53.6 million skier and snowboarder visits during the 2014-15 season – down 5% from the previous season’s 56.5 million total, and down 3.8% from the five-year industry average of 55.7 million skier visits according to the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA). Despite a stronger economy, weather challenges across all regions of the country contributed to this drop in skier visits. Nationally, snowfall was 28% below average this season. NSAA’s survey results also contained some particularly positive news. For example, the results from the critical Rocky Mountain region were well above the region’s five-year average. NSAA’s survey results also showed strong growth in season pass sales, which were up 6.2% from the previous season – an important indicator in the public’s demand for skiing and snowboarding. Snow sports market sales topped $4.5 billion for the 2014-15 season, up 2% compared to the 201314 season. Overall, categories including outerwear, snow boots, headwear and more sold very well this season, but equipment and many equipment accessories like goggles and helmet sales dropped compared to 2013-14. Recreational activities continue to be a mainstay of the American lifestyle, and there is widespread optimism regarding 2016. ARC’s report is available for download as a PDF at http://www.funoutdoors. com/files/Outdoor%20Recreation%20Trends%202016.pdf. PAGE 13


Outstanding Ambassador

Jeff Slavens Interview

By Ben Janin

Ambassador: Jeff Slavens Jeff Slavens is bad to the bone – the man raised over $45,000 for OHV advocacy in a single calendar year, proving that he is one the strongest supporters for OHV recreation in Colorado. Much of it was his own hard earned money through a matching donation program that he titled “Save Our Sport”. Love him or hate him, when Jeff speaks people listen and in this instance he put his own money where his mouth is. Unlike many of us, Jeff has not shied away from public opinion and regularly writes letters to his customers on how we can be better advocates to the sport we love. No punches are held and the truth is spoken. This tough love has been reposted on the COHVCO Facebook page and the response has been overwhelming. A Slavens letter reaches an audience 400% more than a typical COHVCO posting at just under 10,000. We sat down with Jeff to learn more about the man, his business and what motivates him.


First and foremost Jeff, I want to make sure to thank your for being such a strong supporter for the sport we love. Can you walk us through how you made the decision to do the matching “Save Our Sport” donation campaign? Well thank you Ben. I want to make sure to thank all the good people at the Colorado TPA, COHVCO and all the clubs through out the state that are working hard to keep our trails open. The “Save Our Sport” donation campaign all started when the tree huggers attacked Captain Jacks trail system over a lame fish reason. As you know, this trail is in my back yard and unjustly they had the nerve to take away my riding area and that pissed me off. The fish that live in this creek by our trail network have been thriving with the coexistence of dirt bikers for over 50 years. The radical tree hugger group called The Center for Biological Diversity from Arizona filed a lawsuit claiming that trail erosion from dirt bikes (not Mtn. bikes, horses or hikers) is killing a “rare” trout species. The anti-motorized access groups are very creative at finding new ways to close trails to motorized use and this was their sole purpose. Our local MC trail group, CMTRA, has worked hard over the years to maintain this trail putting in bridges, managing erosion and just overall maintenance. Several hundred thousand dollars of green sticker funds have been put in to this trail. It takes money to fight litigation, so I raised my hand and figured it might as well be me. I reached out to my customers with a letter and told them that I would match whatever funds they sent in. Together we rose over $45,000 for the Colorado TPA and COHVCO. The majority of the funds went to the Captain Jacks litigation but some of it went to fight issues in other parts of the state. And with it came great success, it looks like Captain Jacks will reopen as well as a number victories throughout the state – where our riding opportunities will remain open. Jeff it seems that you have a great pulse on what is happening in the state of Colorado. How do you do all this as a business owner? I’m frequently in contact with the movers and shakers that fight for our right to ride. I follow the trail issues closely and help out as much as I can, which is not enough but it’s what I can do. These days it’s just not as simple as putting gas in the bike and going riding. We all have to be trail ambassadors and we all have to respond to litigation and make donations to the Colorado TPA and COHVCO who do the dirty work. My main motivation is that I love to ride and I don’t want someone to take that right away from me. I am not a big player in the industry and there are other businesses that could donate hundreds of thousands of dollars, but they don’t. It’s just pathetic because there are very few businesses that are giving back the way that they should. What has the feedback been like since making such a sizable donation and why would you say that your business is thriving? Honestly, I get both positive and negative feedback. There are a lot of people and businesses that just won’t donate. Unfortunately they don’t realize (or don’t care) it takes money to keep our sport going. We need more ambassadors, more donations, more caring people. I don’t make all my decisions on growing the business. I don’t donate to grow the business; I do it because it’s the right thing to do.


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Before Slavens Racing became what it is today, I knew you as thee suspension and engine guy in Colorado. How did your business evolve? Suspension and engine work was hard on me physically. It took its toll on my neck and back as well as other parts of my body. I had headaches, aches and pains every day. During one of my many visits to the doctor’s office he told me that I needed a different job. That’s when the light bulb went off that I had to change my life. Retirement is not attractive to me at this stage, I did it once before and I didn’t like it. Plus I don’t play golf. It’s not about the money or a million dollar house - it’s about riding 2-3 times a week, traveling and enjoying life. Changing my business model has given me more time to ride and enjoy life. I have 45 years of experience in the industry, experience that the young guns don’t have. So instead of working on bikes, I started informational videos with YouTube to help my customers. I now get to show them, via videos, how to replace that $5 gasket so their bike doesn’t blow up or how to do a $20,000 bike build. They buy products from me and I show them how to install them. What future plans do you have for your business? What products and services are you most excited about? I am pretty excited about a number of products that are of high quality for a fair price. But if I had to pick, my favorite product is the Tubeless system by Nuetech. It’s drastically improved my riding experience, just a huge evolution for the industry. Do you have any plans to tie in the business with future OHV advocacy efforts? I feel that my customers are ready for a new approach to raising money and so I have some tentative plans. I would like to start doing some 1-2 day ride events to raise money as opposed to hitting people up for money. I want to get people excited about a riding event, where we have fun. This fall I plan on doing an adventure dual sport ride. I am looking for ways that we can incorporate a fun challenging loop followed up with good food. I am big “foody”, I like to eat well. You have been in the industry for over 45 years in a number of roles including line mechanic, race mechanic, dealership/owner operator and now Slavens Racing. Can you share with us your fondest memories? It’s the comradery. It’s the trail rides like we have been doing lately that we call the “Slavens Beatdowns”. It’s kind of crazy, but it seems like the older (my riding partners) we get the harder the trails we like. We meet for breakfast, go for a ride then join up for a burger on the way home. Also, it’s the days like getting National Enduro Champion Randy Hawkins to haul out a broken bike for 80 miles at the Colorado 600. Here is a guy that is easy to relate to and honest as the day is long. We have been teaming up since 1994 and one of our fondest memories might just be at 10,000+ feet up in the Colorado mountains in the pitch dark dragging out a broken dirt bike. It’s moments like this that I will always remember.

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Any suggestions on what all of us can do to help save our sport? I hate to keep beating this drum but we ALL must donate. If everyone would donate even $20 we would be in a much stronger position to defend our trails and jeep roads from closure. The majority of you reading this drive an expensive truck with expensive bikes in the back, live in a nice house and you have an expensive cell phone but you won’t donate a dime to save the sport you love. I don’t understand how to make sense of that. Also, manufacturers, distributors and retailers make their living off the sport but very few have ever donated a dime. Call, write and ask (in person) the companies that you deal with to donate. They all need to get involved or you should patronize those few companies that are committed to saving our sport. They are either part of the solution or part of the problem, with us or against us. I also have a personal policy of joining clubs in every area of the state that I ride or out of state clubs when I leave Colorado. I refuse to ride with anyone that won’t donate time or money to these clubs and to the Colorado TPA and COHVCO. Consider making this your policy your own. Any closing remarks? I want to give a BIG thank you to all that are working and donating to save our sport. It’s a never ending and thankless job.

VA4WDA Fall 2015 Clean-Up By Sandy Schneirla, Vice President

Oct 24 we hosted our fall trail clean up in the George Washington National Forrest on Bald Mountain (Big Levels). We had 19 members to help with the days tasks. Rangers Whitmore and Wheeler were gracious enough to spend the day working with us to obtain our goals. They also brought lots of great tools for our use. A new kiosk was installed (notice the VA4WDA logo?), 10 new signs were erected to mark spots along the trail, brush was cut back, and much trash was collected. Thanks to all that were able to attend. The Rangers secured a group camp area at Shernado Lake Campground for our use at no charge. We thank them for that. Trash was hauled back to the campground and placed in the dumpsters provide by the campground. A special thank you to Extreme Terrain in PA (who is also a business member) for giving us a $350 grant for this project. And for donating a $100 gift certificate to give away at this event. Fall colors in the mountains were amazing. The company was great. VA4WDA provided a meal on Saturday night. No one left hungry for sure. Please try to make it out for our Spring Trail Clean-up. I believe we may be going back to finish the work here. We have 10 more signs to install and some other work to do.

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OHV Recreation in Jeopardy in California

By Randy Banis

Sunny and windy days are both commonplace in the California desert, making the region “ground zero” for commercial utility scale solar and wind energy development. Those who recreate in there are keenly aware of the impacts these facilities create with respect to OHV and other motorized recreation. Roads and trails have been displaced by construction, regularly used campsites have been obliterated, wildlife has been extirpated, and entire view-sheds erased. In response to these undesired impacts of previously permitted projects, state and federal land, wildlife and energy management agencies have collaborated to create the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan. The plans goals are to better site renewable energy facilities on public lands and to mitigate their impacts through new and expanded conservation and recreation designations. Because OHV Open Area lands are perceived as having higher amounts of ground disturbance and lower levels of biological values, renewable energy developers have often focused their attention on our designated OHV Areas for their project applications. Fortunately, California’s OHV leaders engaged DRECP planners early on in the process and successfully secured protections in the plan for the OHV Areas in the desert by excluding from renewable energy development. Those who recreate within these OHV areas can rest assured they will not be displaced by future solar or wind energy projects. Unfortunately, the future of OHV recreation on nearly 11,500 miles of BLM designated roads and trails in the desert is less certain — even in jeopardy, under the DRECP. OHV recreation planners at the state and federal level under-value and misunderstand the importance of these roads and trails to recreational visitors to the desert. As a result, the DRECP now designates 5 million acres of conservation lands with management protocols that threaten 78% of all currently designated OHV roads and trails in the California desert. Thousands of miles of closures are expected to come as early as November 2016 starting in the West Mojave region. OHV$Miles$

These roads and trails support a dizzying variety of recreation activities including gem & mineral collection, upland bird and deer hunting, stargazing, model rocket launching, landscape photography and painting, wildlife and flower viewing, history seeking, geocaching, hiking, camping, and more. In fact, more recreational visitors to the California desert utilize these 11,500 miles of roads and trails than the 370,000 acres of OHV Open Areas.

In#Conserva+on#

Not#In#Conserva+on#

DRECP planners are quick to point out that the plan also designates nearly 3.6 million acres for recreation. What they won’t tell you is that outside of the OHV Open Areas, all but 27,500 acres are entirely slathered by the aforementioned overlapping conservation designations. Since DRECP specifically gives priority to conservation within overlapping such designations, these recreation designations were rendered into worthless placebos intended only to confuse and mislead the public into falsely believing that recreation has been protected when it, in fact, has not. OHV leaders in California continue to pressure DRECP planners to make good on their commitment to protect OHV recreation from renewable energy development and its resulting conservation actions. As currently proposed, however, the DRECP is openly hostile toward the motorized recreational use of roads and trails on our public lands the California desert.


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BFGoodrich BFGoodrich®®Tires Tires Named Announces 2015 Outstanding Tr Presenting Sponsor of Pomona, Calif., Oct. 3, 2015 – BFGoodrich Tires, in collaboration with Fo United Four Wheel Drive Associations, Blue Ribbon Coalition and Off Road Mint 400 ®

Association, today announced the winners of the 2015 Outstanding Trails p racing’s leading tiretype brandand signsenthusiast multi-year following, the trails selected an for Desert uniqueness, terrain dealfor to sponsor iconicprogram desert raceare: clubs this yearʼs “We are excited to have BFGoodrich involved GREENVILLE, S.C., Dec. 16, 2015 – The brand that invented the all-terrain tire category is putting with The Mint 400 as presenting sponsor and a Applegate-Lassen Wagon Trail, media Nev., High Rock Trekkers partner. They have been a pillar of off-road its heritage of success in off-road racing behind racing and a huge Forest, advocate of off-road the largest desert race inOHV the United States Sierra Bald Mountain Trails, National Calif.,culture. Clovis We look forward to showing the world how annually – the Mint 400. The Polaris RZR Mint ® Barrett Lake Trail, El Dorado National Forest, Hi-Landers exciting off-road racing Calif., is together,” said Mint 400 400 Presented by BFGoodrich Tires will be CEO Matt Martelli. March 9-12, 2016, near Las Vegas.

