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Belmont University

SPRING 2019

From Here to Anywhere

C I R C L E

M A G A Z I N E

M UD ON T HE T IRE S Paisleys, Belmont break ground on The Store

A P U B L I C AT I O N F O R S T U D E N T S , PA R E N T S , A L U M N I & F R I E N D S


FI R ST LO O K The annual Best of the Best Showcase, a student-run arena concert held each spring, featured performances from winners of previous Christian, urban/pop, rock and country showcases along with four singer/songwriters from prior ASCAP Writers Nights on campus. Pictured is rock showcase winner, Lemondrop.


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U NIVE RS ITY ADMINISTRATIO N PRESIDENT

Bob Fisher PROVOST

Thomas Burns VP/CHIEF OF STAFF

Susan West VP OF FINANCE AND OPERATIONS

Steve Lasley VP OF ADMINISTRATION AND UNIVERSITY COUNSEL

Jason Rogers VP OF DEVELOPMENT AND EXTERNAL RELATIONS

Perry Moulds VP OF SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT

Todd Lake VP OF INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS

Paula Gill CIRCLE MAGAZINE

A WORD FR OM T HE PRESI DENT

MAG AZ INE

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W H AT A W H IR LW IND 2 01 9 IS PROVING TO B E ! Belmont students always make this campus a vibrant setting, but the activities and events from the first six months of this year set a new record for excitement. From a visit from the Chief Justice to launching a nonprofit with alumnus Brad Paisley to opening a magnificent sculpture museum to hosting documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, Belmont was the place to be in a town well deserving of the “It City” moniker.

MANAGING EDITOR

Through it all, I’ve been struck by the concept of generosity. In each of these incidences individuals provided their time, talents and treasures to serve the greater good… Educating aspiring attorneys, feeding the hungry, inspiring artistic creativity, recalling our collective history... This is the power of what higher education can accomplish when combined with the generosity of community leaders who envision a brighter tomorrow. On behalf of everyone at Belmont, we are grateful for the many partners who enable us to play a role in such impactful conversations and initiatives.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Best Regards,

Robert C. Fisher, president

ON THE COVER:

Brad Paisley, Kimberly Williams-Paisley and Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher participate in the April 3 official groundbreaking for The Store, a new referral-based free grocery store.

April Hefner (M.A. ’07) DESIGNERS

Deborah Brewington, Sarah Hobbs, Anna Howard, Natalie Smith (B.F.A. ’08) UNIVERSITY PHOTOGRAPHER

Sam Simpkins CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jared Ames, Kenzie Baker (B.B.A. ‘21), Josh Behm (B.B.A. ’19), Tommy Gotsch (B.A. ’20), Katy Haas, Justin Kaicles, Craig Mellish

Claire Anderson (B.S. ’19), Lydia Bailey (B.S. ’19), Hope Buckner (B.S. ’12, M.Ed. ‘17), Morgan James (B.A. ’20), A.J. Mazzolini (M.S.A. ’19), Greg Sage Circle magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of Belmont University. Address changes and alumni notes should be directed to the Office of Alumni Relations. Third-class bulk postage is paid at the U.S. Post Office, Nashville, TN. Direct inquiries and comments to: Office of Communications/Circle magazine 615.460.6641 or circlemag@belmont.edu Belmont University is a Christian community. The University faculty, administration, and staff uphold Jesus as the Christ and as the measure for all things. As a community seeking to uphold Christian standards of morality, ethics, and conduct, Belmont University holds high expectations of each person who chooses to join the community. In compliance with federal law, including provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Sections 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Belmont University does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service, or sexual orientation in its administration of education policies programs or activities; its admissions policies; or employment. Consistent with applicable civil rights law, the University seeks employees of Christian faith who are committed to the mission of the University. The University has appointed the director of the Office of Human Resources to serve as coordinator of compliance with Title VII and IX issues and questions for staff and faculty. The Director of Title IX Compliance and Prevention Programs serves as coordinator of compliance for Title IX issues and questions for students. Inquiries or complaints should be directed to: Lauri Chaudoin, Director, Title IX Compliance and Prevention Programs, Freeman Hall, 3rd Floor, 1900 Belmont Boulevard, Nashville, TN 37212, 615.460.5661. Email: lauri.chaudoin@belmont.edu or Leslie Lenser, Chief Human Resources Officer/Sr. Director & Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Fidelity Hall, Room 426, 1900 Belmont Boulevard, Nashville, TN 37212, 615.460.6456. Email: leslie.lenser@belmont.edu.


