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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES Newsletter Issue 3, December 2018

Inside this issue: From the Editor

Page 2

Introducing Robin Burns

Page 3

Introducing Wendy

Page 4

OCIES 2018 Conference Highlights Edition

Choo WCCES Update

Page 5

Conference Highlights

Page 6

The OCIES Waka

Page 8

Conference reflection

Page 9

New and Emerging Researcher Fono

Page 14

Visioning OCIES

Page 16

2018 Emerging

Page 17

Scholars OCIES 2019

Page 18

OCIES News Bites

Page 19

New books and

Page 20

media Beyond Oceania

Page 21

2019 Newsletter

Page 25

Contributions

Further details inside this issue 1


OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

From the Editor Warm Pacific Greetings, The December issue of our OCIES newsletter is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on the work of our Society throughout 2018 and the outstanding contribution from members within the region. Thank you to all our members who have contributed to this newsletter. Your contributions help to communicate our work in a way that is relatable, meaningful and engaging. We appreciate your time, enthusiasm and commitment. This December Issue showcases our OCIES 2018 Conference, held at Victoria University of Wellington in Aotearoa New Zealand from 19th-22nd November. For those who were unable to join us in Wellington this year, we hope that the photos and reflective pieces will help you to feel part of this inspiring, engaging and relational conference. Thank you to Professor Kabini Sanga and his wonderful conference team for working tirelessly to make this conference such a success. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou. Our New and Emerging Researchers Fono (NERF) launched at OCIES 2018 and page 14 provides highlights of this well attended event. As we look towards 2019, page 15 details a Call for Papers for a special issue of the International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives. This special issue is specifically designed to support OCIES New and Emerging Researchers towards publication. Stay tuned for further updates in 2019 as NERF launches other events and opportunities to support and further strengthen our OCIES New and Emerging Researchers community. This December Issue also turns our focus towards the 2019 World Congress of Comparative Education Societies Conference (WCCES) held in Cancun, Mexico in May 2019. We hope that OCIES members will join us in Cancun to contribute towards the conversation about ‘The Future of Education’. See pages 5 and 23 in this issue for further details and the Call for Proposals. At our recent OCIES AGM, we signaled some changes to the OCIES Executive Committee. We say farewell to Dr Matthew Thomas who has served as the OCIES Secretary for the past three years. His dedication, insight, efficiency and genuine desire to see the Society flourish will be greatly missed. Thank you Matthew for your years of transformative service to OCIES. We warmly welcome Professor Robin Burns into the position of OCIES Secretary and are thrilled that she will continue to build on Matthew’s great work (you can read more about Robin on page 3). Finally, after a thoroughly enjoyable two years of developing and editing our OCIES newsletter, it is time for me to step aside to continue to build other aspects of our OCIES communications platforms. It gives me great pleasure to welcome Wendy Choo, who was elected to the newly established role of newsletter editor at our OCIES AGM. You can turn to page 4 to read more about Wendy. I look forward to working with Wendy in 2019 as she further develops and strengthens our OCIES newsletter. We wish you, your family and loved ones a restful, safe and joy-filled Christmas and holiday season, Ngā mihi nui, Dr Donella Cobb OCIES Communication Officer

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Introducing Professor Robin Burns OCIES Secretary My varied professional life started with a BA (hons) and an MSc in Psychology (visual perception), moving to a tutorship in Anthropology and Sociology following representing Australia at the World University Service (WUS) general assembly in Dar-esSalaam in 1966, then trying to pursue my concern for development assistance, largely fostered by WUS and involvement with the new university in Papua New Guinea, by joining the Department of Foreign Affairs as a diplomatic cadet. The 3 years with FA taught me the meaning of gender discrimination, as the only female cadet that year, unequal pay and with no possible postings to the Third World as it was then known. After postings to Germany and Eire, La Trobe University School of Education took me into its developing multidisciplinary Centre structure where I discovered Comparative Education and stayed there for the next 27 years. Involvement in ANZCIES from its inauguration led to the honour of becoming President for 1983-5 and with Barry Sheehan, running the Women and Education conference for the Society in 1984. Continuing my involvement with WUS both nationally and internationally, I undertook a survey for them of development education in nine developed countries, and extended this to a detailed comparative study of Australia and Sweden for my PhD at La Trobe. My teaching included courses on Education in Papua New Guinea, The Anthropology of Education, Multicultural Education, Education in Sweden, Education in Developing Countries and Social Education for a Changing World. Our BEd student base changed and I did too, adding Women and Development, and after a Master of Public Health, courses on Women’s Health and Women, Psychology and Psychologists and was seconded parttime to Monash Medical School to teach in the MPH program.

The School of Education underwent drastic changes, colleagues retired and suddenly Comparative Education faded away. Reviving an old interest in science, and the sociology of knowledge, my last project investigated “Doing scientific work in the field: an investigation of the epistemological and socio-cultural aspects of scientific fieldwork in remote locations” which was a great excuse to undertake participant observation on an Antarctic base, a field station in the Namib Desert, an archaeological expedition to Uzbekistan and tracking snow leopards in the Altai Republic. Publications include 35 refereed journal articles, 50 book chapters, 20 miscellaneous monographs and articles, co-editing with Tony Welch Contemporary Perspectives on Comparative Education, with Robert Aspleslagh Three Decades of Peace Education around the World, and my last book, ‘Just tell them I survived!’ Women in Antarctica. After a long gap following early retirement, I am delighted to be back in the exciting Comparative and International Education community in Oceania. I am married, no children, one cat.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Introducing Wendy Choo OCIES Newsletter Editor Kia ora! I’m Wendy Choo, a doctoral candidate at the University of Auckland and I'll be the incoming Newsletter Editor. My current research looks at citizenship in Myanmar and seeks to understand how citizenship is produced in conflict-affected, postcolonial states. I was a history teacher in Singapore for 8 years and worked in the Singapore Ministry of Education for two years focusing on inservice teacher professional development. I also worked in Lao PDR for six months prior to my studies in New Zealand and really enjoyed the experience of working in Southeast Asia, a region that I studied and taught as part of history education in Singapore. OCIES 2018 was my first OCIES conference and I thoroughly enjoyed it, as well as the people I met at the conference. I look forward to learning from Donella about the work of a newsletter editor and to learning about you through your sharied committment to the OCIES community. Ka kite anō au I a koutou!