• • Inde • 4WD • Black Bear Pass, Silverton, Colo., Creeper Jeepers Gang of Durango

With its long heritage as an innovative all-terrain The multi-year sponsorship allows BFGoodrich ® maker, BFGoodrich produces tough, durable Tires to engage with the off-road community BFGoodrich Tires builds tires fortire any adventure, including and race-winning tires that offer unmatched throughout the full schedule of events, including traction and toughnessThrough and excel in the the pre-race festivitiesoff on Fremont those that contingency take drivers their daily roadways. itsmost precarious conditions. The tire brand boasts Street, the annual Pit Crew Challenge, on site Outstanding Trails program that promotes sustainable and more off-road race victories than any other tire at the race itself and through broadcast on NBC maker where conquering of terrains Sports and advertising platforms. responsible off-road driving, BFGoodrich Tires oncea variety again with consistent performance and durability are will“Desert award grants of $4,000 each paramount. to these qualified and racing is where BFGoodrich Tires has written much of its off-road clubs history,” said passionate off-road in Jaye North America. These clubs will use their gra Young, business segment manager, BFGoodrich to continue their efforts that preserveAbout and protect their hometown trails. ® BFGoodrich Tires Tires. “Sponsoring the MINT 400 provides a With more than 100 years of heritage, BFGoodrich® Tires signature event in the United States for us to is dedicated to providing high performance tires for those demonstrate product performance and develop who have a passion forwith driving inenthusiast virtually any environment. “BFGoodrich stands shoulder-to-shoulder off-road co activities around Tires the race that continue to prove Combining technical expertise with 40 years of motorsports leadership withand the off-road enthusiastresponsible experience, BFGoodrich Tires delivers tires for a full range to our preserve protect off-road activities,” said Dua of driving experiences from ultra-high performance street community.”

communications manager for BFGoodrich “Thetheme Outstanding Trai to off-road terrainTires. with one common – extreme performance. Come upgrade your performance with BFGoodrich is coming off a record year getting outTires and challenging the four-wheel drive culture they BFGoodrich and see where our tires can taketo you prove at www. of success in off-road racing, from short course BFGoodrichTires.com, on Facebook at www.Facebook. explore their toworld. After receiving more than 150 nominations, we are pr championships more desert race wins than com/BFGoodrichTires or on Twitter at @BFGoodrichTires. any other tire manufacturer. BFGoodrich Tires efforts reward these four clubs and their to enhance their trails.” has won 20 of the last 22 overall major North American desert races.

Media Contact: Tom Sullivan, th BFGoodrich Tires 864-458-4321 or Tom.Sullivan@us.michelin.com

As Outstanding Trails celebrates its 10 year, BFGoodrich selected presenting sponsor of this yearʼs program. 4 Wheel Parts helped prom PAGE 19 provide a critical outreach extension to four-wheel-drive clubs across program also is conducted in collaboration with United Four Whee


WINTER

The snowy side of Maine’s Vacationland

ORBA.BIZ

By Alexis Nelson While half of the snowbelt states in the Western part of the country have begun winter with gusto, the Northeast has been patiently awaiting the white gold to Bob with no snow mobiles sign blanket the trails. On Christmas day, many cities across New England reached all-time record highs that soared past the 70 degree mark. Atypical for this time of the year; however four days later, the first snowstorm arrived. It happened to be on the day that I sat down with Bob Meyers, Executive Director of the Maine Snowmobile Association to discuss the state of snowmobiling in Maine. Established in 1967, the Maine Snowmobile Association has been in business for 48 years and of those years, 21 have been with Meyers’ at the helm. While it may appear that we are off to a bleak start of the snowmobile season, Bob has a positive spin on the subject. He was fairly relaxed yet excited about what will unfold for Maine’s booming winter economic engine during the 2016 season. This positive outlook comes with many years of experience in the business from serving as the Association’s lobbyist to working with the 280+ local clubs that make up the Maine Snowmobile Association. The Maine Snowmobile Association, also known as ‘MSA’ is a member based non-profit organization that serves as the liaison between snowmobile clubs, landowners, and state agencies who are promoting and advocating the sport of snowmobiling. MSA provides members with superb services; from education on the important role private landowners play in establishing the trail infrastructure, and reminders on respect for the environment, to having a significant lobbying presence at the Legislature. MSA has several safety programs, specifically the ‘To Ride Right’ program, has an inhouse newsprint: the Maine Snowmobiler Newspaper, and online publications, services & various social media platforms. MSA also prints and distributes the annual Snowmobile Maine Guide and the Interconnected Trail System trail map, as well as facilitates all Association forums, meetings, and fundraising events. Staff and members have wide spread representation on various committees and organizations related to outdoor recreation, access, support of traditional uses of the land, and forestry & agriculture. MSA works closely with the Snowmobile Division of the Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands, Department of Conservation, and under the direction of the MSA Trails Committee. Through this cooperative effort along with the 280+ clubs, and businesses supporting snowmobiling, the 14,000 miles of trail across the state of Maine are a booming and essential piece of the winter economy. This includes 3,500 miles of primary trail that is known as the Interconnected Trail System (ITS). The ITS connects many scenic areas with local towns and with adequate snow cover, snowmobilers may ride anywhere across the system spanning Maine. PAGE 20


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Like many of the organized trail systems in New England, the majority of Maine’s snowmobile trail system is located on private property. There are very few parcels of publicly owned land; and most of them are managed by the State of Maine. Approximately 96% of Maine is privately owned, leaving a small percentage for publically managed opportunities. 2.5 million acres are classified under conservation easements which are protected against any development and open for various levels of recreational activity including the traditional uses such as snowmobiling, ATV’ing, hunting and fishing. So how does an Association made up of hundreds of volunteer clubs and dedicated snowmobilers manage tens of thousands of miles of trail on private property? Much of the success has been achieved through building accountability with landowners. Local clubs spend considerable amounts of time creating and maintaining these important connections with private landowners. It also helps that the State of Maine has an excellent landowner liability law that protects private landowners that allow recreational activities on their property. The landowner is not responsible nor will they incur liability for any injury to person or property caused by any act of persons to whom the permission is granted. It is with this collaboration and the thankless work put into trail development and maintenance that the organization continues to thrive. The funding and support from the Snowmobile Division of the Bureau of Parks & Lands, local municipalities, supporting businesses and the many landowners throughout the state who generously allow access to snowmobilers that attribute to the success of the trail system as a whole. There are a lot of moving parts in this well-oiled and balanced system. In addition to the partnerships between business, landowners, clubs, and MSA, there’s support from other related industries that are tied to traditional use of the land and the sustainability of Maine’s natural resources. About eight years ago, a coalition called the Natural Resource Sector was formed. Their primary purpose was to develop a manifesto to support each other’s efforts, initiatives, and work together to achieve common objectives in addressing the opposition and potential legislation that may affect their purpose and mission. The Sector is committed to providing sustainable management of Maine’s abundant natural resources. These organizations (to name a few – the Sportsman’s Alliance of Maine, Small Woodlands Association, Forest Products Council, Farm Bureau, Maine Lobsterman’s Association, Maine Trappers Association) collectively generate approximately $15 Billion annually in economic activity within the state of Maine. They recognized this as an opportunity and joined forces that have reaped tremendous benefit in educating and promoting the importance of strengthening Maine’s natural resource related business. One of the major battles that MSA has been working on is the potential plan for the creation of a National Park in the Katahdin Region near Baxter State Park. Roxanne Quimby, co-founder of Burt’s Bees and her son, Lucas St. Clair, own an entire township plus thousands of acres in the pristine Katahdin region also known as Maine’s North Woods. They have been trying for years to rally local support that will ultimately steer congressional backing or opposition for the plan. Fortunately, the arduous process of gaining support from local landowners, residents, town officials and members of the congressional delegation are not in favor of a national park. While the resistance was building, the proponent’s strategy was increasing momentum. The snowmobile community had a lot at stake with this proposal. Losing a vital section of the ITS, loss of traditional recreational activities, loss of economic value and vitality in rural Maine, and minimizing the forest products industry were all going to provide everlasting negative impacts on the future of Maine’s outdoor heritage. MSA decided it was time to take a leadership role on this possible game changing proposal. Negotiations were underway to create a 75,000 acre National Park restricting activities to hiking, fishing, and camping and create another adjacent area and designate it as an National Recreation Area where snowmobiling and hunting are permissible activities. MSA and PAGE 21


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The snowy side of Maine’s Vacationland.

(cont’d)

members of the Natural Resource Sector worked with their members, local Select boards & residents, and successfully passed a resolution in 2011 condemning the National Park. The One-hundred and Twenty-fifth Legislature of the State of Maine created a Joint Resolution memorializing the President of the United States, The United States Secretary of the Interior, and the United States Congress to oppose the creation of a National Park in Maine’s North Woods. While the notion of creating a national park remains idle, the possibility of a new designation is on the rise and it could take place over the next year. The 100,000+ acre parcel has the potential of becoming a national monument through the Antiquities Act. A power bestowed under the President of the United States, the Antiquities Act grants the President authority to create a national monument with a stroke of a pen. President Obama has already set a record, naming nineteen monuments during his tenure. This designation could become a reality. The best case scenario is to have the management responsibility fall under the State of Maine where traditional uses will remain intact and the public will be able continue to access public lands. Meyer’s and his colleagues will be paying close attention to detail and making a few trips to Washington D.C. in early 2016 to discuss possible outcomes and strategy. Overall, the state of snowmobiling in Maine is good. Despite a warm beginning to this season, there is a positive buzz around this winter. I asked Bob if he was concerned about the non-existent start of winter. He responded with a hardy laugh and said, ‘Gas prices are going down and it’s going to snow when it snows. We don’t have any control over the weather.’ And yes, today happened to be the day when the snow finally hit the ground and snowmobilers all over Maine are ramping up for an incredible season on the trails.

For more information: Visit www.mesnow.com

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News Release

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MINNEAPOLIS (January 4, 2016) — Polaris Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII) today announced the acquisition of 509, an aftermarket leader in snowmobile helmets and goggles. 509, a privately owned company based in Spokane, Wash., joins Polaris’ growing portfolio of aftermarket apparel and accessories brands, which includes Klim®, Kolpin®, and Pro-Armor®. The terms of the transaction were not disclosed. “We are always exploring opportunities to make Polaris a stronger, more competitive global company. As we look toward the future, parts, garments and accessories will continue to be a growth driver for Polaris,” said Steve Eastman, President of Parts, Garments and Accessories for Polaris. “509 is a growing brand that resonates with snowmobile enthusiasts and complements our current portfolio. As snowmobile enthusiasts ourselves – and having worked with 509 on co-branded goggles for three years – we like their products, we like their brand, and we like their team.” 509 will continue to operate as a distinct brand under the leadership of Tom Delanoy, founder of 509, who will continue in his role of President. Operations will remain headquartered in Spokane. 509 was advised by The Meriwether Group. “The 509 brand was created from an authentic and passionate love of snowmobiling,” said Tom Delanoy, 509 founder and CEO. “We have a passion for making highly technical riding gear and producing award-winning films and media content that truly captures the amazing experience of snowmobiling. 509 is very excited to be a part of the Polaris family. Sharing the same passion and vision with the company that mass produced the first snowmobile six decades ago is truly a great fit for us. We look forward to banding together and building an exciting future for the 509 brand.” About Polaris Polaris is a recognized leader in the powersports industry with annual 2014 sales of $4.5 billion. Polaris designs, engineers, manufactures and markets innovative, high quality off-road consumer and military vehicles, including allterrain vehicles (ATVs) and the Polaris RANGER® and RZR® side-by-side vehicles; snowmobiles; motorcycles and onroad electric/hybrid powered vehicles. Polaris is among the global sales leaders for both snowmobiles and off-road vehicles and has established a presence in the heavyweight cruiser and touring motorcycle market with the Victory® and Indian Motorcycle® and Slingshot® brands. Additionally, Polaris continues to invest in the global Work and Transportation vehicle industry with Global Electric Motorcars (GEM), Goupil Industrie SA, Aixam Mega S.A.S., and internally developed vehicles. Polaris enhances the riding experience with a complete line of Polaris Engineered Parts, Accessories and Apparel, Klim® branded apparel and ORV accessories under the Kolpin®, Cycle Country® and Pro Armor® brands. Polaris Industries Inc. trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “PII,” and the Company is included in the S&P Mid-Cap 400 stock price index. Information about the complete line of Polaris products, apparel and vehicle accessories is available from authorized Polaris dealers or anytime at www.polaris.com. About 509 509 is a global leader in snowmobile riding gear. Founded in 2004 as a snowmobile film production company, 509 evolved into an authentic developer of technical riding gear, including helmets, goggles, and accessories. The combination of industry-leading gear and award-winning content & media production has solidified 509 as an iconic snowmobile-gear brand with an unparalleled and fanatical following.