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B EIN G BE L M O NT There’s nothing quite as perfect as when springtime arrives on The Lawn.


C RE LOVE

AT THE A L U M N U S B R A D P A I S L E Y A N D H I S W I F E K I M B E R LY W I L L I A M S - P A I S L E Y BREAK GROUND ON THE STORE ON BELMONT’S CAMPUS.

Belmont alumnus Brad Paisley wasn’t afraid of getting a little ‘Mud on the Tires’ in April when he hopped on a backhoe to symbolically break ground on Belmont’s campus for The Store, a nonprofit free-referral based grocery store he and his wife Kimberly Williams-Paisley are starting. The Paisleys are partnering with Belmont on the location of The Store at 2005 12th Ave. South, next to the University’s Ministry Center, as well as on planned services for Store patrons. The University has begun offering legal aid clinics at the Center, and plans are underway to also offer healthcare services. Both groups will work closely together to serve the broader community in a range of ways. Brad Paisley said, “Our goal is to give dignity to parents. They can go to The Store and shop in a completely normal way, from choosing the food to checking out, but with no money exchanging hands. The kids can

even ride a mechanical pony out in front of The Store —no charge. Kids do not need the stress of wondering how their parents are going to feed them. In Nashville we have the power of the benevolence of the residents to support The Store.” Much of The Store’s food will come from Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee and will include perishable and nonperishable offerings. All food in The Store will follow guidelines set by dieticians from Second Harvest Food Bank. Individuals and families will be referred by nonprofit and government agencies.


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Architect and The Store board member David Minnigan presents the Paisleys and Dr. Fisher with a commemorative print in honor of the groundbreaking.

Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher noted, “Belmont’s mission is to challenge students with an education that empowers them to use their talents and skills to engage and transform the world. As an alum, Brad Paisley has certainly achieved that mission and more throughout his career, and today’s groundbreaking for The Store marks another milestone in the work he and Kimberly are doing to impact lives for the better. I am especially grateful that Belmont University has been invited to partner with them in this effort... This is just the beginning—we anticipate The Store being a significant part of the Belmont community for years to come.” Construction of The Store is projected to be completed by the end of 2019.


DESIGN A

TO MAKE

DIFFERENCE What a way to wrap up Year One! The O’More School of Design hosted its annual Fashion Show the night of Belmont’s last day of classes, marking the first Fashion Show on campus since O’More joined Belmont University last fall.

CIRCLE MAGAZINE

The annual show served as an opportunity to showcase the work of nine senior fashion design students and two award-winning alumni. Student capstone collections ranged from avant-garde to lavish evening gowns to contemporary wear to Asian-inspired street wear.

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A show highlight came from a special collection born of a partnership with GiGi’s Playhouse, a nonprofit dedicated to changing how the world views Down syndrome. Fashion design students were paired with teens and adults who have Down syndrome and created a custom outfit for their GiGi’s client, made with their specific preferences and needs in mind. The GiGi’s clients then modeled the finished pieces, moving many in the audience to tears with the unrestrained joy and confidence they displayed on the runway. Tori McMahon, a 24-year-old GiGi’s participant, said, “I feel like a queen and gorgeous and fabulous.” Chair of Fashion Design and Merchandising at the O’More School Jamie Atlas said this unique experience is a significant one for her students, as well. “It is exceptionally gratifying to do this work,” she said. “These pairs develop personal bonds, collaborate on style, fabric and color and partner to create an outfit specifically for this client. I only wish those in attendance could see the collaboration process for themselves.” She added that the entire process of preparing a collection for the show is important because it teaches students about the effort and commitment it takes to succeed in the fashion industry. “They experience having their work scrutinized and how stressful it is to deliver great quality under deadline pressure. It is demanding, but when it is over, they realize just how rewarding the experience is.”


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O’MORE SCHOOL OF DESIGN H O ST S F I R ST FA S H I O N S H OW S I N C E M E R G E R W I T H B E L M O N T.


