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July 2012

Issue 19

www.oddfellows.co.uk

Around Britain: Olympic special

Culture club Royally good celebrations

We celebrate HM The Queen’s 60 year reign and look at how we celebrated royal occasions in the past.

Active travel

Seven years in the making We visit the Olympic Park ahead of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and find out how our members across the UK are getting into the spirit.

Food & drink Classic London lunches Cathy Adams, journalist and food blogger reviews a selection of the capital’s best traditional eating establishments; perfect for refuelling after a day of sightseeing and spectator sports.

Also featured this month

Top tips for staying safe abroad this summer

Win WIN: £50 to spend at the London 2012 Olympics online shop! To enter, simply sign someone up to Friendscene magazine. Email subscribe@oddfellows.co.uk with the email address of your friend or family member by Tuesday 31 July and you’ll both be entered into the draw. Good luck! WIN: A dazzling pair of gardening gloves! Send George a question and if we print it you win the gloves.

Discoveries: We reveal the winner of our monthly photo competition. Health & wellbeing: Advice from our Care department on covering the costs of long term care through the NHS. Home & garden: Our resident gardener George is here to answer your green-fingered questions. Sport & leisure: We meet ‘Roving Rev’ Bruce Nicole, the Oddfellows member who walked 390 miles for charity. Money: “We owe our children an apology” The author and journalist Francis Beckett takes time to reflect two years on from his controversial book ‘What did the Baby Boomers ever do for us?’

WIN: £50 of Jessops vouchers in our ‘Through the lens’ photo competition! Send us your best photo inspired by this month’s theme: Jubilee jubilations.


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Culture club “I love going to the theatre once in a while, so when I heard my local Oddfellows Branch was arranging a trip I couldn’t pass it up.” Sharon - Manchester

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Right royal celebrations

As HM The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations come to an end, we take a look back in time to see how the Oddfellows Society has marked the Monarch’s key moments throughout its 201 year history.

Below is an extract from the 1897 Oddfellow magazine, which comments on the Diamond Jubilee.

1897 – Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee As the first British Monarch to reach a Diamond Jubilee, Queen Victoria was Head of State for two thirds of what many historians have named Britain’s ‘imperial century’. By 1897, the UK and the British Empire covered more than 10 million square miles with a population of over 400 million people. Joining in the celebrations at the time were almost 1 million Oddfellows members across the UK who used the Society to socialise, save for a rainy day and look out for one another, long before the NHS or the welfare State.

(Continued on the next page...)


Culture club Many Oddfellows Branches, or Lodges as they are more often referred to, decided to mark the Jubilee by creating special memorabilia. Members of the Poole District for example, presented an inscribed chain and pendant to their District Chairman to keep for future generations . The Grenville Lodge welcomed 65 new members at a Diamond Jubilee themed party. Durham’s Lodge held a celebratory dinner for 50 people, while Lancashire’s Goosnargh Lodge set up the Diamond Jubilee Lodge to honour the occasion. 1977 – HM The Queen’s Silver Jubilee It was all street parties, bunting and parades in ’77 when HM The Queen celebrated 25 years on the throne. After a record-breaking trip to 36 UK counties in less than 3 months, the Queen returned to London in June to be greeted by more than 1 million well wishers. “When I was twenty-one I pledged my life to the service of our people and I asked for God's help to make good that vow. Although that vow was made in my salad days, when I was green in judgement, I do not regret nor retract one word of it.” (HM The Queen, 7 June 1977) Needless to say, our Branches rose to the occasion with lots of events happening across the country. Loughborough members held a tree planting ceremony in Queen’s Park for 150 guests while Watford District combined the Jubilee with its own centenary celebrations and entered a float in the local Jubilee carnival parade. And as these pictures reveal, younger members across the country also got involved.

2012 – HM The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee It would take more than a spot of rain to ruin the four day celebrations that marked Queen Elizabeth II’s 60 year reign this June. One thousand ships took part in the river pageant on 3 June, watched by 1 million rain-soaked revellers on the banks of the Thames before a music concert the following day.

(Continued on the next page...)


Culture club The weekend was then rounded off on 5 June with a balcony appearance by the Royal family and with the most British of traditions; a fly-by from the Red Arrows. Our members came together across the UK to celebrate, a selection of pictures from Skipton, Ormskirk and Southport and West London events are below.

And our Financial Director, Jane Nelson, wrote to HM The Queen on behalf of the Society to congratulate her on her achievement. Below is her letter, and the warm response she received.

The Oddfellows Society’s archive has over 160,000 documents stored online, offering a unique insight into the UK from 1810 to the present day. To find out more click here and sign up for your free trial today.


