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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

                 OCIES Newsletter Issue 2, August 2017

In this issue: From the President

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WCCES Update

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OCIES Conference

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Keynote Speakers

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The University of New

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Caledonia Accommodation

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Information Emerging Scholars

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Conference Events

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About Noumea

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Fellowships and Networks News

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Project Updates

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Oceanic News

Page 18

New Books by OCIES

Page 20

members Digital Updates

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Beyond Oceania

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Upcoming Events

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News from IEJ:CP

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Newsletter – Issue 3

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From the President Warm Oceanic Greetings to All

Our Communications Officer, Dr Donella Cobb, has excelled herself yet again – the skillfulness and creativity that clearly has gone into the production of this newsletter is nothing less than awe-inspiring! (I was tempted to write “awesome” but thought that might be considered a bit ridiculous coming from one of advanced years). I have no doubt that as you proceed through the many pages that follow you will agree with me. While quite a chunk of the 20+ pages are devoted to the forthcoming annual conference (see more below), many other activities and events are also reported via words and photos – most notably the updates on our Fellowships and Networking Grants, those just granted and those still underway. Also included are sections providing information on and/or illustrating members’ works – recently published books and blogs, and IEJ-CP’s presenting of Dr Sarah Jane Moore’s visually compelling works on canvas. This newsletter thus provides powerful evidence of a vibrant and flourishing OCIES community, one well on track to achieving the two broad objectives that informed the decision less, than three years ago, to change our regional society’s name: to revitalise our society by encompassing the diversity of issues, interests, perspectives and contexts represented in Oceania; and to strengthen educational interconnectedness through collaborative CIE research and practice within and beyond the relational space of Oceania. Just a few comments about this years’ annual conference, being convened and hosted by OCIES members from the Laboratoire interdisciplinaire de recherche en éducation (LIRE) at the Université Nouvelle-Calédonie (UNC) in Nouméa, New Caledonia, from the 7th to 10th of November.

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From the President Thanks to the generous subsidising of conference costs by our UNC hosts, we have been able to keep the registration fees for the 3-day conference at the same levels as those for last year’s 2-day conference at University of Sydney (which was significantly reduced from previous years). We have also introduced a new fee category for unwaged participants. Apart from some proposals/abstracts submitted in French language, all that arrived by the deadline of July 15 have been reviewed and submitters have been informed of their acceptance or otherwise. Because a number of members were in contact shortly before the initial deadline to request an extension, the deadline has been extended out to August 10th. We look forward to many more submissions arriving for review and acceptance. What can be reported at this stage is that if all involved in the proposals accepted so far do attend, we already have close to 80 participants – from my previous experience as a convening committee member this is much higher than is usual this far ahead of the conference taking place, which is most encouraging. Also encouraging and exciting is the multiplicity of contexts, from within and beyond Oceania that will be represented among both presenters themselves and in terms of research sites referred to in presentations. Equally exciting is the extent to which out theme and thematic questions are being addressed – the potential for critical dialogue about the complex relationship between education and sustainable development, and the production of new knowledge about each of the identified dimension of sustainable development - environmental, social, cultural and economic – from local/national, regional and global perspectives, is very real. Strengthening this potential will be our three keynote speakers: Emmanuel Tjibaou, Director of New Caledonia’s Tjibaou Cultural Centre; Konai Helu Thaman, Professor of Education at the University of the South Pacific, and Roger Dale, Professor of Education at Bristol University. Each day’s programme will begin with a keynote address for which simultaneous French/English translation will be provided, and which together will provide local/indigenous, regional and global perspectives on our theme. You can read a short biography of each keynote speaker and their presentation titles a few pages over. Abstracts for each keynote address will be posted on the website in coming weeks, as will further information about events associated with the conference and on organizational matters. Many thanks to all who have contributed to this wonderfully rich account of what has been and will happening in our OCIES community – enjoy reading and viewing the excellent content, and marvel at how cleverly Donella has put it all together! Best wishes Eve

OCIES News Bite OCIES 2017 Conference Abstract Submissions Close*: 10 August (* Extended deadline)

CIE Seminar at Monash University 26th September OCIES 2017 Conference: Noumea, New Caledonia. 7-10 November. Contributions for OCIES 2017 Newsletter #3 due: 27 November

Executive Committee Positions Several Executive Committee positions, including the President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer, will come to the end of their term at the OCIES 2017 conference. Voting members are eligible to seek election for these positions. Information about these roles can be found on the OCIES website: www.ocies.org. Further information about the application process will be made available prior to the OCIES 2017 conference.