For additional information, please visit www.RIDE509.com. PAGE 23


ORBA.BIZ

SEMA in 60

WINTER

By Keri Wanner

Wheels, Tires, Tools, Paint Booths, Heels, Drifting, Lifts, Dynos, Antiques, Grilles, Bumpers, Mohawks, Short Skirts, Enthusiasts, Jeeps, Wraps, Peddle Trikes, Timbersleds, UTV’s, Jeeps, Low Cut Shirts, Helmet Cams, Selfie Sticks, Cars, Shocks, Motors, Business Owners, Beer, Food, Boobs (sorry men they were covered but still very perky), and did I say jeeps?! Ok, it’s not likely SEMA (Specialized Equipment Manufacturer’s Association) can be done in 60 seconds; let alone 60 minutes. I’ve heard of the show but couldn’t possibly imagine what it was all about through the stories I’ve heard and pictures I’ve seen. It was a show my husband, Corey, spoke about and peaked my interest because let’s face it, our house is all about Going Big or Going Home and our abundance of toys shows it! So when the opportunity presented itself for Corey and I to go, we couldn’t say no. Corey and I attended on behalf of ORBA (Off-Road business Association); an organization we have become to respect and love because of how hard it works to create unity amongst user groups and provide advocacy and most importantly a voice for the user community. We flew into Las Vegas not sure what to expect. All we knew is we had to represent ORBA; and that everywhere we went our camera would be in tow to document our first time experience. And that first time experience is being represented here for all of you to see! I’ve heard people mention that SEMA is a weeklong show and that it takes all weeklong to see everything. I always thought those people were exaggerating to set the excitement for the show but I quickly learned it does take all week. SEMA is held at the Las Vegas Convention Center which is not just one but several huge buildings and a couple of the buildings are more than one level. Each floor is geared towards something specific such as wheels and tires, while another floor is all off-road accessories. And it goes on, and on, and on, and it doesn’t stop there. When they say take a taxi or shuttle to the show, do it! There isn’t parking because SEMA takes over every square feet of parking lot around each facility to host the show. Chevy and Ford each had their own section of parking lot and the spots are large enough to have a drifting course smack dab in the middle. Literally the only part of the parking lot that wasn’t filled with displays was the area reserved for the hotel shuttle buses, taxis and uber. The craziest thing of all, is I never saw one empty space where a vendor didn’t show or a spot wasn’t sold! Every spot was taken and packed to the brim with the latest and greatest products you need for your toys and for your businesses show room. This is all made possible because of you, the user group that wants to get outside and enjoy the outdoors from the seat of their favorite toy. The nerd I am and because of my background in the motorized industry, I was drawn to my favorite part of the show. My favorite part of the show was the ORBA Lounge. The lounge was a gathering place for recreational enthusiasts from all sectors. Throughout the week ORBA had presentations hosted by NOHVCC (National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council) on how to work with the United States Forest Service, a brain storming session on what user groups need and how they can work together developing ORBA’s One Voice program, and ORBA’s next steps as it moves into the future. Yeah, this may not be as exciting as all the goodies I already mentioned but if it wasn’t for ORBA and the team of user groups it works with, we might have some cool toys and accessories but no place to ride. Rounding off my SEMA experience, I can pretty much say it has something for everyone. Laughs, fun, business, cool toys and accessories! If it’s not on your bucket list already, it should be for the future because SEMA brings out the kid in all of us!


Market Based  Solutions  

When Opportunity  Meets  Obligation   By  Ben  Janin  

WINTER

ORBA.BIZ

Market Based Solutions When Opportunity Meets Obligation

The OHV  industry  is  (4)  decades  behind  that  of  its  threat,  which  is  often   the  outdoor  industry.    So  why  is  the  outdoor  industry  so  intent  with  their   damaging  initiatives  and  activities?    Simply  put,  these  businesses  make  more  money   when  they  connect  with  their  clients  through  relevant  market  based  solutions.       There  is  an  opportunity  for  the  OHV  industry  to  replicate  these  types  of  activities   and  strategies   because  rbehind esearch  that indicates   it  improves   the   financial   osition  oindustry. f   The OHV industry is (4) decades of itsthat   threat, which is often the poutdoor the   p articipating   b usiness.       So why is the outdoor industry so intent with their damaging initiatives and activities? Simply put, these   businesses make more money when they connect with their clients through relevant market based solutions. The   O utdoor   ndustry   There is an opportunity for Ithe OHV industry to replicate these types of activities and strategies because The   o utdoor   industry   operates   very  differently   then  the  OHV   industry,   research indicates that it improves the financial position of the participating business. committing  themselves  to  activities  at  very  high  and  complex  levels  that  often   threaten  our  sport.    The  outdoor  industry  raises  millions  of  dollars  annually,   The Outdoor Industry blurring  the  lines  between  private  and  public  sectors,  to  support  non-­‐profits  that   The outdoor industry operates very differently then the OHV industry, committing themselves to activities at designate  land  as  not  suitable  for  OHV  use.    They  are  very  cohesive  and  operate  very   very high and complex levels that often threaten our sport. The outdoor industry raises millions of dollars effectively  in  unison.     annually, blurring the lines between private and public sectors, to support non-profits that designate land as A  great  example  includes  The  Conservation  Alliance,  which  is  a  non-­‐profit   not suitable for OHV use. They are very cohesive and operate very effectively in unison. formed  in  1989  by  Outdoor  Industry  leaders  REI,  Patagonia,  The  North  Face  and   Kelty.    This  nonprofit  is  on  pace  to  raise  $2  million  annually  for  “conservation”   A great example includes The Conservation Alliance, is a non-profit in 1989 by Outdoor Industry initiatives   that   often   declare  public   land  as  which not  suitable   for  OHV  rformed ecreation.    Since   leaders REI, their   Patagonia, The North Face and Kelty. This nonprofit is on pace to raise $2 million inception,  this  alliance  of  185  outdoor  businesses  has  raised  over  $13  million   annually for “conservation” initiatives often declare land as not suitable for OHVin  recreation. Since their dollars   and  has  “that helped   save   more  tpublic han  42   million   acres   of  wildlands”   North   inception, thisAmerica.   alliance  Tofhe   185 outdoor businesses has raised over $13 million dollars and has “helped save graph  below  showcases  noteworthy  outdoor  companies  donating  to   more than 42The   million acres of wildlands” in North America. The graph below showcases noteworthy outdoor Conservation  Alliance;  this  includes  8  companies  donating  over  $100,000   companies donating to The Conservation Alliance; this includes 8 companies donating over $100,000 annually:   annually:  

By Ben Janin

     

Outdoor Industry  Companies     Contributing  to  the  Conservation  Alliance  

$100,000 Annually   Noteworthy  Companies       Colombia   Black  Diamond  Equipment   Outdoor  Industry  Association   Patagonia   CamelBak   OutdoorIndustryJobs.com   REI   Eddie  Bauer   Outside  Magazine   The  North  Face   JanSport   Saucony   Merrel   Kelty   Smith  Optics   Cliff  Bar   Mountain  Hardware,  Inc.   Teva   KEEN   National  Geographic  Maps   The  Timberland  Company   Eastern  Mountain  Sports   New  Balance   Yakima     The  1%  for  the  Planet,  cofounded  by  Patagonia  and  Blue  Ribbon  Flies,  maybe   The 1% forcthe Planet, cofounded by Patagonia and one  of  the  best  examples  of  how  the  outdoor   industry   onnects   with   their  clients   Blue Ribbon Flies, one the best examples and  raises  money  for  environmental  causes.    The   nonprofit   has  maybe raised  o ver  of $100   of how the outdoor industry connects with their clients and raises money for environmental causes. The nonprofit has raised over $100 million in 12 short years as businesses designate one percent of their gross sales to the environmental non-profits of their choice. This entity connects the consumer to more then 1,200 businesses that are giving to more then 3,300 environmental nonprofits.

There is a new reality that the outdoor industry is a political and economic force. Former REI CEO and long time commercial banker Sally Jewel is our nations ”Salley Jewell” Photo is from the associated press photo Secretary of Interior. So why would Sally Jewell by Rick Bowmer. chief executive of REI earning an annual salary of $2


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Million take a job paying less then $200,000? Peter Metcalf, president and CEO of Black Diamond Inc. shares that the outdoor industry became a political force by putting “money behind it”. This move is clearly one that could prove to detrimental to the OHV industry. Jewel is in charge of one-fifth of the U.S. landmass, 700 million acres of subsurface mineral estate, 1.7 billion acres of offshore territory, 401 national parks, 561 national wildlife refuges, 476 bureau of reclamation dams, 2055 endangered or threatened species and the maintenance of good relations with 566 American Indian Tribes. Patagonia’s CEO, Rose Marcario, is a former Vice President of a private equity firm that specialized in mergers and acquisitions. Since her arrival, Patagonia has doubled its scale and tripled its profits. How are they doing this? By acquiring and investing in businesses that are giving back to environmental causes. The outdoor industry is maintaining and growing their culture and strategies by “buying in” and becoming stronger.

is former presicond from the left, James Curliegh, se president of Levi’s brand. Levi’s w dent of Keen and no worked for four years as Keen he r te af h eg rli Cu ling sales in hired ief Executive, doub CoincidenCh d an t en id es Pr c In time. d bags during that ervation footwear, socks an th lved with e Cons vo in ily av he s wa tally Keen rliegh’s tenure. Alliance during Cu

The OHV Industry As it stands it is difficult for consumers to know what powersports businesses are in the game of giving back. Unlike the outdoor industry we do not have a 1% for the Planet, and good luck trying to find a stewardship tab on a website that shows how the business is working on their customers behalf. There is a complete lack of transparency. Some businesses are giving tens of thousands of dollars and volunteering their valuable time to the cause, while others maybe doing next to nothing. The following are real examples that are happening in the industry and in our community. Retail Business “A” generates less then $10 million in revenue and is growing quickly. This business is highly engaged in OHV advocacy and has raised tens of thousands and has volunteered a considerable amount of time. Dealership “B” on the other side of town generates tens of million in revenue and donates not much more then the necessary requirements to be a dealer. Dealership “B” has not been to one of the monthly local OHV club meetings in years. Portfolio Company “C” has been in business for over 100 years, abundantly sells powersports products and generates up to $1 Billion in annual revenue. They also happen to own some of our industries most iconic proprietary brands and they distribute these products in a number of different ways. In 2012 the company celebrated a very significant business milestone by donating $1.2 million dollars to entities that “advance art, culture and beauty in our community.” There is no mention on their website, or of their subsidiaries, of giving back to the OHV community that support their businesses. Portfolio Company “C’s” affiliated family foundation, which made the donation, actively manages $5.9 million in net assets and yet the foundation does not support its relevant market base. Manufacturer “D” has record year over year with revenue and earnings before interest and tax deductions, and some claim that up to 75% of their products are offroad. While the annual report discusses risk and sustainability, it fails to discuss how the two are synonymous. Further more, the annual report does not discuss how they are advocating on the behalf of their customers to keep their OHV recreational opportunities alive and well. This is very unlike REI with their annual stewardship report.

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So why should an OHV business give back to its community and participate with a relevant strategic marketing alliance? Increases Gross Sales and Net Profit Today’s business leaders incorporate relevant social causes and business strategy because they are learning it improves the bottom line. Corporate Social Responsibility and business are now one in the same thing, creating a new hybrid business model. Gone are the days of simple corporate responsibility and writing checks to non-relevant social issues. When in an organization is involved in a cause that consumers feel worthwhile: * 78% of them say they are more likely to buy the product * 66 and 62% would likely switch brands and retailers * 53% indicate that they would even pay a 10% premium Adds Value to the Business What would 1% for the Planet equivalent do for an OHV business? It would allow consumers to start buying from businesses that care and stop buying from businesses that are not in the game. Such an endeavor creates additional value for the business through goodwill and brand recognition. The marketing alliance is the goodwill and provides the platform for the business to initiate their CSR activities for brand recognition. Many of our businesses have iconic brands or are connected to history in way that could be only enhanced through a foundation that gives to a relevant cause. For instance, what could a Malcolm Smith Foundation or a Marty A. Smith Foundation do? It could become a win-win activity for OHV advocacy and its brand. Mitigating Risk When a business chooses to participate in a relevant strategic marketing alliance, it’s making the decision to be actively involved in the solution. Companies often wait for a crisis to develop before seeking opportunities to collaborate. The opportunity for companies is much greater if they operate from a position of strength rather than in reaction. This is why businesses that join an alliance first tend to benefit the most. Agencies such as the USFS, the BLM and the DNR make many of their decisions at the local level. The outdoor industry has been pretty clever about executing their exclusionary initiatives by taking advantage of this. What often has the appearance of a grassroots initiative is not, it’s often the outdoor industry funding from the top down. An OHV strategic marketing alliance could be critically important as pending local level issues are anticipated to be much more complicated and compounding up to national levels. Closing Remarks We cannot begin to address our problems effectively until we come together as a community. There is a sense of pessimism because many of us feel that the industry is small. However, the powersports dealer network by conservative numbers generates $22.5 Billion dollars in revenue. The challenge is that we are fragmented and we lack the framework to be effective. There is complexity and depth with a strategic marketing alliance because it encourages businesses of all sizes and sophistication to participate. This article should challenge our business leaders to think differently as the act of donating to OHV advocacy should be recognized as one that helps businesses make more money. Consumers have all the power; they do not have to buy the products from those that are not in the game. Business leaders have the opportunity to promote their products and services by giving back to the relevant cause of OHV advocacy. The first companies that get this marketbased alternative and invest in their customer’s equity will stand to benefit the most.

