Page 1


2


We are pleased to present a compila on of the Ohio La no Educa on Summit Best Prac ces for the years 2013 through 2015. This collec on of 27 abstracts reflect the efforts of our educa onal ins tu ons, community organiza ons, non‐ profit groups, La no serving organiza ons and advocates to support our goal of assis ng Hispanic and La no students to achieve long‐term success through edu‐ ca on.

The La no Educa on Summit brings together educators, administrators, non‐ profit leaders, parents, students and policymakers to discuss prevailing issues re‐ garding the educa on of Ohio's Hispanic students. The conference features work‐ shops where selected par cipants share "best prac ces" with each other and with a endees, as well as addi onal programming focused on educa onal issues for Ohio La nos. The summit builds and creates networks and community coali ons that pursue expanded opportuni es for La no students year‐round. By bringing our school administrators, teachers, parents, policymakers and key agencies to‐ gether, we foster dialogue about methods that will con nue to keep our La no students achieving those educa onal milestones for success. OHIO LATINO EDUCATION SUMMIT COMMITTEE  Tony Or z, Wright State University, Educa on Commi ee Chair, OCHLA Dr. Gregory Guzman, Commissioner, OCHLA Dr. Raul Soto, Ohio Department of Educa on Yolanda Zepeda, The Ohio State University John Turner, University of Akron Lilleana Cavanaugh, Execu ve Director, OCHLA Andrea Lewis, Public Policy Officer, OCHLA

The Best Prac ce Abstracts are available electronically at: h p: ochla.ohio.gov

The commi ee cannot be held responsible for errors in content. The views and opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the commi ee members. This compila on is provided for informa onal purposes. Any ques ons regarding the content of best prac ces should be directed to the author(s) of the best prac ce. Publica on date: 29 February, 2016.

3


TĆćđĊ Ĕċ CĔēęĊēęĘ 2015 Best Practices Exploring School Counselor Advocacy in The Career Development of Undocumented La no Youth…………………………………………………………………. 6 Strategies to Engage Families to Support Educa on…………………………………… 7 Northern Kentucky University La no Programs and Services: La no Student Success: Des no Educa vo 2020 ………………………………………………….. 8 Bridging the Gap Between the Hispanic Community and Health Care: New Medical Spanish Programs at The University of Akron …………………….. 9 Ensuring Equal Opportunity in Educa on for Hispanic Students ……………….. 10 What Parents Should Know About the Educa onal Rights of Students with Disabili es or Limited English Proficiency …………………………………………. 11 Addressing the Impact of Parental Deporta on on La no/a Students’ Post‐Secondary Educa onal Goals …………………………………………….. 12 English Language Learners: Reaching Every K‐12 Student Through Forma ve Instruc onal Prac ces ………………………………………………………………. 13 Student Success Isn’t Just About Comple on ………………………………………..….. 14 Our Na on’s Needs for Hispanic Nurses ……………………………………………..…….. 15 Ohio’s Educa onal Op ons PreK‐12th Grade: Quality Schools …………..……… 16 Leveraging Resources: Top Ten Tips for Educators, Counselors, Administrators, and the Communi es That You Serve …………………………..…. 17 Preparing Hispanics for STEM Careers …………………………………………………..…. 18

4


TĆćđĊ Ĕċ CĔēęĊēęĘ 2014 Best Practices Central Ohio English Learner’s Educa on Collabora ve (COELEC)………... 20 El Puente Educa onal Center: Six Years of Growing and Learning……….. 21 Hispanic Outreach Program, Springfield CSD ………………………………………. 22 Esperanza, Inc. …………………………………………………………………………………….. 23 Kicked Out and Locked In: How Discipline Policies Hurt La nos ………….. 24 La no Outreach at Ohio State ……………………………………………………………... 25

2013 Best Practices El Puente Learning Center……………………………………………………………...……. 26 Hispanic Outreach Program …………………………………………………………………. 27 Tackling the La no Achievement Gap Star ng with a Winning Lineup…. 28 Championing La no Higher Educa on Success: Preparing the Next Genera on of Global Leaders …………………………………………………………….. 29 Hispanic Enrollment in Ohio Higher Educa on and Examples of Best Prac ces to Recruit and Retain Hispanic Students ……………………………….. 30 Race to the Top Program …………………………………………………………………….. 31 The Ohio State University L.A.S.E.R. Program and College 101 Program.. 32 Cincinna Public Schools ……………………………………………………………………… 33

