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2012-13 ANNUAL REPORT


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN This has been a year of change and achievement for our College of Health Sciences! Major changes included the addition of the Athletic Training Program and faculty to our college along with renaming of the School to the School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training. We also recruited a new chair, Dr. Roy Ogle, which under his leadership has been renamed the School of Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences to better reflect the programs we offer. We launched the new Center for Global Health and recruited the center’s founding director, Barbara Greenberg, we are actively recruiting a new faculty member and research associate with expertise in biostatistics to support the work of the center, the college and our partners. Another major change is the development of the new clinic, Monarch Physical Therapy, which will open this fall providing much-needed services to our area with the incorporation of the technology in our Center for Brain Research and Rehabilitation, providing another venue for service learning and research. This year, we also have two people retiring, Sandra Breeden, director of advising and Professor Michele Darby, chair of the School of Dental Hygiene. On behalf of the College of Health Sciences, I wish them enjoyable retirements after many years of dedicated service. We also welcomed a new major gift officer, Manisha Sharma, and a new marketing/PR specialist assigned to our college, Jon Cawley. We are optimistic that our work with both of them and the Advisory Board will help get out the word of the good work we do and share our vision to potential donors. A review of the gifts to the college demonstrates that we have quite a ways to go to achieve the level of giving that can help this college achieve its vision. The vision of the College of Health Sciences is to advance health care education and research through interdisciplinary and global collaborations. The college is committed to promoting health and quality of life in Hampton Roads while emulating our values of integrity, inclusiveness, excellence and collaboration. We are the recognized leaders in cytotechnology, dental hygiene, online graduate nursing programs, nuclear medicine technology, medical technology and physical therapy education. We intend to keep these distinctions through continued update and renewal. Our graduates continue to be the health professionals of choice by health systems, colleges/universities, government agencies and industry in Virginia and around the globe. Our graduates also create businesses, small and large, contributing even more to economic development beyond our workforce contributions. As the health care industry undergoes dramatic changes in access, costs, reimbursement and technology, there is unprecedented emphasis on patient-centered care delivered by interprofessional teams. We will be known for innovation in online education and simulation to prepare health and public health professionals who can effectively work in teams, incorporate evidence-based practice and deliver solutions to global health challenges, locally and around the world. Our research continues to contribute to best practices and new approaches to persistent health care problems. With clear focus, productive partnerships, key recruitments, and faculty retention, we also aim to be the recognized leaders in public and global health, molecular diagnostics, and translational sciences. As reflected in this annual report, our students, faculty, alumni and partners are working together to achieve ambitious goals as we educate world-class health care and public health leaders of the future.

Shelley C. Mishoe, PhD Dean


TABLE OF CONTENTS Administration Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mission/Vision/Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Chairs’ Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 Programs Offered. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Enrollment & Degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Financial Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Accreditations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Overall Pass Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Commencement 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Enrollment Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14 Service and Engagement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Grants Awarded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Grant Funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Student Scholarship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 School Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Faculty/School Achievements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-21 Annual Giving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-24 Global Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-26 Military Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Alumni Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Publications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-31 Books and Book Chapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Our Dean’s Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover


ADMINISTRATIVE MESSAGE Richardean Benjamin,

Deborah Bauman,

RN, MPH, PhD, FAAN Associate Dean

BSDH, MS Assistant Dean

Our graduate programs are in high demand as evidenced by the increasing enrollments this past year. The increased need for advanced practice health professionals is directly linked to changes in health care needs of residents in the Commonwealth and across the nation shifting from an acute care focus to one of prevention and health promotion. Our graduates are uniquely prepared to meet the challenges of today’s population. Graduate students accounted for over 60 percent of the college’s enrollment during 2012-13, with slight increases in both master’s and doctoral students. Over the last year, the college reported impressive graduation rates. Doctoral graduates (PhD, DNP, and DPT) total more than 300 students since 2009. The college remains committed to educating “competent caring health professionals.” Two of our core values guide us in accomplishing that goal – “excellence” and “partnership.” These values, indicators of our performance, allow us to respond favorably when asked the question, “How well are you doing?” or more importantly, “Do you have quality programs?” Our response most definitely is, “We have excellent programs.” A measure of excellence in health professions programs is often determined by a program’s accreditation status. We proudly report that 13 of our programs hold specialty accreditation and most recently our master’s in environmental health program completed its self-study and on-site evaluation in February. The team reported favorable results and we expect positive outcomes following the meeting of the National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council in June. Satisfying agency accreditation standards represents the ultimate quality standard denoting excellence. Partnership, another core value of the COHS, is reflected in our most recent work focusing on development of a college-wide effort to promote interprofessional education. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has long urged health professions programs to educate their students in teams rather than in silos to produce a safer and more cost-effective clinical environment. The first report from Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC), a partnership of six associations of health professional schools -- nursing (AACN), osteopathy (ACOM), pharmacy (AACP), dentistry ( ADEA), medicine (AAMC), and public health (ASPH) -- established a set of competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice organized into four domains: values and ethics for interprofessional practice; roles and responsibilities; interprofessional communication; teams and teamwork. Central to the work in our college has been establishment of an interprofessional education task force being led by Dr. Rebecca Poston. The goal of the task force is to develop a strategic plan for our college that supports the mandate of the IPEC commission, while at the same time developing an approach that is compatible with our unique programs. Additionally, we began advancing our initiatives by preparing faculty to develop and implement interprofessional instructional strategies in our programs. We look forward to reporting impressive results over the next several months.

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It is evident from the wonderful faces smiling at us from the 2012-2013 Annual Report cover that ODU Health Sciences students value their educational experiences, their classmates, the security of knowing they will pass their licensing exam and their employment prospects. The exceptional faculty (67 full-time and approximately 100 adjunct) and staff members make this a reality for ODU Health Sciences students. Inside these pages you will be amazed by the interdisciplinary research and community service conducted by the students and faculty and the growth of the College. Our collaborations locally and globally are extremely rewarding and our opportunities are multiplying. We are especially proud of our students with military backgrounds. I will miss Sandra Breeden, Director of the College Undergraduate Advising Center, who retired this year as founding Director and following 17 years of exceptional service guiding students in career choice and efficient completion of degrees. Katie Ferrara, Health Sciences Success Advisor, won the ODU New Advisor of the Year award and recognition from the national advising association. The College gained an additional full-time advisor position this year, which helped to address the increasing numbers of intended Health Science majors. Our Nuclear Medicine Technology received “Continued Accreditation” decision and Ophthalmic Technology program completed its self-study and on-site evaluation in April this year. Our College, a leader at ODU, in web based, online and distance learning program offerings has increased accessibility while delivering quality programs, especially undergraduate degree completion programs. I am awed by the accomplishments of the students, faculty and staff and truly cherish Old Dominion University and the College of Health Sciences!


MISSION/VISION/VALUES

Our Mission

Our Vision

Our Values

“The College of Health Sciences will provide leadership in health care by offering excellent educational experiences in a quality learning environment to facilitate the development of competent, caring health professionals; by generating knowledge through inquiry and discovery; and by engaging in lifelong learning, professional, and community service.”

“To advance healthcare education and research through interdisciplinary and global collaborations”

Integrity Inclusiveness Excellence Partnership

Medical Technology Students

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 3


CHAIRS’ MESSAGE Michele Darby, University Professor,

Deanne Shuman, BSDH, MS, PhD

Eminent Scholar, and Chair Gene W. Hirschfeld School of Dental Hygiene (SODH)

Professor and Interim Chair Community and Environmental Health

The School of Dental Hygiene priorities continue to focus on interprofessional, multidisciplinary global collaborations, engaging a talented network of community and global partners, as well as alumni, faculty and staff. We believe these transformational experiences facilitate student, staff and faculty success, and we are committed to create opportunities for those we work with. Our community partners and alumni serve distinguished roles as adjunct faculty, speakers, mentors and future employers to our students. The generosity of our network supports scholarships, special events, and the acquisition of the electronic health record capability for the Dental Hygiene Care Facility. Although our faculty are small in number, their efforts in the past year have resulted in the publication of two book chapters, 15 referenced publications (some with faculty from the departments of physical therapy, engineering, medicine, community health and biology), two professional magazine publications, three grants obtained with four grants still pending, and 10 presentations on the national and international stage. Assuring the advancement of the department in research and education, faculty and student teams continue to study the application of blue-spectrum light technology for oral cancer identification, use of simulation in crosscultural competence training, the application of virtual reality for anxiety control, and the effects of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma on oral pathogens and tooth whitening. Our BSDH-entry level, BSDH-degree completion and master’s degree programs prepare future generations of practitioners, leaders, researchers and academicians. Both our full and adjunct faculty and students are a real source of pride, as they continue to garner recognitions. Faculty service spans membership on editorial, industry and foundation advisory boards, and our continuing education program meets the annual needs of over 500 professionals. Our community engagement programs delivered outreach oral health services to over 8,000 people with $90,000 in donated service-learning care, while the on-campus clinic experienced close to 6,000 patient encounters. Faculty and graduate students, Physicians for Peace, and the University of Nicaragua faculty are global partners for the first dental hygiene program in Central America, an initiative that is scheduled to start in fall 2013. Leadership skills were obvious at the annual Student and Alumni Awards and Networking Event, where returning alumni shared their inspiration and advice for personal and career success. The Distinguished Alumni Award went to Paula Parise, director of dental hygiene, College of Health Sciences, Bahrain University, who traveled from the Middle East to accept this award. As we wish lots of luck to our recent graduates now taking their board examinations, we must also congratulate the Class of 2012, which boasted a 100 percent first-attempt pass rate on the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination. Our achievements reveal the school’s ability to shape its future and advance its mission. While we face challenges, the same commitment to excellence will continue to be our legacy.