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Move Over Motocross…. USA BMX is set to arrive by Ben Janin

The single greatest area of opportunity for the OHV industry is for our most influential stakeholders to connect with their consumer’s equity and sustainability. It’s no secret that the sports we love are struggling, and often we hear comments that the difficult economic climate and the more expensive 4-stroke are killing it. One can make the case that it is not so, and that rather we struggle because our comprehensive business strategies are failing. After the 2008 Financial Debacle era, USA BMX has emerged as one of the fastest growing sports in the country sanctioning over 14,000 races a year. An industry Motocross versus BMX comparison reveals that they are doing it much better then we are, and that programs like the Kurt Casselli Foundation and a focus on tourism is how we can improve. Since 1996, the Warnicke Scholarship program has awarded over $425,000 to the members of the BMX racing community. Bob Warnicke was instrumental in growing the sport of BMX through ESPN and other media before his death in 1994. In the 2015, a record breaking $75,000 were awarded to over (70) BMX student college athletes. Funds were raised through (318) USA BMX and BMX Canada events hosting Bob Warnicke Scholarship races. The memorial scholarship fund was created to support the BMX racing community by assisting students and their families in meeting the costs of in undergraduate college education. The scholarships are awarded to blue and white-collar ambitions alike….And why is this so important? There is some evidence that suggests, that when these student athletes finish college and settle down with their well-paying jobs, they are giving back to the sport that supported them. Building on this momentum, collegiate BMX has become a reality and so have additional scholarships through a growing number of respected academic institutions. In addition, High School sponsored BMX clubs are beginning to form, with 15 clubs in just the last year through essentially a subsidiary of USA BMX called “Schoolded-U BMX”. When a sport is not state sanctioned, the state’s liability insurance is not in play. So for a club sport to take flight, the school must be confident that they are not liable. To address this concern, USA BMX has agreed to include any school participating in a vetted program (such as Schooled–U BMX), on an insurance rider policy statement. This removes liability from the school for USA BMX sanctioned events (practices and races). BMX scholarships are now real and are very obtainable. The official membership magazine of USA BMX and BMX Canada is called “Pull” and it is exceptional and it’s a reflection of how the entity USA BMX operates. The magazine is very informative and compelling to many stakeholders. Including topics such as step-by-step processes on how to PAGE 29


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work with communities and agencies (such as Parks & Rec) to build, promote and sustain BMX recreational opportunities. In addition, the magazine is littered with promoting BMX race events around the nation and at times a bit like a vacation or travel destination. The man behind much of this strategy is arguably USA BMX COO John David. He shares that it is always difficult to have good and exciting locations and to find great partners who add value to the participant and to the customer, which is their most important asset. Good partners have a passion for their community and that gets USA BMX excited about being there. They always want to give something more then just a BMX race. They want to give them an experience. John David goes on to say “my best advice is a rule that I live by, not only in business but in life and that is to create meaningful partnerships. That means that not only does USA BMX succeed, but when we go to a community or work with a sports commission or work with a Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB), we deliver. And when we get their support, we put pressure on ourselves as a staff to bring the numbers that we say that we are going to bring. To make them look good in their own communities.” The SEMA Memorial Scholarship Fund has awarded over $2 million to over 1,000 students who pursue automotive careers. Most recently in 2015 awarding $150,000 to 58 students; 45 SEMA scholarships going to current students, and 13 loan-forgiveness gifts to employees of SEMA-member companies. Scholarship applicants must submit school transcripts, a letters of recommendation and two 250word essays as to why the feel they deserve a SEMA scholarship.

Welcome to the Novant Health BMX Supercross Track Owned and Operated by the City of Rock Hill, South Carolina

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The larger Monster Supercross and Lucas Oil Motocross venues probably could not agree anymore with Mr. David’s sentiment. However, in the case of USA BMX the participant and the customer are often one in the same thing. You see BMX mainstream and grassroots are very much synonymous. It’s a lot more like Little League then what random sanctioned race one can participate on “Any Sunday”. If your riding BMX, you’re probably USA BMX. Comparatively, we are fragmented and all over the place. Earlier this year a young, spirited, and aspiring amateur rider received media attention, as he was pretty quick to call Loretta Lynn’s a “joke” and that it was not a proper gage of talent because it was “flat”. His temperament was additionally concerning as he indicated that he was not going to waste his time if he didn’t have a respectable return on investment. Comparing this young man’s attitude versus other youth sports, this should be considered alarming. Something is “lost” in the sports we love and perhaps there is a need to create a new definition of “making it”. Through the help of a Motocross Scholarship, why not strive to be a successful family man, working professional, volunteer and ambassador? This young man highlights a number of topics that are noteworthy. One, he wants to be noted for his ability to ride a motorcycle well on a consistent basis, which he feels the current amateur motocross platform or structure does not offer. Two, he has an “all or nothing” persona about what it means to be a competitive motocross racer and how he should make a living. The structure in which USA BMX versus amateur motocross or off-road racing operates is much different. USA BMX has a comprehensive points system for all of its riders and races across the nation. Amateur to Pro and local to national races, points are always accumulated. The bigger the event the bigger the points, however with local races being held every Friday, Saturday and Sunday it’s pretty hard for a well performing local rider to not get noticed. Which also makes it harder to sandbag by the way, because a race win is the same as anywhere in the country. In addition a track operator has the authority to move a rider up if they feel it’s appropriate, and it does happen. While motocross, off-road “scrambles” and trials have roots going back to 1906, our sports struggle compared to ball sports or BMX with growth, sustainability, collegiate scholarships and safety for its stakeholders. Perhaps with the push to make Motocross and Supercross so mainstream, the industry lost sight of its customer at a grassroots level. Consistently we have been loosing our historic and culturally important closed course and open riding areas, and really cool support programs. While some businesses have diversified (often within the action sports industry with sports like BMX) and pushed for additional economies of scale through globalization, they have waivered with relevant market-based solutions – perhaps analyzing it incorrectly as an opportunity cost. In addition our most influential nonprofit generates millions a year in revenue and has millions in investable assets. Unfortunately, for too long our most influential stakeholders have not offered a channel for scholarships for athletes and grants to invest in OHV economic impact studies. Suddenly the Kurt Casseli Foundation (KC66) looks very important and becomes a paradigm shift in the right direction. The mission of KC66 in short is all about safety and scholarships, which our sports most desperately need. As enthusiasts we have acknowledged the calculated risks involved in our sports, however negligence or inability to evolve should not be considered a risk factor. For some reason, at all levels and all over the world we are struggling with simple safety precautions and standards. We are doing things like going the wrong direction on the track, crashing into heavy

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equipment that are still operating on the track and not making specific efforts to keep our youngest riders safe. Most recently Matt Moss crashed into a skid steer that was at the other end of 90’ tabletop, and Colton Haaker made mention of mini bikes out on the track at the same time the worlds fastest were out zipping around – clearly not safe. If KC66 can connect with race events, organizations and tracks the way BMX has with their scholarship program, significant improvements can be made in our community. What if our community began to make ambassadors, like BMX has, through the KC66 Foundation at (70) collegiate motocross athletes a year? Think of a young, educated John-Erik Burleson and what he did for KTM North American, and now multiply that by (70). What could that do for our community? Hypothetically, how cool would it be to have a track that meets KC66 Foundation standards? One that has multi level controls that keep our young riders safe? Parents could travel to a track and with a higher level of confidence knowing that their kids can ride safely. USA BMX promotes itself through a number of public agencies, often with local communities and these agencies supporting the build and long-term sustainability of a track. This maybe assisted with economic impact studies from the tourism sports industry. There is plenty of indication that local communities have been involved with the closing of our OHV recreational opportunities without fully understanding their negative economic impact of that decision. We desperately need our most influential stakeholders, nonprofit and for-profit organizations, to create a channel for local and state advocacy groups to conduct their own OHV economic impact to a region. These studies cost real money, often more then a small state organization or club can afford. It’s a simple notion, that business leaders spend money to make money. And somehow as a community we have failed to reinvest in ourselves and to grow our own equity effectively. The Kurt Caselli Foundation is a trend in the right direction for our community and our industry. It’s an investment in our future. Perhaps it will encourage additional market based solutions, like a grant funding source for OHV economic studies through out our country at the state level.

Cooper Janin had an awesome time at his first MX track….but we have not been back in part because big bikes were on the same track. “Needed - kids only track” with controls to keep it so.

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My Alma mater: Fort Lewis College, 4 time USA Cycling #1 Division I Team and their first recipient of the Stan Rabbe Memorial Cycling Scholarship is Brennan Buiso – a BMXer.

Marian University is a Collegiate BMX Power House and has a number of their athletes receiving scholarships through various channels.

This $25 Sticker Kit from the Kurt Caselli Foundation is a Game Changer.

Move Over Motorcross Photo Credits http://www.grandvalleybmx.com http://cityofrockhill.com/departments/parks-recreation-tourism/parks-facilities/rock-hill-outdoor-center/novant-health-bmx http://cycling.fortlewis.edu/2015/08/11/local-cyclist-brennan-buiso-receives-stan-rabbe-cycling-scholarship/ http://www.usacycling.org/marian-university-riders-dominate-collegiate-bmx-nationals-in-georgia.htm https://www.usabmx.com/site/postings/819


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Friends of Uhwarrie

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By Robin Touw, Social Media Director

There are approximately 20 miles of challenging off highway vehicle trails consisting of steep, rocky, muddy sections, stream crossings and loose gravel in the Uwharrie National Forest located in the North Carolina Piedmont. The US Forestry Service continuously works on these trails to keep a balance between our desire to explore and enjoy the trail system and nature’s needs. The USFS holds volunteer workdays, encouraging the many clubs and individuals that enjoy the trail system to donate their time assisting with physical maintenance that the system requires but cannot afford to fund. Friends of Uwharrie is a non-profit organization that helps maintain and preserve the Uwharrie National Forest. We work with these volunteers to help the US Forestry Service complete projects that are critical to keeping this beautiful resource available for thousands to enjoy each year. These workdays are led by Terry Slavery, USFS and Darin Touw, FOU who plan well in advance and prioritize the projects, preparing materials and motivating teams of volunteers who many times, use their own tools and vehicles to complete projects that fortify, clean, and protect the system. We are in the process of preparing for a March 2016 “super work-weekend”. March 19 – 20th, volunteers will install over a mile of metal guard railing, rock armor mud sections, close illegal bypasses, clear limbs and debris and shovel tons of rock onto the OHV trail system in an effort to protect the special environment that surrounds it and to provide added traction and erosion control. These trails bring hundreds of four wheel drive enthusiasts to Uwharrie because of their terrain challenges. It will take 100 people or more, working over this weekend, to complete this project. Without this work, this trail is in danger of being closed or shortened. Several sponsors have already pledged items to be used on the work weekend. Generous grants have been received from sponsors that will be used to make this work weekend happen. Southern 4WD Association will be providing 10-20 ton loads of gravel, NC4X4 will provide food for the weekend, OMIX-ADA is providing a Bobcat rental and a trailer for hauling rock. Several 4WD clubs are purchasing hand tools, shovels, tampers and other items. Individual enthusiasts have donated funds for safety supplies like gloves and eyewear. We are searching for additional sponsors to provide incentive gifts to encourage and thank our dedicated volunteers who will be camping on site, regardless of the weather. In the near future, the USFS plans to make changes to our trail system by adding a new challenging OHV trail named Lake View Trail, an addition that will include beautiful scenery, challenging terrain, turns, climbs and side slopes. As we look forward into 2016, we are thankful to be able to use this beautiful trail system to explore and challenge us. Our volunteers will continue to give back on the third Saturday of each month, always beginning a 9 am at the Uwharrie Hunt Camp. No special skills are necessary, except a willingness to lend a hand and a love of nature. PAGE 33


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2,400 OHV Enthusiasts Cross The Mackinac Bridge ... Now That’s A Club Ride!

by Dave Halsey, NOHVCC Contributing Writer

The Mackinac Bridge is a suspension bridge, 5 miles long, connecting the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan. Each year, in addition to millions of car and truck crossings, the bridge is the site of special events for walkers, runners and bicyclists, as well as enthusiasts of Jeeps, Corvettes and antique tractors. Now, added to that list are off-highway vehicles (OHVs), thanks to one man’s vision and the support of local clubs and communities. The event was called Trek The Mighty Mac. On October 3rd, 2015, OHV riders from 14 States and Provinces lined up on their ATVs, ROVs (side-by-sides) and OHMs (off-highway motorcycles) and rode across the Mackinac Bridge from Mackinaw City to St. Ignace. It was a cloudy, windy day, but that didn’t dampen the spirits of those out for a unique day ride. John Chad, an OHV activist from Grayling, Michigan, came up the idea for the inaugural bridge crossing, to promote OHV recreation in Michigan. After his unexpected illness and PAGE 34

death last July, OHV clubs and communities banded together to make the ride happen. The Michigan ORV Association and St. Ignace Special Events Committee organized Trek the Mighty Mac, with assistance in planning and the actual crossing provided by the Mud Brothers of the North ATV Club, St. Helen Dirt Packers and the Cycle Conservation Club (CCC) of Michigan. About 500 riders were expected. Over 2,400 showed up. Drivers paid a $35 fee to participate, passengers paid $25. Promoting safe, responsible riding was a key component of the ride itself. “It was a fun and safe event for everybody,” said Lewis Shuler, executive director of the CCC of Michigan. “We ran everyone through a tech inspection, for sound testing, ORV stickers, and going over the machine to make sure it could make the Trek safely. We didn’t allow extra seating in side-bysides, or riding two-up on a single-seat ATV.”