Culture club

The Reader’s Review Book: One for sorrow This is a charming little book. The foreword offers an excellent insight into some of our favourite sayings and proverbs, many of which are based on earliest religious beliefs. A wide variety of topics are discussed in this book, most coming from the observations of country folk and wise men, long before today’s technology was even dreamed up. Yet sayings like ‘red sky at night, shepherd’s delight’ actually have modern scientific explanations which wouldn’t have been known when they were created. There are some interesting facts in there, such as; in countries where the magpie doesn’t live, the saying ‘Hello Mrs magpie…’, was actually replaced by the crow. So like I said, it’s a charming book. It’s not one to sit and read and be captivated by for hours, but it’s a good book for the car or as a bedside companion that’s there to be picked up and browsed. It will, however, allow you to find some fascinating information that will amaze your friends.

Richard Ashton, St Helens and Warrington District Oddfellows

Book: Lost London Lost London is a little gem of a book which, although meticulously researched, has none of that 'dry as dust' quality like many from the same genre. It’s eminently readable, at times idiosyncratic, but always absorbing; skillfully balancing its attention to detail with its ability to engage the reader. By delving into the past and uncovering what time and tide have hidden, this small and unpretentious tome presents a London you never knew existed. It’s clear that the author, Richard Guard, has a profound knowledge of London. He builds a creative montage of the metropolis by interweaving key moments in London's history with individual characters and an alluring, unchartered geography of this intriguing and multi-faceted city. The reader gets taken on an undercover journey through Molly Houses to Alhambra via the Dog and Duck and emerges at the end feeling richer for the experience. A highly recommended read.

Karen Doku, North London District Oddfellows


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Food & drink “My favourite thing about the Oddfellows is that all the events are aimed at foodies like me. We even went on a tour of an English vineyard recently – I’ll drink to that!” George - Brighton

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Traditional London food Cathy Adams Under the pseudonym CityBird, I’m lucky enough to frequent some of the finest eating and drinking establishments the Capital has to offer. Some are more impressive than others, and the eating habits of Londoners change so rapidly it’s hard to keep up. That said, London is one to honour its gastronomic customs, and the oldies really are the goodies. Below are five restaurants so traditional that if you cut them open, the time-old spirit of London would bleed out.

Pie, mash and eels – M Manze Manze pops up in several locations around London, but the oldest (and best) is on Tower Bridge Road in Bermondsey, which opened more than 100 years ago in 1902. The original décor is still intact – think checkered tiles, wooden booths and low ceilings – and the food sticks to its Cockney roots: pies, mash and eels (jellied or stewed). While jellied eels and chips might not be the trendiest of lunches, pie and mash shops are an iconic part of London’s gastro history, and a plate of Manze’s fluffy mash and a crusty pie covered in a slathering of liquor is refreshingly simple. M Manze, 87 Tower Bridge Road, London, SE1 4TW Nearest tube: London Bridge/Borough

English breakfast – The Wolseley Thanks to Breakfast at The Wolseley, written by The Times’ food critic AA Gill, the café-cum-restaurant has gained a huge, and deserved, following. On any given day, the entire spectrum of London can be seen wrapped around one of The Wolseley’s silky hot chocolates: business people, tourists and celebrities are often to be found dotted in its Venetian domed dining room. It’s café culture at its chicest. Naturally, it excels at the traditional English breakfast (complete with chewy black pudding), or a more continental choice, with bagels, kedgeree and granola. Try The Wolseley Imperative coffee: cognac, espresso hot milk topped with chocolate and whipped cream. Reservations are imperative, especially during the week, but you could find yourself rubbing shoulders with a member of the A-list. The Wolseley, 160 Piccadilly, London, W1J 9EB Nearest tube: Green Park

© Rex Restaurant Associates Limited. All rights reserved | Photography by David Loftus (Continued on the next page...)


Food & drink Fish and chips – Brady’s ‘Fish and chips’ is more British than rain at Wimbledon, and London has everything from cheap streetside takeaways to sit-down, knife-and-fork-and-napkin type restaurants when it comes to the ultimate British duo. But for the status quo of fish and chips, head to Brady’s in Wandsworth. Inside the quaint shopfront you’ll find real, honest fish at its best in a cosy seaside-restaurant. The fish is as fresh as it comes, considering there is some distance between South West London and the nearest coastline. Try the potted shrimps to start, a steal at under a fiver, followed by crispy battered cod, or herb-crusted grilled haddock. Team with an array of sauces (there are five different herb mayonnaises, no less), mushy peas and chips – and there you have it, a tried and tested British institution. Brady’s, 513 Old York Road, London, SW18 1TF Nearest train station: Wandsworth Town