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Less than four months after announcing a multi-million dollar gift of more than 250 works of art, Belmont celebrated the dedication of the new Frederick Hart Studio Museum this spring. Deemed one of America’s greatest sculptors, the late Frederick Hart created works that forever changed the national landscape such as Washington National Cathedral’s Creation Sculptures and Three Soldiers bronze at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Lindy Lain Hart, the artist’s wife, recalled that a successful 2004 showcase of her husband’s work on Belmont’s campus set the stage for the enduring relationship between her family and the University. “I am grateful to the Belmont community for its commitment to my husband’s life’s work, and I am pleased to entrust the stewardship of his legacy to an institution with the vision and determination to move the discussion about art and its role in society in challenging new directions.” Belmont has recreated Hart’s working studio and provided display space for the collection within the campus’ Bunch Library. The largest permanent collection of Hart’s work available for public viewing, the museum offers art enthusiasts a unique opportunity to view Hart’s artistic process as the space includes works in various stages of development, molds, plasters, sculpting tools, artifacts and completed sculptures.

Bob Chase, Hart’s publisher and president of the Hart Foundation, added, “We are thrilled and grateful that Belmont University will be home to the Frederick Hart Studio Museum. This museum will offer historians, students, educators and the art-loving public a more complete and intimate view of his life, work and philosophy than has ever been available previously.” Together with the nearby Gallery of Iconic Guitars and Leu Art Gallery, these unique artistic endeavors offer a dynamic collective to further enhance the student learning experience, attract leading scholars to explore Hart’s artistic contributions and promote further awareness of Belmont’s pursuit of excellence in the arts. In addition, the Hart Studio, the GIG and the Leu share a Nashville Trolley Tours stop with the Belmont Mansion, making this portion of the University campus a historical highlight for any Nashville visitor. The Frederick Hart Studio Museum will be open from 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Mondays thru Saturdays and 1–5 p.m. on Sundays.

SPRING 2019

Belmont receives multi-million dollar art donation and opens new Frederick Hart Studio Museum.


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10 SPRING 2019

CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN ROBERTS PARTICIPATES IN CAMPUS CONVERSATION WITH BELMONT LAW DEAN ALBERTO GONZALES.


The Honorable John G. Roberts, Jr., Chief Justice of the United States, participated this semester in a 45-minute conversation with Belmont Law Dean Alberto Gonzales in the University’s Baskin Center. Judge Gonzales, the former U.S. Attorney General, led a discussion with the Chief Justice in front of an audience of Belmont Law students, invited dignitaries and local judges. Roberts’ appearance began with a kind nod to the event’s moderator: “This is not the first time that Judge Gonzales has interviewed me. The first time was about 14 years ago as the first step in the process that led to my current job. So, in my experience, nothing but good things happen when you’re interviewed by Judge Gonzales.” Roberts’ wry humor permeated the event as he and Gonzales engaged in a conversation touching on life inside the Supreme Court as well as Constitutional law and the legal practice in general. Questions for the discussion were submitted by Belmont Law students and faculty.

Lexie Ward, a 2016 Belmont music business alumna who completed her Belmont Law degree in May and will be serving as an assistant attorney general for the State of Tennessee this fall, said, “Today’s conversation was a wonderful testament to the extraordinary opportunities Belmont Law offers to its students. Today, we were able to learn from two of our country’s most remarkable attorneys who have clearly served this country tirelessly. Their inspirational careers certainly serve as a wonderful reminder of the power of hard work and dedication.” Chief Justice Roberts’ visit marks the second time a sitting U.S. Supreme Court Justice appeared at Belmont Law, following Justice Samuel Alito’s address at the inaugural Belmont Law commencement in 2014.

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courtroom conversations


PASSING THE TORCH CIRCLE MAGAZINE

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Following his first NCAA Tournament victory, men’s basketball head coach Rick Byrd announced his retirement after 33 years leading one of the nation’s most respected basketball programs. Byrd said, “I have been the beneficiary of a very supportive family that I could count on every single day, a loyal circle of friends who consistently offered encouragement, and a terrific fan base that has embraced our program and our players for over three decades. Most importantly, it has been an honor to coach the young men that have brought credit to Belmont University, not only by how they played the game, but how they represented our university all over our country.” The Knoxville, Tennessee native notched 805 career victories, ranking 12th all-time among NCAA Division I head coaches. Of even greater significance, he helped establish an unparalleled standard of academic achievement. Since 2001, Belmont leads the nation in Academic AllAmerica selections with 17, including Dylan Windler in 2019, and has posted a team gradepoint average of 3.0 or higher 19 consecutive years. Best of all, in the NCAA Division I era, every Belmont player who completed eligibility under Byrd’s watch earned his degree. Coach Byrd’s example of integrity, humility, service, loyalty and excellence embodies the Belmont ideal. Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher said. “I am deeply grateful for his life of service to Belmont University and his influence in shaping the lives of so many along the way. He’s simply the best!”