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2,400 OHV Enthusiasts Cross The Mackinac Bridge ... Now That’s A Club Ride! (cont’d) One lane of the four-lane bridge was closed down for the Trek. Police escorts were provided front and back. It took just under 2 hours for the 1,340 vehicles to make the ride across the bridge. Some riders continued the ride on trails in the St. Ignace area. Many made a weekend of the event, riding or visiting local tourist attractions on Sunday and Monday. The first 1,000 riders received a commemorative patch. Riders were also treated to a post-ride lunch and live music, and an auction that raised about $1,500 for a local toy drive. Want to ride your quad or dirt bike across the bridge next year? Save the date! Next year’s Trek the Mighty Mac is scheduled for October 1st. For information, visit the St. Ignace web site at: www.stignace.com/event/trek-themighty-mac-mackinac-bridge-atv-crossing.

Please tread lightly and travel only on routes and in areas designated open for motor vehicle use. Remember, Respected Access is Open Access.

THIS PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT IS POWERED BY

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Used Right & Often, Social Media Can Boost Your OHV Organization’s Image And Membership by Dave Halsey, NOHVCC Contributing Writer

Fifth in a series. Why are some off-highway vehicle (OHV) clubs and State Associations vibrant, active and growing, while others are struggling or folding altogether? What is the state of your State Association? Send your comments to trailhead@nohvcc.org. Please include your name, address, and phone number so we can contact you and include your insights in future articles. Hatfield-McCoy Trails Boosts Followers On Facebook To 70,000 On a Wednesday this month, NOHVCC posted on its Facebook page a picture of the famous Honda, bandageshaped sticker with the words “Stupid Hurts” on it. By Thursday, over 1,700 people had seen it. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social networking services are here to stay. They are a key tool OHV clubs and State Associations can use to build awareness of their fun trail rides and social events, safety classes and trail projects and, in the process, build membership. For example, by boosting its use of social media, the Hatfield-McCoy Trail System in West Virginia increased its Facebook fan base from 700 to 70,000. “It’s becoming more and more popular to use social media, especially when you have a small budget to work with,” said Mike Pinkerton, Marketing Director for the Hatfield-McCoy Regional Recreation Authority. “We try to mix it up. We post a variety of things, from contests and videos, to funny photos, links and messages about our sponsors. The shorter ones are getting the most attention. It doesn’t have to be big things and major topics, and shouldn’t be lengthy dissertations.” About 7 years ago, Pinkerton recruited a local newspaper reporter to help create the trail system’s Facebook posts. Today, he sees social media as a powerful tool to reach younger riders, who represent the future of the sport of OHV riding, and that translates to future success at Hatfield-McCoy. “It can be fun and really easy,” he said. “At Hatfield-McCoy Trails, we have grown our Facebook audience to over 70,000 by following a few simple rules.” PAGE 36


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Here’s one more suggestion, from Karen Umphress, NOHVCC IT and Project Manager: When submitting posts to your organization’s Facebook page and other social media networks, make sure you aren’t including photos, videos or messages that promote irresponsible or unsafe riding practices. Said Umphress, “In all NOHVCC photos posted on social media, the riders are always wearing all the proper safety gear and are always engaged in responsible riding activities.”

Here are Pinkerton’s top 4 rules: • Keep your posts simple, generally under 7-10 seconds to read or view. • Use media-photos or videos, plus a short message. Videos can be longer than 9 seconds but should still get to the point very quickly. • Use links, websites and existing material. You don’t have to “invent” every post, but rather simply communicate information that already exists that is relevant. • Mix it up - Use contests, history, events, funny, educational, etc.

What’s New on ORBA.biz Visit our new grants page on www.orba.biz to learn more about grant programs offering financial assistance to maintain off-road and trail access. Here’s a sneak peek at the information! GRANTS Many of our member organizations offer financial assistance to maintain offroad and trail access. The page includes direct links to the programs for your convenience. We will add more as they become available. • Extreme Terrain’s Clean Trail Grant Program • BF Goodrich Outstanding Trails Program • Rugged Ridge Trail Access Grant Program • Yamaha Outdoor Access Initiative Program • Polaris Industries T.R.A.I.L.S Program

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Uwharrie National Forest Update

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To many Uwharrie may sound like some kind of mashed together southern word that’s been created to let folks know some place you’ve already been. Kind of like, “Uwharrie been there, right?” If that’s the case, then you would be sorely incorrect. Uwharrie has been around for almost a hundred years, believe it or not. The land was purchased in south central North Carolina around 1931 and was named after the Uwharrie Mountains. These mountains have been around for millions of years. Much like your granddad’s dentures these babies have been worn down after years of living. They were once thought to be as tall as 20,000 feet above sea level. Nowadays they have been whittled down to around 1100 ft. Thanks to JFK the land that was purchased was put onto the federal registry in 1961. The Uwharrie National Forest was born [Cue This Land is Your Land soundtrack]. The Uwharrie National Forest has many interesting activities that one could enjoy. How about panning for gold? Somewhere around the Depression there was a gold strike there. Something tells me that was a big deal around that time. If you’re into something a little more out there maybe you can take up the hunt for a sasquatch. Some of your favorite channels have visited this ground on more than one occasion in search of the elusive ‘squatch. One of the other great opportunities to enjoy is the privilege to drive your 4x4 on National Forest land and enjoy the outdoors with your family and friends. There is approximately 20 miles of trails that you can choose from that range from laid back rolling hills to steep, rocky and muddy terrain if that’s your flavor of the day. The US Forest Service (USFS) manages the forest and thus has an impact on all the activities that are available. As with most areas, the USFS must do what they feel they need to so that they may manage the resource. This includes uses for both present users and the future. So how could they handle all that work on their own? [Friends of Uwharrie enter stage right]. The Friends of Uwharrie (FOU; friendsofuwharrie.org) organization is a non-profit group created in 2012 with a mission to assist the USFS maintain and preserve the Uwharrie National Forest. Numerous work days have been scheduled with a fantastic turnout by both clubs and individuals also interested in helping to preserve this natural beauty. Typical work days are led by Terry Savery, USFS District Recreation Staff Supervisor and Darin Touw, Chief Operating Officer of FOU. Most projects are planned well in advance and are prioritized so that areas of greatest concerned are addressed first.

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Currently in the forest, FOU is preparing for a March 2016 “Super Work Weekend”. During March 19th -20th volunteers will install over a mile of metal guardrail, rock armor mud sections, close illegal bypasses, clear limbs and debris, and shovel tons of rock onto the OHV trail system in an effort to protect the surrounding environment while providing added traction and erosion control. Without saying, an undertaking of this magnitude will need all hands on deck. Namely to the tune of 100 or more volunteers. Without critical upkeep most of the trails being worked on are in danger of being closed permanently. Several sponsors have generously stepped up to the plate to provide some much needed assistance. Southern Four Wheel Drive Association (SFWDA.org) has pledged 10 – 20 tons of gravel for use on the trail system. NC4x4 (NC4x4.com) will provide the food for the “Super” weekend and OmixADA (Omix- ADA.com) is providing a Bobcat rental and trailer to help haul the rock. Several other 4x4 clubs are purchasing hand tools such as shovels, tampers, rakes, etc. Individual contributions include safety supplies like gloves and eye protection and although this seems like a tremendous task it would be all for naught if we didn’t have these volunteers. Sponsors are still being asked to come forward with incentive gifts for these dedicated volunteers who will be camping on site regardless of the weather. Talk about dedication! And speaking of dedication, because of these past and present efforts there’s big news on the horizon for Uwharrie and most of all the 4x4 enthusiast. The USFS has proposed an expansion, yes you read that right, an expansion of the existing trail system to include a new trail named the “Lakeview Trail”. It will be approximately two miles in length and connect the Wolf Den trail to the Falls Dam trail. This trail will be constructed for ATV, UTV, dirt bike and full-size vehicle travel. It will also have two pull offs where riders can pull off, kick back, crush a sandwich and watch the ducks do what ducks do best along Badin Lake. If you’re interested in being a part of Uwharrie’s volunteers or a Friends of Uwharrie member, there’s always room at the inn. Each third Saturday of each month you’ll find the crews meeting at the Uwharrie Hunt Camp at 9 am. For more information and to become a part of the FOU team hit the websites, www.SFWDA.org/FOU, and www.friendsofuwharrie.org to get on board. No special skills are necessary. Just a willingness to pitch in and make this forest an example of what can be accomplished when dedicated wheelers work together for the bigger picture.

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Hug a Snowmobiler

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By Steven Marlenee Sledders have garnished themselves a bad wrap, and I don’t know why. Snowmobilers are a critical piece of winter recreation, without whom, there would be a lot less to enjoy for a lot of user groups. So, take a moment and look at the facts, and when you’re done, I think a thank-you is in order! When you ask people who don’t ride, to describe a Snowmobiler, most often, the usual picture that is painted is a 40-60 year old overweight alcoholic male. Words like ‘destructive’, drunk’, ‘speed’, ‘dangerous’, ‘lazy’, and several others usually top the list. I’m sure you can confirm this for yourself by checking out the comments on any anti-snowmobiling page on Facebook. But why? Certainly, there are sledders that display behaviors that may fit any of those derogatory terms. But, I think that applies to any group of people, and I think every sport is evolving away from that. Look at ski movies from the early nineties. Everyone is getting wasted and behaving recklessly, but certainly, that is not promoted any longer. Maybe it’s the lifestyle portrayed by the media of adrenaline sports? Whatever the case, I don’t think it’s the norm. At least not out West. Sure, some people like to go have a few beers after a ride, but so do skiers and fattire bicyclists. Does it make a difference that they’re drinking domestic macro beer instead of some one-off microbrew from Portland? Yeah, maybe that’s it. Whatever the case, it’s important to know that of all the user groups, snowmobiles play, probably the most critical role in winter recreation on public lands. I say this for several reasons, including volunteer time, operational benefits, and economic impact.

Volunteering Snowmobilers volunteer. There is a ton of data supporting the actual hours. The International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association (ISMA) has most of it published on their website, www.snowmoible.org. A good portion of this volunteerism is directed towards the sport, but it also reflects efforts outside the sport. Have you ever wondered how winter trails got there? Some of them are old logging roads. Some of them are active USFS recognized routes during the summer, but a lot of them aren’t. They are cut in and maintained by volunteers. And year over year, the trails will fill in with growth, downed timber, and other obstructions. They need maintenance, before the season, during the season, and after the season. And, who does it? SNOWMOBILERS. Next, look at the grooming programs. In the state of Colorado there are 40 clubs, and 28 of them are grooming clubs. In almost every case, they’re 100% volunteer. These kind individuals are out, months before the season, with their own chainsaws and ATVs, burning their own fuel, spend days cleaning up the trails in preparation. Their reward? Most likely the PAGE 40


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companionship of their riding buddies that are by their sides, helping. These are the same people that are fundraising to buy fuel for the groomer during the season. They’re also the ones putting up trail markers and maps. More than likely, a few of them are the volunteers that are driving the groomers at night, so you can hit your favorite honey hole. Or, maybe they’re the volunteer mechanics that are fixing the groomers, using their own tools and often times donating parts. They are cutting and stacking wood for the warming huts. They are donating land to store the groomers. All of this, is done by a huge force of volunteers, who, by the way, are SNOWMOBILERS. The grooming program, in Colorado, receives its funding from a few sources. First, sticker money. Each snowmobile in operation is required to have a valid sticker, and with it comes a small fee. That money is collected and reallocated to the grooming clubs using a formula which calculates based on the total number of allowable miles, divided out among how many miles each club grooms, and a factor of use is put in, to account for popularity and to keep the more heavily used trails appropriately groomed. Again, the accounting and requests for funding are done by volunteers. But it’s not enough. Not even close. Not even half of the money needed to support the grooming program, purely the operations, not asset acquisition, comes from sticker money, even without paying the groomers or mechanics. Second, clubs subsidize grooming with fundraisers. For many Colorado clubs, the largest fundraiser is the annual snowmobile raffle. Proceeds are divided between the state organization and local clubs based on the volume of ticket sales. Most of the clubs, maybe all of them, do additional fundraising to help support their operations. This may include beg letters to local businesses, impacted by snowmobilers, or may be a series of chili feeds, poker runs, or local raffles. Money raised is used, both for asset purchases and repairs, as well as for grooming operational costs. Third, the DOT sets aside a small portion of gas tax to maintain recreational trails. This is called RTP money (Recreational Trails Program). RTP money is split into ‘motorized’, ‘nonmotorized’, and ‘mixed-use’ funding, and is allocated out per season. The amount varies per year, depending on fuel sales, and the grooming clubs have access to the entirety of the motorized piece, as well as a portion of the mixed-use piece. This money is doled out through the State Trails Committee, which is sat on by, you guessed it, volunteers. The grant packages are issued in spring, reviewed and compiled, and then, each grant is presented to the subcommittee (also volunteers), by each club (again, volunteers). This money is designated for assets and/or projects. Typically, it’s used to help offset a portion of the groomer purchase costs, but has come with other uses. In return, the State now has claim to a portion of each groomer, and to help make sure the program is properly administered. While it changes by year, most grants do not exceed the $100,000 mark, and are, in fact a lot lower. Now figure that a new groomer can easily approach $250,000 and you can start to see the bind a lot of clubs are in. Good thing they have so many good volunteers to help fundraise!