Thank you Dr Matthew Thomas OCIES Secretary 2016 – 2018 At our OCIES AGM and Conference Dinner we said thank you and farewell to Dr Matthew Thomas who has stepped down from his role of OCIES Secretary. Matthew held this role for the past three years and has been instrumental in the revitalisation of OCIES. Thank you Matthew for your years of hard work and your tireless service. We wish you all the best for your future endeavours.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

WCCES Update

OCIES is a member society of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES). In 2018, the OCIES engagement with WCCES has been active, collaborative and leaderful. Briefly, the following are reported: 1. Early in the year, the OCIES co-presidents sent introduction letters to our neighbouring society presidents; and further made connections in-person with some who attended the WCCES Executive Committee meeting. 2. I was appointed as the OCIES rep to WCCES and became a member of the WCCES Executive Committee. Eve Coxon continued as the WCCES Bureau Member-At-Large. 3. In June at Johannesburg, I represented OCIES at three events: WCCES 53rd Executive Committee Meeting, the WCCES Retreat and the WCCES 1st Symposium & the 5th IOCES Conference. Eve Coxon was unable to attend due to South Africa visa delays. 4. WCCES President Prof N’Dri Assie-Lumumba launched The Journal (GCE vol. 2, 1.) & The Chronicle (vol. 2, 2). A number of OCIES members contributed to the GCE and Eve Coxon’s contribution was acknowledged at the launching. 5. Had discussions with Dr Kanishka Bedi (President of IOCES) and his colleagues about possibilities for working together with OCIES. 6. Eve Coxon was appointed by President Prof N’Dri Assie-Lumumba as a member of the Task Force on Congress Periodicity, Bidding Cycles and Number of Hosts. A report has been tabled but is yet to be discussed by the EC. There are implications for OCIES if planning to bid for a future congress. 7. OCIES contributed US$2K towards the WCCES Congress travel fund to support financially constraint constituent societies. 8. Actively participated in and maintained communication and consultations with WCCES secretariat throughout 2018. Kabini Sanga (OCIES rep in the WCCES Executive Committee) November 2018

XVII World Congress of Comparative Education Societies The XVII World Congress of Comparative Education Societies will be held May 20-24, 2019 in Cancún, Mexico. Please visit http://2019worldcongress.org/ for full conference information and the Call for Proposals. Please note, proposal submissions close 31st December 2018. We would love OCIES members to attend this conference. Please let us know if you are planning to attend (ocies.org@gmail.com).

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

46th Annual OCIES Conference 2018 Conference Highlights Over 130 researchers, educators and practitioners from 25 countries gathered from 19th –22nd November at Victoria University of Wellington for the 46th OCIES conference. The conference theme Exploring, celebrating and deepening Oceanic relationalities encouraged reflection on the gains, challenges, and possibilities of strengthening people-relationalities in our changing times. Presentations reflected our shared commitment to post-coloniality, deimperalisation, the recognition of Indigenous rights, social justice, sustainability and people-enablement. Conference delegates were welcomed onto the Victoria University of Wellington with a powhiri at Te Herenga Waka Marae. Delegates experienced a traditional karanga (call onto the marae), whaikōrero (speeches) and waiata (song). Following the formalities, Paul Meredith, the Executive Officer from the Office of the Deputy VC Maori, at the Victoria University of Wellington shared the rich history and stories of prominent Māori ancestors told in the poupou (carved figures) and tukutuku panels (woven panels). We were then treated to a hakari (afternoon feast) at the wharekai (dining hall). Throughout the conference, over 100 papers, panel presentations, talanoa and tok stories took place. These papers prompted rich engagement and invigorating discussion around key ideas and the conference theme. We were treated to three outstanding keynote speakers. Professor Vilsoni Hereniko encouraged us to engage in ‘relational flexibility’ by embracing multiple knowledge systems. Associate Professor Joanna Kidman gave a stirring keynote that challenged us to engage in intellectual soul searching within our field. Finally, Dr Michelle Johannson used spoken word, music and dance to demonstrate the power of ‘restorying’ through embodied literacies.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

46th Annual OCIES Conference 2018 Conference Highlights Continued

The conference dinner was held at the stunning Te wharewaka function centre and proved to be a highly memorable night. We enjoyed a Māori-style buffet and were entertained with performances by students from the Whitireia (Polytechnic) Performing Arts School who treated us to music and dance from the Pacific. Much to our delight, they even invited OCIES members to join in! The evening acknowledged and honoured the work of OCIES elders and past Executive Committee members – Larry Saha, David Small, Helen Hill, Robin Burns, Brian Denman, Eve Coxon, Ritesh Shah and Alex McCormick. We also said farewell to Matthew Thomas who concluded his role as OCIES Secretary. What a wonderful way to recognise the great work of those who have contributed to the Society over the past 46 years! Our heartfelt thanks to conference organisers Dr Martyn Reynolds (programme co-convener), Dr Stephanie Doyle (programme co-convener), Dr Adreanne Ormond, Ali Glasgow, Maggie Flavell (doctoral candidate), Louise Falepau (doctoral candidate), Jianfeng Cheng (doctoral candidate), Stella Watta (conference manager), and Kabini Sanga (conference convener). This team has worked tirelessly to provide an engaging, hospitable and well-organised conference. We appreciate all of the work that you put into making this conference so memorable. Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou. Conferences offer lots of opportunities. Quiet conversations over coffee with new friends, a chance to use the two words you know in someone else’s tongue, ideas which reshape your own, words of inspiration and challenge: OCIES 2018 had all that and more. It was a space for emotional engagement, for the meeting of hearts and the exchange of stories. It was a time to learn to know others so as to know oneself better. Behind the joys of any conference sit long hours reading abstracts, developing timetables, crafting calls for participants and requests for keynotes, time spent wondering who will come. The reward is to see dreaming actualised on the ground. At OCIES 2018, right from Vilsoni’s presentation, relationality was the conference core, intentionally embedded in practice, embroidered in words, and celebrated. Thanks goes to all who brought themselves and their various contributions to join us at VUW. You gave body to what we imagined and left your breath of life with us. Dr Martyn Reynolds (OCIES 2018 conference committee)