5


Exploring School Counselor Advocacy in the Career Development of Undocumented La no Youth CASSANDRA A. STORLIE, PH.D. Kent State University

School counselors working on career development objec ves with undocumented La no youth have unique challenges that can inform and improve advocacy efforts within the counseling profession. With approximately two million undocumented La no students in the U.S. public educa on system (Passel, 2006; passel & Cohn, 2011), school counselors are faced with unique challenges in providing and advo‐ ca ng for career services to this marginalized group. This qualita ve study explored the experiences of 16 school counselors providing ca‐ reer counseling to undocumented La no students within states with the highest popula ons of undocumented La nos. Using grounded theory methodology (Pa on, 2002, Corbin & Strauss, 2008) results generated salient themes in how school counselors understand the barriers facing undocumented La no youth and provided important insights into how the school counseling profession can improve advocacy for this popula on.

For more informa on: h ps://www.dropbox.com/s/5jptgmycu6825vc/ULY_OHLa noEdSummit_2015%20‐%20Storlie%20Presenta on.pdf? dl=0

6


Strategies to Engage Families to Support Educa on ZULAYKA RUIZ CARLOS ALVARADO Esperanza Inc. Esperanza’s mission is to improve the academic achievement of His‐ panics in Greater Cleveland by suppor ng students to graduate high school and promo ng post‐secondary educa onal a ainment. Our programs include Family Engagement, Mentoring, Hispanic Leader‐ ship, Ohio gradua on test prepara on (OGT), Saturday academy, SISCO (Stay in School for College and Career Opportuni es), and col‐ lege scholarships for students in Cuyahoga and Lorain coun es. The overall goal of Family Engagement is to link parents of Esperanza stu‐ dent par cipants to their respec ve schools (teachers, administra‐ tors, etc.), to increase parent involvement and ul mately increase the opportunity for their child to graduate high school. Our work‐ shops teach engagement techniques an s ll confidence. Consistent program par cipa on results in parents becoming be er equipped to support their children to be successful in life, teaching them the im‐ portance of educa on and values, in our unique and diverse commu‐ nity.

For more informa on: h p://www.esperanzainc.org/programs/aspira‐youth‐leadership

7


Northern Kentucky University La no Programs and Services: La no Student Success: Des no Educa vo 2020 LEO CALDERON, M.P.A. MIRIAM KANNAH, PH.D. Northern Kentucky University

The Northern Kentucky University (NKU) La no Programs and Ser‐ vices (LPS) office was established in the spring of 2001 to be er serve the needs of La no students. This session will discuss an internal comprehensive evalua on of how we a ract, retain, and graduate La no students. Overall, LPS has been very successful in the region; however, we strongly advised that a university‐wide approach should be improved to address these three barriers. As a result, a compre‐ hensive task force was established in the fall semester of 2014, along with three subcommi ees are charged with iden fying best prac ces regarding their area of focus and making recommenda ons to the task force. They will summit this by the end of March a er a presen‐ ta on, and by end of April the task force will provide their official rec‐ ommenda ons.

For more informa on: h p://la no.nku.edu/

8


Bridging the Gap Between the Hispanic Community and Health Care: New Medical Spanish Programs at UA PARIZAD DEJBORD SAWAN, PH.D. The University of Akron

This presenta on will iden fy two new ini a ves that create more meaningful rela onships between current and future health care pro‐ viders and the Hispanic community they serve through be er com‐ munica on and cultural understanding. We will review the prac ces that led to the implementa on of a sequence of language and cultur‐ al courses, at the beginning and advanced level, on site for health care professionals at Akron Children’s Hospital and on campus for students majoring in the health professions. These interdisciplinary courses were designed to simulate real life interac ons between pa‐ ents and health care providers in an innova ve and dynamic way. Students in these classes improve their Spanish oral proficiency through role‐playing and the acquisi on of medical‐related terminol‐ ogy. They also develop an increased understanding of the Hispanic family and community and the specific challenges they face when seeking health care assistance.