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The 2012-13 academic year has been a productive one for students, faculty and staff in the School of Community and Environmental Health. The school has four degree programs: BS in Health Sciences, BS in Environmental Health, MS in Community Health-Environmental Health and the joint Eastern Virginia Medical School/ODU Master in Public Health. Faculty expertise resulted in 14 peer-reviewed publications, two conference proceedings, three book chapters, and 27 scholarly presentations at regional, national and international conferences. The total of new grant funding for the school was approximately $800,000. One grant is from the National Institutes of Health’s National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for a project titled “Policy resistance within a region’s healthcare system: A system dynamics approach,” developed by Joshua Behr, Raphael Diaz, Harry Zhang and Mariana Szklo-Coxe. Professor Steven M. Becker has a funded project from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security/Cazador to develop, test and refine materials that can be used to better inform people regarding radiological emergencies. Steven M. Becker was appointed by President Barack Obama to the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, an independent agency of the federal government, which provides scientific and technical oversight of the nation’s plans for managing and disposing of highlevel radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Jim Blando was an expert consultant for a New York Times article on OSHA and long-term health risks in industry. Maureen Boshier is editor of the first edition of Nursing in the 21st Century, an electronic journal available by mobile app. James Neff was awarded the American Academy of Health Behavior Poster of Distinction at the March 2013 conference. Jim English was reappointed by the Norfolk City Council to the Norfolk Services Advisory Board for a three-year term. The MS in Community Health/ Environmental Health Sciences had a successful reaccreditation site visit by the National Environmental Health Science and Protection Council in February under the leadership of Anna Jeng. The ODU Student Public Health Organization, consisting of 14 students and faculty member Ann Marie Kopitzke, traveled to Guatemala City for spring break to participate in healthcare volunteer placements at various hospitals and clinics. Elizabeth Shepheard was recognized as the 2012-13 Outstanding Undergraduate Environmental Health Student. Alumna Cheryl Cunningham, who earned a BS in Health Sciences in the Health Services Administration Program in 2007 and MS in Community Health in 2010, received the 201213 Virginia Western Community College Distinguished Alumni Award. Jacqueline Sharpe guided the charter of a new honorary society, Eta Sigma Gamma, ODU Chapter Epsilon Theta. Our achievements reflect the school’s commitment to advance. The continued success of our programs and the accomplishments of our graduates reflect our goal of inspiring minds and transforming lives.


Roy C. Ogle, PhD, Chair,

Karen A. Karlowicz, EdD, RN

School of Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences

Associate Professor and Chair School of Nursing

I am delighted to have recently become chair of the newly named School of Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences, known for more than 30 years as Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences. Our name now more accurately describes who we are and what we do: offering five professional programs in medical diagnostic and clinical sciences—medical technology, nuclear medicine technology, cytotechnology, ophthalmic technology and molecular diagnostics -- and conducting biomedical research and graduate education in areas that directly target the bedside care and complement the educational focus of the College of Health Sciences. We have a wealth of experience among our teaching faculty that makes our school an exceptional place to learn. We are greatly indebted to Professor Sophie Thompson both for her service as previous chair and for her continuing guidance of our cytotechnology program. Her national peers have recognized her with a nomination for the National Award for Outstanding Achievement by the American Society of Cytopathology as “the best cytotechnologist in the U.S.” Professors Faye Coleman and Thomas Somma are celebrating 35 years on our faculty, while Professor Scott Sechrist is completing 25 years. Dr. Sechrist and Professor Lori Wood each piloted us through successful five-year reaccreditation reviews for the nuclear medicine and ophthalmic technology programs, respectively. It is no small feat that all five programs achieved a 100 percent pass rate this year for certification exams. In scholarship and research, we continue to excel, with much credit due our seven joint faculty appointees in the Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, a research group unique around the world. The Center for Bioelectrics directed by Dr. Richard Heller has continued to obtain extramural funding from NIH, Department of Defense and organizations such as the American Heart Association; it has published and presented many significant studies at international meetings, including novel methods for gene delivery, selective ablation of cancer cells and biomedical applications of cold plasma; and serves as a catalyst for innovation in biotechnology in the region. With establishment of my laboratory and recruitment of new faculty, we anticipate additional growth in areas such as stem cell biology, tissue and organ banking and regenerative medicine. Our school also strives to serve the Hampton Roads region, Commonwealth and global communities as well as the teaching and research professions. Our faculty and students give generously of their time to organizations such as American Red Cross and Physicians for Peace. We also serve on numerous boards, study sections and advisory boards. While our school is poised for growth and accomplishments, we fully intend to preserve and cultivate the excellence in teaching and service that have marked our previous three-plus decades.

Partnerships are critical to the mission of the School of Nursing. Over the past year, we have worked to strengthen existing partnerships, cultivate new collaborations and to sow the seeds for potential opportunities that will enable us to continue preparing exceptional nurses, extending nursing science and impacting our global community. We have worked to strengthen our existing partnerships with Virginia Community College System nursing programs. Not only do we have articulation agreements that permit associate degree nursing graduates to enter our RN-to-BSN program with 33 advanced placement credits for their previous nursing education, we are now working with community college programs to facilitate the concurrent enrollment of selected students in the RN-toBSN program through an initiative led by Kay Palmer. It is no surprise that this program option is becoming increasingly popular as employers signal a preference to hire more nurses with an earned BSN to meet the statewide goal of an 80 percent BSN nursing workforce by 2020. The School of Nursing collaborates with all health systems in the region to facilitate clinical education of undergraduate nursing students. New collaborations with our clinical partners have permitted us to place nurse practitioner graduate students in system-affiliated medical practices for preceptor-supervised clinical experiences. The addition of local clinical sites for nurse anesthesia students at Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters, Riverside Regional Medical Center and Sentara Princess Anne Hospital has enabled the program to begin decreasing the number of out-of-state clinical rotations to meet requirements for student training. An ongoing collaboration with CHKD and Eastern Virginia Medical School to promote patient safety assists the school to bring nationally recognized speakers to campus; their stories of experience with medical errors help students reflect and understand their role as patient safety advocates. Likewise, in 2012, the School of Nursing received an HRSA grant award to advance interprofessional education for advanced practice nursing students. Collaborations established through this federally funded project with ODU faculty in physical therapy, dental hygiene and human counseling supports the project team, headed by Carolyn Rutledge, to create interprofessional learning opportunities. Finally, thanks to the efforts of Kimberly Adams Tufts as director of community and global initiatives for the School of Nursing, we have sown seeds for potential new opportunities through preliminary Memoranda of Understanding with educational institutions in Ghana, Turkey and Austria. As the School of Nursing continues to grow and evolve, we are ever-mindful of our vision … to create a health care future where inspired minds transform lives as exceptional nurse leaders, scientists and advocates.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 5


CHAIRS’ MESSAGE Martha Walker, PT, PhD Associate Professor and Chair School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training The core values of the College of Health Sciences are partnership, excellence, inclusiveness and integrity. These values help guide us as we fulfill our mission to improve individual and community health by advanced professional education, influential research, and responsive service. There isn’t enough room in this forum to explore how we manifest all of these values in our student and faculty activities, so I’ll just choose one: Partnership. Life is a team sport. We work with others to improve and restore health across the lifespan and across the wide range of abilities and activities. In order to teach our students how to effectively engage as part of a team, we teach them to manage working in groups on assignments; we devise interprofessional experiences for them, and we model teamwork in our effort to provide them the best education possible. Our hope is that when they are treating patients they will remember strategies to enhance communication and cooperation among team members, and they will know how to lead. This is definitely the year for us to showcase partnership because our school expanded as athletic training faculty from the Darden College of Education joined faculty in the School of Physical Therapy. In the future we will offer both graduate programs. We extend our warmest welcome to athletic training faculty Bonnie Van Lunen and Matthew Hoch and adjunct faculty Johanna Hoch. The trio bring exceptional skills in teaching and scholarship. The master’s program has 12 to 13 students per year pursing an education in advanced skills and research in athletic training. Examples of partnership are evident in teaching, research and service activities. This year saw a collaboration of counseling, dental hygiene, nursing and physical therapy faculty to create an interprofessional topics course. This was supported by external funding, so you know that a strong partnership among the faculty from different departments was working away long before the students formed their interprofessional partnerships during their class projects. In another collaborative effort, nursing and physical therapy faculty created and guided students from the two disciplines on a spring break study abroad trip to the Dominican Republic. Physical therapy clinical education is strengthened by a partnership among directors of clinical education (DCE) from programs in the mid-Atlantic region. The DCEs work to ensure high-quality clinical experiences for physical therapy students regardless of institution. A close look at the grants and publications of PT/AT faculty shows the results of interprofessional, across-colleges and across-universities work on grants, peer-reviewed research articles and presentations. Service learning opportunities have been strengthened by partnerships with Physicians for Peace, and other community organizations such as the Virginia Beach Free Clinic, Norfolk PrimePlus Senior Center and the American Diabetes Association. As we cultivate and maintain vibrant partnerships, we cultivate success.