Curry – Tayyabs Britain – and most certainly London – is famous for its most popular import: the curry. Now Britain’s favourite food if you are to believe the weary surveys (sorry, roast dinner), curry houses are as ubiquitous on London’s streets as Tesco plastic bags. But as they proliferate, the quality typically goes in the opposite direction, and a good curry in the capital is surprisingly hard to find. Once again, London’s East End comes to the rescue with Whitechapel’s Tayyabs. Hidden behind the Royal London Hospital, Tayyabs dates back to 1972 and still retains its casual working-class charm. Famed for its peshwari nans and sizzling lamb chops, you’ll find punters queuing around the block for a table. The waiters have a tendency to hustle you in and out, but for a mouthful of its pumpkin masala I’m anybody’s. Tayyabs, 83 – 89 Fieldgate Street, London, E1 1JU Nearest tube: Whitechapel/Aldgate East

Quintessential British food – Rules No guide to traditional London food would be complete without a fleeting mention of Rules in Covent Garden. It takes the gong for being the oldest eating establishment in the capital. Opened in 1798 by Thomas Rule, its Englishness will wallop you in the face the moment you push its weighty dark wood doors. Through the ages it has served the last Tory government (Ken Clarke and Michael Heseltine were regulars thanks to its proximity to Whitehall) as well as most of the James Bonds. Even Edward VII and Charles Dickens have dined here. It boasts more blue-blood than Elizabeth II, and naturally specialises in feathery game, reared at Rules’ own estate in the Pennines. Order a leg of ptarmigan or widgeon, cloaked in bread sauce and gravy, and ask for a bottle of claret as standard. Many may feel stifled by heavy red velvet seats, starched white tablecloths, a picture hanging from every possible wall space and the expected American clientele – but don’t be put off. Rules is a bastion of old-fashioned English virtue, and London wouldn’t be the same without it.

Rules, 35 Maiden Lane, London, WC2E 7LB Nearest tube: Covent Garden


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Around Britain “These days we take ‘staycations’ in the UK to keep costs down. But wherever we go there are always Oddfellows events to entertain us.” Lesley - South Yorkshire

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London 2012 - Olympic Oddfellows How our members have been getting involved in this once in a generation event...

As the torch relay continues its 8,000 mile journey around the UK, many of our members have already had a close encounter with the Olympic flame. As featured in last month’s Friendscene, 87 year old George Phillips recently took part in his second Olympic torch relay. A Member of Plymouth and Truro, he first carried the flame in ’48, the last time London hosted the games. He was nominated to carry it again through the centre of Plymouth this year. Meanwhile, members of the Oddfellows from Deeside recently captured the moment when the torch relay passed the Oddfellows Hall in Saltney. The Reverend Canon Christopher Humphries was the torch bearer, who incidentally lived in a house called Oddfellows Cottage as a child. Watch the full video on YouTube by clicking here.

Nigel’s going for gold Paralympic gold medallist and Oddfellows member Nigel Murray will be competing for the ultimate prize in London this August, a gold medal in the sport of Boccia. Read more about his preparations in next month’s Sport & Leisure section.


Around Britain Dorothy’s Olympic memories Dorothy Emerson, a member from Oldham, won an Olympic silver medal in the high jump at the 1960 Rome Olympics, thinking back she remembers,“it was a very amateur sport in those days, even though we had to have a professional outlook.” Training for her used to include jumping gates and washing lines, “I worked full time and had to fit training around all my other commitments – it was hard work but a great experience”. Dorothy will be attending the finals of the high jump at the London Olympics and a number of other functions as one of more than 500 surviving British Olympic medallists. Image courtesy of the Oldham Advertiser

Going for gold - fun ways to win your own Olympic medal! Olympic themed events being organised around the country 21 July, Exeter, 7.30pm - Indoor Olympics - To suit all abilities and ages, followed by refreshments and a raffle.

7 August, St Helens, 12pm - An Olympic quiz - Test the knowledge of you and your friends

Call 01392 272749 or email jennifer.pooley@oddfellows.co.uk

Call 0151 420 0661 or email angela.smith@oddfellows.co.uk

2 August, Rotherham, 11am Tiddlywink Olympics - Open to all with prizes for the winners.

18 August, Richmond (Surrey), 7.30pm - An evening of food and Olympic fun with prizes to be won

Call 01709 838673 or email paul.eyre@oddfellows.co.uk

Call 020 8940 7556 or email derek.cleveland@oddfellows.co.uk

8 August, Wrabness (Essex), 10am Olympic themed beach games, crabbing and picnics. Next to the Thames Estuary Call 01206 330962 or email diana.randall@oddfellows.co.uk

For the full list of Olympic-themed events happening around the UK, visit www.oddfellows.co.uk and click on ‘events’ or visit www.oddfellows.co.uk/events. All of the above events are open to all. Prices and availability may vary. Please contact the organisers before the event if you would like to attend.