For more informa on: h ps://www.uakron.edu/modlang/faculty‐staff/bio‐detail.dot?u=parizad

9


Ensuring Equal Opportunity in Educa on for Hispanic Students MEENA MOREY CHANDRA, J.D. United States Department of Educa on, Office of Civil Rights

This presenta on will be conducted by the Director of the U.S. De‐ partment of Educa on, Office for Civil Rights (OCR). OCR is responsi‐ ble for enforcing Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 (Title VI) as well as several other civil rights laws. Title VI prohibits discrimina on on the basis of race, color and na onal origin. This presenta on will be an overview of several aspects of OCR’s Title VI enforcement such as ensuring equal access to educa onal opportuni es for English Language Learners, harassment based on race, color, and na onal origin, and different treatment in discipline. OCR Cleveland is one of twelve regional offices within the agency and it covers the states of Ohio and Michigan.

For more informa on: h ps://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/OCR/contactus.cfm

10


What Parents Should Know About the Educa onal Rights of Students With Disabili es or Limited English Proficiency KATIE FELDMAN, J.D. DEBORAH DALLMANN,J.D. The Legal Aid Society of Cleveland

This presenta on will educate parents and community members about the educa onal rights of families and students with disabili es or limited English proficiency. The presenta on will cover special edu‐ ca on rights for preschool and school age children and the rights of students with disabili es in school discipline. We will also highlight language access for parents of children with disabili es, misiden fica‐ on of students with limited English proficiency, and how Ohio’s Third Grade Reading Guarantee impacts students who are English Language Learners. Finally, we will discuss how immigra on status impacts in vs. out‐of‐state tui on at Ohio’s state colleges and universi es.

For more informa on: h ps://www.dropbox.com/s/mjwg3vx5hu7ovwk/2015%20Ohio%20La no%20Educa on%20‐%20Ka e%20Feldman% 20‐%20FINAL%20Version%20(without%20notes).pdf?dl=0

11


Addressing the Impact of Parental Deporta on on La no/a Students’ Post‐Secondary Educa onal Goals LUIS FERNANDO MACIAS The Ohio State University

In the past decade, the mass deporta on of predominantly noncrimi‐ nal immigrants from Mexico and Central America has resulted in the forced separa on of numerous families. At a me in which nearly one fourth of all deporta ons are issued to parents of U.S. ci zens, teachers need to be be er prepared to support students from undoc‐ umented families. This work examines the impact of parental deporta on on U.S. ci zen La no/adolescents’ postsecondary aspira‐ ons. This qualita ve collec ve case study is set in Northwest Ohio, where established families with mixed immigra on status have be‐ come fearful of and/or been separated due to harsh immigra on en‐ forcement efforts. This study finds that for some adolescents who held college aspira ons prior to the deporta on, the abrupt parental removal nega vely affected their percep on of safety and stability in their home and school environments.

For more informa on: h ps://huminst.osu.edu/people/macias.23

12


English Language Learners: Reaching Every K‐12 Student Through Forma ve Instruc onal Prac ces MARY PETERS, PH.D. CAROL HARPERS Ba elle for Kids How can teachers help English language learners know where they are in their learning, where they are going, and how they can get there? By using Forma ve Instruc onal Prac ces, teachers and stu‐ dents K‐12 are able to gather and respond to evidence of learning. FIP teachers constantly examine if their efforts result in students be‐ coming clear, confident and self‐reliant on their path to mastery‐in content areas and self–reliant on their path to mastery‐in content areas and language learning alike. A endees will be introduced to several Forma ve Instruc onal Prac ces (FIP) modules and tools made available at no cost through the Ohio Department of Educa on and Ba elle for Kids. Par cularly, we will explore the Reaching Every Student module that supports instruc on for students acquiring English.