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

The OCIES Waka (Canoe) At the 2018 OCIES in Wellington, the AGM officially adopted the OCIES waka (MÄ ori for canoe) as the OCIES taonga (valuable) and symbolic representation. A waka symbolizes purpose (engagement, voyaging, journeying) and direction (visions, dreams, futures) towards newer shores, territories, spheres and more hopeful communities. A waka is created. It is designed, shaped, re-shaped, repaired and co-constructed through time. The OCIES waka and its journeying are ours to create, care for and re-create. A functioning waka bears the marks of past journeys; telling stories of yesterday, of worlds conquered, mistakes made and offering lessons from which to learn. In time, a waka represents endurance and commitment; giving hope, renewing strength and inviting newer travellers to build on their genealogical roots and histories. As one journey ends, another begins. Waka journeying is integrated, overlapping and adaptive. One is a launch pad to other journeys. A waka straddles seas and lands. At times a waka is beached, allowing for newer or other land journeys to be pursued. In this sense, the OCIES waka straddles and connects different worlds. Oceania connects, communicates and enlarges understanding. The OCIES waka is ceramic (modern and durable for international border-crossing). Its artwork is oceanic. The OCIES waka is open and spacious, inviting, welcoming, inclusive and peopleprivileging. It has no permanent or reserved seats. An Oceanic community of mind are invited to bring their own paddles, take their places within the OCIES waka and journey together as a community of educators, scholars and researchers. Kabini Sanga (co-President), November 2018

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES 2018 Conference Reflection

OCIES 2018 reflection 46th

The Annual OCIES Conference 2018 has been an amazing experience for me as a Pacific scholar and an emerging researcher. As a first time-attendee, I found this space intellectually enriching and culturally inclusive. I had the opportunity to meet, interact and engage with new people with great minds and ideas who are experts and professionals in different disciplines and who work in different institutions and organisations in the Oceania region and other parts of the world. – people who are interested in relationalities within diverse-philosophical perspectives and contexts. I had the opportunity to engage in discussions on various topics and issues around the Oceania region and to reflect on the gains, challenges and possibilities of our changing times. The conference has opened a whole new page of a new chapter in my life. I had the opportunity to share the stories of women in my society who are disadvantaged and marginalized and continue to live in silence because of difficult circumstances. I have been challenged to share the stories that have been a part of me, so that the voice of this marginalized group can be heard. The OCIES space has given me the opportunity to share these stories. My greatest hope is that one day this silence will be disrupted, and that, these women can live freely and enjoy the same basic human rights as all people. I am truly grateful for the hard work of the Organising Committee and the Executives who have worked to make the 46th OCIES conference a successful one. I have been inspired and motivated by the words, speeches and the hard work of some great people who are our role models in the OCIES space. I am also grateful to those who have made it possible for me to attend OCIES 2018. It is indeed an unforgettable experience. Tenkiu olgeta, thank you olgeta wansolwara. Thank you everyone, Thank you people of the same Ocean. Alice Yenas Postgraduate Student, The University of Waikato

OCIES 2018 an experience beyond an academic conference The opportunity to be at OCIES 2018 has broadened my perspective about the academic life. Inspired me to keep going, inspired me to know more and, inspired me to persevere. OCIES provided me with a dip into local culture and a deepening academic knowledge through the wealth of works that have been shared. A democratic, inclusive and sensitive meeting, I say this, because even as a doctoral student I was welcomed and integrated in all times and in all spots. In addition to many things that brightened OCIES 2018, I highlight some episodes that made this a remarkable conference. Starting with the nobility and kindness of being welcomed us for MÄ ori powhiri. Moreover, the next day we had the opening lecture, where the gentle and admirable Professor Vilsoni Hereniko has led us to a deep reflection on the premise of being connected to each other. An incomparable moment was the night where they were offered us a dinner full of cultural experiences and opportunities for new friendships. In the end, a lecture with songs of hope where Dr. Michelle Johansson shared with us her project full of life, knowledge, and achievements. Hence, OCIES 2018 becomes for me, an academic, emotional and social experience that I will take throughout my life and for my beloved Brazil. Adriane Matos de Araujo State University of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil Sydney, December 5th 2018.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES 2018 Conference Reflection

Held by land and water

A Reflection on the OCIES Conference in Wellington By Sarah Jane Moore

Held by land and water we skimmed black stones and gathered. As flotsam and jetsam As foam. Fresh. Salty. We breathed in Breathed out. Together we offered up our flax And busy hand wove stories; wrapped stones. In unison We cherished. In unison We embraced the other.

Fellowships and Networks News

And we sang.

Our thoughts to the circle

Our songs to the land We listened We learned Loved and left Ripples to reflect and Waves to return.

My name is Sarah Jane Moore and my two children and I visited Aoteroa New Zealand, Wellington for the OCIES Conference in November. I graduated with my PhD in Reconciliation through music and art from the University of Sydney in 2016 and as an early career researcher welcomed the notion that the conference offered a development day. I found the opportunity to focus on my writing, my trajectory and my research journey nourishing. Time and time again over this day I was asked What is your passion? Where lies your heart? Where is your niche? Having the time, the space and the place to wonder these things safely and with support was a gift to me as I navigate motherhood, research, teaching and creative arts practise. The first day was doubly special because my family and I were welcomed by traditional owners and heard the stories of the carvings, learned the significance of the Maori cultural space and shared personal perspectives and Indigenous learnings from wise local folk who shared with great generosity and spirit. I carry these stories with me, as do my children and it was a conference highlight for us. The conference was a learning space where children were welcomed and included and in this way the conference was transformational for my family and had great impact. The key notes over four days provided strong discussions and difficult conversations and I appreciated the opportunity to be there to hear them. In this age and time of recorded lectures, digitised learning and non-real time academia, this work was up close, it was personal and it was face-to-face; nose-to-nose. The conference also provided me with the opportunity to offer an active, creative arts weaving and storysharing workshop to interested participants. Those who attended did so with wholehearted generosity. Robin Burns reflected in an email to me on my return; I am still amazed at the creativity, openness and enjoyment at the conference last week. I especially wanted to make contact again with you and say that after your great workshop, for the very first time I think I understand the concept and importance of country. I felt it working with you and the others and the materials. 10 Thank you so much!


OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES 2018 Conference Reflection A Collective Account

We are Anh Ngoc Trinh – PhD student, University of Canterbury, New Zealand; Hang Nguyen – PhD student, University of Melbourne, Australia; and Tho Vo, PhD student, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. We are all new Vietnamese researchers, working on different aspects of higher education. The 46th OCIES conference has left us with a deep impression of, and great affection for, OCIES. This has ignited us to share a collective account where we dedicate our individual thoughts about what the conference means to us. •

To me, OCIES is my special ‘home’ where I have found my ‘inner–self’ through developing a strong sense of belonging, engagement and commitment. As a real member, I am a small but valuable piece of the very large, dynamic, magnificent masterpiece of the Comparative and International Education landscape. In the cosy and closely-knit OCIES house, this conference was my home journey where I kept myself occupied with academic and social encounters with high sprit of inquiry, compassion, and acknowledgement. I saw myself more thoroughly in relation to familiar members and new ones, as well as in my connection with the diversity of others. My mind-set, heart-set, and hand-set were reinforced in a multi-dimensional way. My academic and social values of diversity, equity, and inclusion have been truly embraced and cherished in OCIES. (Anh Ngoc Trinh – PhD student, University of Canterbury, New Zealand)

OCIES 2018 conference was a wonderful experience that strengthened the relationalities among oceans, cultures, and hearts. It offered me a feeling of connectedness – a community where the scholars, experienced supported the inexperienced, where cultures met and embraced in respect and harmony. I was academically engaged with the New and Emerging Researcher Fono, keynote addresses, and parallel sessions as much as activities such as the Māori powhiri/welcome and a visit to the Te Herenga Waka Marae that fostered my understanding of Maāori culture. The conference made me think of who I am and how to live a life with meaningful contribution to knowledge and wisdom. I was inspired to reflect on my life, my journey, and my becoming in the future with more connection to the OCIES community. research (Hang Nguyen – PhD student, University of Melbourne, Australia) •

The conference was an unforgettable event as it offered me an array of first-time experiences in my life. For the first time I saw many tears dropping down when people shared with each other the same passions in academia. Never before had I attended a paper presentation without slides and discussions, but participants sitting on the floor and telling their life stories. The highlights of the conference were not only academic but also social. I could keep abreast of the recent approaches or trends in research (such as Asia as a method, tok stori, comparative and international education) and get the new ideas in teaching (like embedding creativity and integrating technologies into classroom activities). Also I was impressed by opening and closing ceremonies and the conference dinner where I could socialise with a diverse group of people and expose to cultural beauties of the Māori and islanders across the Pacific ocean. The OCIES conference has energised and inspired me as an emerging researcher to follow up with new contacts in academia, establish collaborations and think about new ways of approaching my academic career. (Tho Vo, PhD student, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES 2018 Conference Reflection

My reflection as a New Emerging Researcher – John Iromea

My name is John Iromea. I come from Malaita Province in the Solomon Islands. I am currently a PhD student at the University of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. I am a member of the OCIES and a New Emerging Researcher. As one of the recipients of the New Emerging Researchers Award for OCIES Conference 2018, I would very much highly acknowledge the Society for offering me such a valuable award that will always reminds me of such a remarkable achievement in my life. Without the support of the Society (OCIES), it would have been difficult for me to attend and present my Research Thesis Proposal at the Conference. Honestly speaking, it was my first time to experience and participate in such a big conference overseas among other highly qualified and experienced scholars, academics and professionals. To attend and present amongst very highly qualified and respected people with wealth of knowledge they possess is not that easy as one might think. There were actually pressures and tensions within oneself and I for one felt such atmosphere of hesitance. One has to acknowledge the fact that being a member of OCIES is a unique opportunity that has in many ways provided me with trajectory as a New Emerging Researcher to have new oceanic connections, creating network of academics, establishing strong foundation for Pacific leadership, and deepening ones understanding and acceptance of the diverse and rich societies that we represent. It is indeed, a new learning space for me as a New Emerging Researcher to be part of such a wellrecognised and well organised Society that truly made me proud. And I for one must also take this time to commend our OCIES leaders, executives (old and new), participants, new friends, and colleagues for a job well done. The success of the OCIES Conference was about everyone contributing and supporting each other. I could see and feel that spirit of togetherness, spirit of caring, spirit of sharing, and spirit of oceanic brotherhood and sisterhood. The simplicity and the humility of the experienced researchers and academia really caught my attention. I was really impressed to see such quality of leadership displayed by OCIES leaders. Finally, I must congratulate Associate Professor Kabini Sanga and his colleague of well qualified and respected OCIES Staff for organising such a unique gathering that speaks clearly of Oceanic Leadership that keeps the Oceanic flame burning and rekindling the Oceanic ember glowing. I stand to salute you all for such a lively and supportive atmosphere that all of you have showcased in one-way or the other. Thank you and wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year 2019. I hope to see you all in Samoa Conference, 2019

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES 2018 Conference Reflection

Anh Ngoc Trinh, Hang Nguyen, Tho Vo

Kabini Sanga, Michelle Johansson and Adriane Matos de Araujo

“I was really blessed to have come to the conference. I had been around the former ANZCIES but have not seen such an inspiring conference. This OCIES conference had moved the Pacific worldview to another level within the conventional university setting.” (Pacific Islands academic) “We invited OCIES members and others to come and explore, celebrate and deepen our Oceanic relationalities. Did we achieve these? Yes and more. I think we had a real feast on relationality: We talked. We danced. We sang. We cried. We were challenged. We felt uncomfortable. We were inspired. We reflected in-side out. We resolved. We’re re-committing and more.” (Conference committee member).