Operational Benefits A question I often answer, is what is the effect of snowmobiling for other users. Well, it’s plain and simple, for me, anyway. Snowmobilers are the ONLY group of winter users that pay the way. No other user group pays a use-fee, and very few of them fundraise like sledders do. In such, snowmobilers have the money to make things work. For a vast majority of the state, it’s snowmobile sticker fees and volunteers that are responsible for grooming, and not just snowmobile trails. In fact, I can’t think of any motorized-only trails that are maintained by PAGE 41


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Hug a snowmobiler (cont’d)

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By Steven Marlenee

CSA. No, these trails are enjoyed by cross-country skiers, snowshoers, dog-sledders, fat tire bicycles, and several other backcountry enthusiasts. I do wish more of them understood this when they so adamantly protest what sledders are doing. I’ll keep this succinct. If there is a winter trail in the back country in Colorado, chances are pretty good that it is established, maintained, and groomed by snowmobilers.

Economic Impact Probably the benefit of motorized recreation that comes with the greatest political clout, is the economic impact. Even when you narrow the spending down to direct economic impact, it is a big disparity. Motorized users, on average, according to various US-Government funded studies, show that motorized users, on average, spend anywhere from 5-10 times as much money while they recreate. These studies look at direct impact, so it’s the hotel rooms, fuel, supplies, and food they spend while recreating, and doesn’t take into account the $60,000 truck, pulling a $20,000 trailer, with four $15,000 sleds, each with another $5,000 of accessories and mods. It doesn’t look at the $1,000 in gear per person or the $200 belts you buy. It’s only money spent while recreating on any one trip. In a day when a lot of struggling small towns in Colorado are being dealt a final death-blow from the closing of a mine or saw mill or other epicenter of economy, motorized recreation has been the life-saving organ transplant that has allowed these communities to survive. In fact, a few years ago, I was on a dignitary ride with several members from Hickenlooper’s cabinet, along with some County Commissioners and City Counselors up at Grand Lake. The local officials adamantly and directly stated, that without snowmobiling, Grand Lake would effectively board the windows and close down for the winter. Now, maybe I’m a bit skewed, being from a small community, but that’s powerful. Another great example is what the Meeker area has done. For the past decade, oil and gas activity had been booming in Rio Blanco county, Colorado. However, falling prices and a change in direction left the Meeker area with little to no activity. Once, it was nearly impossible to get a hotel room there. Then, it busted. Hotels struggled to maintain 10% occupancy. The community got together and moved forward supporting motorized recreation. The city and county passed ordinances allowing OHV operation on their roads (excluding state highways). They spent their bank-roll developing and creating the wagon-wheel trail system, knowing that few places in Colorado were friendly to OHV users, and they have some of the most unique scenery in CO. Within a year, the town has rebounded and is once again healthy. I’m sure it isn’t all due to motorized users, but I definitely think it helped. Now, if you’ve stuck with me this long, I hope you get the point. Take a moment, and hug a snowmobiler!

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Car Enthusiast Turned Legislative Advocate… and Spreading the Word By Colby Martin

This limited-edition poster was given out at the SAN’s 2015 SEMA Show display. The piece featured my illustration of the newly finished ’31 Ford Model A as well as background information on the build. Like most car enthusiasts, I don’t recall a time when I wasn’t into cars. Mastering the form of a chopped hot rod coupe through drawing became an obsession early on. Owning one seemed nearly impossible. At a young age, I wondered if I could earn a living using these interests as assets. The results have proven unique.

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School brought many interesting subjects, none of which could match my art classes—where hot rods were favorite subjects. Local car shows gave me a chance to showcase my illustrations publicly and design commercially. In college, I began freelancing for the automotive specialty-equipment industry. While employed by the renowned SO-CAL Speed Shop in 2002, I purchased a chopped ’31 Ford Model A. Driving Force readers might recall seeing an in-progress photo of the hot rod on the February 2012 cover. The project began with a vintage dropped I-beam front axle that I had acquired while in high school. My father, Al Martin, bought a MIG welder and other metalworking tools as the project developed. The ’58 348ci Chevy engine, Muncie M-21 four-speed transmission and ’39 Ford Deluxe coupe dashboard were donated by friends. From there, we spent our spare time collecting parts and hand-crafting the coupe in my dad’s garage over the next 13 years. The finished product made its debut at the 2015 SEMA Show at the SEMA Action Network’s (SAN) exhibit space, as depicted on the cover of this very newsletter. It stood as a visual symbol of the types of vehicles and equipment that many jurisdictions seek to restrict and regulate. The outpouring of excitement and accolades for the car by Show attendees was absolutely gratifying and humbling for my family and me. It’s appropriate that the ’31 should have its first public exposure through the SAN. I began supporting the advocacy group early in my 11-year career at SEMA. In fact, a pencil drawing of mine appeared on the first SAN T-shirt! When given the opportunity to lead the SAN in late 2011, my decision to accept was natural. Our work to influence automotive legislation and regulations nationwide serves to allow owners of vehicles like mine the full enjoyment of our nation’s roadways. With my lifelong passion for this hobby, it was truly an offer I could not refuse. If it’s not apparent already, I’m not only the leader of the SAN, I’m one of its biggest beneficiaries. Working with the SAN on a daily basis has redefined my understanding of our shared hobby. As you will see elsewhere in this issue, a slew of legislative victories were once again achieved across the nation in 2015. Several of these victories were the result of hard-fought battles. In Nevada, for example, legislation was introduced that would have negatively altered the requirements for vehicles eligible for registration as classic vehicles, old timers, street rods and classic rods. The bill was ultimately vetoed by the governor as a result of our persistent opposition and with the assistance of our allies in the legislature. After speaking with SAN members in Las Vegas during the SEMA Show, I was reminded just how personal these legislative proposals can be to local communities. After spending so much time, effort and money on my own hot rod, it is easy to sympathize with the threat of greater restrictions. On behalf of the SAN, thank you for your involvement! Let’s continue to rally others in preparation for the 2016 legislative sessions. Together, we will continue to make a difference for ourselves and for the “gearheads” of future generations.

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SAN Creates Guide for Understanding State/ Federal Laws Governing Motorsports Trailers by Stuart Gosswein, SEMA (stuartg@sema.org)

The SEMA Action Network (SAN) has created a new web based resource to help the motorsports community understand state and federal law governing trailers and tow vehicles. The website provides guidance on how racing enthusiasts can avoid citations for a trailer that is too long, a trailer that is not properly registered with the DOT or for other related issues. The webpage divides the resource material into three sections: a comparison of state laws, folders containing laws/regulations for each individual state, and an explanation of federal laws triggered by commercial activity or vehicle weight. The highway patrol may not know if you are engaged in a commercial activity such as racing for prize money. They will only be looking for visual clues associated with such activities. For example, is there a business name on the tow vehicle or corporate logos on the trailer or vehicle? Since the weight threshold triggering federal or state registration is relatively low (U.S. Department of Transportation: 10,001 pounds for a “commercial” vehicle/trailer combination), it is beneficial to understand the law in order to avoid problems. The website also includes comparison of rules in all 50 states covering trailer dimensions, brakes, hitch/signals, lighting/reflectors, mirrors, speed limits, towing and other restrictions. The material is posted on the SEMA Action Network’s resources menu under “motorsports trailers”: www.semasan.com.

National Park Service Proposes Plan to Regulate OHV Access at Cape Lookout National Seashore, NC by Stuart Gosswein, SEMA (stuartg@sema.org)

The National Park Service (NPS) has proposed a new plan for regulating off-highway vehicle (OHV) access to the Cape Lookout National Seashore, a 56-mile long section of the Southern Outer Banks in North Carolina. The NPS is responding to requirements to manage motorized recreation while protecting wildlife and endangered species. Listed below are highlights of the proposed regulation: • The NPS proposal relies on designated OHV routes and establishes a permit system capped at 5,500 annual permits. For families that own multiple OHVs, each vehicle would require a permit. • The Plan provides OHV access to 47 miles between March 16 and December 15. • The current year-round pedestrian-use only restriction for seven miles of land would be limited to Memorial Day through Labor Day. • Vehicles with a two-stroke engine would be prohibited immediately. After a one-year grace period, only non-sport ATVs and UTVs would be permitted access, with a 25 mile per hour speed limit. • Trailers exceeding 30 feet in length and vehicles with wheel base exceeding 180 inches would also be banned after the one year grace period. The deadline for submitting public comments is February 16, 2016. For more information, https:// www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2015-12-18/pdf/2015-31793.pdf

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Congressional Committee Reviews Two Bills That Increase OHV Access by Eric Snyder, SEMA (erics@sema.org)

The U.S. House of Representatives’ Federal Lands Subcommittee held a hearing to consider two SAN-supported bills impacting off-roaders in California. The first would create six national OHV areas in southern California and the second would reopen off-road trails at Clear Creek that were closed in 2008. • H.R. 3668, the “California Minerals, Off-Road Recreation, and Conservation Act” (CMORCA): Rep. Paul Cook (R-CA) and his staff have worked closely with OHV, environmental, preservation, energy, military, and local communities on legislation that offers a pragmatic path forward for managing federal lands in the southern California deserts. At issue is the need to balance competing demands and, in some instances, find shared-use solutions. CMORCA would permanently designate six existing OHV areas comprising 300,000 acres in San Bernardino County as national OHV areas: Johnson Valley, Spangler Hills, El Mirage, Rasor, Dumont Dunes and Stoddard Valley. The first three would also be expanded by 60,000 acres. The president would be prevented from designating national monuments within OHV and Special Management areas covered in this legislation. Rep. Cook’s bill would also create the Sand to Snow National Monument and protect motorized recreation on designated routes within the monument. Apple Valley would also create an OHV area within land deeded to the town by the federal government. Click here to contact your lawmakers in support of this SAN supported bill: http://www.semasan. com/page.asp?content=aa_2015fed8&g=SEMAGA Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) has also been seeking to work with the diverse group of interests for a number of years to pass a similar bill in the Senate. Although Rep. Cook’s bill is more generous to the OHV community, Sen. Feinstein’s “California Desert Conservation and Recreation Act of 2015” (S. 414) also provides enhanced OHV access, including the creation of five federally recognized OHV recreation areas covering over 140,000 acres. Sen. Feinstein’s legislation also creates the Mojave Trails and Sand to Snow National Monuments, in addition to wilderness areas covering 250,000 acres. While the Senator’s bill includes a number of favorable provisions, it does not provide explicit national status to the OHV areas nor does it expand the Johnson Valley OHV area. The bill does, however, require U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to complete a study within two years that determines whether there is additional land available to expand Johnson Valley and the OHV areas created by S. 414. Despite the fact that the Senate Public Lands Subcommittee held a hearing on Sen. Feinstein’s bill, she has requested that President Obama unilaterally designate the Mojave Trails, Sand to Snow and Castle Mountains national monuments. Such an action would put at risk the chance to find a comprehensive solution for all of the federal lands. • H.R. 1838, the “Clear Creek National Recreation Area and Conservation Act”: Under Representative Sam Farr ‘s (D-CA) bill, the BLM would be required to reopen the 75,000 acre Clear Creek National Recreation Area (NRA) in San Benito and Fresno counties for recreational use, including OHV access. The bill would provide OHV access to over 240 miles of public trails. In 2008, Clear Creek was closed as a result of concerns surrounding exposure to asbestos. However, the California Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Commission ordered an independent risk assessment study, which concluded that management and operational strategies could be effectively employed in the area to allow OHV use without exposing the public to unacceptable risks. H.R. 1838 ensures that Clear Creek NRA will be managed in way that permits responsible recreation, while also providing for the safety of all of the area’s visitors.