For more informa on: h p://www.ba elleforkids.org/

13


Student Success Isn’t Just About Comple on ESTHER C. KRAFT Cuyahoga Community College

In 2013‐2014 we received a one‐year grant to develop and imple‐ ment a La no Student Support Program (STEPP). This program creat‐ ed an “extended familia” for students in that they gained a support network of peers, a sense of belonging to Tri‐C and a sense of con‐ nectedness with the College staff vested in their success. In this ses‐ sion, we will discuss the program descrip on, student par cipa on, use of support services and outcomes metrics including academic, financial assistance and employment. The outcomes were so success‐ ful that we were provided with funds from Tri‐C to con nue on with the program in the 2014‐15 academic year.

For more informa on: h ps://www.dropbox.com/s/orrad5mznwv02zs/Kra %20Presenta on%20‐%202015%20Ohio%20La no% 20Educa on%20Summit%20‐%20STEPP%20Program.pdf?dl=0

14


Our Na on’s Need for Hispanic Nurses HELEN BOEHLEFELD, B.S.N., R.N. Na onal Associa on of Hispanic Nurses: Northeast Ohio Chapter, Akron Children’s Hospital

As the Hispanic popula on grows so does the need for Hispanic nurs‐ es. This session will discuss the first Ohio Chapter of Na onal Associa‐ on of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN), which was formed in 2014. NAHN’s mission is commi ed to advancing the health in Hispanic communi‐ es and to lead, promote and advocate the educa on, professional, and leadership opportuni es for Hispanic nurses. NAHN is also dedi‐ cated to the improvement of the quality of health and nursing care of Hispanic consumers.

For more informa on:

h p://www.nahnnet.org/NAHNOhio.html

15


Ohio’s Educa onal Op ons PreK‐12th Grade: Quality Schools LORNA MACLAIN School Choice Ohio

In Ohio, there are many different op ons available when it comes to your child’s educa on.. Choosing the right school for your child is no longer as simple as just registering her at your local school. There is a discovery process for parents as we all learn about the different types of schools and programs that are available in Ohio today. This presenta on will break this discovery process down into two parts: school sector and program style. “School sector” is the nuts and bolts, behind the scenes considera ons like government oversight, regula‐ on, applica on process and funding. “Program style” is the day‐to‐ day approach of a school including its curriculum, focus student pop‐ ula on and teaching style. We will discuss the ways that sectors and styles can match up in almost any combina on.

For more informa on: h p://www.scohio.org/

16


Leveraging Resources: Top Ten Tips for Educators, Counselors, Administrators, and the Communi es That You Serve! GINA WEISBLAT, PH.D., ERIK PORFELI, PH.D. SERGIO GARCIA

How can you use what you have and be more effec ve? What incen‐ ves are hidden that can help you be er leverage your resources for members, the programs you offer and the community? This session will address using your assets, building capacity in context and cre‐ a ng sustainable opportuni es that con nue to keep on giving. We will discuss asset usage, incen ves and flipping the community equa‐ ons‐program that NEOMED has successfully employed in partnering and co‐crea ng with the La no community. Par cipants will under‐ stand how to look at root incen ves as a cri cal component for lever‐ aging assets; how to use exis ng assets in different capacity to create a new, greater set of resources that will have a higher ROI and sus‐ tainability; and how to frame a story in order to reach the greatest connec on possible: increased social capital.

For more informa on: h p://www.neomed.edu/

17


Preparing Hispanics for STEM Careers RAMONA ORTEGA‐LISTON, PH.D. The University of Akron

Colleges and universi es across the United States (US) are placing greater emphases on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) college programs. The purpose of this study is to assess whether Hispanics, the largest ethnic popula on in the US, are pre‐ pared for jobs in the growing fields of science and technology. Three research ques ons are discussed: Are Hispanic students majoring in science, technology, engineering, and math programs? What college majors are Hispanic choosing? Will mentoring programs encourage Hispanic students to enter STEM programs? Blacks/African American and Whites serve as comparison groups. Results suggest Hispanics lag behind other ethnic groups. Results suggest Hispanic lag behind other ethnic groups at all levels of educa on and may not be adequately prepared for jobs in the fields of science and technology.