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Issue 3, December 2018

New and Emerging Researcher Fono Pre-conference Workshop OCIES 2018 launched of our very first OCIES New and Emerging Researcher Fono (NERF). The interest in this workshop exceeded our expectations, with over 50 participants from around the Pacific joining us for this oneday workshop – wow! As well as providing support for career development, this fono created a relational space for emerging scholars to make new friends, build networks and strengthen relationships prior to the start of this conference. Associate Professor Carol Mutch began the day by facilitating an engaging and inspiring workshop on ‘finding your niche’ and ‘designing publishing plan’. She drew activities and examples from her award-winning book Optimising your academic career’ to help emerging scholars to bring their academic trajectories into razorsharp focus. OCIES Co-president, Professor Zane Ma Rhea joined us after morning tea to share her insights on academic publishing, with a particular focus on the International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives. This followed with a panel consisting of Dr Alexander McCormick (The University of Sydney), Dr Ritesh Shah (The University of Auckland), Associate Professor Eve Coxon (The University of Auckland) and Professor Zane Ma Rhea (Monash University), who provide advice, guidance and insight for emerging scholars. After lunch we introduced a Call for Papers for a 2019 Special Issue of the International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives, which is specifically designed to support NERF scholars to publish their conference paper. Details of this Call for Papers can be found on page 15 of this newsletter or on the OCIES website (www.ocies.org). This workshop signals the beginning of an OCIES New and Emerging Researcher Standing Committee. It is our hope that through this Standing Committee we will build a strong, vibrant and supportive NERF community throughout Oceania. This Standing Committee will be a permanent fixture within OCIES, and will allow leadership and professional development opportunities for OCIES New and Emerging Researchers. As we look towards 2019 and beyond, we aim to nurture these relationships and strengthen our NERF community by creating spaces within online platforms. We intend to see the continuation of pre-conference NERF workshops in future OCIES conferences and continue to provide supportive opportunities for NERF scholars to publish from their conference papers. Stay tuned via the OCIES website, social media platforms and the OCIES newsletter for NERF updates throughout 2019. We are incredibly grateful that NERF has received such strong support from the OCIES Executive Committee and Senior OCIES academics. This pre-conference workshop was made possible because of an OCIES Fellowship and Networks Grant, which was awarded to Sonia Fonua (The University of Auckland), Daniel Couch (The University of Auckland) and Donella Cobb (The University of Waikato). This seed funding enabled us to gather our Emerging Researcher community together at no extra cost to participants. We are also extremely thankful to Carol Mutch, Zane Ma Rhea, Eve Coxon, Ritesh Shah and Alex McCormick who invested in our professional learning and career growth throughout the day. Thank you for your unwavering support and your ongoing belief in us. Finally, we are so thankful for every ‘NERFer’ who attended the day. We hope you continue to engage with us throughout 2019 as we work to see our NERF community continue to strengthen and grow.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES New and Emerging Researchers Fono Call for Papers Special Issue: Exploring, Celebrating and Deepening Oceanic Relationalities In a world which is increasingly both interconnected yet individualistic, the need to explore, celebrate, and deepen relationalities in, and through, education has become more evident. These relationalities exist in, and between, various actors, contexts, and scales, and presents possibilities as well as challenges. As a society of scholars from Oceania, we are aware of our moral imperative to explore these possibilities and challenges in a manner which reflects our shared commitment to people-enablement, post-coloniality, deimperialisation, the recognition of Indigenous rights, social justice, and various forms of sustainability. The guest editors of this special issue of International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives invite extended abstracts that explore, celebrate and deepen relationality in, and beyond, Oceania. We invite extended abstracts that consider how Comparative and International Education can contribute, theoretically, practically, and spiritually to education at global, regional, national, and community levels. We also welcome extended abstracts that challenge existing Comparative and International Education knowledge and research approaches, and those which seek to develop new knowledge and practice. Key dates Call for abstracts: Opens 19th November 2018 Abstract submissions due: 21 January 2019 Authors notified by: 18th February 2019 Manuscript deadline: 26th April 2019 Submission Policy Authors: The lead author must be an OCIES member and an Early Career Researcher. Timeline: Extended abstracts must be submitted on Monday 21st January 2019. Maximum length for abstracts is 1000 words. The abstracts should address the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

How is the paper relevant to special issue theme of Exploring, Celebrating and Deepening Oceanic Relationalities? A description of the context or setting for the work reported in this article A summary of the substantive literature drawn on for the article A description of the theoretical or conceptual framework adopted in the article For reports on empirical work, the extended abstract must include a description of research methods (including approaches to data analysis and ethical considerations) A summary of the article’s main claims and/or findings How original is the contribution? What do we learn that we did not know, and why is it important? Implications for policy, research, and/or practice arising from the work

Authors will be notified of outcome of proposals by Monday 18th February 2019. Details of the formatting requirements will be sent with notification of acceptance of abstract. Full articles due: Friday 26th April 2019. Please note: The editorial team reserves the right to accept or reject extended abstracts. Acceptance of the extended abstract does not guarantee acceptance of the draft or final article. Full articles must be print ready and in IEJ:CP format when submitted by 26th April 2019. Please submit extended abstract via email to s.fonua@auckland.ac.nz by CoB on Monday 21st January 2019 with ‘IEJ:CP Extended Abstract’ as the email subject heading. You will receive confirmation by return email that your extended abstract has been received. Sonia Fonua, Daniel Couch and Donella Cobb (Guest Editors)