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Program Offerings School of Community & Environmental Health n BS in Health Sciences (BSHS) with concentrations in Health Services Administration and Public Health n BS in Environmental Health n MS in Community Health with emphasis in Environmental Health n Joint EVMS/ODU Master of Public Health (MPH) n PhD in Health Services Research n Certificate in Occupational Safety Program (non-credit) School of Dental Hygiene n BS in Dental Hygiene (entry level) n BS in Dental Hygiene (post-RDH licensure) n MS in Dental Hygiene n Continuing education for dental hygienists School of Physical Therapy & Athletic Training n Doctor of Physical Therapy n MS in Athletic Training School of Medical Diagnostic & Translational Sciences n BSHS in Cytotechnology n BS in Nuclear Medicine Technology n BS in Medical Technology n BS in Medical Technology Weekend Program n Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Molecular Diagnostics n BSHS in Ophthalmic Technology n Certificate Modeling and simulation in Health Sciences School of Nursing n BS in Nursing n RN-to-BSN n MS in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner Nurse Anesthesia Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Educator Nurse Administrator n Doctor of Nursing Practice


ENROLLMENT & DEGREES

College of Health Sciences Total Headcounts*

Degrees Awarded*

1350

1300

1050

468

300

1153

1100

1119

1150

1198

1200

1200

484

400

441

1250

430

1297

500

514

600

200

100

1000

0 2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

*SOURCE: OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 7


FINANCIAL STATUS *SOURCE: OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH

800,000

11,000,000

10,000,000 700,000 9,000,000 600,000 8,000,000

7,000,000

500,000

6,000,000 400,000 5,000,000 300,000

4,000,000

3,000,000 200,000 2,000,000 100,000 1,000,000

0

0 FY 09

Salaries and Expenses Totals for Revenue

FY 10

FY 09 7,448,937 218,069.10

FY 11

FY 10 7,707,839 202,776.90

FY 13

FY 12

FY 11 7,980,570 211,086.79

FY 12 9,378,213 572,530.50

Note: Revenue listed above includes amounts attributed to continuing education, Dental Hygiene Care Facility fees and tuition from consortia programs

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FY 13 10,663,861 751,869.60


ACCREDITATIONS Degree and Program

Accrediting Organization

Logo

BS, Dental Hygiene

American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation

ADA

BSN, Nursing

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

CCNE

BSN, Nursing

Virginia Board of Nursing

VBN

MSN, Nursing

Virginia Board of Nursing

VBN

BSNT, Nuclear Medicine Technology

Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology

JRCEPNMT

BS, Medical Technology

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences

NAACLS

MSN, Nurse Anesthesia

Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Program

COA

MPH, Public Health

Council on Education for Public Health

CEPH

Cytotechnology

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs

CAAHEP

Ophthalmic Technology

Commission on Accreditation of Opthalmic Medical Programs

CoA-OMP

MS, Environmental Health

National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council

ehac

BS, Environmental Health

National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council

NEHS and PCA

BS in Health Sciences

Association of University Programs in Health Administration

AUPHA

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 9


OVERALL PASS RATES

College of Health Sciences Licensure/Certification Exam Overall Pass Rates

High pass rates on licensure and certification reflect excellence in education at Old Dominion University, College of Health Sciences

100

95

90

85

NA

80

75 Cytotechnology

2010-11

10 WWW.HS.ODU.EDU

Dental Hygiene

2011-2012

Family Nurse Practitioner

Medical Technology

Nuclear Medicine Technology

Nurse Anesthesia

Nursing

Ophthalmic Technology

Physical Therapy

Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner


COMMENCEMENT MAY 2013

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 11


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION Undergraduate Enrollment by Program 300

250

200

150

100

50

0 2008-09

Total Headcount by Program: Undergraduate Students

2009-10

Cytotechnology Dental Hygiene Environmental Health Medical Technology Nuclear Medicine Technology Nursing Ophthalmic Technology Health Sciences Health Sciences Public Health TOTAL

12

WWW.HS.ODU.EDU

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2008-09 12 75 27 47 21 243 9 76

2009-10 10 70 21 42 23 228 9 120

2010-11 7 91 27 48 18 292 11 59 20

2011-12 6 93 22 52 12 238 11 31 27

2012-13 7 59 18 54 12 218 12 24 38

435

523

573

492

442


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION Master’s Enrollment by Program 140

120

100

80

60

40

20

0 2008-09

Total Headcount Breakdown: Graduate Students

2009-10

2010-11

MS in Dental Hygiene MS in Community Health-Environmental Master of Public Health MSN in Nurse Anesthesia MSN in Family Nurse Practitioner MSN in Nurse-Midwifery MSN in Nurse Administrator MSN in Nurse Educator MSN in Nurse Practitioner Women’s Health TOTAL

2011-12

2012-13

2008-09 13 29 20 49 97 1 19 37 16

2009-10 20 17 46 39 99 5 17 28 19

2010-11 22 9 51 19 121 3 15 28 15

2011-12 20 15 50 23 123 4 17 20 12

2012-13 22 18 83 24 108 2 13 23 17

281

290

283

284

310

*SOURCE: OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 13


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION Doctoral Enrollment by Program 250

200

150

100

50

0 2008-09

Total Headcount Doctoral Students

*SOURCE: OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH

14 WWW.HS.ODU.EDU

2009-10

2010-11

Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Ph.D. in Health Services Research (Ph.D.) Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) TOTAL

2012-13

2011-12

2008-09 0 29 127

2009-10 42 29 128

2010-11 36 22 130

2011-12 32 25 127

2012-13 50 24 130

156

199

188

184

204


SERVICE AND ENGAGEMENT President’s Honor Roll Dental Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Old Dominion’s Gene W. Hirschfeld School of Dental Hygiene provides health promotion and disease prevention activities to underserved diverse populations in a variety of settings. Through outreach and service, students and faculty provide oral screenings, dental sealants, fluoride treatments, oral radiographs and patient education. Approximately 7,889 people received oral health education/screenings/ clinical services free of charge from the community activities completed by the senior dental hygiene students. In addition, the School of Dental Hygiene donated $85,464 in professional dental hygiene oral health care services. One such service included client assessment and triage to Rappahannock Indian Reservation, located more than 100 miles away from campus. Through service learning, the senior dental hygiene students were able to advance their competencies as community-based practitioners and improve the health and welfare of a Native American population. To make this project sustainable, a grant is in the planning stages. Additionally, the city of Norfolk holds a special event annually to furnish basic health services for the homeless. The students provided oral screenings, repairs and oral health education to homeless members of the Hampton Roads community. Through communitybased service learning, the students experience how the economy, the political climate and unemployment affect health status and social justice in health care, while students improve quality of life for others.

n

Dental hygiene faculty members Sharon Stull, Carolyn Bland and Dr. Lee Melvin accompanied students at the Tangier Island health fair. The donated services provided by the ODU group amounted to $4,000 for the one-day event. (See Photo-Dental Hygiene Tangier Island)

n

At the Give Kids a Smile event in February 2013, the ODU School of Dental Hygiene and the Tidewater Dental Association partnered to provide preventive dental services to locally underserved children at the on-campus Sofia and David Konikoff Dental Hygiene Care Facility. About 80 dentally underserved children from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Tidewater and Lambert’s Point Community Center received oral health education, examinations, fluoride varnish therapy, dental x-rays, and pit and fissure sealants as needed.

n

Capt. Bruce A. Cohen, force surgeon at Navy Expeditionary Combat Command, and an ODU adjunct professor, spoke to Mexican navy students at the Search, Rescue and Diving School in Acapulco, Mexico. A group of U.S. Navy medical specialists taught a clinical hyperbaric oxygen therapy course for 30 Mexican navy physicians, nurses and divers.

n

Students participated with Community Health Partnerships (CHP), a program that takes fourth-year, pre-licensure students and links them with community organizations that serve vulnerable populations. The emphasis is on providing health and wellness interventions to help impoverished children, homeless, elderly and the uninsured. Nursing students work with Being There (at) ForKids, a Norfolk nonprofit organization that provides shelter and assistance programs to homeless families. To understand the organizations, students met with the organization’s staff and the parents helped by ForKids.

n Old Dominion University senior dental hygiene students made dental health fun for Malibu Elementary School students when they visited the Virginia Beach City Public Schools with puppets, super-sized toothbrushes and videos.

n

The Medical Laboratory Sciences Student Association sponsored a blood drive on April 2, 2013. It was an enormous success; 125 units were collected, which is the most since the student association started the service over 25 years ago. The Medical Laboratory Sciences blood drive has been used as a model for other student organizations on the campus.

n

Nursing students registered 101 potential bone marrow donors at a Relay for Life event and health fair.

n

ODU nursing students collected 3,884 diapers in a diaper drive. Through their community health course, students work with Loving Steps, a Resource Mothers’ program in Norfolk.

President’s Honor Roll-Dental Hygiene

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 15


GRANTS AWARDED Interprofessional

School of Dental Hygiene

Bobzien, J. (Principal), Chen, C.-H., Bruhn, A. (Dental Hygiene), Murray, D. (Nursing), Poston, R. (Nursing), and Lee, A. H. (Nursing), (Co-Principals). The Utilization of Video Face Replacement Technology (VFRT) for Routine Clinical Procedures in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Office of Research Multidisciplinary Seed Funding Grant, Old Dominion University, (Jan. 2013 – Jan. 2014). $46,088.

McCombs, G. Clinical Trial of Periozone Periopatch in Subjects with Chronic Periodontitis. MIS Implant Technologies Inc., Private (June 13, 2012 – Dec. 13, 2012). $70,023.

Morrison, S. (Physical Therapy, Principal), Colberg-Ochs, S. R. (Co-Principal), Diawara, N., Bourcier, M., Parson, H. K., and Vinik, A. I. Impact of Supervised vs. Home-Based Exercise Training on Gait, Balance, and Falls Risk in Type 2 Diabetes. American Diabetes Association, Private (July 1, 2012 - June 30, 2015). $599,999. Morrison, S. (Physical Therapy, Principal), Colberg-Ochs, S. R. (Co-Principal), and Cortes, N. Effect of Balance Training on Posture, Falls, and Daily Activity in Older Adults. Commonwealth Health Research Board, state (July 2012 - June 2014). $198,185. Rutledge, C. M. (Nursing, Principal), Renaud, M. (Nursing), Kott, K. (Physical Therapy), Lemaster, M. F. (Dental Hygiene), and Fowler, C. (Nursing), (Co-Principals). Educating Nurse Practitioners to Practice Interprofessionally. Department of Health and Human Services Advanced Practice Nursing Program, HRSA, federal (Sept. 1, 2012 – Aug. 31, 2015). $1,046,157.

School of Community and Environmental Health Becker, S. (PI). Development of Materials to Inform the Public Regarding Radiological Emergencies. U.S. Department of Homeland Security/Cazador (Aug. 25, 2012 – Dec. 31, 2013). $378,309. Behr, J. G., Diaz, R., Zhang, Q., Szklo-Coxe, M. Role: Co-Principal Investigator Policy Resistance within a Region’s Healthcare System: A System Dynamics Approach. National Institutes of Health (Aug. 9, 2012 - July 31, 2014). $419,216. Jeng, H. (Principal Investigator). Community Action for a Renewed Environment Project. Greater Southeast Development Corp. (Oct. 1, 2012 – Sept. 30, 2013). $20,000. Zhang, Q. (Co-Principal). Policy Resistance within a Region's Healthcare System: A System Dynamics Approach. National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, federal (Aug. 9, 2012 - July 31, 2014). $419,266.