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Utah Public Lands Initiative Update House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) and Rep. Jason Chaffetz (RUT) have been working for over three years on land-use decisions covering 18 million acres of land in eastern and southern Utah. Given the divergent interests involved (local communities, environmentalists, off-road groups, logging, grazing, energy interests, etc.), the “Utah Public Lands Initiative” has taken a bit longer than intended to develop as legislation. Chairman Bishop has asked for continued patience – several more weeks or longer -- and notes that it will be worth the wait. Under the initiative, Utah’s San Juan, Daggett, Uintah, Carbon, Duchesne, Emery, Grand and Summit Counties have put forward individual county plans to finalize land designations, including protections for motorized recreation. Although there may be some road/trail closures, the counties have a no net loss policy with the potential for positive trade-offs. Chairman Bishop has publicly stated that his plan will include a provision to prohibit the president from using his powers under the Antiquities Act to designate national monuments in the counties covered by the proposal. Stay tuned...

EPA Increases Ethanol Requirements for 2014-2016 by Eric Snyder, SEMA (erics@sema.org)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued final targets for the amount of ethanol to be blended into gasoline in 2014, 2015 and 2016, while relying on expanded sales of E15 (gas that contains 15% ethanol) in order to meet the targets. The EPA is required to set ethanol targets under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). The law was intended to reduce the nation’s dependency on foreign oil but has translated into ever-increasing corn production so that the ethanol byproduct can be blended into gasoline. Ethanol, especially in higher concentrations such as E15, can cause metal corrosion and dissolve certain plastics and rubbers in automobiles produced before 2001 that were not constructed with ethanol-resistant materials. SEMA is working to enact legislation to repeal the EPA regulation authorizing E15 sales, cap the amount of ethanol blended into gasoline at 10% and eliminate a mandate that 15 billion gallons of corn-based ethanol be blended into the U.S. fuel supply every year. SEMA has joined with more than 50 other organizations from the auto, boat, food and energy industries to support passage of the legislation. For more information, contact Eric Snyder at erics@sema.org.

The SEMA Action Network: Protecting the Rights of Off-Roaders The SEMA Action Network (SAN) is a nationwide partnership of vehicle clubs, enthusiasts and members of the specialty automotive and off-road industries who volunteer to protect the hobby from unreasonable laws and regulations. Founded in 1997, the SAN has over 65,000 individual and car club members throughout the United States and Canada and is in direct contact with millions of enthusiasts through electronic communication, publications and social media. The SAN maintains that it is possible to balance environmental protection and promote responsible recreation opportunities while advocating for a number of basic principles, including: • Implementing OHV policies that recognize the importance of vehicle oriented recreation. • Conducting case-by-case reviews of lands subject to a wilderness designation to ensure widespread local community support, and releasing any lands that do not meet the wilderness criteria since they have been developed with roads, trails, buildings, etc. • Cherry-stemming existing roads/trails, a process that excludes them from the wilderness area and, thereby, remain open to recreation. www.semaSAN.com: help shape the course of off-road legislation before it becomes law -- free, no spam. PAGE 48


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Overland Challenge Series By Christian Crawlers 4X4 Club

This was the second year of the Overland Challenge Series held in the Ozark National Forest. From the official event website: www.overlandchallengeseries.com “The National Forest envelops most of the northwest section quadrant of Arkansas. To the north you have the Buffalo River - our nation’s first National River - and Mark Twain National Forest. To the south, lie the Arkansas River Valley, the Ouachita National Forest and Hot Springs National Park. The western side of the National Forest is bordered by the Boston Mountains and several state parks. The eastern side will lead you to Wooly Hollow State Park and eventually the Mississippi River Basin (after lots of farm land!). The Ozarks have a rich history, apparent with a stop at any rural cemetery or homestead. ” Teams consisted of two or three vehicles with no more than six people total. All vehicles had to be street legal, have operating 4 wheel drive, front and rear mounted recovery points, and a full size spare. It was also recommended that vehicles have at least 31” tires, extended breather tubes, and limb risers. In addition each team had to have at least one working winch, a snatch block, a tree strap and a recovery strap. Also since was a three day trip participants had to provide their own camping gear, food, and drink. Five gallons of extra fuel was also recommended as gas is scarce. (IMG_3870) Our team, The Ozark Navigators, had competed in two previous challenges where we won the first event and was disqualified for our second event due to a misunderstanding about the required checkpoints. We had three vehicles for this event, Brad, from West Monroe, LA was driving a 2005 Jeep Rubicon, James, from southern Missouri, was driving a 1999 Toyota Forerunner, and I was driving a 2008 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited. Our team, The Ozark Navigators, had competed in two previous challenges where we won the first event and was disqualified for our second event due to a misunderstanding about the required checkpoints. We had three vehicles for this event, Brad, from West Monroe, LA was driving a 2005 Jeep Rubicon, James, from southern Missouri, was driving a 1999 Toyota Forerunner, and I was driving a 2008 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited.

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We arrived at the required drivers meeting held at Lake Dardanelle State Park, at 7pm Thursday evening where we signed the standard personal injury waiver, received the coordinates for the five required checkpoints and the ten optional checkpoints of which each team had to choose at least five to make a total of ten checkpoints each team had to complete. The team that was successful in completing ten checkpoints while covering the least distance would be awarded the coveted honor of first place!

As the drivers meeting began so did the rain and by the time it was over it was very windy with driving rain. Our team decided to find a dry spot to plot our route for the event, iHop was the perfect spot since they are open all night. After two hours of plotting the coordinates for each of the five required checkpoints and all ten of the optional checkpoints it was time to decide which five of the optional checkpoints, in combination with the five required checkpoints would most likely give us the least mileage to the finish line. After much discussion we had our route and returned to the state park where we crawled into our sleeping bags about midnight only to be up and on our way to the starting line by 7:30. Each team had to arrive at the starting checkpoint between 7 and 9 am Friday morning where event staff recorded each vehicles starting mileage, answered any last minute questions, and sent you on your way.

Each optional checkpoint had an associated percentage from .5% to 4% depending on the difficulty of the trail required to get there. The percentage points for each team would be totaled at the finish line and the team mileage would be reduced by the percentage accumulated by the team. Our first optional checkpoint gave us a 3.0% reduction. The good news is the rain had stopped and there was no dusty trails to deal with but the rain also made some trails muddy in spots and would impact some of the water crossings that would be required to complete our planned route.

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As we started our chosen route we encountered seven staff vehicles that so happened to choose the same trail as we had. All was good until we got to a steep hill climb that had some ledges about half way up that were made more difficult with the rain the night before. Our team ended up behind the staff vehicles and several were having a difficult time negotiating the slick obstacle. Five of the seven vehicles had to be winched up the obstacle before we could try our luck. Of course by this time it was rutted and slick! Two of our three vehicles we able to get over the obstacle without help but we did have to winch one. By the time we got off this first trail we were at least an hour behind schedule and had to pick up the pace to try to make up some time. With the previous days heavy rain we encountered two water crossings that were 3-4 foot deep! I was the only one with a snorkel in our group and choose to cross at the deepest part while my team mates choose the safer route to the other side. We all made it through with no problems. As it turned out we were about an hour late to our last checkpoint of the day. This checkpoint is known as Pilot Knob which is a knob that sits about 2300 feet above sea level and affords some breathtaking views. Unfortunately by the time we got there the sun had all but disappeared on the horizon and this is the only picture we got. It was time to find someplace to camp for the night so back down the mountain we went in search for a spot to camp. By the time we found a camping spot we had driven about sixty miles since we started the event, had completed two of the five required checkpoints, and four of the five optional checkpoints we had chosen. As we set up camp for the night one of the other teams drove up and asked if they could share our campsite. Everyone had a good time sharing their experiences of the day as we wound down from the day’s journey. The second day would be an easier day for our team as our route would be less challenging for the most part and not as time constrained. We were up and back on the road by 7:30 headed toward our next checkpoint which was the old Union Schoolhouse built in 1929 after the previous schoolhouse that was built in 1886 burned down. Across the road from the schoolhouse is an old well with a hand pump. Our next stop was the old homestead. Part of this homestead was built during the Civil War. A gentleman by the name of Bub bought the property for the timber but keeps the old homestead open for those that happen to wonder by on the dirt road that leads to the homestead. If you’re lucky, Bub will be there taking care of the place. Bub’s always willing to tell some stories of the history of this area and give visitors a tour of the old homestead, barn, and well. Unfortunately Bub wasn’t there this trip but it’s just as well because we didn’t have time to stay and chat as we had to be at the Oark General Store, our next checkpoint, before 10am. We were making good time when we drove up on another team that was pulled to the side of the trail. We stopped only to find out the Tacoma, one of them was driving, had broke the passenger side front axle assembly. We pulled over to see if we could lend a hand. It turned out two bolts had come loose and the axle collapsed causing the tire to blow. After further inspection it was discovered that two of the four bolts required were sheared off and the PAGE 51


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other two had worked their way out along the road. Thank goodness the owner had brought some spare parts and was able to get the axle assembly back together. Once they had everything under control we decided to continue on in hopes of making the next checkpoint on time. As we pulled up to the Oark General Store many of the challenge participants were there, filling up their vehicles outside and their tummy inside. This store has been in operation since 1890, the oldest such place in Arkansas. Inside everyone was having breakfast and swapping stories of the challenges they had encountered thus far. Some were planning out the day’s route mile by mile. We finished breakfast and were back on our way. We still had a lot of miles to cover to get to the finish line by dark.

We made it to our last optional trail and then on to Shore’s Lake, the last required checkpoint before the finish line. We arrived at Shore’s Lake by 2pm and even though we had all our required checkpoints there was one more optional checkpoint that looked like we might be able to do without adding any additional mileage to our trip as it was in the general direction we needed to travel to get to the finish line. It also had a 2.5% mileage reduction with indicated it might be a little more challenging than the other trails we had encountered thus far on our second day. There was some question as to whether the closest trail that would take us to the challenge trail was even open though. The decision was made to at least go to the trail head and find out. As it turned out the trail we wanted to take was in fact gated and by the time we would get to the alternate route we were concerned that we would be late to the finish line and it would probably add more mileage than the 2.5% reduction provided by completing the trail. At this point we decided to play it safe and backtrack the 1.2 miles back to our original route and head for the finish line. As it was this 2.4 miles would come back to haunt us. We pulled up to the finish line about 3:30pm on Saturday afternoon. The finish line was on private property just west of Winslow, AR. Our official mileage was 153. We had also accumulated reduction points of 8%. We made our way down the trail to the camping area for the night. As more teams arrived the stories abounded! Everyone enjoyed the pork BBQ dinner provided and then it was off to the campfire as the temperature had dropped into the 40’s and the bonfire was the place to be. Tomorrow would bring a hearty breakfast followed by the awards ceremony then for those that wanted to stay there were several optional challenges including the teeter-totter, the winch challenge, the blind driver course, bridge building, and one last challenge trail. Daylight came early and everyone was up making their coffee and warming by the fire while breakfast was prepared. After a good breakfast it was time to find out if our route and resulting mileage and discount percentage would land us in the winner’s circle. As everyone gathered around the first place winners were announced, it would be OGE4x4 hailing from Venezuela by way of Miami Florida with a total mileage of 151.2 and an accumulated 11.75% reduction for an adjusted mileage of 135.3. The second place team was the Mudbloods with a total mileage of 148.57 and an accumulated 5.75% reduction for an adjusted mileage of 140.49. Our team, The Ozark Navigators took third place with a total mileage of 153 and an accumulated 8% reduction for an adjusted mileage of 141.6! Not bad for a field of 13 teams, and yes we all wished we had those 2.4 miles back! There was also a Camaraderie Award that went to the team that helped out other teams the most during the event. This award went to the Mud Crawlers. Here is the way everyone finished. All in all it was another great event and I want to thank Jayston Landon for creating this event, and the rest of the staff members that helped with this event including Violet Westrick, Rick and Nickie England, Tod Dudley, Tony Natali, Les and Lesia Griffin, Kole Wade, Joe Ison, Nathan and Jami Travis, Spencer Robinson, and Will Cody. My hope is that this event will continue to grow and would become one of the premier events of this type in the country. Until we ride again,