“Casey embodies everything we are looking for in our next head coach,” said Athletic Director Scott Corley. “He is a man of high character who will not take any shortcuts to success. As a former player and assistant coach, he understands our core values and the approach that makes Belmont basketball so well respected nationally. Lastly, Casey is a winner. He’s won at every step of his basketball career, and I expect that to continue as the leader of this program.” Alexander, 46, returns to his alma mater after spending the past six seasons as head coach at Lipscomb University where he led the program to a 29-8 record this season and a 2019 Postseason NIT Championship berth. “This will always be Coach Byrd’s program in my mind,” Alexander said. “So nothing will motivate me more than to make him proud and honor his legacy. We have a history of sustained excellence at Belmont, and everything is in place to build upon recent successes and make new history. We’re ready to get to work.”

SPRING 2019

Less than two weeks after Coach Byrd announced his retirement, Bruin Nation was thrilled to learn of the hiring of alumnus Casey Alexander as the new head men’s basketball coach.

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LEGENDARY MEN’S BASKETBALL COACH RICK BYRD RETIRES ON A HIGH NOTE, AND ALUMNUS CASEY ALEXANDER RETURNS HOME TO LEAD HIS MENTOR’S PROGRAM.


SPOT L I G HT In the 2018-19 season Belmont’s basketball teams demonstrated again why they are among the nation’s elite programs. Both teams earned entry to the Big Dance, with the women’s celebrating their fourth straight appearance while the men secured the first NCAA Tournament win in program history. The teams also garnered national respect for their academic chops, landing in the Championship games of Inside Higher Ed’s March Madness Academic Brackets. While this year’s teams featured stand-out senior classes, two who graduated this May will long be remembered for the incredible legacy they leave on this campus.

MEN’S BAS K ET BA LL CIRCLE MAGAZINE

27-6 R ECO R D Fi rst NC AA

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TOU RN A MEN T

SPRING 2019

WIN FI RST AT L A RGE NCAA Tou r na ment Bid i n

PROG RA M HI STORY

DYLAN WINDLER The only player in America to average at least 20 points, 10 rebounds and 2.5 assists per game, Windler was a two-time Academic All-American and was invited to the 2019 NBA Draft Combine.


3 R D S T RAIGH T S E A S ON WITH

26 W IN S ( O R M OR E )

4 T H CON S E CU TIVE

OVC

TOURNAME NT TITL E

DARBY MAGGARD The OVC Player of the Year, Maggard broke Belmont’s NCAA-era all-time scoring record, ending her college career with 2,031 points and ranking 4th all time nationally with 430 made 3-point shots.

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WOME N ’ S BASK ETB ALL


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During the event, Burns unveiled two Martin D-28 Guitars signed by 76 of the 101 country music artists interviewed for the documentary. Among the signatures on the guitars are Merle Haggard, Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, Vince Gill, Reba McEntire, Kris Kristofferson, Brenda Lee, Loretta Lynn, Garth Brooks and others. Burns, along with writer/producer Dayton Duncan and producer Julie Dunfey, officially presented the guitars to Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher for a temporary exhibit in the GIG through the summer and early fall. Burns then announced a collection of educational resources prepared by PBS and Belmont faculty that will reach middle and high school students across the country. The materials, including video and lesson plans drawn from the research that

went into the film, will explore American history through country music, illustrating the extent to which this distinctly American art form reflects the times in which it evolved. Students and teachers will be able to access the collection for free on PBS Learning Media which reaches one million users each month throughout the school year. “As with all of our films, we work with partners to help teachers and other educators share this history with students,” said Burns. “The history of country music provides an engaging, thoughtful and often soulful way to help students understand unique parts of the American story. Perhaps most importantly, from this unique art form, which was created by so-called ordinary Americans often struggling with extraordinary hardship, we see how the ‘rub’ of American cultures gives birth to country—and really gives birth to who we are as a people.” Belmont faculty participating in the “Country Music” curriculum include Dr. Don Cusic (music business), Dr. Jeremy Lane (music), Dr. Sarah Blomeley (English), Dr. Nancy Riley (music), Dr. Lauren Lunsford (education), Eric Holt (music business), Dr. Amy Smith (music business), Dr. Ryan Fox (math) and Dr. Mark Hogan (education).