Win £50 to spend at the London 2012 Olympics online shop! You can win a piece of history with £50 to spend on London 2012 merchandise. To enter, simply sign someone up to Friendscene magazine. Email subscribe@oddfellows.co.uk with the email address of your friend or family member by Tuesday 31 July and you’ll both be entered into the draw. Good luck!

Competition terms and conditions 1) Please ensure you get the permission of the person you are nominating to subscribe to Friendscene before you submit their details. Only once we have received confirmation of their willingness to subscribe will you both be entered into the prize draw. 2) Only one entry allowed per applicant (aged 18 or over). 3) The deadline for entries is before Tuesday 31 July – any entries received after this time will not be counted. 4) The winning entries will be chosen at random from all entries and notified within three weeks. 5) This prize cannot be exchanged for another option. 6) The Oddfellows reserves the right to change the details of this competition without prior notice. The prize may be subject to change, up to the value indicated above. For further details please contact ezine@oddfellows.co.uk.


Around Britain

London 2012:The Stats

With just days to go before the eyes of the world look to London for the 30th Olympiad, here are some key facts about the enormous £9 billion, seven year project. The Olympic Park in numbers Before construction began: • 1.4 million cubic meters of soil had to be de-contaminated • More than 200 buildings were demolished • 98% of all cleared materials were saved and recycled

Fast fact: More than 160 cats were rescued from the site during the clean up During the build: • 46,000 people have been involved in the construction process • Two giant 6km tunnels were built to reroute 52 pylons using 200km of new cable • More than 16,000 beds were installed in the Athlete’s Village • 10,000 portable loos will be on site, enough for the entire population of Malta

Fast fact: The entire 3,000-tonne roof of the Aquatic Centre was moved 1.3miles into its final position The finished site now has: • 100 hectares of new parkland • 8 kilometres of new waterways

• half a million new plants • 30 new bridges • a new press centre for 20,000 people.

Fast fact: 120,000 people are expected to pass through Stratford Station each morning during the Games


Around Britain

London 2012:Olympic venues A selection of the venues for the 2012 Olympic games Athlete’s Village • Accommodation for 23,500 athletes and officials

The Olympic Stadium • Capacity: 80,000 • Hosting: Athletics, Opening and Closing Ceremonies

The Velodrome • Capacity: 6,000 • Hosting: Track Cycling

The Aquatics Centre • Capacity: 17,500 • Hosting: Diving, Swimming, Synchronised Swimming and Modern Pentathlon

Images property of London 2012 BMX Track • Capacity: 6,000 • Hosting: BMX Cycling

Water Polo Arena • Capacity: 5,000 • Hosting: Water Polo

Basketball Arena • Capacity: 12,000 • Hosting: Basketball, Handball finals

The Riverbank Arena • Capacity: 16,000 • Hosting: Hockey

Lee Valley White Water Centre • Capacity: 12,000 • Hosting: Canoe Slalom

Weymouth and Portland • Hosting: Sailing

Eton Manor • Capacity: 12,500 • Hosting: Paralympic Wheelchair Tennis, Aquatics Training

Handball arena • Capacity: 7,000 • Hosting: Handball, Modern Pentathlon (fencing)

Eton Dorney • Capacity: 30,000 • Hosting: Rowing, Canoe Sprint

The Royal Artillery Barracks • Capacity: 3,500 • Hosting: Shooting


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Active Travel “I went to Austria with the Oddfellows last summer. Everything was taken care of – the only thing I had to worry about was making sure to enjoy myself.” Paula - Manchester