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WCCES Update

Since our last newsletter I have continued to engage in regular (and at times lengthy) WCCES bureau discussions/meetings via skype and email. The busy-ness of core officials (President/Secretary-General/Treasurer/Communications Officer in particular) in their efforts to ensure effective and efficient management of WCCES is ongoing. Noteworthy from our most recent Bureau meeting held last Wednesday (at 4-6 am NZ time!) was hearing from Vice-President Prof Marco Navarro about the preparatory work going on ahead of the next World Congress to be held in Cancun, Mexico in May 2019. Also of interest is that in early November our President, Professor N’Dri Assié-Lumumba, will attend UNESCO’s General Conference, at which Unesco’s next Secretary-General will be elected. This is a significant event for international/comparative education and our leadership views it as most important that WCCES should take up its allocated seat as a formally affiliated NGO. This work and other matters will be shared with the Presidents/duly-nominated representatives of the 41 constituent societies of the WCCES Executive Committee members at meeting to be held at l’Université de Corse (Corsica, France) from October 10-11, and key decisions will be made regarding the ongoing and future work of the organisation. I will attend the meeting in my dual roles of OCIES President and Bureau Member-at-Large and report back at the AGM in Noumea. I am pleased to report two further direct connections between OCIES members and WCCES. The first is the appointment of Professor Unaisi Nabobo-Baba (University of Guam) to serve on the Advisory Board of Global Comparative Education: Journal of the WCCES and World Voices Nexus, two new peer reviewed publications initiated by President N’Dri as chair of the recently established Journal and Newsletter Task Force (JNTF). Karistio kei na vakanuinui vinaka duadua, Unaisi. The second relates to the decision by President N’Dri and the WCCES Historian that each edition of the new journal should include a historical profile of a key CE educator. OCIES is greatly honoured that our much respected and long-term member, Professor Anne HicklingHudson, has been selected to feature in that role in the foundation edition of Global Comparative Education: Journal of the WCCES, due for publication in September - October. Wonderful news, Anne – we look forward to reading it. Eve Coxon WCCES Bureau Member-At-Large Member, WCCES Executive Committee

Proposal Submission Deadline Extended The OCIES 2017 Conference submission deadline has been extended to 10th August 2017. Please visit the OCIES website (www.ocies.org) for further details about proposal submissions.

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OCIES Conference 2017: Nouméa, New Caledonia

Key Conference Dates

Education and Sustainable Development in Oceania and Beyond 7- 10 November 2017

10 August 2017* Abstract submissions close * Extended deadline

15-July -15 August Abstract acceptance notification

1 October 2017 Conference program is finalised and available on website

5 October 2017 Registrations close

7 November 2017 Conference begins at 5 pm

10 November 2017 Conference ends at 4 pm

In 2015, ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ nations across the world signed up to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals within it. The theme of our 2017 OCIES Conference has been selected because of our belief that, two years into implementation, it is timely to consider the educational implications of the current global development agenda at regional and national levels. The twofold aim of the conference is to enhance critical dialogue about the relationship between education and sustainable development, in all its complexities, and to strengthen research relationships within and beyond our region. We are hopeful that the conference will both build on and challenge existing Comparative and International Education (CIE) knowledge and methodology, and work towards the production of new knowledge and practice. Researchers and practitioners in the field of Comparative & International Education see Education as at the heart of sustainable development and underpinning each of the SDGs. Of specific interest is how Goal 4, “To ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote life-long learning”, and its set of targets (see www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/education/) might inform education development for Oceania.

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A key concern that might arise is to question the extent to which the international development community has universalised the notion of “sustainable development” and shaped a global discourse towards it, and how this could influence education policy and practice in Oceania. Also significant for Oceania, given both its cultural diversity and the importance of maintaining and enhancing indigenous knowledge and ways of living within the region, is that SDG 4 recognises both culture’s contribution to sustainable development and the importance of respecting and learning from indigenous communities in order to promote sustainable lifeways.

Call for Proposals We are interested in presentations that explore the implications of sustainable development for education structures and processes (curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, management) at all levels (early childhood through to adult education) and of all types (formal, non-formal, informal). Also of interest will be proposals that connect education to any or all of the three dimensions of sustainable development – environmental, social, and economic. Thematic questions that you might choose to respond to include the following: 1. How relevant and/or useful are globally defined sustainable development goals and targets to regional and national aspirations and needs? What are the implications of this for debates about the purposes and intended outcomes of inclusive and quality education and lifelong earning within regional/national/sub-national contexts? 2. What is the relationship between education and sustainable development? How might the discourse and practice of sustainable development affect educational settings at any or all learning levels (early childhood to adult)? In what ways can education research and practice influence sustainable development discourse and practice? 3. In what ways should schools and other educational institutions facilitate the development of the knowledges, skills, behaviours and attitudes needed for sustainable development? What do we know/need to know about the sets of knowledge and human capabilities that Oceanic communities value as defining sustainable development? What should be taught and learned? How and in what language(s)?

OCIES invites proposals – in French or English – from researchers, policymakers and practitioners from throughout the region and beyond. We see this conference as a significant opportunity to listen to and learn from each other, to both disseminate and explore high quality academic research and share and analyse experiences of how things work in applied educational settings. Proposals must meet the submission guidelines for the chosen type of presentation: 1) Individual papers 2) Panel sessions 3) Workshops or 4) Roundtables/Talanoa. Refer to the website (www.ocies.org) for further details on submission guidelines.