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With his eight-part, 16-hour documentary on “Country Music” set to premiere Sept. 15 on PBS, filmmaker Ken Burns came to Nashville in May to provide Music City a sneak peek of his latest ambitious project. But prior to the evening screening that featured a performance by Kathy Mattea, Burns and his team held a press conference in the Gallery of Iconic Guitars (GIG), lending the University timely instruments for an exhibit and announcing an educational initiative around his new film.

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‘COUNTRY MUSIC’ FILMMAKER KEN BURNS LENDS BELMONT GUITARS SIGNED BY LEGENDS AND PARTNERS WITH FACULTY ON EDUCATIONAL INITIATIVE.


ALU M N I STO RI E S

MEET O’MORE ALUMNI

LAUREN MOORE ’13 Opened in August 2018, Modern Remains is an interior design studio located in the up-and-coming Nations neighborhood in Nashville that was dreamed up by three alumni of the O’More interior design program.

E VA N M I L L A R D ’ 1 2

“I think we all came from a round-about way to O’More, and perhaps that is why we gravitated toward each other,” Trabue said. After originally earning a degree in psychology and spending time in the Navy, Trabue returned home to Franklin and enrolled at O’More. Her colleagues’ stories are similar, as they both also enrolled in O’More after attending elsewhere. Meeting at O’More in the fall of 2010, the three quickly bonded over late nights working on projects and shared time in the studio. Each had the opportunity to design spaces for real clients, as students, and were able to see their designs come to life. “O’More opened my eyes to a whole new

BETSY TRABUE ’12 world of design,” Moore said. “It helped me see the world differently… design school began to train my eye, focus my attention and helped me learn how to take an idea and bring it to life.” The three designers were able to make their dream a reality by opening Modern Remains. They will continue to bring their creative skills and designs to Nashville in a new way. “Starting an interior design atelier and showroom with two close friends is a dream come true,” said Millard. “Every day I step into Modern Remains brings the biggest smile to my soul.”


DR. JIMMY BERTHAUD

CHRIS JOSLIN

’88

CINDY MABE ’95

SPRING 2019

Chris Joslin’s Belmont experience helped him merge his love of bluegrass with a savvy business mind to become the executive director for the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum. “I want to help make the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum a world-wide destination that is considered ground zero for the genre of bluegrass music.”

CIRCLE MAGAZINE

brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscles. To students, he advised, “If you want to go into the medical profession, make sure it is exactly what you want to do. It is a lot of work so you have to be really dedicated to your studies and know what the profession entails.”

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A Middle Tennessee native, Dr. Jimmy Berthaud graduated from Belmont with a degree in biology and went on to receive public health and medical degrees. He now serves as a clinical assistant professor of neurology at the University of Michigan Medical School, and his work focuses on conditions of the

’06

KASSI ASHTON ’16

Music business alumna Cindy Mabe and commercial music grad Kassi Ashton were on campus this semester, sharing stories of their adventures in the music industry. Mabe serves as president of Universal Music Group Nashville where Ashton is signed (in conjunction with Interscope Records). CMT calls Ashton “fearless” and notes “her point of view is inspired and her storytelling knows no bounds.”

NICK ASHBURN

A double major in political science and German, alumnus Nick Ashburn turned his studies of international political economies and a year-long Germany study abroad experience into a career as the senior director of impact investing of the Wharton Social Impact Initiative. In a campus

’08

convocation lecture this semester, Ashburn said, “I think a lot about how we use capital to drive social impact, from philanthropy and grants for nonprofits, to emerging, innovative ways people are using their investment dollars to tackle issues.”


CAM PUS N E WS

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NEW ARCHITECTURE DEGREE WILL HELP DESIGN NASHVILLE’S FUTURE Proving again to be an innovator in higher education and strengthening its position in design, Belmont University will launch the first Bachelor of Architecture program in Middle Tennessee, beginning fall 2020. The five-year degree will provide a direct path to pursuing licensure while filling a gap for architectural education in the Nashville area. Following Belmont’s 2018 acquisition of the O’More College of Design, the University has the foundation to form a world-class program. Adding an architecture program to current O’More majors in interior and graphic design makes perfect sense. In fact, beginning August 1, the programs will all