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Staying safe abroad As the old saying goes, failing to prepare is preparing to fail. But when it comes to travelling abroad, a lack of forward planning can have serious consequences for your holiday. Let these tips from the Foreign Office help you prepare for a trouble free trip this summer. Before leaving home • Tell family and friends where you’re going and leave contact details or an itinerary with them • Get a good guidebook and find out about your destination. Make sure you know about the local laws and customs • Make a note of the nearest British Embassy or Consulate • Check your passport is still valid and write full details of your next of kin inside. Don’t risk it • Take out travel insurance that covers any special requirements you may have or extreme activities you’re planning to do • Take enough money to cover emergencies and check the expiry dates on your credit/debit cards. Did you know? An estimated 6 million people in the UK go abroad each year. Good health • Visit www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk and check if you need any vaccinations before travelling. You’ll need to see your GP at least six weeks before your trip if you do • Make sure any medication you’re on is legal in the country you’re planning to visit • If you’re travelling within the European Union, don’t forget your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) – visit www.dh.gov.uk/travellers for more details. Once you’re abroad • Use a money belt or secure inside pocket. Don’t openly display your cash and don’t keep all your cards or money in the same place – keep it in different places • Don’t get involved in illegal drugs – the penalties can be far more severe than in the UK – and don’t carry parcels or luggage through customs for other people. If your passport or valuables are lost or stolen • Report it at once to the local police and obtain a statement (you’ll need this to claim against your insurance later) • Don’t forget to cancel credit cards or travellers cheques with your service provider. If you stay safe then there’s more chance you can enjoy your trip without any nasty surprises. All the information above is courtesy of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). More advice and downloadable guides about travelling abroad can be found on the FCO’s website by clicking here.


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Home & garden “Sorting out the garden is how I like to relax. An expert gave a talk at my local Oddfellows branch – it helped me no end.” Christine - Derbyshire

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Dig deep this summer

6 – 12 August 2012 is the UK’s National Allotment Week. So to celebrate, Georgie Willock from the National Allotment Society explains how you can join the ‘grow your own’ revolution. What is National Allotment Week? It’s our yearly seven day event that aims to get more people growing and make local people realise the benefits of having allotments in their neighbourhoods. This year marks its tenth anniversary, so we’re asking the 123,000 allotment holders that we represent to hold a party on their plot to share the enjoyment allotments can bring with the wider public. Why hold it? Allotments often come under threat from councils or private landlords who want to sell off land for development. This threat has been made more acute by the recent Localism Act which came into force this year, giving more decision making powers back to local communities. Can you explain the party on the plot? It can be anything you like, from a BBQ or a plant sale to an old-school village fete. So long as you invite the general public to come and share the day with you, pretty much anything goes! Because allotments are perceived to be tight-knit communities behind gates, the benefits of having them nearby often get overlooked by local people. We believe that by showing communities the true value of the allotments around them, this will help safeguard these green, growing spaces for years to come. And what better way to do that than by throwing a party for the whole neighbourhood. (Continued on the next page...)


Home & Garden

Image courtesy of the National Allotment Society Why should I get an allotment? Owning an allotment can benefit you socially, financially, physically and mentally. You’ll often make friends there, save some money and get as much exercise in 30 minutes as a trip to the gym. But most importantly, it can reaffirm your sense of self and give you an enormous sense of wellbeing. Isn’t it just an old man’s game? Not at all; we want this week to be something for people of all ages, from 8 to 80. From young professionals looking to save a bit of money on their shopping, to retirees enjoying their hard earned spare time, our new website is a resource for both new and experienced gardeners. What about those long waiting lists? If the waiting list in your area is long, you could always try speaking to a local school or landowner and negotiate the use of some land. We can even help you with the tenancy agreements. Did you know? Allotments in the UK date back to the 18th century, reaching a peak in 1918 with 1.5 million allotments Some councils are actually halving the size of some of their plots in order to cut the waiting lists – this is one solution that lets more people garden at a time when there’s a huge desire to grow your own. How can I get involved? It’s open to all, and allotment owners can find ‘How to Guides’, posters and plenty of advice about throwing a party online. (See website details at the bottom of the page). How can I get one? There are two options available to you. You can contact your local council to find your nearest council-owned site. You’ll then be able to apply for a plot or put your name on a waiting list if necessary. If there isn’t one in your area then your local authority is compelled by law to provide one. Like any business plan, if you and five other people can show there’s a need for it then you’ll stand a good chance of getting one created. However patience is a virtue, as the law doesn’t indicate a time frame in which the local authority must act! Alternatively you can always use the search engine on our website (www.nsalg.org.uk) to find your nearest allotment association and go to them direct – they might have spaces available or be able to point you in the right direction.