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OCIES Conference 2017: Keynote Speakers

Emmanuel Tjibaou Director of the Tjibaou Cultural Center, Nouméa Presentation Title: Kanak society and its contribution to sustainable development. Born in 1976 in New Caledonia, Emmanuel Tjibaou is an ethnolinguist. He holds a master’s degree in oceanian languages from the National Institute of Oriental Languages and Civilizations (INALCO, Paris). His master’s thesis dealt with the stylistic analysis of the traditional narratives of the Hienghène region, located in the north-east of Grande-Terre (New Caledonia). Under the direction of Emmanuel Kasarhérou, then Director of the Tjibaou Cultural Center, he founded the « Heritage and Research » Department of the Kanak Culture Development Agency (ADCK), with the main mission of collecting, disseminating and promoting the immaterial Kanak heritage. The members Emmanuel Tjibaou of this research department developed their own methodology in close collaboration with the custom councils and partners in the project (UNC, IRD, EHESS, IAC). The link between culture, research and development has been refined over the years through the implementation of events highlighting the inclusion of strategies for cultural development at the heart of the exchanges in New Caledonia (Drai Ne Xen-Slow food, Dö Xöu project around the valuation of the traditional mat, implementation of ecotourism tours). Since 2012, Emmanuel Tjibaou runs the Tjibaou Cultural Center Kanak Culture Development Agency. Emmanuel Tjibaou’s keynote will address one particular aspect of the Conference overview text: "for our region, given its cultural diversity and the importance of maintaining and enhancing indigenous knowledge and ways of living within Oceania, is that SDG 4 recognizes both culture’s contribution to sustainable development and the importance of respecting and learning from indigenous communities in order to promote sustainable lifeways. Kanak society and its contribution to sustainable development.

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OCIES Conference 2017: Keynote Speakers

Professor Konai Helu Thaman Professor of Pacific Education and Culture at the University of South Pacific Presentation Title: Whose sustainable development? A Pacific perspective on education for sustainable development Konai is currently Professor of Pacific Education and Culture and was, until 2016, the UNESCO Chair in Teacher Education and Culture at the University of the South Pacific (USP). She was born and raised in Tonga where she received her primary and secondary education. She studied at the University of Auckland (BA in Geography), Auckland Secondary Teachers’ College (Teaching Diploma), the University of California at Santa Barbara (MA in International Education), and the University of the South Pacific (PhD in Education). She taught in high schools in Tonga and has been on the staff at the USP since 1974. She has researched and published widely in the Professor Konai Helu Thaman areas Pacific curriculum, teacher education, indigenous education, women and university management, and more recently Pacific research frameworks and education for sustainable development. She has held a number of management positions at the USP including the Director of the Institute of Education, Head of the School of Humanities, and Pro Vice Chancellor. She is currently a member of the Joint ILO/UNESCO Committee on the Recommendation on the Status of Teachers (CEART); a Fellow of the Asia Pacific Centre for Educational Innovations in Development (APEID) and was member of the UNESCO Asia Pacific Scientific Committee on Research in Higher Education, She is also a widely published poet whose work is studied by school children throughout the Pacific region and have been translated into several languages including Chinese, French, and German. She is married to Randy Thaman, Emeritus Professor of Biogeography at USP. They have two adult children, and three grandchildren.

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OCIES Conference 2017: Keynote Speakers

Professor Roger Dale Professor of Sociology at the University of Bristol Presentation Title: Post*-PISA/MDGs/EFA Prospects for ‘Education for Development’ Roger Dale is Professor of Sociology of Education at the University of Bristol, UK. He was previously Professor of Education at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where (together with Susan Robertson) he received a Marsden Fund award to carry out a comparison of regional organisations in Education. He was Scientific Coordinator of the EU’s Network of Experts in Sociology of Education (NESSE), and has been involved in four major EU-funded research consortia. He has presented keynote addresses in several countries, including Brazil, Finland, Cyprus, Taiwan, Hong Kong China, Australia and Portugal. His major interests focus on the critical cultural political economy of education, and comparative education. He was President of BAICE (British Association for International and Comparative Education) in 2015, and has been active in the Globalisation Professor Roger Dale and Education Special Interest Group in CIES. He is co-editor and co-founder of the journal Globalisation, Societies and Education. He has supervised around 60 doctoral theses, and examined 50+ doctoral theses in more than 30 Universities worldwide.

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OCIES Conference 2017: The University of New Caledonia

The French University of the Pacific was founded in 1987 to provider higher education for both New Caledonia and French Polynesia. In 1999, the University was divided into two independent entities: the University of New Caledonia (UNC) and the University of French Polynesia (UPF). Today, UNC is a public institution under the authority of the French Ministry for Higher Education and Research. Because of its size (3000 students) and its location, every effort has been made to create a unique campus at Nouville with an emphasis on facilities for UNC and international students to ensure their comfort and success. UNC promotes initial and continuing opportunities to learn. The university has three departments (economics, law and management; literature, languages and social sciences; science and technology), two schools (school of education and PhD school) and an institute of technology. In addition to its mission specified in the 1998 Noumea agreement, research and training activities within UNC aim to meet the needs of New Caledonian development. In particular, the Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Recherche en Éducation (LIRE) at UNC aims to develop a research in education focused on the environmental and cultural specificities which exist in New Caledonia and in Oceania. Being a French and European university in the South Pacific, the UNC’s ambition is to: * Develop a policy of co-operation in the areas of science and teaching, in conjunction with foreign universities and organisations; * Participate in the public policies of regional co-operation of both France and New Caledonia in the domains of training and research; * Encourage mobility, both incoming and outgoing, of lecturers, researchers and students; * Promote French teaching and French speaking.