be housed in the new O’More College of Architecture, Art and Design. “Nashville is one of the hottest places in the country for growth and construction, and yet the region does not offer architecture education,” said Dr. Bob Fisher. “We are consistently analyzing gaps in the market and seeking to build programs that prepare our graduates for needed careers that will impact communities. I can’t think of a more appropriate, timely or exciting program for Belmont to introduce in Nashville.” Ralph Schulz, president and CEO of the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce,

added, “Belmont’s new architecture program is a perfect pairing for a city on the move like Nashville. Belmont University continues to invest in relevant programs with a great track record for excellence.” Licensed architects currently teach in Belmont’s Interior Design program, paving the way for seamless expansion with this new degree offering. Belmont architecture majors will graduate fully prepared for the required three-year Architectural Experience Program, and their degree will position them to sit for the Architectural Registration Exam.


Belmont’s annual MLK week kicked off with speaker Bishop Vashti Murphy McKenzie, first female bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, encouraging audience members to take a stand.

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Just over 10 years after the 2008 Town Hall Presidential Debate at Belmont, the University was announced as one of six finalists for a spot to host a 2020 debate.

‘TAKE A STAND’

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BELMONT 2020

STUDENTS SERVE OTHERS For 100 Belmont students, faculty and staff, Spring Break was spent serving others in communities in Mexico, Guatemala, China, the U.S. and the Dominican Republic.

BELMONT ON ‘AMERICAN IDOL’ Music education student Walker Burroughs advanced all the way to the Top 8 on this season of “American Idol” and even performed a duet with one of his musical heroes, Jason Mraz.

FILLING THE GAP CITY

CURRENT METRO POPULATION

# OF ARCHITECTS

​N ASHVILLE 1.75 MILLION 570

​Austin

​C harlotte Atlanta

2 million

1,010

1.25 million

1,190

4.5 million

2,120


PROFESSOR AWARDED GRANT TO RESEARCH MUSIC ROW STUDIOS AURAL HERITAGE

FROM HERE TO MOLDOVA

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Alumni Sean Grossnickle and Maxine Bouldin will be living out Belmont’s motto of “from here to anywhere” this fall as they travel to Moldova to work with the Peace Corps.

SHEERAN SELFIE A group of Belmont students had the opportunity to perform the song “Can’t Help Falling in Love” with superstar singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran for NBC’s “Elvis All-Star Tribute.”

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TENNIS COMES HOME Belmont announced plans to build a new 850-space parking garage on campus that will feature six NCAA Division I regulation tennis courts along with locker rooms and coaches’ offices, allowing Belmont’s men’s and women’s tennis teams to once again compete on campus.

Masters of Science in Nursing Graduates Earn

FUTURE NURSES The School of Nursing held its first-ever white coat ceremony where a class of undergraduate students were celebrated.

100% PA S S R AT E

15th Year in a Row

Dr. Doyuen Ko, associate professor of audio engineering in the Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business, was awarded a $350,000 grant for a study he’s pursuing on the digital preservation of aural heritage. The second largest grant recently received from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Ko’s work seeks to digitally replicate the acoustics of historic structures, including legendary Nashville Music Row studios. Ultimately, this research will establish protocols for preserving the aural heritage of culturally significant sites. Ko and his research colleagues noted in their grant proposal that a building’s acoustics influences how humans experience sounds. “For centuries, across music history, composers and performers have viewed performance rooms as musical instruments, with distinct tonal, spatial and dynamic character,” they wrote. “Composers have sought to include the interaction of players and rooms within their music, and instrument makers consider a room’s response to sound.” Belmont University is uniquely equipped for the group’s planned studies in terms of geographic location and facilities, including a hemi-anechoic chamber and a 250-seat film sound mixing stage with a DOLBY ATMOS immersive audio system, the first university-based installation in the world. In addition, the college owns and operates two historic recording studios on Music Row, Columbia Studio A and B, which will be preserved and auralized in the project.


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DIGITAL HUMANITIES CLASS PILOTS MUSIC ROW WALKING TOUR Thanks to a special project from Honors Professor of Practice Dr. Mary Ellen Pethel, Belmont students are able to engage with an exciting and emerging new field, digital humanities. Pethel recently completed a post-doctorate certification in digital public humanities, an academic field which applies technology and digital resources to traditional humanities disciplines such as literature, history and philosophy.