To find out more about the National Allotments Society or National Allotment Week, visit www.nsalg.org.uk


Home & Garden

Ask George

Is your garden giving you grief? Well, fear not, help is at hand. George Hill is here to answer your gardening problems. Send your gardening question to ezine@oddfellows.co.uk and if we publish your question in next month’s edition we’ll send you a fantastic gardening kit absolutely free! This includes one brand new pair of dazzling gardening gloves and ten packs of assorted seeds to get you started. All thanks to Joe’s Garden and Suttons Seeds. Q: “I’ve got a three year old twinned conference and William pear tree that’s three foot in height. It’s got patches on up to a third of its leaves that have turned jet black and don’t drop off. Can you help?” Margaret Duncan, Salisbury A: I think your tree is probably lacking in pot ash. These patches can sometimes be black and sometimes purple but it’s common in trees around that age. Give it a feed of liquid pot ash and it will restore the vigour in the foliage and improve the tree all around. Often though, trees will grow out of it as they mature. Q: “How do I get rid of dock leaves from my garden?” Emily, Manchester

Q: “My tubs of broad beans flowered a month ago and the leaves have started to go brown. What is it and what can I do?” Robert, Lincolnshire A: It sounds related to the recent cold temperatures. Broad beans don’t like fluctuating temperatures and it’s been a difficult, topsy-turvy kind of year so far. I would give them a feed of Maxicrop, this is an organic feed made from seaweed. You should normally use approximately three capfuls to each gallon of water but check the bottle for the correct strength needed for each crop. It really does improve the texture of the soil and also helps with the flavour of the veg later on.

A: If you don’t want to use chemicals then make sure that you dig them up properly. They have a long tapered root that you must get up completely otherwise it’ll just grow back. The other thing you can do is use one of the sprays designed to kill broad-leafed weeds.

(Continued on the next page...)


Home & Garden

George’s focus: July

July is the time of year when the garden has really come alive. Because of the strange spring we’ve had, things have taken longer than normal to get going, but with a bit of luck, the sun will come out for a fruitful summer. Important jobs this month Concentrate on sowing your brassicas, purple kale, broccoli, spring cabbage. They’ll then be ready to plant out to their permanent maturing positions in the first week of September.

Bed of roses Make sure that you go through your rose beds to remove any dying flowering heads. You should have had a nice display of roses so far, but now’s the time to keep them cut back to let the new growth come through.

I like the spring hero variety of spring cabbage; it’s a good round cabbage that stands the winters very well. Purple king is another nice variety that seldom fails and has a nice flavour when eaten next spring.

Finish off by giving them a dressing of Toprose, or a similar fertiliser, when you de-head them.

Make sure you mulch your sweet peas with a good liquid feed don’t let them dry out. Otherwise they flowers will quickly go to seed and once they start to seed they cease to flower so well. What to harvest right now • Broad beans – don’t let them get too big. If you pick them regularly then they should keep cropping • Salad boxes – if you’ve sown them at regular intervals you should have a fresh supply right through the summer season

It can all seem a bit fussy but it does pay off. All of this should combine to give you another wonderful display of roses in September. Look after tomorrow’s marrows today If you’ve not done so already, move your courgette and squash plants outside to a sheltered spot that’s out of the wind. But keep watering them every third day to ensure they don’t try out.

• Strawberries – you should get the first fruits cropping soon. Don’t pick them too early, wait until they’re at their full ripeness.

Members with green fingers Suttons is an internationally renowned supplier of flower and vegetable seeds, young plants, bulbs, fruit bushes and other horticultural products to amateur gardeners. Members are eligible to receive a 10% discount on anything at www.suttons.co.uk, from seeds and bulbs to gardening equipment and greenhouses. To take advantage of your exclusive Oddfellows 10% discount click here*. *You will need to be signed in as a member to access the Members' Benefits page.


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Sport & leisure “I’ve never really been ‘sporty’, but I try to keep fit. My local Oddfellows branch now hosts a walking club. It’s great to get some fresh air, and we always have a good time.” Diana - Essex

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Rev’s a wild rover A vicar from Surrey has made a modern day pilgrimage to Northumberland on foot, walking 390 miles in less than a month for charity. The Reverend Bruce Nicole, vicar of St Michael’s Church in Camberley, completed the 29 day journey to Holy Island, or Lindisfarne as it’s often known, this summer. The Oddfellows member did it to raise money for a planned renovation at St Michaels. Walking between 10 June and 9 July, Bruce somehow managed to avoid the worst of the rain in what’s been officially the wettest June on record. Armed only with maps on his smartphone, Bruce averaged 15 miles per day as he passed through Oxford, Derby, Sheffield, Leeds and Newcastle. He also took in the views of the Cotswolds, the Peak District, the Yorkshire Dales and the Northumberland Coast. He stayed with 29 host families along the way, many of whom were strangers to him before he set off. As Bruce explains: “Very often, I would just find a friendly looking website in the town I was staying in, contact the owners and ask them if I could stay.” Apart from the occasional companion along the way, he made the entire trip alone. Yet far from a lonely experience, this was one of the most enjoyable parts. “Usually there’s just so much else going on,” explains Bruce, “families, jobs, hobbies and the rest. It’s good to tune out of all those things for a while. “The quieter it’s been, the more chance I’ve had to focus on who I am. It’s done me good and, hopefully, done some good for others too.”