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OCIES Conference 2017: Accommodation Information The convening committee members have sourced three options for various types of accommodation, at the most costeffective prices. There could be movement in the conversion rate, and thus the cost, between now and November: 1. The cheapest option is the University’s on-campus selfcontained studios and apartment. A T1 studio (price $AUD36 per night) is suitable for only one person while a T2 apartment ($AUD45) can sleep two people in separate rooms. Those who wish to book either T1 or T2 will need to email e.coxon@auckland.ac.nz stating which type and how many nights are required. Payment will then be required via bank transfer to the OCIES account as soon as the booking is confirmed. 2. The second option is the Nouvata, a large hotel located along the busy and colourful L’Anse Vata beachfront. The types of rooms listed below range from least to most expensive: Standard Room: include kitchen (fridge/microwave) facilities with pool/garden view for 1 or 2 people: $AUD93 with ocean view for 1 or 2 people: $AUD105. Comfort Room with pool/garden view for 1 or 2 people: $AUD105 with ocean view for 1 or 2 people: $AUD118. Premium Room with pool/garden view for 1 or 2 people: $AUD118 with ocean view for 1 or 2 people: $AUD130. NB: You are responsible for making your own reservation at Nouvata. In order to receive the reduced price, email either of these two addresses: commercial@glphotels.nc and/or sc@glphotels.nc and use Booking Code OCIES2017. Your reservation will be confirmed soon after it is made and payment will be expected at the time you check into the hotel. 3. The third option sourced is for very roomy and well-equipped two bedroom/two bathroom self-contained apartments at Casa Del Sole, located not far from the Nouvata. The discounted price for a four person apartment is $AUD180 per night. Those wishing to reserve an apartment at this price must do so directly through Casa Del Sole’s electronic address: commercial@casadelsole.nc and state that the booking is for the OCIES conference. PLEASE NOTE: The convenors will organise a shuttle bus to transport participants from Casa Del Sole and Nouvata to UNC each day.

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OCIES Emerging Scholar Recipients 2017 The selection committee for the Emerging Scholars Awards, available to current postgraduate members of OCIES (masters and doctoral students) and recent doctoral graduate members, met last week to consider their independent assessments and arrive at collective decisions. Given both the significantly larger than usual number of applicants – all of whom were supported strongly by supervisors or senior colleagues and the high quality of all applications, it was not an easy task deciding which six applicants should receive the scholarships. We are delighted to announce that the following six emerging scholars, in no particular order, were the successful applicants: Jonamari Floresta Sapna Sharma Jacinta Oldehaver Dr Rhonda Di Biase Yulia Nesterova Fuaialli Dr Tagataese Tupu Tuia

University of Sydney University of Auckland University of Auckland University of Melbourne Hong Kong University National University of Samoa

Particularly pleasing to note is the extent to which these six emerging scholars reflect the diversity of OCIES membership (within and beyond Oceania). Also noteworthy is that together their proposed conference papers address significant issues in CIE theory and practice in relation to the conference themes and drawing on research from a range of contexts within and beyond Oceania. Our sincere thanks also to the emerging scholars who were not successful this year – we recognise the time and thought evident in your applications and regret that we did not have more scholarships to disseminate. We hope that you are still able to come to Noumea and present your very interesting and pertinent papers, all of which have been reviewed and accepted into the conference programme. Eve Coxon (pp the selection and convening committees for the OCIES 2017 conference)

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OCIES Conference 2017: Events and Reception Dinner Welcome ceremony/reception All participants are invited to the welcome ceremony and reception on November 7th at 5pm. This will be held at the restaurant ‘1881’, which is located right opposite the university campus. You will enjoy tasty canapés and savour wonderful wine by the beach at sunset.

Conference dinner The conference dinner will be held on the 9th of November at Art et Gusto, the restaurant of the yacht club in the marina at baie de l’orphelinat. It will be an evening of pure pleasure – savouring French and New Caledonian specialties and tasting French wine in a convivial atmosphere. Information about purchasing conference dinner tickets ($AUD80) will be made available shortly on the OCIES website.

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OCIES Conference 2017: About Nouméa Nouméa is the capital city of New Caledonia. The city faces the sea and is lined with bays, beautiful beaches and magnificent views. The city offers a variety of activities including snorkeling, swimming, windsurfing, kitesurfing, golf and tennis. There are bars, clubs, restaurants and shops in downtown Noumea and Anse Vata. Alma Street, Sebastopol Street and the Promenade are great spots to visit.

Must-Sees in Nouméa Anse Vata Bay

Tjibaou Cultural Centre

Places des Cocotiers (Coconut Tree Square)

The Nouméa Isles

To find out more about Nouméa visit: http://www.newcaledonia.trav el/en/noumea

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Fellowships and Networks News Fellowships and Networks Application Deadline The next funding round for the Fellowships and Networks Grants closes 1 December 2017. Grants of up to AUD $5000 are available and must be used within a year of receiving the grant. Applicants must be current members of OCIES. Application criteria, process and examples of eligible activities can be found on the OCIES website (www.ocies.org) )

OCIES Fellowships and Networks Grant 2017 First Funding Round Recipients Thank you to all who submitted applications for the first round of the 2017 OCIES Fellowships and Networks Grant. We were able to award two successful applications. The details of these projects are detailed below:

Culture and wisdom: Talking transformation workshops/ exhibition Submitted by Dr Sarah Jane Moore, Independent Researcher, and Associate Professor Nigel Bagnall, The University of Sydney. Awarded: $1165 The Culture & Wisdom Talking Transformation project involves story telling and visual art workshops delivered at The University of Sydney by Moore and Bagnall.. The workshops give participants the opportunity to story just exactly how their work embraces Indigenous cultural wisdoms and encourages each participant to produce a canvas that symbolises their practice. An exhibition of canvases created by researchers, students and academics will be displayed in the glass cabinets in the foyer of the School of Education at the University of Sydney for one month. This exhibition will travel to Noumea and be presented at the 45th OCIES Conference. This exhibition will be added to in Noumea through similar workshops facilitated by Moore & Bagnall.