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Visioning OCIES As part of efforts to develop a vision statement for OCIES and establish practical strategies for the realisation of that vision, a conversation was held with members and non-members present at the OCIES conference following the conference powhiri. Over 25 people attended and we were fortunate to have many people who were relatively new to OCIES. This brought a fresh perspective and created the opportunity for ideas and terminology, which may be assumed as understood, to be highlighted and unpacked. Valuable input had also been received via email from several OCIES elders who were not able to attend the conference. Overall, those in the conversation felt connected to the ideas expressed in the vision and agreed with the strategies suggested. Understanding Oceania, and OCIES as a “community of heart and mind”, rather than a geographical territory was highlighted. How we communicate that understanding effectively is a key challenge posed by those in the conversation. The group identified the need to improve the accessibility of the language in the current statement. Clear, plain-language communication about the Society and what we stand for, without assuming shared understanding of key terms or concepts, was identified as a need. Articulating on our website or in other forms, OCIES’ understanding of terms such as comparative education, relationality, wisdom was recommended. Those in the conversation, as well as some of the feedback received from those not able to attend, raised the question of how to ensure the language of Oceania is as encompassing, and those who may not immediately identify with the term are able to still connect with OCIES. For example, complementing Oceania with the use of ‘pan-Pacific’ was suggested as one way to bring in those within our region but who may not identify with the former term. Removing reference to “the” Oceanic worldview was also noted, as there is not just one Oceanic perspective. The importance of recognising life-long education was also highlighted – the Vision statement’s reference to children and young adults only should be expanded to promote life-long education. Those in the conversation valued a statement that embraced diversity and communicated OCIES as unique, in place of any sense of competing with other societies, as current phrasing such as ‘second to none’ indicates. As a group we recognised that taking the strategies into more practical steps and actions is a necessary next step; the ambitious, inclusive and empowering language of the strategies was seen to create opportunities for members to come up with a variety of ideas to implement them. That said, some of the strategies were felt to be overly ambitious and may inspire more action by members if they were pitched at a more achievable scope. That our target audience is the scholarly community was emphasised and suggested as needing to be kept in mind as we consider the language of the statement. At the same time, interaction between academics, practitioners and teachers was something that those in the conversation suggested strengthening in the statement. The opportunity to strengthen collaboration in the Primary and Enabling strategies was highlighted through the conversation. Collaboration between universities in Oceania, informal and formal networking, using the journal to support greater ongoing collaborations, supporting OCIES member networking more through the website and through grants were all suggestions raised. The relationship to WCCES, and opportunities to link up with and also ‘piggy-back’ off other international societies was identified as needing to be stronger in the primary and enabling strategies. The emphasis on mentoring was valued by those in the conversation, and practical ways of supporting this particularly through the journal and conferences were suggested. Overall, it was a rich discussion, one we look forward to continuing into 2019. Thank you to all who joined the conversation and contributed your heart and mind to the vision. Next steps for us as a team are to recruit more members to the task! Please do get in touch if you want to contribute to taking forward these ideas for OCIES – this can be in any form, contributing to the finalisation of the statement, taking forward specific strategies, or just sharing your ideas with us. We will communicate with members again in the new year on how we are taking forward this work. Vision team Donella Cobb and Rebecca Spratt

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Celebrating our OCIES 2018 Emerging Scholars Recipients Congratulations to the following OCIES 2018 Emerging Scholars recipients who were celebrated at our OCIES AGM : Anh Ngoc Trinh Yagya Raj Pant Rachel Bleeze John Iromea Noah Romero Liberty Pascua

Canterbury University University of Auckland University of Adelaide University of Sydney University of Auckland University of Sydney

OCIES Co-president Kabini Sanga awarding recipients Rachel Bleeze, John Iromea, Liberty Pascua, Yagya Raj Pant, and Anh Ngoc Trinh CIES Treasurer Rebecca Spratt holding the award for Noah Romero.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Introducing the OCIES 2019 Conference The National University of Samoa

The Faculty of Education at the National University of Samoa (NUS) will be hosting the 47th OCIES 2019 conference in Samoa. At the official closing of the 46th OCIES 2018 conference the host Victoria University Wellington conducted a handover ceremony for closure. The honorable Luamanuvae Dame Winnnie Laban an NUS senior council member received the handover from VUW. She was supported by the NUS staff members, Fuaialii Dr Tagataese Tupu Tuia, Alo Dr Silia Pausisi, Niusila Faamanatu-Eteuati, Honiara Salanoa, Moana Petaia and Alovale Sau. As the National University of Samoa representatives to the conference, we would also like to extend our sincere appreciation to the host University (VUW) for all the conference preparation, especially the Powhiri and the handover ceremony. OCIES has added a handover ceremony to its’ annual conference programme, which also marked a new beginning for our OCIES future conferences. As your host for the 47th OCIES 2019 conference, the Faculty of Education and the National University of Samoa will ensure that next year’s conference will be as good as the one at Victoria University of Wellington. We look forward to seeing you all there at the beautiful islands of Samoa, which is known to the Pacific as the Paradise.

Fuaialii Dr Tagataese Tupu Tuia, Luamanuvae Dame Winnie Laben and Alo Dr Silia Pausisi

By Fuaialii Dr Tagataese Tupu Tuia.

Alovale Sau, Honiara Salanoa, Alo Dr Sila Pausisi, Luamanuvae Dame Winnie Laben, Moana Petaia, Fuaialii Dr Tagataese Tupu Tuia, and Niusila Faamanatu-Eteuati

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES News Bites New Issue of International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives Now Available! Volume 17(3), 2018 This Special Issue, edited by Dr Philip Chan, Dr Hongzhi Zhang and Professor Bob Teasdale explores ‘dialogues about the local and global in education’. This Special Issue showcases the work of OCIES Early Career Researchers, and can be viewed via the OCIES website (www.ocies.org/iejcp/

Calling all reviewers! We are looking for reviewers to help us review articles for International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives. If you are interested, please visit https://openjournals.library.sydney.ed u.au/index.php/IEJ/user/register to register your interest. Don’t forget to tick the ‘reviewer’ box at the bottom of the form.

Fellowship and Network Grant Funding The purpose of the OCIES Fellowship and Networks Programme is to support the exchange of ideas and work between educators, researchers and education policy actors. Grants of up to AUD $5,000 are available to enable individual researchers and/or groups of researchers to undertake collaborations or networking initiatives between institutions and OCIES members. The next round of Fellowship and Network grants will close on 1st February. Visit https://ocies.org/fellowships-and-networks-program/ for further details.