Pethel and her students are creating a historical, digital walking tour of several historic sites in downtown Nashville. Called Nashville Sites, the mobile-friendly website is expected to launch in fall 2019 with approximately 20 walking or driving tours of Nashville including “Civic and Public Spaces,” “Food for Thought” (based on historic restaurants), “Architecture” and “Gulch History (1860-1900).”

With funding and support from many community stakeholders, including Belmont,

“The goal,” she said, “is to attract and engage a wide audience to learn more about Nashville’s

historically and culturally significant sites through images, text, navigation, audio narration and credible information.” Biology major Grace Hurley took the course for her Honors seminar because she was interested in finding out more about the meaning of “digital humanities.” “The most challenging aspect was finding all the specific information about the building, like what it used to be or who built it. I had to contact many of the businesses and go into city records. In this class I gained many


The Belmont Office of Leadership Development hosted a Student Leadership Fair this spring to give students the chance to learn more about leadership development opportunities across campus.

Alumni Anna and Emily Weisband and Rusty Gaston from THiS Music returned to campus during Homecoming week to give advice to students pursuing careers in songwriting.

ANIMAL MINERAL VEGETABLE

VOLMAN GETS GOLD

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HIT MAKERS ADVICE

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LEADERSHIP POTENTIAL

research skills, and learned a great deal about Nashville through the process.” When complete, physical medallions will be placed on signs throughout the city, providing QR codes to connect to the tour website. Pethel believes Nashville Sites will offer the city’s natives and tourists alike engaging, self-directed, historically accurate tours of Nashville that are scholarly and ad free.

This year’s Belmont Undergraduate Research Symposium (BURS) featured a guest lecture from Animal Planet’s “Monsters Inside Me” host Dan Riskin as well as presentations from students representing 23 different academic departments.

Co-founder of The Turtles and Belmont faculty member Mark Volman was awarded a gold record by the Recording Industry Association of America this April for his advocacy work for copyright law and the CLASSICS Act.

Belmon t L aw Class of 2018

ACHIEVES RECORD-BREAKING

96%

E M P L OY M E N T R AT E


CLASS OF 2019 CELEBRATES COMMENCEMENT Belmont University held its spring 2019 commencement ceremonies for graduate and undergraduate students on Saturday, May 4 in the Curb Event Center. The event celebrated the graduation of 1,277 students, the largest ever.

GATEWAY TO BRANDENBURG

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December 2018 Honors program graduate Ali Humbrecht was recently awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship Grant to Germany and will teach in Brandenburg.

READY FOR LAUNCH Belmont offers one of the best programs for students aspiring to launch their own businesses according to The Princeton Review, which named the school No. 24 on its nation-wide list of “Top 25 Undergraduate Schools for Entrepreneurship of 2019.”

These new alumni and their families can take comfort in the strong first destination rate (career outcomes) that Belmont University historically achieves. First destination data reflects the percentage of graduates who secure employment, enroll in graduate school or enlist in military service within six months of graduation. For Belmont, which draws that information from student and alumni surveys, the most recent rate is 94.25 percent, significantly higher than the national average of 81 percent.

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The current data comes from reports and surveys from the Class of 2018. Their responses indicated that 74 percent of that year’s graduates had completed an internship while at Belmont, and 34 percent participated in short-term study abroad experiences for course credit.

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KNOW YOUR NUMBER

GOLDEN HALL

Episcopal Priest, psychotherapist and popular Enneagram expert/writer/podcaster Ian Cron spoke in Chapel in February, encouraging students to be more self-aware and “follow your bliss.”

The U.S. Green Building Council recently awarded Belmont’s Tall Hall with LEED certification at the Gold level, the University announced during its April 22 Earth Day celebration.

LEED-CERTIFIED CAMPUS BUILDINGS

P L AT I N U M

GOLD

A ye rs Aca d em i c Center

Tall Hall Baskin Cen ter Joh n son Cen ter

But beyond their resulting careers, the graduates’ time at Belmont inspired an ongoing quest that will far outlast their college experience. As graduating senior Jill Barrett, a French and English double major, wrote, “For me, academic achievement means never stopping. It means embracing the concept of ‘lifelong learning,’ and pursuing knowledge without end. True achievement comes with the recognition that all we can ever do is keep learning, especially once we leave the hallowed halls of academia and enter into society. Because if we’re not learning…what’s the point?”