School of Medical Diagnostic & Translational Sciences Godfrey, E. (PI-EVMS), Ogle, R., and Heller, L. (Co-Principal Investigators). Development of Human Stem Cells and Anti-inflammatory Drugs in ALS Therapy. Virginia Gentleman Foundation, EVMS (May 26, 2012 – May 27, 2013).

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Newcomb, T. (Principal), Bruhn, A. (Co-Principal). Radiographic Imaging for Mass Fatality Training in Dental Hygiene Students." Faculty Innovator Grant, Center for Learning and Teaching, Old Dominion University (Jan. 2013 – Jan. 2014). $15,912.

School of Physical Therapy & Athletic Training Hoch, M., Weinhandl, J., and Van Lunen, B. L. Plantar stimulation in adults with chronic ankle instability. American College of Sports Medicine, Private (July 1, 2012 - July 1, 2013). $4,999. Houston, M. and Hoch, M. (Co-Principals). Clinical and laboratory predictors of self-perceived function in individuals with chronic ankle instability. Mid-Atlantic Athletic Trainers’ Association, Private (Nov. 2012 – Nov. 2013). $1,500. Irmischer, B. (Principal), Weinhandl, J. (Co-Principal), Hoch, M. and Russell, D. Influence of femoroacetabular impingement on lower extremity kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activation. International Society of Biomechanics, Private (Feb. 2013 – Feb. 2014). $5,000. Van Lunen, B. L. (Supporting). Functional Evaluation to Predict Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injury. National Institutes of Health, Federal (Sept. 15, 2012 – Aug. 31, 2017). $1,500,000.


GRANT FUNDING Grants Awarded

Number of Grants

$ Awarded External

Grants Awarded

Grants Requested

70

3,500,000

60

3,000,000

50

2,500,000

40

2,000,000

30

1,500,000

20

1,000,000

10

$ Awarded Internal

500,000

0 2009

2010

Grants Awarded over the past five years

$12,348,131

2011

2012

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

0

2013

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Grants Requested

Grants Awarded

$ Awarded External

$ Awarded Internal

65 55 46 30 42

25 26 21 17 20

2,047,492 3,093,212 1,921,726 2,398,827 2,433,374

1,080 0 133,495 40,758 278,167

*SOURCE: OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 17


STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP PhD candidates also presenting their research at the 2013 Student Capstone Conference at VMASC were Leigh Ann Diggs, “Measuring Sense of Presence and User Characteristics to Predict Effective Training in an Online Simulated Virtual Environment,” and Margaret Lubas, “Grief Support Groups in Second Life: Exploring Professional Opportunities to Increase and Improve Grief Support.” Stephanie Willis, BSN, was chosen for an ODU Alumni Association’s Outstanding College Scholar Award. She has a 4.0 GPA. On April 11, 2013, the following master’s and PhD in Health Services Research students participated in the Graduate Research Recognition Day presentations: Sricharan Pasupulati, “Correlates of Bullying Victimization Among In-School Adolescents in the 2005 Botswana Global School-Based Health Survey.” Kristen Trost, “The Role of Theory in Teen Pregnancy Prevention: A Review of 31 Federally Supported Evidence–Based Programs.” Students inducted in the Alpha Eta national honor society for allied health included: Courtney Bruno, Sara Elza, Lesley Cabrera, Angelina Hendon, Sarah Grenier, Karen Sussman, Dana Stonelake, and Michelle Tracy, Tommie Barnes, Katelyn Henry and Ashley London, Sarah Kate McMullin, Debra Sherwood, Kendra Kleppe, Emily Hawkins, Bridget Holroyd, Nathan Michels, and Kevin Parcetich.

PhD in Health Services Research program - dissertations Spring 2012 -Eldoseri, Halah. Intimate partner physical violence against women in Jeddah primary health care clinics. Committee members: Kimberly Adams Tufts, director; Jennifer Fish and Harry Zhang. Summer 2012 -Tiraphat, Sari. Multilevel analysis of physical activity among U.S. adults across U.S. census regions: The role of environmental contexts. Committee members: Qi Zhang, director; Laurel Shepherd and Joshua Behr. Fall 2012 -Feltenberger, Gregory S. An examination of factors affecting non-urgent use of emergency department services by patients with university healthcare. Committee members: E. Andrew Balas, director; Qi Zhang and Carolyn Rutledge.

Katherine Tan, a freshman in the School of Nursing, is the new blogger for Reflections on Nursing Leadership, an international online journal of Sigma Theta Tau International. Carmelo Barrios-Padrino, master’s in dental hygiene student, was awarded Best Track Presentation in the gaming and virtual reality section of the 2013 Student Capstone Conference held at VMASC in Suffolk, Va., for his research: The Use of Interactive Immersive Visualization for the Control of Dental Anxiety during Dental Hygiene Treatment.

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The ODU nursing students in community health obesity prevention and injury prevention worked with a local homeless shelter that provides both emergency and transitional housing for families. Students helped raise funds for the organization, helped prepare homes for the participants, and helped move families from one home to another. Angela Eddy and Jessica Suedbeck were nationally selected to represent District III student members at the American Dental Hygienists’ Association House of Delegates, and they participated at the Virginia Dental Hygienists’ Association professional development workshops. Jocelyn Weidner, 2012 graduate of the nursing program, was selected as a 2013 Kaufman Award finalist. Viann Nguyen, a recent graduate of the joint ODU-EVMS MPH program, presented a poster titled, “Perceptions of Prenatal Hot Yoga” at the annual American Public Health Association meeting in San Francisco, held Oct. 27 - 31, 2012. (see photo-Viann) December 2012 inductees in Upsilon Phi Delta, the national honor society for students in healthcare management and policy, include: Dana Barnum, Carrie Carson, Lester Painter, Megan Ring, Patty White, and John Wolf . May 2013 inductees were Megan Alese Estep, Kershundra Yvette Clinton, and Tina C. Tolliver. 2013 charter student inductees for Eta Sigma Gamma, national honorary society for health education, were: Justina Acquah, Chantel Affum, Jordyn Armstrong, Leah Babin, Breana Bates, Kristi Donnell, Brittany Hufstetler, Kristie Jones, Ciara Joyner, Cherese Lewis, Lauren Nickson, Holly Onks, Alex Peterson, Brittany Robbins, Megan Schick, Chanmoly Seng, Andrea Shaffer, Chantel Speller and Mallory Stratton.


SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS Retiring

Retiring

Michele L. Darby, Eminent Scholar, University Professor, chair of the Gene W. Hirschfeld School of Dental Hygiene and former graduate program director, has retired after 39 years in the college, she received a BS in dental hygiene in 1971 and an MS in dental hygiene in 1972 from Columbia University. She joined ODU as an assistant professor in 1974 and was promoted to Professor in 1984.

Sandra L. Breeden is retiring from Old Dominion University. Breeden began her employment with ODU in 1996 and became an advisor for the College of Health Sciences. During her time at the university, Breeden advanced to become director of advising and director of the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences degree program - one of ODU’s earliest forays into distance learning. She is also the longest-serving advisor to the Virginia Beach Higher Education Center.

Her research focuses on oral disease processes, ergonomics and oral care product effects. She is associate editor of the International Journal of Dental Hygiene, member of the Oral Health Institute Grant Review Committee, member of the Sunstar Foundation World Dental Hygienist Award selection committee, and editorial review board member for major journals. In addition to three major textbooks, Research Methods for Oral Health Professionals; Mosby’s Comprehensive Review Michele Darby with girls in Almoffi camp. of Dental Hygiene (6th ed.); and Dental Hygiene Theory and Practice (2nd ed.), she has more than 50 peer-reviewed publications. Professor Darby has lectured across North America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Breeden was honored (and roasted) by her colleagues Wednesday during a reception at the Ted Constant Convocation Center’s Big Blue Room that followed an awards luncheon for faculty and staff of the College of Health Sciences.

She is a recipient of the Warner Lambert-ADHA Award for Excellence in Dental Hygiene, the Rufus Alan Tonelson Distinguished Faculty Award from the ODU Alumni Association in recognition of outstanding contributions to the intellectual development of the University, the Virginia State Council on Higher Education for Virginia’s Outstanding Faculty Award, the Faculty Advisor Award from the American Dental Hygienist’ Association for her work with its student hygienists’ association, and the Outstanding Achievement Award from the Friends of the Old Dominion University Library. In 2007-08, she served as president of the ODU Women’s Caucus. She is a Fulbright Distinguished Scholar, and one of about 30 faculty at Old Dominion University who has earned the title of Eminent Scholar (in 1989). Her Fulbright study was conducted at Jordan University of Science and Technology in Irbid, Jordan. She received the Distinguished Dental Hygiene Alumna 2011, School of Dental Medicine, from the University of Pittsburgh. In 2012, during her leadership, the Gene W. Hirschfeld School of Dental Hygiene was awarded the Health Heroes Award for community engagement from Inside Business news magazine.