Throughout his journey, Bruce drew upon the old and the new for inspiration. By following in the footsteps of the first pilgrims, he spent valuable time alone with his thoughts. But by using new technologies like blogging and social media as ‘the Roving Rev’, he’s managed to spread news of his trip to a far wider audience. And it worked. Bruce’s trip has been covered by local press, radio and the Guardian newspaper. Bruce’s wife, Jane, is an Oddfellows’ Branch secretary in the Surrey area. Some members may recognise him from this year’s Annual Movable Conference in Southport where he took the service. Finally, for those of you wondering how Bruce got home afterwards, he was given free travel all the way home by two train companies as a gesture of good will. “I certainly didn’t mind asking for a lift by then,” jokes Bruce, “I hope I’ve earned it.” You can find Bruce’s blog or donate to his cause by visiting http://www.stmikesopen4all.org.uk/

Images: All rights reserved by StMikesOpen4All


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Discoveries “I’ve promised myself I’ll try new things, and I can do that thanks to the Oddfellows. My friends never thought I’d try paragliding, but it was of the best things I’ve ever done!” Karen - Nottingham

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Cutting edge news from the world around us Unlocking the secrets of aging New research has been released which could pave the way towards us living longer, healthier lives. Researchers in Barcelona tested the genes of a newborn and a 103 year old in an attempt to better understand the causes of aging. Inside each of the trillions of cells within our bodies, there is a genetic blueprint for all of the different cells that make us human. However a nerve cell does not need the functions of other cells, such as bone or muscle cells for example, so it controls which functions it uses through an ‘off switch’; releasing chemicals into specific parts of our DNA. According to the researchers, their findings show significant differences in our cells’ ability to control this ‘off switch’ as we get older. These differences are known as epigenetic changes, and may be related to the familiar signs of aging such as wrinkles, weaker muscles and poorer eyesight. Researchers looking at epigenetics hope to one day discover whether they can reduce the aging process, or at least manage it more effectively. Dr Manel Esteller, head of the research team at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, said: “epigenetics is playing a central role in ageing... if it is something we can intervene from outside, maybe we can change the epigenome to change or slow ageing.”

Thirst quenching social media Fans of Twitter were recently given the chance to get free drinks thanks to some innovative social media advertising in South Africa. A soft drinks company encouraged people walking past a specially designed drinks machine to visit the microblogging website and send a tweet using a unique hashtag. A hashtag, more commonly known as the # symbol, is often used on Twitter to identify topics of interest. By mentioning the hashtag specified by the drinks machine, the thirsty tweeter then qualified for a free drink. The idea was just a publicity campaign, but its opened the door for new, inventive ways for companies and their customers to interact in the future.

You can keep up to date with the latest news, views and members’ stories throughout the month by following the Oddfellows’ on Twitter. Simply click on the icon or visit www.twitter.com and search for @OddfellowsUK.


Discoveries Through the lens – photography competition The theme of last month’s photography competition was ‘summer’ and the winner was Andy Hulme from Liverpool, for his photo – ‘Summer in Hale Woods’. Congratulations, you’ve won £50 of Jessops photography vouchers to spend in-store. Thanks to everyone who entered, your photos will be posted on our Facebook page this month for people around the world to enjoy. This month’s theme is ‘Jubilee jubilations’; so show us how you’ve been celebrating HM The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. If we choose your photo to appear in the next edition, you’ll win £50 of Jessops vouchers to spend in-store. So go and get snapping. You can enter by emailing your photo to ezine@oddfellows.co.uk, posting it on our Facebook wall or sending it in a tweet that mentions @oddfellowsUK. Click on the links below to visit our social media sites.

Terms and conitions 1) Entries can be submitted at any time and still be included in this competition. However the cut off date for each edition will be the first day of the month. For example, this month’s competition closes on 1 August. 2) If successful, you will be contacted by the Oddfellows to arrange delivery of your prize. 3) If your photograph contains an image of a person, building or private location please ensure you get permission from the person/building owner before submitting your entry. 4) By submitting a photograph to this competition you are confirming that you have given permission to use and reproduce this image and that the Oddfellows can use this photo in future publications and marketing material, both online and printed. 5) The Oddfellows will assume your consent has been given once your entry is submitted unless you directly state otherwise.

Congratulations! Well done to Chico Pachéco from London, you’ve won an embroidered cushion worth £45, courtesy of Baker and Grey. Thanks to everyone else who entered; keep reading Friendscene every month for more chances to win other prizes.