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OUR MEMBERS The companies listed below are proud members of ORBA. They support our common goal of preserving off-road recreation for America’s families. ORBA appreciates their support and looks forward to working with them on the future of off-road recreation. Learn how to join our team efforts and become a member at www.orba.biz. COMPANY WEBSITE 4 Wheel Parts Wholesalers www.4wheelparts.com SEMA www.sema.org OMIX-ADA Inc. www.omix-ada.com BFGoodrich www.bfgoodrich.com Falken Tire www.falkentire.com Fox Racing Shox www.foxracingshox.com MAXXIS International www.maxxis.com AMA D37 Off-Road www.district37ama.org ARB USA www.arbusa.com The Carlstar Group LLC www.carlstargroup.com CNSA www.cnsa.net DynoMax www.dynomax.com Family Events/The Promotion Co. www.familyevents.com KAR TEK Off-Road www.kartek.com Kawasaki Motors Corporation www.kawasaki.com McKenzie’s Performance Products www.mckenzies.com MOTOWORLD of El Cajon www.motoworldofelcajon.com Off Road Warehouse www.offroadwarehouse.com PAC Racing Springs www.racingsprings.com Performance Automotive Group www.p-a-g.net Pro Comp Suspension www.procompusa.com Race Car Dynamics, Inc. www.racecardynamics.com Rancho Performance Suspension www.gorancho.com Southern Four Wheel Drive Association (SFWDA) www.sfwda.org Southern Motorcycle Supply, Inc. www.southernms.com Tenneco, Inc. www.tenneco.com Thrush www.thrush.com Yamaha Motor Corporation USA www.yamaha-motor.com YUASA Battery, Inc. www.yuasabatteries.com Accion el la Baja TV View on Facebook Advance Adapters Inc. www.advanceadapters.com Advantage Performance www.advantage-on-line.com All German Auto www.allgermanauto.com Alpinestars www.alpinestars.com Alumi Craft www.alumicraft.info AMA D36 www.ama-d36.org APE Wraps www.apewraps.com Baja Designs www.bajadesigns.com Baldwin Motor Sports www.baldwinmotorsports.com Beaumont Yamaha www.beaumontpowersports.com Bell Helmets www.bellsports.com Berts Mega Mall www.bertsmegamall.com Bestop, Inc. www.bestop.com Bilstein/ThyssenKrupp of America www.bilstein.com California Association of 4 Wheel Drive Clubs, Inc.www.cal4wheel.com Calmini Manufacturing www.calmini.com C&D Cycle Center www.cndcyclecenter.com CB Performance Products, Inc. www.cbperformance.com Champion Wheel Co., Inc. www.championwheel.com Coyne Motorsports www.10westmotorsports.com Currie Enterprises www.currieenterprises.com Custom Decals, Inc. www.customdecal.com Cycle Gear www.cyclegear.com D.I.D. Chain/Daido Kogyo Co. www.did-daido.co Daystar Products International www.daystarweb.com Dirtboy Designs www.dirtboydesigns.com

CITY STATE Compton CA Diamond Bar CA Suwannee GA Greenville SC Fontana CA Santee CA Suwanee GA Garden Grove CA Renton WA Ontario CA Bakersfield CA Monroe MI Indiana IN Corona CA Irvine CA Anaheim CA El Cajon CA San Diego CA Southfield MI Chino Valley AZ Chula Vista CA El Cajon CA Monroe MI Friendsville TN San Diego CA Monroe MI Monroe MI Cypress CA Laureldale PA Baja California Mexico Paso Robles CA Riverside CA Escondido CA Torrance CA Santee CA Pioneer CA Coronado CA San Marcos CA Las Vegas NV Beaumont CA Santa Cruz CA Covina CA Broomfield CO Poway CA Sacramento CA Bakersfield CA San Diego CA Farmersville CA Lake Elsinore CA Banning CA Anaheim CA El Cajon CA Benicia CA Chuo-Ku Japan Phoenix AZ Eltopia WA

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WINTER Don Emde Publications – Parts Magazine www.partsmag.com Duncan Racing www.duncanracing.com DWT Racing www.douglaswheel.com Dyno Shop www.thedynoshop.com East Bay Motorsports, Inc. www.eastbaymotorsports.com EBC Brakes USA, Inc. www.ebcbrakes.com ECP Powder Coating ecppowdercoatinginc.com El Pato Rojo Off Road Racing www.elpatorojo.com EMPI, Inc. www.empius.com Extreme Terrain www.extremeterrain.com F&L Racing Fuel www.fandl.com F. K. Bearings Inc. www.fkrodends.com Factory Effex www.factoryeffex.com Factory Pipe www.factorypipe.com Full Traction Suspension www.full-traction.com Fullerton Sand Sports www.fullertonsandsports.com Fun Bike Center www.funbike.com Funco Motor Sports www.funcomotorsports.com G&G Auto Repair No website Garvin Industries www.garvin-industries.com GenRight Offroad www.genright.com Hammerking Productions No website Hanson OffRoad PureJeep www.hansonoffroad.com Hella, Inc. www.hellausa.com Hellwig Products www.hellwigproducts.com Helmet House www.helmethouse.com Hinson Clutch Components www.hinsonracing.com Howe Perf. Power Steering www.howeperformance.com Imperial Valley Cycle Center www.ivcycle.com K&N Engineering Inc. www.knfilters.com KC HiLiTES www.kchilites.com Kennedy Engineered Products www.kennedyeng.com King Shock Technology, Inc. www.kingshocks.com Lake Tahoe Adventures www.Laketahoeadventures.com Latest Rage www.latestrage.net Lazer Star www.weekendconcepts.com Liberty Motorsports www.libertymotorsports.com Lightforce USA, Inc. www.lightforceusa.com Lucas Oil www.lucasoil.com Marketplace Events – AIMExpo www.AIMExpoUSA.com M.I.T. Drivetrain Specialists www.mit4x4.com M.T.A., Inc. www.mta-la.com MasterCraft Race Products www.mastercraftseats.com Maxima Products www.maximausa.com Mickey Thompson Perf. Tires www.mickeythompsontires.com Mid-Cities Honda/Kawa/Sea-Doo www.mid-citieshonda.com Moore & Sons M/C www.motorcycle-usa.com Moore Parts Source www.mooreparts.com Motion-Pro www.motionpro.com Motive Gear www.motivegear.com Motorcycle Racing Association of Nevada www.mranracing.com National Powersport Auctions www.npauctions.com Neanderthal Cycle Salvage www.cyclesalvage.com Nemesis Industries www.nem-ind.com Off Road Design www.offroaddesign.com Offroad Power Products www.offroadpowerproducts.com Off Road Protectors www.offroadprotectors.com Off-Road Adventures Magazine www.offroadadventures.com Off-Road.com www.off-road.com OMF Performance Products www.omfperformance.com O’Neal, Inc. www.oneal.com Outerwears, Inc. www.outerwears.net Outfront Motorsports www.outfrontmotorsports.com Painless Performance www.painlessperformance.com Palomar Communications www.allwaysracing.com

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ORBA.BIZ Aliso Viejo CA Santee CA Vista CA Santee CA Hayward CA Sylmar CA El Cajon CA Cabo San Lucas Baja California Anaheim CA Malvern PA Long Beach CA Southington CT Valencia CA Ukiah CA Bakersfield CA Stanton CA San Diego CA Rialto CA Bakersfield CA El Cajon CA Simi Valley CA Twin Peaks CA Bakersfield CA Peachtree City GA Visalia CA Calabasas Hills CA Upland CA Lakeside CA El Centro CA Riverside CA Williams AZ Palmdale CA Garden Grove CA South Lake Tahoe CA Alpine CA Paso Robles CA Yuma AZ Orofino ID Indiana IN Irvine CA El Cajon CA Choudrant LA Santee CA Santee CA Corona CA Paramount CA Santa Cruz CA Anaheim CA San Carlos CA Chicago IL Henderson NV Poway CA Bloomington CA Englewood CO Carbondale CO Spokane WA Murrieta CA Compton CA Joseph OR Riverside CA Simi Valley CA Schoolcraft MI Buena Park CA Fort Worth TX Escondido CA


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ORBA.BIZ PCI Race Radios, Inc. www.pciraceradios.com Petroworks Off-Road Products www.petroworks.com Phoenix Stamping Group, LLC www.phoenixstamping.com Pirate4x4.com www.pirate4x4.com Pit Bull Tire Company www.pitbulltires.com Poison Spyder www.poisonspyder.com Polaris Industries, Inc. www.polarisindustries.com Poly Performance, Inc. www.polyperformance.com Power Tank www.powertank.com Predator 4 Wheel Drive, LLC www.predator4wd.com Primedia Off-Road Group Pro Competition Tire & Wheel Co. www.procomptires.com PRP Seates www.prpseats.com Racer X Illustrated www.racerxonline.com Rancho Performance Transaxles www.ranchoperformance.com Replay XD www.replayxd.com Rocky Mountain ATV/MC www.rockymountainatv.com Rough Country Suspensions www.roughcountry.com RuffStuff Specialities www.ruffstuffspecialities.com San Diego’s House of Motorcycles www.houseofmotorcycles.com San Luis Motorsports www.sanluismotorsports.com Sand Sports Magazine www.sandsports.net Sand Sports Super Show www.sandsportssupershow.com Savvy OffRoad www.savvyoffroad.com Scat Enterprises www.scatenterprises.com Scott’s Performance Products www.scottsonline.com Scorpion Motorsports www.scorpionlasvegas.com SXS Performance www.sxsperformance.com Skyjacker Suspensions www.skyjacker.com SLiME/Accessories Marketing, Inc. www.slime.com SoCal SuperTrucks www.socalsupertrucks.com Sullivans Motorcycle&Snowmobile Access. www.sullivansinc.com Superlift Suspension www.superlift.com Sway-A-Way, Inc www.swayaway.com Team Alba Racing www.teamalbaracing.com The Brothers PowerSports www.brotherspowersports.com The Converter Shop www.tcsperformance.com Torchmate, Inc. www.torchmate.com Total Chaos Fabrication www.chaosfab.com Toyota of Escondido www.toyotaescondido.com Trail Gear, Inc. www.trail-gear.com Trail Tech Inc. www.trailtech.net TrailReady Products,LLC www.trailready.com Trails Preservation Alliance www.ColoradoTPA.org Troy Lee Designs www.troyleedesigns.com Truck-Lite Company, LLC www.truck-lite.com Tuff Country Suspension www.tuffcountry.com Tuffy Security Products, Inc. www.tuffyproducts.com UM Performance Products www.umracing.com VP Racing Fuels, Inc. West www.vpracingfuels.com VW Paradise www.vwparadise.com Walker Evans Racing www.walkerevansracing.com WARN Industries www.warn.com Weddle Engineering www.2weddle.com Wheel Pros www.wheelpros.com Wide Open Excursion www.wideopenbaja.com Wilco Products/Tiregate www.tiregate.com Wiseco Pistons www.wiseco.com Works Connection, Inc. www.worksconnection.com WPS/Fly Racing www.flyracing.com Xtreme Tire Co. Inc. www.xtremetireonline.com Yukon Gear & Axle www.yukongear.com

WINTER Signal Hill CA Fallbrook CA Atlanta GA Georgetown CA Saint Louis MO Banning CA Medina MN San Luis Obispo CA Elk Grove CA Colorado Springs CO Anaheim CA Compton CA Temecula CA Morgantown WV Fullerton CA Newbury Park CA Payson UT Dyersburg TN Loomis CA San Diego CA San Luis Obispo CA Costa Mesa CA Torrance CA Tustin CA Redondo Beach CA Montrose CA Las Vegas NV Riverside CA West Monroe LA Grover Beach CA San Bernardino CA Hanson MA West Monroe LA Chatsworth CA Santee CA Bremerton WA Chino CA Reno NV Corona CA Tustin CA Fresno CA Battle Ground WA Lynnwood WA Colorado Springs CO Corona CA Falconer NY Salt Lake City UT Cortez CO N. Las Vegas NV Wildomar CA San Marcos CA Riverside CA Clackamas OR Goleta CA Cerritos CA Irvine CA Santa Ana CA Mentor OH Diamond Springs CA Boise ID Phoenix AZ Everett WA

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WINTER

ORBA.BIZ

January 15-17th: Superstition 17 – El Centro, CA January 15-17th: Winter Fun Festival – Grass Valley, CA January 28th: NOHVCC Conflict Prevention Webinar February 5th: King of the Hammers (the ultimate desert race) – Landers, CA February 5th-7th: International Motorcycle Show (IMS) Show – Minneapolis March 19th-27th: 50th Annual Easter Jeep Safari – Moab, UT April 10th: Sand Sports Super Swap – Costa Mesa, CA February 12th-14th: IMS Show - Chicago May 6th-8th: TrailFest 12 (AOP) September 16th-18th: Sand Sports Super Show – Costa Mesa, CA September 23rd-25th: Dixie Run 30 (GMP) October 1st-2nd: Off-Road Expo – Pomona, CA Novembr 1st-4th: SEMA Show - Las Vegas, NV December 30th: Log Road MX - Bronson, MI December 31st: Salinas Ramblers M/C Salinas, CA

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Off-Road Business Association 1701 Westwind Drive #108 Bakersfield, CA 93301 661.323.1464 Fax 661.323.1487 ORBA Board Members • Chairman: Greg Adler, Transamerican Auto Parts • Treasurer: Mark Turner, Daystar • Secretary: Lindsay Hubley, Family Events • Member: Brad Franklin, Yamaha Motorsports USA • Member: Stuart Gosswein, SEMA • Member: Kurt Miller, The Enthusiast Network • Member: Jim Chick, Bestop, Inc. ORBA Staff President & CEO: Fred Wiley 661.323.1464 fwiley@orba.biz Office Manager / Accounting: Deborah Burgess 661.323.1464 dburgess@orba.biz


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ORBA.BIZ

WINTER

Please tread lightly and travel only on routes and in areas designated open for motorized vehicle use. Remember, Respected Access is Open Access.

This Public service AnnouncemenT is Powered by

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National Advocate - Winter 2016  

The Winter 2016 issue of the National Advocate features: updates from ORBA Representatives, SEMA, Cal4 Wheel, Outstanding Ambassador Jeff Sl...

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