Globalising social science knowledge in Higher Education Submitted by Dr. Mousumi Mukherjee, O.P. Jindal Global University, India Awarded: $4,000 This symposium aims to establish an academic alliance between OCIES and teachers, school leadership, and researchers investigating educational issues incorporating local wisdom and theories within the South Asian context and other marginalized/colonized contexts around the world. A special issue of IEJ:CP will be published with highlighted key-note papers and workshop sessions with participating teacher and teachereducators across India. The workshop format in the second half of the one-day symposium will be designed like an action-research project. Academic experts will be able to co-author papers with teachers for policy recommendations to help design locallyrelevant teacher education programme.

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Fellowships and Networks Project Updates OCIES ECR Symposium at Monash University By Dr Hongzhi Zhang and Dr Philip Chan As the core event of our OCIES Fellowships and Networks Programme – ERC Connect: Examining Oceanic education issues in international and comparative perspective, the OCIES ERC Symposium was successfully organised on 26 th June, 2017 at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. This symposium aimed to establish an academic alliance of ECRs to investigate trans-Oceania educational issues through examining and incorporating local wisdom and theories. It also helped us to de-centre ourselves from an obsession with the West and Western knowledge, culture, theories and epistemologies. Professor Bob Teasdale (one of the programme mentors) gave the keynote speech, titled “Studying and theorising the local in education”. He shared his fascinating stories about research processes derived from a broader and cross-cultural approach, and explored implication for OCIES early career researchers. Professor Teasdale believes that the deeper values of justice and democracy lie at the heart of the local, and that we need to theorise and research the local just as much as we do the global. We cannot focus on globalisation alone. The local is equally important. Six papers were selected through a peer review process to present in this symposium. Dr Donella Cobb’s presentation challenged assumptions that open educational resources are socially neutral pedagogical platform and raised questions about the rapid implementation of open educational resources as a form of digital education aid. Dr Irene Paulsen examined important factors impacting on the university study experiences and outcomes of Solomon Islander learner in Melbourne. Dr Sarah Moore used a creative way to interpret the story of transformational educational research in Guam. Dr Tagataese Tuia presented an insightful topic about the impact of teacher education systems on pre-service teachers in Samoa. Ms Ang Ngoc Trinh, doctoral student, explored detailed patterns of localisation and types of local knowledge and wisdom infused in internationalisation of the curriculum from a New Zealand perspective. Dr Philip Chan and Dr Hongzhi Zhang conducted a significant comparative study about OCED’s Program for International Student Assessment and regional disparity in Education in Australia and China. The two mentors for this Programme (Professor Bob Teasdale and Associate Professor Zane Ma Rhea) were invited as discussants to provided many constructive comments for each presentation, which were quite beneficial and useful for the improvements of the papers.

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Fellowships and Networks Project Updates This symposium also attracted many academic staff, visiting scholars and PhD students from Faculty of Education, Monash University to join the discussions. One of the students – Miss Zijia Cheng said that “I am very honoured to be part of this excellent symposium. From this inspirational event, I realised that researchers and educators need to find the balance between local education and global education. To help students live better in the modern world, global education is significant. However, local education is the foundation, which builds students' culture and tradition. In other words, local education stands for students' identity. In my future research, I will pay more attention to look for the balance.” As the editor of the International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives, Associate Professor Zane Ma Rhea provided detailed instructions for the special issue. The papers of this symposium will be prepared for a special issue in the IEJ:CP. Furthermore, this symposium also created many potential collaborative research opportunities, such as the “evaluations of pathway programs for HDR students from small island nations in Australian and New Zealand Universities” and “pre-service student teachers’ placements across OCEANIA”. All the attendances agreed that this symposium was just a start of OCIES ERC connect. They all look forward to creating more collaborative research opportunities in the future. We concluded the symposium by enjoying a yummy dinner at a Chinese restaurant after a series of productive and fruitful presentations.

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Fellowships and Networks Project Updates A Comparative Education Seminar, Melbourne. Exploring challenges in education through innovation and collaboration By Dr Rhonda Di Biase and Rebecca Spratt A comparative education seminar was held in Melbourne on 27 July with the intention of strengthening networking opportunities as well as promoting OCIES activities amongst CIE researchers within Melbourne. About 40 people attended the event, held at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Participants were a mix of academics, research students, practitioners and those with an interest in working or researching cross-culturally. We were treated to three wonderful presentations: Professor Fazal Rizvi; Professor in Global Studies in Education, The University of Melbourne, presented on Marc-Antoine Jullien de Paris, widely regarded as the ‘father’ of comparative education’ and discussed some of the different ways in which comparative education has been conceptualized over the years and how his ideas continue to be influential. Professor David Clarke; Director, International Centre for Classroom Research, The University of Melbourne, presented on ‘Dilemmas regarding the cross-cultural comparative analysis of classroom practice’ illustrating a series of potential dilemmas in what and how comparisons are made. Dr Radhika Gorur, Senior Lecturer in Education, Deakin University, presented on her research on 'Accountability practices in the Global South' and discussed the potential implications of compliance-based accountability measures for efforts to improve the quality of education within the framework of Sustainable Development Goal 4. The presentations were followed by discussion and networking opportunities over food and drinks. Participants gathered around geographic areas of interest. Discussions were plentiful and it was a wonderfully stimulating afternoon for those who share an interest in comparative and international education. The feedback on the day indicated that it would be good to hold another event later in the year, with the view to creating ongoing opportunities for regular networking and discussion.