After sharing several stories about her colleagues, Breeden remarked about the length of her stay at ODU, noting several health sciences students who went on to become faculty members. “I feel so grandmotherly,” she said. Breeden will relocate to Orlando to be closer to extended family. “I’m going to be in Florida where I will always be in flip-flops or bare feet,” she told the crowd. During the retirement reception, Breeden was presented with a small glass sculpture engraved with a plaque that read: “Sandra Breeden, thank you for 18 dedicated years of ensuring student success in health sciences.” While several colleagues presented a humorous David Letterman-style Top 10 list detailing the “real” reasons for Breeden's departure, College of Health Sciences Dean Shelley Mishoe commented on her dedication. “Sandy has been an ambassador for living/learning communities and for guiding students into health careers,” she said. Sandra “Sandy” Breeden, the College of Health Sciences first advisor, retired Dean Mishoe, Sandra Breeden and Debbie Bauman during her retirement after 18 years with reception. Old Dominion University. Breeden inspired a generation of students to become successful health professionals. She was also a mentor to the many teaching assistants who passed through her doors; she supervised and helped them develop their new (or old) advising skills. Breeden is the longest-serving advisor to the Virginia Beach Higher Education Center.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES

19


FACULTY/SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENTS Successful Accreditations and Program Review n MS in Community Health/Environmental Health site visit for National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council, Feb. 20-22, 2013. n BS in Nuclear Medicine Technology site visit July 16-17, 2012.

n BSHS concentration in Ophthalmic Technology site visit April 11-12, 2013.

n MS in Dental Hygiene and BSDH degree completion programs’ external program review, April 21-22, 2013.

Faculty Recognition Steven M. Becker, professor of community and environmental health in Old Dominion University’s College of Health Sciences, has been appointed to the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board by President Barack Obama. Anna Jeng has been appointed as an editorial board member of the Journal of Environmental Science and Health’s Part B: Pesticides, food contaminants and agricultural wastes. Richardean Benjamin, associate dean, received an award presented by the Virginia Nurses Foundation to members of the Virginia Action Coalition, Future of Nursing Campaign for Action, for their work in devising and implementing transformative nursing solutions to the health care challenges facing Virginia. Ann McNeal, School of Nursing, retired after more than 16 years with the University. Lori Wood, program director for ophthalmic technology, completed a master’s degree in education in August 2012. Jim English, associate professor for community and environmental health, was reappointed for a three-year term to the Norfolk Services Advisory Board by the Norfolk City Council. Lynn Tolle, School of Dental Hygiene professor, was elected to membership to the national board of directors of Alpha Eta (the national honor society of allied health). Adjunct associate professor Ken Marinak, DDS, was honored with the Virginia Tidewater Dental Hygienists’ Association Service Award. Jackie Sharpe established a new honor society for public health majors, the Epsilon Theta chapter of Eta Sigma Gamma, the professional health education honor society. The ODU chapter was chartered April 25 and 19 students and five faculty members were inducted during its initiation ceremony. This brings the total number of honor societies sponsored in the college to include Alpha Eta (allied health), Upsilon Phi (health care management), Sigma Phi Alpha (dental hygiene) and Sigma Theta Tau (nursing).

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Physical Therapy White Coats Class of 2015

James Alan Neff, professor of community health, was awarded the American Academy of Health Behavior Poster of Distinction at the 2013 conference held in Santa Fe, N.M., in March for a poster titled “Preliminary Results Regarding the Effectiveness of a new Screening and Brief Intervention Protocol for Heavy Drinkers in Dental Settings.” Other ODU collaborators involved in the presentation included Michelle Kelley, James Paulson and Abby Braitman from the psychology department and Michele Darby and Meg Lemaster from dental hygiene. Katherine Ferrara, College of Health Sciences advisor, won the ODU New Advisor of the Year Award and the Region 2 National Academic Advising Association New Advisor Award.


FACULTY/SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENTS Outstanding Program Graduates n n n n n n n

Angelina Hendon, Outstanding Nuclear Medicine Technology Student Lesley Cabrera, Outstanding Medical Technology Student Elizabeth Shepheard, Outstanding Undergraduate Environmental Health student Sarah Kate McMullin, Outstanding Undergraduate Dental Hygiene Student Hadeel Ayoub, Outstanding MS Degree Graduate Student Anthony Pachuta, Outstanding Ophthalmic Technology Student Stephanie Willis, Cindy Sullins, David Frey and Denise Jones, Outstanding Undergraduate Nursing Students n Jennifer Cable, Zachary Cline, Emily Hawkins and Bridget Holroyd, Outstanding Physical Therapy Students

Staff Achievements Class of 2013 nuclear medicine technology students hosted a 25th anniversary event for the program and for Dr. Scott Sechrist. Approximately 70 graduates, students, faculty and clinical instructors attended.

University Awards n Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award nominee: Carolyn Rutledge, Nursing n University Teaching with Technology Award: Donna Rose, Nursing n University Doctoral Mentoring Award finalist: Bonnie Van Lunen, Physical Therapy and Athletic Training n University New Advisor of the Year Award: Katherine “Katie” Ferrara, Health Sciences n Most Inspirational Faculty Member, College of Health Sciences: Linda K. Bennington The following faculty members were recognized for their years of service at the university: 35 Years - Faye Coleman, Medical Diagnostic &Translational Sciences 35 Years - Thomas Somma, Medical Diagnostic &Translational Sciences 30 Years - Lynn Tolle, Dental Hygiene 25 Years - Jim English, Community and Environmental Health

Connie Davis, from the Dean’s Office, was recently honored for 30 years of service at Old Dominion University during the 2012 annual service ceremony. Trina Hawkins, Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences, is president of the Hourly and Classified Association (HACE), serves as a HACE representative at the new employee orientation and serves on the Diversity Champion Award Committee Tammie Smith, also from the Dean’s Office, completed online courses in Creating Web Pages and Advanced Web Pages and is planning to take online courses in Intermediate CSS3 and HTML5. Betsy Thomas, business manager from the Dean’s Office, has a degree in marketing and is now getting a minor in management. She is pleased to report that she completed Algebra at ODU during the spring semester.

Hadeel Ayoub, pictured at left with President John R. Broderick, presented a poster “Fluorescence Technology Versus Visual and Tactile Examination in the Detection of Oral Lesions: A Pilot Study.”

College of Health Sciences Award Recipients Outstanding Adjunct Faculty Teaching Award: Dr. Kathie Zimbro, Nursing Outstanding Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Jackie Sharpe, Community and Environmental Health Outstanding Staff Member Award - Linda Wray, Nursing Gene W. Hirschfeld Faculty Excellence Award - Dr. Kimberly Adams Tufts, Nursing

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 21


ANNUAL GIVING 2011

2012

Annual Giving For 2012

$150,000

$34,026.33 $22,417.50

$100,000

$120,550.00

$50,000

0 Total Amount of Individual Gifts Received

22

Total Amount of Alumni Gifts Received

Total Amount of Corporate/ Organization Gifts Received

Total Amount of Foundation Gifts Received

Total Amount of Individual Gifts Received Total Amount of Alumni Gifts Received Total Amount of Corporate/Organization Gifts Received Total Amount of Foundation Gifts Received

2011 $38,703.59 $31,098.62 $29,255.00 $111, 100.00

2012 $34,026.33 $22,417.50 $36,945.00 $120,550.00

TOTAL

$210,156.00

$213,938.00

WWW.HS.ODU.EDU

$36,945.00

n Total Amount of Individual Gifts Received n Total Amount of Alumni Gifts Received n Total Amount of Corporate/ Organizational Gifts Received n Total Amount of Foundation Gifts Received


ANNUAL GIVING Manisha Sharma, major gifts officer, College of Health Sciences, joined our team in March 2013. She brings to ODU more than seven years of diverse development experience. Before arriving at ODU, Sharma was the director of development for Saint Louis University School of Medicine for four years. During her time there, she organized successful reunion giving programs, working with hundreds of medical alumni to regularly surpass fundraising goals. She also encouraged many generous donors to fund endowments in support of the school’s greatest opportunities. Sharma traveled frequently throughout the United States representing the university and visiting with alumni and donors. Sharma previously was the associate director of funding research and proposals at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri. Her successful grant writing provided mentoring services for thousands of youth in the greater St. Louis area. While working at Girls Inc. in Lowell, Mass., she expanded the outreach programs from two schools to nine schools through strong community relationships, successful grant proposals and effective fundraising strategies. Sharma originally hails from Massachusetts and is excited to be back on the East Coast. Although new to Hampton Roads, she is eager to get to know the community and visit with alumni and friends of the ODU College of Health Sciences. To learn more about opportunities to support the college, please contact her at (757) 683-4313 or m1sharma@odu.edu.

May is always a special time on campus. Families, friends, faculty and alumni gather together to congratulate the graduates and celebrate their accomplishments. The graduates are filled with excitement about starting their next chapter and beginning their career as a well-prepared health care professional. For many of our graduating students, this dream would not be realized without scholarship support. Two-thirds of Old Dominion University students rely on financial aid to achieve their dreams, and 70 percent of this aid consists of student loans. Although Old Dominion is one of the best educational values in the Commonwealth, the University’s current endowment per full-time student is $8,055. This leaves the average Old Dominion undergraduate facing $15,000 - $20,000 of student loan debt upon graduation. Scholarship support can make the difference between completing an education - or not. Private donations in support of student scholarships allow us to help keep tuition lower and make the college’s offerings more competitive. An initial investment of $25,000, payable over five years, will establish a named, endowed scholarship. The principal is not invaded, and the income will contribute to the success of deserving students. There are several ways to make your gift. A gift of appreciated stock, a gift from an Individual Retirement Account or a bequest to the College of Health Sciences in a will or trust may be the best way for you to support the college.

In Remembrance John “Jack” Echternach, founder of the Old Dominion University physical therapy program, died Thursday, July 11, at his mountain home near Roanoke, Va. Echternach is survived by his wife of 56 years, Jeanne. Echternach, 81, was a professor and Eminent Scholar Emeritus at ODU, where he served on the faculty from 1978 to 2005. During his time at the university, he served as chair of the School of Community Health and Physical Therapy. In 1991, he was awarded the Eminent Scholar designation in recognition of his distinction as a teacher-scholar and his many contributions to the university. Even after his retirement in 2005, Echternach remained significantly involved with the College of Health Sciences. Earlier this year, Echternach received

the first Lifetime Achievement award from the Virginia Physical Therapy Association. George Maihafer, associate professor and graduate program director of the School of Physical Therapy, said Echternach admitted ODU’s first class of 24 students, and during his time on the faculty, physical therapy grew from a bachelor’s degree to a master’s program, eventually transitioning to the current doctoral program that accepts 45 students annually. Not only was Jack respected by over 400 physical therapists who graduated from this program (since its inception), he was chairman of the School of Community Health and Physical Therapy in the College of Health Sciences and, as an active faculty member in the Ph.D. in health services research degree, was responsible for many doctoral candidates’ research," Maihafer said. “Jack will be dearly missed by the Old Dominion University physical therapy community with many of us owing our careers to his guidance and dedication to excellence.”