Do you follow OCIES on Social Media? Did you know that we send out regular updates via Facebook and Twitter? Keep up-to-date with the latest news and information by following us on social media and/or subscribing to our email updates. Visit our website to find out how! www.ocies.org

Have you read the latest issue of Global Comparative Education? This issue is packed full of articles from OCIES members. Visit www.theworldcouncil.net to view.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

New Books and Media by OCIES Members

Optimising your academic career: Advice for early career scholars By Carol Mutch Winner of the 2018 ‘Teacher Resource in Tertiary’ Category at the CLNZ Education Book Awards Beginning a new career as an academic is a daunting task. Carol Mutch’s latest book aims to demystify the process by providing new and intending academics with an insight in what to expect. The book is based around the real-life concerns and questions that were raised by the early career academics she worked with in her innovative Emerging Scholars Forum. Her advice is based on over 30 years in New Zealand’s tertiary sector in a range of teaching and leadership positions. It is supplemented by words of wisdom from early career academics and their more experienced colleagues from a range of tertiary institutions and disciplines. The book answers many of the questions you would expect, such as, how do you secure an academic position, how do you find a mentor, how do you develop your teaching, and how do you prepare a research plan? The answers include many practical examples, tips, and questions to consider. The three main aspects of an academic’s job description— teaching, research and service—are covered in depth and often in ways that challenge misconceptions. The book concludes with a chapter on managing the many conflicting demands of being an academic and then provides suggestions for setting up an Emerging Scholars Forum. Mutch reiterates that life as an academic has its challenges but it also has its advantages and responsibilities. She reminds her readers that as an academic you can use your position to make difference to those around you and to wider society. As one of the early career academics says in the book, “Academic life is a privilege—enjoy it and value it.” For more information, visit: https://www.nzcer.org.nz/nzcerpress/optimising-your-academic-career

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Beyond Oceania An update on Comparative and International Education activities beyond our Pacific shores Call for papers - Indigenous self-determination in a ‘chronically mobile’ world: Critical perspectives from anti-racist scholars of migration and mobility Journal: Studies in Social Justice-https://journals.library.brocku.ca/index.php/SSJ/index Issue Editors Soma Chatterjee, PhD. Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, York University; Tania Das Gupta, PhD. Professor, Department of Equity Studies, York University In a world of ‘accelerated dispossession’ (McNally, 2013), the right to migration is often a key pathway for freedom, albeit one that is unequally accessed by dominant and subaltern actors. And yet, the exercise of this right (e.g., via cross-border migration and subsequent justice claims) risks compromising the rights of Indigenous peoples who are internally displaced. As Dean Saranillio (2013) compellingly put it in the context of Hawaii: “the avenues laid out for immigrants’ success and empowerment are paved over native lands and sovereignty”. However, in the contemporary global order immigrants, migrants and refugees continue to meet Indigenous nations in contested geopolitical territories, and are faced with the complex responsibility of carving out a workable and just co-existence. It is in this context of world-wide migratory movements and ongoing occupations that we situate this special issue. More than a decade has passed since Bonita Lawrence and Enakshi Dua (2005) signaled the necessity for more research on conflicts and collaborations between Indigenous and anti-racist justice (see also, Dhamoon, 2014; Jafri, 2012; Phung, 2011, Sehdev, 2011). More recently, Chickasaw scholar Jodi Byrd (2011) contemplated whether “… arrivants and other people forced to move through empire” could exercise their democratic justice claims without pushing Indigenous dispossession ‘toward a vanishing point’. Alongside and following such field-defining interventions highlighting the tensions and contradictions between anti-racist (which we understand to be a political position encompassing immigrant, refugee and broader diaspora issues) and Indigenous justice projects, a range of scholars have also drawn crucial attention to their separation as notnatural, but constitutive of settler colonial capitalist nationalism (Chatterjee, 2018a, b, Day, 2016; Mamdani, 2012; Sharma, 2010, 2012, 2015; Stanley et al, 2014; see also Bakan, 2008; Bannerji, 2005; Coulthard, 2013; Sharma & Wright, 2008; Left Turn, 2007 etc.). As such, the proposed special issue seeks to explore how anti-racist scholars, educators, and activists grapple with Indigenous self-determination as they conceptualize social justice in a world that Anthropologist Lisa Malkii (1992) evocatively called ‘chronically mobile’. What are their theoretical, epistemological and methodological considerations with regards to the political citizenship of migrant and refugee populations in occupied lands? Do their conceptualizations of anti-racist justice explicitly engage Indigenous selfdetermination? What are the challenges and possibilities in such engagements? To use but one example, what are the possibilities and challenges of ‘no border’ politics (a movement deeply committed to right to mobility as fundamental to migrant justice) in the geopolitical contexts of settler colonialism? Further, which are the disciplines at the front lines of these discussions and what insights (particularly interdisciplinary) could be drawn from those? Similarly, what are the views from activist frontlines which often are in productive tension with theoretical insights, or the postsecondary sector which has emerged as a key site for reconciliation? These are but a few of the questions we are interested in.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Beyond Oceania Continued An update on Comparative and International Education activities beyond our Pacific shores Call for papers Continued - Indigenous self-determination in a ‘chronically mobile’ world: Critical perspectives from anti-racist scholars of migration and mobility While rooted in an interest in Canadian anti-racist scholarship and the highly insightful debates and discussions cited above, we also invite abstracts from other sites where similar questions are being asked, and dialogues are underway (e.g., USA, New Zealand, Australia, The Pacific Islands, Norway, and parts of postcolonial South). We also bring to this special issue a resolutely interdisciplinary stance. As such, we invite contributions frominterdisciplinary migration scholarship from Sociology, the broader Migration, Transnationalism and Diaspora Studies, Geography, Critical Race Studies, Indigenous Studies, Social Work, Women and Gender Studies, Disability Studies, Politics and Governance, Literature, Equity Studies, Education, Cultural Studies, Canadian Studies, and Environmental Studies etc. We seek full-length articles, creative interventions and dispatches (see below for details on each of these). We also welcome contributions in the form of interviews and dialogues. As issue editors we plan to invite and engage discussants and/or provocateurs to further animate the conversations generated by the various contributions selected for the special issue. Submission & publication timeline & other details Please submit 250 words abstract to Soma Chatterjee & Tania Das Gupta at chatterjeedasgupta@gmail.com by 15th Dec, 2018. Please clearly indicate which of the three categories your contribution belongs to. Please do not hesitate to reach out to us if you have questions. Abstract selection: by 15th January, 2019 Final paper submission to guest editors: 31st May, 2019 Initial review by editors and invitation for double blind review: 31st August, 2019 Reviews, revisions and final completion of special issue by: July-Aug, 2020 Articles (6 – 8,000 words): Original, previously-unpublished, and fully-referenced research contributions that significantly extend knowledge in the topic called for in the special issue along substantive, theoretical or methodological lines, and which are likely to be of interest to researchers and practitioners. Articles are peerreviewed in a double-blind process. Dispatches (< 4,000 words): Reports or commentaries from the non-academic and academic spaces of social justice practice, discourse and contestation. Dispatches may report on research activities, methodological innovations, movement experiences, mobilization efforts, educational practices, social justice events and actions, etc. Their aim is to show how theory is put to work in the field and to allow practitioners to enter a dialogue with academics that not only enriches research approaches but overcomes challenges many of us face because of a historically hierarchical flow of information from academia to the field. They need not employ an academic writing style or speaking position. Dispatches will be reviewed and vetted by the editorial team, which will work with authors as necessary to help shape submissions for publication. They will not be exposed to a blind review process. Creative Interventions: Visual, aural or textual products using an aesthetic or evocative mode of address. Creative interventions will be reviewed and vetted by members of the editorial team or others with competence in the relevant areas of creative practice. They will not be exposed to a blind review process.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Beyond Oceania