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Oceanic News

An update on regional activities by OCIES Members

Global Engagement Early Career Mobility Scheme By Matthew A.M. Thomas

Dr Matthew A.M. Thomas of the University of Sydney recently spent four weeks as a visiting scholar at the University of Glasgow. A grant recipient of Sydney’s Office of Global Engagement Early Career Mobility Scheme, Thomas was affiliated with the Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change. This centre within Glasgow’s School of Education is under the direction of Professor Michele Schweisfurth and aims to advance research on educational equity and development. While in Glasgow Thomas conducted research on international development discourses related to ‘teacher educators’ and how they are framed, positioned, and addressed in global reports and national policy documents. Several publications and grant applications are in process that builds on this initial work, and more information about the seminar Thomas offered in Glasgow is available through the Robert Owen Centre blog.

The University of Glasgow

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Oceanic News An update on regional activities by OCIES Members Sámi Education Conference By Associate Professor Kabini Sanga In early June 2017, OCIES member and Solomon Islander Dr Kabini Sanga of Victoria University of Wellington was a guest of the indigenous Sámi peoples at the Sámi Education Conference which was held at the Sámi University of Applied Sciences in Norway. Invited to deliver a keynote address on Indigenous peoples’ reclaiming of education for themselves, Kabini shared stories of and insights from the experiences of Pacific Islands peoples and responded to many questions from conference participants. In response to a question about what contributions indigenous research methodology might make to intercultural research, Kabini answered: “Methodologically, indigenous research offers a number of contributions for our wider global learning about research. Key among these, I think, is the potential for indigenous scholars to educate the mainstream research community about silence; its philosophical understandings, its cultural conceptualizations and its methodological justifications and applications.” Kabini argued that for indigenous peoples, “silence” is ontological; thereby requiring a different set of methodological appreciations for the knowledges which are “hidden” in silence to be discerned fully and respectfully.

Dr Kabini Sanga & Dr Ylva Jannok Nutti of Sámi University of Applied

Visit to the US and China By Professor Tony Welch Professor Tony Welch (University of Sydney) was recently in the US, for WUN meetings on the SDGs and Higher Education, as well as discussions about a possible international research projects on Refugees and Higher Education. More recently, Tony was a Plenary speaker at the Xian Jiaotong Liverpool (XJTLU) University’s Wisdome Lake Higher Education forum, in Suzhou, as well as celebrating the first of his local Ph. D. candidates to be awarded her degree at the University of Tianjin. Finally, on that China visit, he spent time working with colleagues at Tsinghua (China’s flagship university, sometimes called ‘China’s MIT’), and visiting the University’s splendid Museum, that was not only hosting a superb exhibition of modern Western Art, from the St. Etienne museum in France (that would have graced any museum, worldwide), but also browsed the Museum’s excellent collection of ceramics, as well as the extraordinary collection of recently-donated bamboo sticks, from about 300 BCE, that are illuminating aspects of governance and philosophy in Ancient China

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

New Books by OCIES Members Wisdom, Knowledge, and the Postcolonial University in Thailand By Zane Ma Rhea ▶ Lays out an epistemic map that helps in understanding the ramifications of the commodification of university knowledge ▶ Examines international, global, regionalist, and local Thai approaches to higher education ▶ Uses interview analysis to provide evidence of old and new exchanges among the education community in Thailand

This book examines Thai knowledge and wisdom from the perspective of postmodern, postcolonial globalization. Ma Rhea explores the ways in which the Thai university system attempts to balance old knowledge traditions, Buddhist and rural, with new Thai and imported knowledge. It traces the development of Thai university partnerships with outsiders, focusing on the seventy year relationship between Thailand and Australia. In comparison, it analyses the old Thai Buddhist wisdom tradition and in the final chapters proposes its worthiness as a pedagogical pathway for universities globally. Weblink: http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9781137382924

Transnationalism, Education and Empowerment: The Latent Legacies of Empire By Niranjan Casinader This book challenges the existing notion that transnationalism is

fundamentally concerned with an action; the spatial movement of people. Instead, it argues that transnationalism incorporates a mindset that has evolved over the centuries, and was psychologically manifested, if dormant, in colonised populations. Each chapter of the book focuses upon educational transnationalism as a means of empowerment for groups throughout the British Empire, and how it became, and remains, the tool for liberation by marginalised groups within formerly colonised societies. Examples will be drawn from contexts including Sri Lanka, as well its Burgher and Tamil diaspora in Australia and the United Kingdom. Weblink: https://www.routledge.com/Transnationalism-Education-andEmpowerment-The-latent-legacies-ofempire/Casinader/p/book/9781138916012)