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 23


A Half-Century of Giving: Petros Continue Legacy through Scholarships By Burton St. John It would be understandable to assume that a well-established nursing professional like 82year-old Helen Yura Petro – who has given her time and talents to students and patients for over half a century – would decide she has given her all. That would be an inaccurate assumption. “My husband, Joe, and I have always valued education,” she said, “And we want to do our part to make sure nurses get the advanced education that allows them to demonstrate how they are at the forefront of saving lives.” And, since 2005, the Petros have carried forth their passion on this subject by funding three different scholarships for ODU nursing students. “We’ve always had this belief in our family that education is such an important way to improve oneself, to act out of a desire for perfection,” said Joe. That love of education within the Petro family tree sparked them to endow scholarships so that they can spread the legacy of education to someone else. “Our hope is that scholarship recipients will, at some point in their lives, be able to also help another person through a similar gift,” said Helen. Both Helen and Joe have a long history of giving. Helen, an ODU eminent professor emeritus, finished her undergraduate degree in nursing at the University of Dayton in 1950. In 1967, she co-edited the seminal textbook “The Nursing Process: Assessing, Planning, Implementing and Evaluating,” a book cited by hundreds of nursing educators across its many editions. Then, she earned her doctorate in higher education at Catholic University in 1970. While pursuing her education across those 20 years, she also served patients as a head nurse and worked with students in such areas as the fundamentals of nursing and psychiatric mental health nursing. Her time at ODU was particularly marked by her activities as a nursing project developer and graduate program director of nursing until her retirement in 1988. Joe had enlisted in the Navy in 1939 and, in 1942, served in several Pacific battles, including the notable battle of Guadalcanal. He was one of only 30 survivors after a Japanese airplane hit his ship, the George F. Elliott. Over the next 30 years, Joe advanced in rank and responsibilities, serving in such places as Philadelphia; Washington, D.C.; Caracas, Venezuela; and Yorktown, Va. Since his retirement from the Navy as a chief warrant officer, he has taken on the rehabilitation of a 200-acre farm and has been active in Virginia’s Adopt-A-Highway program.

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Helen and Joe Petro

Clearly, the Petros have a long track record of serving others; their scholarships continue that theme. They see the scholarships as honoring their family’s emphasis on education and giving back to the ODU community. “We’re doing this in great part because we want to touch the giving dimensions of people’s minds,” said Helen. “There’s something gratifying to see that someone else has the opportunity to better themselves because you shared of the fruits of your labor.”


GLOBAL HEALTH Barbara Greenberg, Director of the Center for Global Health During the past eight months, the Center for Global Health has moved forward with establishing the infrastructure and developing community partnerships. The center will partner with the ODU National Centers for System of Systems Engineering to formulate a unique approach to global health that is grounded in systems thinking, an approach that embraces holism, transparency and interdisciplinary models. The advisory board was established and consists of ODU faculty and a representative from our community partners. During the monthly meetings, the board has finalized and approved the goals of the center, established the short- and long-term objectives and formulated ad hoc committees to address things such as marketing and community engagement. The director of the center and the dean of the College of Health Sciences have solidified partnerships with several community organizations, including Physicians for Peace, Friends of Barnabas, Operation Smile, Operation Blessing and Virginia Beach Clinic. We are actively reaching out to other community partners in Hampton Roads and beyond and look forward to building new and exciting partnerships and collaborative initiatives in the coming year.

The ODU Public Health Organization traveled to Guatemala City for spring break. Students participated in clinical health care volunteer placements over the course of seven days at various local hospitals and clinics that will cater to underserved Latin American populations, while shooting a project documentary. Gayle McCombs and Lynn Tolle partnered with Physicians for Peace and the University of Nicaragua-Leon to establish the first dental hygiene program in Central America. The faculty lectured and provided clinical instruction and consultation services for dental hygiene program development in Leon, Nicaragua. (Nov. 28-Dec. 3, 2012)

To prepare health professionals as leaders locally and abroad, ODU has launched the Center for Global Health with the College of Health Sciences. The center aims to create multidisciplinary global health experiences for faculty and students, prepare students to assume leadership roles in global health, and facilitate opportunities for students to learn about health from the global perspective. To

University Professor Lynn Tolle presented “Nonsurgical Periodontal TherapiesStrategies for Success” and University Professor Gayle McCombs presented “Advanced Instrument Sharpening” at the 21st International Dental Symposium in Leon, Nicaragua, in November 2012.

learn more about the Center for Global Health, visit globalhealth. ww2.hs.odu.edu/globalhealth/

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GLOBAL HEALTH Nursing and Physical Therapy Students Partner with Physicians for Peace For most students, spring break conjures up thoughts of relaxing somewhere warm in tropical breezes, far from schoolwork, perhaps on a Caribbean vacation. But, for seven nursing students and two physical therapy students from Old Dominion, a work-free spring break in 2013 took a back seat to teach Resource Mothers, also known as Madres Tutelares, perinatal health education in the Dominican Republic (see photos below). Resource Mothers was created by Physicians for Peace in the Dominican Republic, based on the need to mentor at-risk teenage mothers to ensure a safe and healthy pregnancy, delivery and first year of a child's life. The nursing students offered instruction on perinatal topics such as signs and symptoms of infant dehydration and awareness of sexually transmitted diseases. Hands-on training included reinforcement of vital sign assessment. This training and education helps Resource Mothers assist their clients in seeking medical attention and preventing more serious complications. The physical therapy students focused on teaching the importance of recognizing infant motor milestones, as well as ways to reduce musculoskeletal pain during pregnancy. “I saw this trip as a way to gain a different perspective from what I've been learning in nursing school,” said Marcella Kennedy, an ODU nursing student who graduates in August 2013. “I’ve learned that the problems I’ve seen in my clinical experiences are international problems as well.” To gain a better understanding of the women's daily struggles and living conditions, the students interviewed Spanish-speaking Resource Mothers and their teenage clients. During the weeklong trip, students had the opportunity to accompany Resource Mothers as they worked with clients in their local neighborhoods. Students also toured the maternal child regional hospital, Los Minas Maternity Hospital, and the Dominican Association for Rehabilitation facility. “Access to health care is a significant problem for young women of the lower socioeconomic classes in Santo Domingo,” said Janice Hawkins, chief academic advisor for the ODU School of Nursing, and chaperone on the yearly trip. “Nursing students who go on this trip gain a new understanding of the limited health care services in the Dominican Republic compared to our own in the U.S.” The multidisciplinary spring break international outreach, coordinated in collaboration with Physicians for Peace, is now in its second year, and includes physical therapy and nursing students, as well as faculty from both specialties. Interestingly, two students on the trip are also involved in the Norfolk-based Resource Mothers program, where they work with lowincome teenage mothers through their Community Health class. Kennedy is one of these students who bridged her clinical work locally with the study abroad trip. “It was so interesting to meet the Resource Mothers internationally after having worked

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with women with similar problems in my own backyard,” Kennedy said. “In particular, teenage girls in both countries have problems with transportation to doctors’ appointments and affording diapers. The two groups aren’t as different as I imagined.” Infant mortality rates are high in the Dominican Republic at 21.3 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2012, compared to six deaths per 1,000 live births in the United States, according to the Central Intelligence Agency. Dr. Ramon Lopez, director of Physicians for Peace Latin Americas, said this is due, in part, to high teenage pregnancy rates. “Many of these girls have not graduated from high school,” Lopez said. “This is why the Madres Tutelares are so important. They provide education and motivate these girls toward economic independence.” “We give hope of a better life,” Lopez said of the Madres Tutelares. “We motivate these girls to want a better life for themselves and their babies.”


MILITARY APPRECIATION ODU Health Sciences Students Share Personal Experiences at College’s Military Appreciation Day By Jon Cawley Nestled in the heart of Hampton Roads, which has the largest concentration of military personnel anywhere in the world, it’s not surprising that about one-quarter of the 24,000 students enrolled at Old Dominion University are active duty or have some affiliation with the armed services. To honor their service, and in conjunction with the Memorial Day holiday, the ODU College of Health Sciences held its Military Appreciation Day in April. The annual luncheon recognizes the men and women who are currently (and formerly) in military service and, typically, Hampton Roads personnel are invited to talk about their personal experiences. This year, event speakers were Nicole Flores and Alicia Kostka, who are students in the College of Health Sciences with military backgrounds in the U.S. Coast Guard and Naval Reserves, respectively. “Their remarks were so powerful and reflective of why our college established an annual day and luncheon to show appreciation for our military-affiliated students,” said Deborah Blythe Bauman, assistant dean, ODU College of Health Sciences. In her address, Flores – who grew up an “Army brat” and has been active duty Coast Guard for 12 years – noted the challenges of military life and that “it is nice to know that as a student at ODU we are part of a family and we have a place that we can always call home.” “Having a bachelor’s in Health Service Administration from ODU will assist me with advancement within the Coast Guard. I am in the process of applying for Chief Warrant Officer and I am confident that my application will stand out due to the experiences I have had here at ODU,” she said. “In my time here I have improved my writing skills, advanced my knowledge in leadership and management and been highly involved in the ODU community volunteering as a M-Power peer educator through the Women’s Center. The knowledge and skills I am gaining here at ODU will allow me to continue to serve the Coast Guard as a highly competent and knowledgeable healthcare professional. The management and leadership skills I will obtain through this degree program will enable me to become a role model and a valuable asset to any Coast Guard health care facility where I am assigned.”

Kostka, Dean Mishoe and Flores, at Military Appreciation Luncheon.