An update on Comparative and International Education activities beyond our Pacific shores

XVII World Congress of Comparative Education Societies Conference Cancún, Mexico, 20-24 May, 2019 Congress Theme: The Future of Education This century started with renewed goals for the millennium and statements about global citizenship and sustainability; but there are also new issues like migration, terrorism, wars, fuel crisis, among others, that impinge upon the present but will have strong effects upon the future and deserve special thinking and action for educators. That is why we invite comparative education societies to work upon the far and the near future of education, either with a global or a local perspective. To re-think about the ends of education, to make reflections about pedagogies, about the curriculum of the future, the future profile of families and learners, or their new educational settings, or about the fate of teacher training, future scenarios portray so many topics for comparative education. Cancún is a well known cosmopolitan place with an average of 180 conferences per year and flights to the main cities of the world. The accommodation capacity and restaurants, together with the turquoise color of the seas and the white of the sands, make a great venue for our world conference. The government of the state of Quintana Roo, as well as a number of universities, together with the Sociedad Mexicana de Educación Comparada (SOMEC), are working towards providing with the nicest facilities to ease our academic work. The XVII World Congress of Comparative Education Societies in Cancún, Mexico will give you a unique opportunity to visit fantastic nearby sites, such as Chichén Itzá, recently named one of the new Seven Wonders of the World and cultural heritage of humanity by UNESCO. We invite comparative education societies, scholars, practitioners, and teachers to work upon the far and the near future of education, either with a global or a local perspective. To re-think about the ends of education, to make reflections about pedagogies, about the curriculum of the future, the future profile of families and learners, or their new educational settings, or about the fate of teacher training, future scenarios portray so many topics for comparative education. For further information visit: www.worldcces.org/

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

Beyond Oceania An update on Comparative and International Education activities beyond our Pacific shores Job opportunity Data collection/research Looking for a student of Education, Indigenous Studies, Linguistics or a related field to conduct data collection for a research project at Université de La Sorbonne, Paris 3. Job description This is a research position to enable data collection for a research project at University of La Sorbonne Paris 3. Contract duration: 3 to 5 months (negotiable to suit the successful candidate's needs) Start: negotiable to suit the successful candidate's needs Remuneration: $45 per hour of recording plus a set-up payment of $150 to include liaison meetings with the project coordinator, teachers, tutors, boarding house parents and administrative staff at a middle or secondary school of the successful applicant's choice which meets the project criteria. The expenses for a return flight in economy class will be covered should the school be located interstate. The successful applicant will demonstrate: • excellent verbal and written communication skills in English • eligibility to obtain an ochre card (Working With Children clearance) • ability to obtain an Australian Business Number • outstanding interpersonal skills • experience and motivation to work with adolescents from a wide range of Indigenous Australian and other cultures • ability to liaise with senior educators and administrative staff in a multi-cultural educational setting in a highly professional manner • experience using a voice recording device (will be provided if necessary) and transmitting the recordings online The possibility to co-author research publications and attend conferences exists. Project description – tandem learning In 2016, a pilot study was conducted at a middle and senior school in Darwin to examine the feasibility of a teacher-student tandem in language education of Indigenous boarding students at the college. Students were encouraged to teach their tutor their first language using vocabulary exercises and short texts. After the first promising results, more data is needed to further refine conclusions and recommendations to educational authorities. The data will provide the basis of analysis for a PhD thesis at La Sorbonne, Paris 3 in France. Contact For further information or to express your interest in this position: Please send a short statement of motivation, the contact details of two referees and your complete CV to: Ms Christiane Charon christianecharon.cc@gmail.com Application deadline: 31.12.2018

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 3, December 2018

OCIES Newsletter # 1, 2019 Our next issue of the OCIES newsletter will be published in April 2019. We welcome contributions from members to make our newsletter relevant, engaging and informative. In particular, we invite pieces that explore: 1. Oceanic News: Send in your 500 - 600 word contribution (and photos) of recent comparative and international activities within the region. This could include teaching, research or networking events. Don't forget to include a caption to accompany photos and the name/s of individuals. Please ensure that you have gained permission from individuals to publish their photo. 2. Beyond Oceania: Do you know of any comparative and international education conferences, gatherings or events in 2019 that are taking place beyond our Oceanic shores? If so, keep us informed. Please send information (including weblinks) to publicise these events. 3. Book publications: Let us know if you have recently published a book. Send in a photo of the cover and a short blurb. 4. Blogs: We'd love to let members know about your blog! Let us know if you have a blog that explores issues relating to comparative and international education. Please send a short blurb about your blog and the link. 5. PhD Completions: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to celebrate OCIES members who have recently completed their PhD. Please send details of your thesis title and institution. 6. Awards and Distinctions: OCIES members are a pretty talented bunch. Let us celebrate your success in our next newsletter. Please send details of any recent awards, distinctions or scholarships (this includes institutional awards, research awards and/or scholarships). Send your contributions to the Communications Officer (ocies.org@gmail.com) no later than 25th March 2019.

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Profile for OCIES

OCIES Issue 3, December 2018  

This is the December 2018 newsletter for the Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (OCIES).

OCIES Issue 3, December 2018  

This is the December 2018 newsletter for the Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (OCIES).

Profile for ocies
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