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

Digital Updates by OCIES Members The Stories Within Blog By Dr Sarah Jane Moore www.sarahjanemoore.com.au I have a web site and a blog about the Stories Within Project. The blogs that I have published include The Stories Within Project, The Stories Within and The Island of Honour, The Impact of the Stories Within Project and The Stories within and Transformational Learning. The blogs describe the exchanges, journeys and creative ideas associated with my artistic residency at the University of Guam that took place in February 2017. The blogs share images created by University students alongside poetry and images that I have produced in response to my learning in Guam. Stories are shared and the web site also links a song that I sing in Chamorro. The song is Si Sirena and respected linguist, musician and University of Guam Adjunct Professor Joseph Franquez has been working with me in the digital space to teach me correct pronunciation and respect for his language. This digital dialogue has been an honour for me as the beauty of the language has real for me and is revitalised and invigorated through our work together. I performed the song at the Early Career Researcher OCIES Symposium at Monash University where I also shared art works and stories created in response to my experience in Guam. I will be sharing the paper Creative Wisdoms; The Story of Transformational Research in Guam and look forward to more conversations, creative journeys and collaborations and the research that will unfold as a journal article and book chapter.

Can education be used to create peace? Podcast by Dr Ritesh Shah and Associate Professor Mieke Lopes Cardozo

Teaching in Pohnpei By Dr Dean Olah

http://teachinginpohnpei.blogspot.com/

http://www.freshedpodcast.com/cardozo-shah/ In this podcast, Associate Professor Mieke Lopes Cardozo from the University of Amsterdam and Dr. Ritesh Shah from the University of Auckland ask the question: can education be used to create peace? Can it help mend long standing issues in conflict afflicted regions? They identify that education has they capacity for both positive and negative outcomes. They explore how education can resolve conflict by giving voice to under-represented groups, yet also be used as a tool by ruling elites.

My blog explores the teaching experiences, culture, students and explorations while teaching education methods courses at the national campus College of Micronesia (COM-FSM) on Pohnpei,

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

Beyond Oceania: News from the Wider Field CALL FOR PAPERS

“Education, Migration and Translation” Research Symposium, Sunday 26 November 2017 Hosted by the Centre for Global Migrations, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Keynote speaker: Professor Michael Singh (Western Sydney University) In educational contexts, those who experience or encounter migration in its many manifestations will negotiate linguistic, cultural and/or epistemological translation. Translation allows people to move between languages, social and behavioural norms, ideas, interpretations, and individual and collective meanings. However, (mis)translation also risks misunderstanding. Historically, translation and language loss have occurred alongside colonisation, and colonial relations continue in university ranking methodologies and academic publishing processes that privilege the English language. Indigenous perspectives demand attention to the purposes and outcomes of education at all levels, including the role of education in promoting both language loss and language revitalisation. Contemporary educational migrations take many forms and have a range of implications for national education systems. “Internationalisation” involves the movement of ideas, staff and students across borders, raising questions about which languages and histories “education provider” countries privilege in their course development and delivery. Internationalisation also raises questions about the translatability of course content – whether ideas grounded or developed in one socio-political context are relevant to another. Forced migrations raise questions about educational access – how national education systems can serve those from minority language groups, who may have experienced trauma, loss, and broken educational pathways. How might educational contexts be re-imagined in ways that privilege bi- and multilingualism? How might English language dominance be challenged in higher education at local and global levels? What can be learnt from existing educational spaces that privilege minoritised or indigenous languages? How might we exercise “linguistic hospitality” in a world marked by high levels of forced migration and educational mobility? What would this look like in practice? This multidisciplinary symposium welcomes proposals for 20-minute presentations that examine the connections between education, migration and translation (a further 10 minutes will be allocated for questions and discussion). The organisers welcome paper proposals on the following topics (other topics will be given due consideration): Deadline for abstracts and short biography (200–250 words): 30 July 2017 (late abstracts will be considered). Abstracts should be submitted in English, or English and another language as appropriate, to henry.johnson@otago.ac.nz The conference registration fee is $25. For those not presenting, we will need confirmation of attendance for catering purposes by 31 October.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

Beyond Oceania: News from the Wider Field CALL FOR PAPERS

First International Conference on Comparative Education 22-23 November, 2017 Lorestan University, Khorramabad, Iran We would like to invite you and your research partners to participate in the First International Conference on Comparative Education (FICCE), to be held at Lorestan University, Khorramabad, Iran, 22-23 November 2017.

FICCE aims to build an international platform that allows interested parties together to share and discuss their studies regarding all aspects of education from various comparative perspectives. Prospective authors are welcome to submit their full papers or Abstracts. All submissions to the conference will go through blindly review processes by at least two independent peers. Interesting topics are listed below for your reference only, and not limited to the following topics:

1. Globalization and Localization 2. Quantity and Quality of Education 3. Knowledge Economy and Marketization of education 4. New Educational Technologies 5. Equity and Efficiency 6. Educational Management and Programs 7. Theory and Methodology in Comparative Education 8. Educational Systems and Cultural Relations 9. Teacher Education 10. Scientific Assessment and Quality Assurance of Higher Education 11. Higher Education and Applied & Scientific Skills The deadline for Abstract is Thursday, August 21 , 2017. The detailed information please refer to the conference website: http://conference.cesir.ir/en/ We sincerely hope that you would participate in FICCE and assist this conference in disseminating its news to your colleagues and local research community.