Initially, Kostka said she was “overwhelmed” by the prospect of completing prerequisite courses, the application process and a “daunting” three-year physical therapy program but she learned her years in military service prepared her well for the rigors of academic life. “In my experience, serving in the military was not unlike being a member of my PT class. In the Navy, arduous training, long hours and a common sense of purpose foster camaraderie among crewmembers,” she said. “That same spirit of teamwork exists among my classmates here at ODU and has directly impacted my graduate school experience in the College of Health Sciences. Kostka, who wants to help rehabilitate injured war veterans, added: “Many people in their lives seek a rewarding occupation that they can enjoy and for which they are well suited. The lucky few succeed in finding a job where, at the end of the day, they feel satisfied that their accomplishments have been worthwhile.

Kostka, an inactive naval reservist who is a second-year physical therapy student at ODU, explained to luncheon attendees how many of the university’s students have put their lives and goals on hold to serve and protect their country. “It’s been my impression over the past few years that Old Dominion is an academic institution steeped in a rich military heritage and has always fully supported their active duty, reservist and veteran students, faculty and employees in every way possible,” she said.

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ALUMNI HIGHLIGHTS Cheryl Cunningham, a 2007 graduate with a bachelor’s degree in health services administration and a master’s degree in community health in 2010, received the 2012-13 Virginia Western Community College Distinguished Alumni Award in March 2013. She graduated from the VWCC radiology program in 1986 with an associate of applied science degree and worked in the private sector before enrolling at ODU. Currently, she is an assistant professor for VWCC’s radiology program. Paula Parise ’89 received the ODU School of Dental Hygiene Outstanding Alumni of the Year Award on April 26, 2013.

Adriane Brown, an ODU alumna and one of the 100 most powerful African American executives in the United States, as chosen by Black Enterprise magazine, returned to campus in January 2013 as the Landmark Executive-in-Residence speaker. Brown holds a master’s degree in management from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she was a Sloan Fellow, and earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental health from Old Dominion University. She was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters from ODU in December 2009. Brown is president and COO of Intellectual Ventures, a privately held invention capital company. Before joining Intellectual Ventures, she served as president and CEO of Honeywell Transportation Systems.

Jennifer Rowland PT, PhD, MS, MPH has been hired as a tenure track associate professor in the physical therapy department of University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. Amir Kazimi, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS, is vice president and clinical director of Apex Physical Rehabilitation and Wellness of Texas. Amir owns and operates three clinics in the greater Houston area. C. Brandon Ream, MPT, CSCS, has recently opened Midlothian Village Physical Therapy in Midlothian, Va. His clinic specializes in rehabilitation after surgery and orthopedic injuries. Suzanne Foxx, DPT, owns and operates Denbigh Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine clinic.

Adriane Brown, seen here with ODU President John R. Broderick at Spring 2011 Commencement.

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PUBLICATIONS Community and Environmental Health Al Shatrat, S., Shuman, D., Darby, M.L.,& Jeng, H. (2013). Jordanian dentists’ knowledge and implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies. International Dental Journal. doi: 10.1111/idj.12031. Blando, J., O’Hagan, E., Casteel, C., Nocera, M., & Peek-Asa, C. (2013). Impact of hospital security programs and workplace aggression on nurse perceptions of safety. Journal of Nursing Management, 21 (3), 491-498.

Winterbauer, N., & Diduk, R. (2013). The ten essential public health services model as a framework for correctional health care. Journal of Correctional Health Care, 19(1), 43-53. doi: 10.1177/1078345812458248 http://jcx.sagepub.com.proxy.lib.odu.edu/content/19/1/43.full.pdf+html Herring, P., Siziya, S., Pasupulati, S., Rudatsikira, E., & Muula, A.S. (2013). Correlates of bullying victimization among in-school adolescents in the 2005 Botswana Global School-Based Health Survey. Int J Child Adolesc Health, 6(3):00-00.

School of Medical Diagnostic & Translational Sciences

Blando, J., McGreevy, K., O’Hagan, E., Worthington, K., Valiante, D., Nocera, M., Casteel, C., & Peek-Asa, C. (2012). Emergency department security programs, community crime, and employee assaults. J Emergency Medicine, 42(3), 329–338.

Huang, C.S., Das, A., Barker, D.A., Tholpady, S.S., Wang, T.W., Cui, Q., … Ogle, R.C. Local delivery of FTY720 accelerates cranial allograft incorporation and bone formation. Cell Tiss. Res., 347(3), 553-566. DOI: 10.1007/s00441-011-1217-3.

Blando, J., Leonard, B., Viann, N., Diaz, R., & Jeng, H.A. (2012). Anthropogenic climate change and allergic diseases. Atmosphere, 3, 200-212.

Sundin, T., Peffley, D.M., & Hentosh, P. (2013). Disruption of an hTERT-mTOR-RAPTOR protein complex by a phytochemical perillyl alcohol and rapamycin. Molecular Cellular Biochemistry 375: 97-104.

Blando, J., Bielory, L., Nguyen, V., Diaz, R., & Jeng, H.A. (2012). Anthropogenic climate change and allergic diseases. Atmosphere 3(1):200-212. Jeng, H. A., Pan, C.H., Chao, M.R. (2012). 1-Hydroxypyrene as a biomarker for assessing the influence of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on semen quality and sperm DNA Integrity. Journal of Environmental Health and Sciences, Part A. 48(2),151-8. doi: 10.1080/03601234.2012. 716741.

Sundin, T., Peffley, D.M., Gauthier, D., & Hentosh, P. (2012). The isoprenoid perillyl alcohol inhibits telomerase activity in prostate cancer cells. Biochimie 94: 2639-48.

School of Dental Hygiene Claiborne, D. (2013) Root of the problem. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 11(4), 38-42.

Block, M.L., Auten, R.L., Bilbo, S.D., Chen, H., Chen, J.C., Cory-Slechta, D., … Wright, R. (2012). Outdoor Air Pollution and Brain Health. Neurotoxicology 33(5), 972-84.

Claiborne, D. (2012). Medication use and xerostomia. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 10(11), 34-38.

Jeng H.A., Pan, C.H., Lin, W.Y., Wu, M.T., Taylor, S., Chang-Chien, G.P., … Diawara, N. (2013). Biomonitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coke oven emissions and reproductive toxicity in nonsmoking workers. Journal of Hazardous Materials Jan. 15; 244-245.

Lemaster, M. (2012). Restore pH Balance. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 10(3), 19-22.

Mansyur, C., Pavlik, V. N., Hyman, D. J., Taylor, W. C., & Goodrick, G. K. (2013). Self-efficacy and barriers to multiple behavior change in low-income African Americans with hypertension. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 36, 75-85. Neff, J.A., Walters, S.T., Braitman, A., Kelley, M., Paulson, J., Brickhouse, T. H., … Walsh, M. (2013). A brief intervention for heavy drinkers in dental practice: Rationale and development. Journal of Health Psychology, 18(4), 542 -553. Hudson, J., Neff, J. A., Padilla, M., Zhang, Q., & Mercer, L. T. (2012). Predictors of physician use of inpatient electronic health records: An heuristic model. American Journal of Managed Care, 18(4), 201-206.

Newcomb, T., & Sokolik, T. (2012) Cultural competency-How to incorporate different cultural beliefs and practice into the dental hygiene process of care. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 10(4), 58–61. Bruhn, A. (2013). Technology transformation: Advancements in technology have greatly impacted the provision of dental hygiene services for both patients and clinicians. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene: A Centennial Celebration of Dental Hygiene. 11(4), 32-44. Debowes, S., Tolle, S. L., & Bruhn, A. (2013). Parkinson’s disease: Considerations for dental hygienists. International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 11(1), 15-21. Bruhn, A., Darby, M., McCombs, G., & Lynch, C. M. (2012). Vital tooth whitening effects on oral health-related quality of life in older adults. Journal of Dental Hygiene, 86(3), 239-247.

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PUBLICATIONS School of Nursing Pitts, M. J., & Adams Tufts, K. (2013). Barriers to and facilitators of effective family discussions and decision-making about the state mandated HPV vaccine. Qualitative Health Research, 23(5), 605-617. Haney, T., & Adams Tufts, K. (2012). Electronic communication in home health: Implications on parental well-being and satisfaction. Home Health Care Nurse, 30(2), 216-224. Bennington, L. K. (2012). Sacred healing stories told at the end of life. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 30, 69-80. http://jhn.sagepub.com/content/30/2/69.full Gray, D., & Rutledge, C. M. (2013). Herbal supplements in primary care: Patient perceptions, motivations, and effects on use. Holistic Nursing Practice, 27(1), 7-12. Hawkins, J. E., O’Connor, L., & Santo Domingo, R. (2012). Bridging the gap between school and the real world: Student perspectives on nursing externships. Imprint, 59(4), 42-43.

Hoch, M., Staton, G. S., Mattacola, C. G., McKeon, J. M., & McKeon, P. O. (2012). Dorsiflexion and dynamic postural control deficits are present in those with chronic ankle instability. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15(6), 574-579. Hoch, M., & Grindstaff, T. L. (2012). Effectiveness of joint mobilization for chronic ankle instability: A review of the current literature. Athletic Training & Sports Health Care, 4(5), 237-244. Hoch, M., McKeon, P. O., & Andreatta, R. D. (2012). Plantar vibrotactile detection deficits in adults with chronic ankle instability. Medicine & Science in Sport & Exercise, 44(4), 666-672. Cline, Z. U., Dewey, S. E., Houchins, E. E., & Kott, K. (2013). Preventive pressure ulcer protocols used in physical therapy for the adult complete spinal cord injury population: a systematic review. Journal of Student Physical Therapy Research, 6(1), 7-27. Thomas, K., Van Lunen, B. L., & Morrison, S. (2013). Changes in postural sway as a function of prolonged walking. European Journal of Applied Physiology. 113(2):497-508.

Hawkins, J. E., & Vialet, C. L. (2012). Service learning abroad: A life-changing experience for nursing students. Journal of Christian Nursing, 29(3), 173-177.