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Health & wellbeing “The Oddfellows give so much. I wish more people knew about the great services they have to offer.” Paul - London

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Covering the costs of long term care

For a growing number of people, ongoing health problems mean their healthcare needs don’t stop at the hospital doors. That’s why the NHS offers continuing healthcare, a long term care service that members of the public can apply for. And it can be backdated as well to cover care that was received any time in the last eight years. Phil Hadfield, head of the Care Department for the Oddfellows, explains what it’s all about, how to work out if you’re eligible and what your next steps should be. What is NHS continuing healthcare? Continuing care is described by the NHS as likely to be ‘complex, substantial and ongoing care needs that result from a disability, chronic illness or following hospital treatment.’

What are the current deadlines about? 30 September 2012 is the final deadline for applications regarding past care costs. If you think that you’ve paid for care between 1 April 2004 and 31 March 2011 which the NHS should have covered then you can request to be assessed for funding. If your application applies to care between 1 April 2011 and 31 March 2012 then you’ve got until 31 March 2013 to apply. How can I apply? If you live in the UK and Scotland you can request an assessment by writing to the NHS continuing care coordinator at your local NHS Primary Care Trust (PCT). In Wales you can write to the Chief Executive of the local Health Board. If your application is unsuccessful, you have the right to request a review of the decision. Alternatively you can call NHS Direct on 0845 46 47.

Unlike means-tested NHS social care, continuing healthcare offers a package of care and support for patients that’s paid for and organised by the NHS, regardless of background or income. If you currently need this type of care and you’ve yet to be assessed, or your condition has deteriorated, you can ask for an assessment any time.

Need more support? This is an issue for many suffers of dementia in particular, so the Alzheimer’s Society has produced a helpful booklet that’s available to everyone called ‘Have you been paying for care?’ which is available online at www.alzheimers.org.uk/continuingcare or by calling 0845 3000 336. Age UK also have a detailed factsheet that’s available at www.ageuk.org.uk or by calling 0800 169 6565. Alternatively you can contact us here at the Care Department for help on this issue and many others. Click here or call 0845 606 3102.


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Money “When I had money worries the Oddfellows put me in touch with the right people who could help. They were with me every step of the way.” Pam - Cambridgeshire

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What did the Baby Boomers ever do for us? In his book, What did the Baby Boomers ever do for us, author and Guardian writer Francis Beckett argued that the children of the 60s betrayed the generations that came before and after. For the first time there was money, there was safe sex, there was freedom, and no one bothered to stop and remember the price earlier generations paid for this. The baby boomers we remember today, Beckett wrote, are not the political reformers, but the millionaires. The true legacy of the swinging sixties and the most radicalsounding generation for half a century is in ashes. Now, two years later, he reflects on the controversy caused by its publication. I started the book thus: "The baby boomers saw themselves as pioneers of a new world; freer, fresher, fairer and infinitely more fun. But they were wrong. The world they made for their children to live in is a far harsher one than the world they inherited." The reaction was, I suppose, predictable, but I didn't predict it. Young people loved it. "The mirror Beckett holds up to the recent past is smeared with the suffering of young people today" wrote Laurie Penny, one of the New Statesman's best and youngest writers. "Grey-haired hippies will read this book and shudder; the rest of us, though, will read it for the splendid stories and shafts of insight" wrote the distinguished, but young (he was born in 1974) historian Dominic Sandbrook.

Whatever we were individually, however much you excuse us as a generation, the world went to pot (and other illegal substances) on our watch, and we let it happen. We owe our children an apology.

But my own generation – the baby boomers, those born between 1945 and 1955 – felt hurt and betrayed. Hurt and indignant, fellow baby boomers contended that we cannot be held responsible for the decline in opportunity and quality of life which we've seen since the 1960s. They've got a point. It makes no sense to condemn a whole generation. It was, in truth, a bit hyperbolic for me to write: "Proud of having conquered our inherited inhibitions, in our foolishness we thought there was little else to conquer."

But my basic message remains valid. Whatever we were individually, however much you excuse us as a generation, the world went to pot (and other illegal substances) on our watch, and we let it happen. We owe our children an apology. Francis Beckett, author, journalist and playwright, is the author of What did the Baby Boomers ever do for us? (Biteback, 2010.) Have your say: Have the baby boomers lived the good life for too long at the expense of future generations? Tell us what you think; email ezine@oddfellows.co.uk, search for OddfellowsSociety on Facebook or mention @OddfellowsUK on Twitter.

July eZine 2012  

After seven long years of preparation, the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games are just days away. We visit the Olympic Park ahead of t...

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