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

Beyond Oceania: News from the Wider Field CALL FOR PAPERS

Identities and Education: Comparative Perspectives in an Age of Crisis May 29 – June 1, 2018 University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus Identities are made and unmade and this is especially true in our current times of crisis. Depending on one’s perspective and location, this moment may be about enduring conflicts, deepening poverty and inequalities, dislocations of peoples, or for example, the rise of post-factual information flows. It may also be about the resurgence of populist movements that are fuelling new forms of border protectionism, cultural closure and anticosmopolitan identity displays. But crises are not only about identity disruption and anxiety. They are also moments of possibility and potential. Not only do they trigger discussion about the causes of our current situation, but they also facilitate debate about our possible futures. Education, central to the project of individual and collective identity formation, national development and international relations, is at the heart of these moments. Whilst education has undoubtedly contributed to creating these moments, it is uniquely placed to engage with them. What should be the agenda of study and action for education in such times? The conference offers the chance to examine and problematise our contemporary moment. Through the heuristic of identity, the conference aims at creating a platform for understanding our current challenges and considering the potential of education to address them. As an intellectual strategy, comparative education is well suited to explore the intersections of local, regional and global history, social structures and biographies of persons that interact to produce uncertainty as well as opportunity. As a palimpsest of history, cultures, aesthetics, geopolitics and disputed meanings, Cyprus and its capital city of Nicosia are one of the most suitable locations for exploring identity and education in interdisciplinary, inter-sectional, relational and eclectic ways. The following key speakers are invited to help us unfold the conference theme through Plenary Lectures: • Antonio Nóvoa, University of Lisbon, Portugal • Ruth Wodak, Lancaster University, United Kingdom, and University of Vienna, Austria • Noah W. Sobe, Loyola University Chicago, USA • Michalinos Zembylas, Open University of Cyprus, Cyprus • Nelly Stromquist, University of Maryland, USA Individual or co-authored, theoretical or empirical papers and panels will be presented at the working groups, the cross-thematic sessions and the thematically-focused panels. Also, multi-author panels can be suggested (3-4 papers) and will take place within the crossthematic sessions and the thematically focused panels. The deadline for proposal submission is February 1, 2018. For more information about the conference: http://www.ceseeurope.org/2018

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

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Upcoming Events Day seminar at Monash University Pedagogic possibilities of New Diaspora Formations and Transnationalism

Tuesday September 26th 2017 , 10.00 – 3.30 pm Monash Club, Clayton, Melbourne

Migration is not what it used to be. Advances in transport and communication technologies have transformed the nature of migrant experiences, enabling globally mobile people to remain in touch with each other across vast distances and national borders, transforming their sense of belonging, stretching their imagination and aspirations. It has also ‘transnationalized’ the nature of our classrooms and schools. Examine the pedagogic challenges and opportunities associated with the dynamic conditions and logic of transnational mobility with Professor Fazal Rizvi.

9.30 – 10.00am

Morning tea

10.00 – 12 noon

Presentation

12 noon – 1.30pm

Buffet lunch

1.30 – 2.30pm

ECR Workshop

2.30 – 3.30pm

HDR Workshop

Registrations essential for all three events: http://bit.ly/2vOu5Ia Contact: Dr Niranjan Casinader (niranjan.casinader@monash.edu) or Associate Professor Lucas Walsh (lucas.walsh@monash.edu)

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

News from the International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives

Dr Sarah Jane Moore presents ‘Lunar Mother’ – a work on canvas that expresses the vision of our journal: to look to the future of education.

1) IEJ:CP Volume 16(2) now available The first general edition for 2017, Volume 16(2) has just been published. You can view this by visiting: https://openjournals.library.sydney.edu.au/index.php/IEJ 2) Adding ORCID ID Please can all authors add their ORCID ID on their profile page to help expand the dissemination of their work. The commercial publishing world is making a big push on the ORCID and this can only help journals like IEJ:CP 3) Sharing articles Please share your articles on Academia.edu and Research Gate to bring people to the IEJ:CP website Associate Professor Zane Ma Rhea IEJ:CP Editor

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OCIES Newsletter

Issue 2, August 2017

‘Pools of Wisdom’ by Dr Sarah Jane Moore speaks to pools of knowledge. It connects with and draws from our watery wisdoms. It conjures geckoes that click and scurry on walls throughout the Pacific alongside memories of swimming in the Nitmulik pools on Jawoyn community lands. It moves strongly in waves and ripples, in memory and according to ancient and imagined watery lore.

OCIES Newsletter # 3, 2017 Our next issue of the OCIES newsletter will be published in December. We welcome contributions from members to make our newsletter relevant, engaging and informative. In particular, we invite pieces that explore: • Oceanic News: Send in your 500 - 600 word contribution (and photos) of recent

comparative and international activities within the region. This could include teaching, research or networking events. Don't forget to include a caption to accompany photos and the name/s of individuals. Please ensure that you have gained permission from individuals to publish their photo. • Book publications: Let us know if you have recently published a book. Send in a photo of the cover and a short blurb. • Blogs: We'd love to let members know about your blog! Let us know if you have a blog that explores issues relating to comparative and international education. Please send a short blurb about your blog and the link. Send your contributions to the Communications Officer, Dr Donella Cobb, at donella.cobb@waikato.ac.nz no later than 27th November, 2017.

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OCIES Newsletter: Issue 2, August 2017  

This is the Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (OCIES) triannual newsletter.

OCIES Newsletter: Issue 2, August 2017  

This is the Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (OCIES) triannual newsletter.

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