SPRING 2019

27

CIRCLE MAGAZINE


WE BE L I E VE CA MPA IG N JAMES AND LOIS ARCHER GIFT MAKES POSSIBLE $10 MILLION BELMONT ENDOWMENT FOR VALUES-BASED LEADERSHIP James Archer, president/CEO of Nashville-based MV2 Entertainment, and his wife Lois announced this spring the creation of a $10 million endowment, resulting in a renaming of the Belmont’s prestigious Presidential Scholars program. The Archers’ gift recognizes Belmont’s longstanding institutional commitment to being a values-based organization which includes a pledge to ongoing excellence and valuesbased leadership development within the University community. Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher said, “I am so grateful to James and Lois for investing their time, energy and resources into Belmont University over the past several years. This new gift is not only extremely generous, but it also demonstrates the Archers’ commitment to the importance of values-based leadership at every level of an organization. These funds will serve to empower students and promote continued efforts across campus to foster the values and leadership the Archers exemplify.” The Archers $5 million gift is being matched by Belmont to create a $10 million endowed fund to support the Archer Presidential Scholars program and ongoing values-based leadership development across

the University. The Archer Presidential Scholarship is Belmont’s most competitive scholarship, providing full tuition, room, board, books and fees for four academic years (eight semesters) of continuous study. James Archer said, “From Texas oil fields to the Nashville music industry to higher education, the common thread running through everything I do is values-based leadership centered on four core values: ethics, commitment, excellence and innovation. It’s always about doing the right thing for all of your stakeholders. My time to date at Belmont has shown me this University shares those values, and Lois and I are honored to further support their efforts in promoting values-based leadership to Belmont’s students, faculty and staff.” *BELMONT IS MATCHING ENDOWMENT CONTRIBUTIONS BETWEEN

$25,000–$1.5 MILLION TO CAMPAIGN PRIORITY AREAS


T O TA L R A I S E D

$224,268,239 $300,000,000

BRADLEY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP ESTABLISHED TO ‘MARK THE MOMENT’ $200,000,000

$100,000,000

YOUR GIFT MAKES A DIFFERENCE

17,015

Total donors to the We Believe campaign

$3,213,525

Raised to support missions

“As I sought out exposure to patient care, I realized how the interplay of singing and medicine created some of the most curative moments for myself and my patients. Music became a remarkable channel that brought us together and turned a monotonous routine into an entertaining venture… This scholarship gave me the liberty to truly explore my passions freely at Belmont in order to determine, with certainty, my life’s calling.” —D  ANIEL MATA Marietta, GA | May 2019 Graduate

Psychology major with a Pre-Med emphasis and Voice minor

$13,237,554 In gifts eligible for University match*

Created to honor Harold Bradley, a legendary session artist who has played on thousands of songs and is known to be the most widely recorded guitarist in history, Belmont University recently announced the creation of the Harold Bradley Endowed Scholarship. Harold and his brother Owen were key architects of the Nashville sound and style of recording, helping to build a recording industry and lay the foundation for Music City. The scholarship, funded by two anonymous donors, will be awarded to freshman guitar students in Belmont’s College of Visual and Performing Arts through their graduation. CVPA Dean Dr. Stephen Eaves said, “This generous gift will not only honor Mr. Bradley, but it will provide meaningful support for the next generation of guitarists. I know students will be thrilled to receive this scholarship and be motivated to aspire to the legacy of Harold Bradley.” Dubbed the “First Family of Music Row,” the entire Bradley family was also honored at Belmont’s 30th Annual President’s Concert with the Applause Award for their impact on the industry and on Belmont. Harold and his brother Owen served as pioneers in the Nashville music industry, and Owen’s children, Patsy and Jerry, kept up the family tradition. Jerry’s son, Clay Bradley, continues the legacy and accepted the Applause Award on behalf of his family.

GIVE NOW

Now is a great time to join the We Believe campaign. To learn more about our campaign, please visit webelieve.belmont.edu or call 615.460.5517.


1900 Belmont Boulevard Nashville, TN 37212-3757

Circle Magazine is printed on Roland Opaque paper, which contains 30 percent post-consumer fiber, is FSC certified, made with renewable energy and is ECF free.

AUG. 21 First Day of Classes AUG. 24 Battle of the Belmont Bands & Family Fun Day SEPT. 27–29 Parent & Family Weekend OCT. 28 Meet the Bruins DEC. 13 Winter Commencement belmont.edu

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Circle Magazine Spring 2019  

Circle Magazine Spring 2019