Hankemeier, D. A., Walter, J. M., McCarty, C. W., Newton, E. J., Walker, S. E., Pribesh, S. L., ‌ Van Lunen, B. L. (2013). Use of evidence-based practice among athletic training educators, clinicians, and students, Part 1: Perceived importance, knowledge, and confidence. Journal of Athletic Training. 48(3):394-404.

Patterson, B. M., & Renaud, M. (2012). Routine hearing screening in primary care for adult populations using distortion product otoacoustic emissions testing. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 24(7), 400-404.

McCarty, C. W., Hankemeier, D. A., Walter, J. M., Newton, E., & Van Lunen, B. L. (2013). Use of evidence-based practice among athletic training educators, clinicians, and students, Part 2: Attitudes, beliefs, barriers, and accessibility. Journal of Athletic Training. 48(3):405-414.

Renaud, M. T., Rutledge, C. M., & Shepherd, L. (2012). Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders. Journal of Nursing Education, 51(8), 454-460.

Hankemeier, D., & Van Lunen, B. L. (2013). Perceptions of approved clinical instructors: Barriers in the implementation of evidence-based practice. Journal of Athletic Training. 48(3):382393.

Rose, D. L. (2013). I've heard report, Now what do I do? Avatars prepare novice students for patient handoff. Nurse Educator, 38(2), 54-55.

School of Physical Therapy Houston, M., McKeon, P. O., & Hoch, M. (2013). Foot and ankle ability measure score in patients with chronic ankle instability following joint mobilization. International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training, 18(2), 4-7. Hoch, M., Andreatta, R. D., Mullineaux, D. R., English, R., McKeon, J. M., Mattacola, C. G., & McKeon, P. O. (2012). A 2-week joint mobilization intervention improves self-reported function, range of motion, and dynamic balance in those with chronic ankle instability. Journal of Orthopedic Research, 30(11), 1798-1804.

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Morrison, S., Sosnoff, J., Hefferman, K. S., Jae, S. Y., & Fernhill, B. (2013). Aging, hypertension and physiological tremor: The contribution of the cardioballistic impulse to tremorgenesis in older adults. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 326, 68-74. Morrison, S., Sosnoff, J. J., Sandroff, B. M., Pula, J. H., & Motl, R. W. (2013). The dynamics of finger tremor in multiple sclerosis is affected by whole body position. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 324, 84-89. Morrison, S., Cortes, N., Newell, K. M., Silburn, P. A., & Kerr, G. K. (2013). Variability, regularity and coupling measures distinguish PD tremor from voluntary 5 Hz tremor. Neuroscience Letters, 534, 69-74. Morrison, S., & Newell, K. M. (2012). Aging, neuromuscular decline and the change in physiological and behavioral complexity of upper-limb movement dynamics. Journal of Aging Research.


PUBLICATIONS Morrison, S., Tucker, M., & Barrett, R. S. (2012). From tremor to movement: Differences in variability and coupling during bilateral finger actions. Motor Control, 16, 31-49. Cortes, N., Morrison, S., Onate, J., & Van Lunen, B. L. (2012). Landing technique affects knee loading and position during athletic tasks. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15(2), 175181. Morrison, S., Colberg-Ochs, S. R., Parson, H. K., & Vinik, A. I. (2012). Relation between risk of falling and postural sway complexity in diabetes. Gait and Posture, 35, 662-668. Singley, K., Hale, B. D., & Russell, D. (2012). Heart rate, anxiety, and hardiness at sky’s the limit: A comparative study of novice and experienced skydivers. Journal of Sport Behavior, 35, 453-469.

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Katsumata, H., & Russell, D. (2012). Prospective versus predictive control in timing of hitting a falling ball. Experimental Brain Research, 216, 499-514. Phan, K., McCarty, C., Mutchler, J., & Van Lunen, B. L. (2012). Clinical preceptors' perspectives on clinical education in post-professional athletic training education programs. Athletic Training Education Journal, 7(3), 103-114. Paszkewicz, J., Brian, W., Tristen, W., Cailee, W., & Van Lunen, B. L. (2012). Critically appraised topic: The effectiveness of injury prevention programs on reducing the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament sprains in adolescent athletes. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, 21, 371-377.

Books and Book Chapters in 2012-13 Faculty Presentation made in 2012-13

$12,348,131 In total grants awarded over the past five years

6000

Doherty, J., Van Lunen, B. L., Ismaeli, Z., & Onate, J. (2012). Hamstring strength measurements in collegiate athletes with a history of hamstring injury. Athletic Training & Sports Health Care, 4(1), 38-44. Onate, J., Dewey, T., Kollock, R., Thomas, K., Van Lunen, B. L., DeMaio, M., & Ringleb, S. (2012). Real-time intercession and inter-rater reliability of the functional movement screen. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 26(2), 408-415.

Faculty Publications in 2012-13

100%

Patient encounters in the on campus Sofia and David Konikoff Dental Hygiene Care Facility. 2011-2012 pass rates in the following programs: Cytotechnology, Ophthalmic Technology, Physical Therapy and Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner and on the first attempt for the 2012 National Board Dental Hygiene Examination

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BOOKS AND CHAPTERS School of Community and Environmental Health

School of Nursing

Becker, S.M. (2012). Responding to disaster and terrorism: The central role of communication. In L.A. Cole and N.D. Connell (eds.), Local Planning for Terror and Disaster: From Bioterrorism to Earthquakes: 29-43. John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Apatov, N. (2012) The Post-anesthesia Patient. In Critical Care Nursing: A Holistic Approach (10th ed.).

Becker, S.M. (2012). Psychological issues in a nuclear or radiological attack. In Office of The Surgeon General, United States Army and the Borden Institute, Medical Consequences of Radiological and Nuclear Weapons, Textbooks of Military Medicine: Chapter 8. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C. Shuman, D., & Locke, E. F. (2013). Cultural health influences. In C. Harris & F. Garcia-Godoy (Eds.), Primary Preventive Dentistry (8th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

School of Medical Diagnostic & Translational Sciences Lubas, M., Mitchell, J., & De Leo, G. (2012). Augmentative and alternative communication solutions and autism. In Vinood B. Patel, Victor R. Preedy, & Colin R. Martin (Eds.), The Comprehensive Guide to Autism. Springer.

School of Dental Hygiene Darby, M. (2012). Comprehensive Review of Dental Hygiene (7th ed.), 1020. St Louis: Elsevier Mosby. McCombs, G., & Darby, M. (2012). Dental applications. In M. G. Kong, G. Morfill, & W. Stolz (Eds.), Applications of Low-Temperature Gas Plasmas in Medicine and Biology, Chapter 12.3. Cambridge University Press. Stull, S. (2012) Current clinical and ethical best practice standards of care when utilizing polishing procedures for teeth and restorations. In C. Hovliaras, Savvy Success Achieving Professional Excellence and Career Satisfaction in the Dental Hygiene Profession, 73-85. Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse.

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Bennington, L. K. (2013). Immunogenetics. In C. A. Kenner & J. A. Lewis (Eds.), Genetics and Genomics for Nursing. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. http://www.pearsonhighered.com/educator/product/Genetics-and-Genomics-for-Nursing/9780132174077.page Bennington, L. K. (2013). Mosaicism. In C. A. Kenner and J. A. Lewis (Eds.), Genetics and Genomics for Nursing. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. http://www.pearsonhighered.com/educator/product/Genetics-and-Genomics-forNursing/9780132174077.page Haveles, E. (2012). Pharmacology. In M. L. Darby (Ed.), Mosby's Comprehensive Review of Dental Hygiene (7th ed.), 392-435. Saint Louis, MO: Mosby-Elsevier. Lee, A. H., & Rose, D. L. (2013). Clinical Decision Making Study Guide for Medical-Surgical Nursing: Patient-Centered Collaborative Care (7th ed.). Maryland Heights, MO: Elsevier-Saunders.


OUR DEAN’S OFFICE Staff

College of Health Sciences Advisory Board

Leanne White, Director of Advising

Jo-Ann Burke, Vice President of Patient Care Services Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters

Sheila Carson, Technical Support Larry Boyles, Administrative Director, Riverside Health System Connie Davis, Assistant to the Dean Eleanor Bradshaw, Community Volunteer Katherine Ferrara, Advisor Dr. James S. Cain, Valley Nephrology Associates Keith Krepcho, Undergraduate Advisor Manisha Sharma, Major Gifts Officer

Dr. C. Donald Combs, Vice President and Dean, School of Health Professions Eastern Virginia Medical School

Kathy Simms, Grant Writer

Patrick C. Devine Jr., Attorney, Williams, Mullen, Hofheimer & Nusbaum

Tammie Smith, Administrative Assistant and Program Specialist

Michael Franklin, President/CEO, Atlantic General Hospital

Betsy Thomas, Business Manager

Marge Green, Dental Hygienist Allen R. Jones Jr., CEO, Dominon Physical Therapy and Associates, Inc. Genemarie McGee, Chief Nursing Officer, Sentara Healthcare; Vice President, Patient Care Services, Sentara Leigh Hospital Michael Kerner, CEO, Bon Secours Hampton Roads Thomas Orsini, President/CEO, Lake Taylor Transitional Care Hospital Dr. A. Ray Pentecost, III, President, Design & Health Linda Rohrer, President/Owner, DPS Inc. Rony Thomas, CEO, LifeNet Health Karen Voogt, Physical Therapist

Jo-Ann Burke is the 2013-2014 Chair College Advisory Board.

Dr. Nancy Welch, Director, Chesapeake Health Department 2012-2013 Chair, College Advisory Board, Eleanor Bradshaw

Connie Davis, Assistant to the Dean

Dr. Gary Yates, President Healthcare Performance Improvement and President, Sentara Healthcare Quality Care Network Dr. David Young, Retired Orthopedic Surgeon Art Zachary, CEO, Rose and Womble Realty



2013 ODU College of Health Sciences Annual Report