For more informa on: h p://ochla.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Educa on/Ortega%20Handout%20‐%20Mentor%20Films%20Handout%20or% 20Ohio%20La no%20Summit.pdf

18


19

Source: h ps://development.ohio.gov/files/research/P7002.pdf


Central Ohio English Learner’s Educa on Collabora ve (COELEC) O erbein University

COELEC integrates three major ini a ves — The COELEC Higher Edu‐ ca on Ini a ve, COELEC Summer‐Plus Academy, and COELEC English Learner Career Ladders — in an effort to increase capacity across ed‐ uca onal contexts to support the academic needs of English Learners in central Ohio. These ini a ves have the poten al to directly in‐ crease the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) pedagogical knowledge and skills of 200 educators who teach English Learners (ELs) in preschool through college (PK‐16). In addi on, the outcomes these ini a ves provide are sustainable. The Teacher Educa on program at O erbein will be forever transformed by a redesigned TESOL‐focused curriculum that will impact more than 300 future teachers each year, newly developed skills and strategies for prac cing teachers will impact genera ons of ELs, and career lad‐ der teaching creden al earners will increase the linguis c and cultural diversity of central Ohio’s teaching force.

For more informa on: h p://www.o erbein.edu/public/Academics/Departments/Educa on/coelec.aspx

20


El Puente Educa onal Center: Six Years of Growing & Learning RICHELE O’CONNOR El Puente Educa onal Center

We seek to close the achievement gap by implemen ng direct one‐ on‐one tutoring services with our Kindergarten through sixth grade students. Our students come from families whose first language is not English, which puts them at risk for low academic achievement. We seek to expand our program to an addi onal 25 students in grades K‐2, to provide early innerva on. This is key in order for our students to gain “Proficient” score on the Third Grade Guarantee. Because a student’s reading proficiency level at the end of third grade is a predictor of future success and the probability that a stu‐ dent will graduate from high school, this program is fundamental to not only our students’ current academic standing but also to their future prospects and economic well‐being. In closing, the El Puente Educa on Center is designed to impact the La no Community and to serve as a model for programming and partnering.

For more informa on: h p://ochla.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Educa on/ElPuenteLearningCenter_Dayton.pdf

21


Hispanic Outreach Program, Springfield CSD LOURDES NARVAEZ Springfield City School District

Closing the Achievement Gap for Hispanic Students means focused support od academics, thus impac ng teste results, but it is also means helping these students acquire non‐academic skills and iden fy opportuni es to be successful in their future. The Program set out to first understand the barriers to parental involvement, iden fy several, including language proficiency, lack of understanding of the school system and unawareness of programs, benefits and support channels available to parents and their children. The Program started to look for viable alterna ves to support our students pursue their dreams of a ending college. One way to accomplish this was to create a pro‐ gram to find corporate internships which could lead to well‐paid jobs and support for further educa on. We see our success in Closing the Achievement Gap; our Hispanic students are gradua ng, gaining confi‐ dence and parents are becoming cri cal partners in student success.

For more informa on: h p://ochla.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Educa on/Hispanic%20Outreach%20Program_Springfield.pdf

22


Esperanza, Inc.—Building Futures ZULAYKA RUIZ CARLOS ALVARADO Esperanza, Inc.

The mission of Esperanza is to improve the academic achievement of Hispanics in Greater Cleveland by suppor ng students to graduate high school and promo ng post‐secondary educa onal a ainment. Esperanza will be a model of academic and community excellence by mo va ng academic achievement, enhancing the quality of economic and community life, promo ng con nuity of community through leadership, offering enriched educa onal services and opportuni es, and by providing scholarship assistance. Esperanza has taken a lead‐ ership role in advoca ng on behalf of Hispanics and developing and assis ng in the implementa on of educa onal policy statements. By establishing linkages between community leaders, organiza ons, and educa onal ins tu ons, Esperanza, Inc. represents a model for over‐ coming educa onal barriers and ensuring quality educa on through community ac on.

For more informa on: h p://www.esperanzainc.org/about_us/mission‐vision

23


Kicked Out and Locked In: How Discipline Policies Hurt La nos CAROLYN NOVAK ACLU of Ohio

In January 2013, the Ohio State Board of Educa on approved a policy on Posi ve Behavior Interven ons and Supports (PBIS). The heart of PBIS is reinforcing desired behaviors and diminishing challenging be‐ haviors by teaching appropriate behavior to students and keeping and using data to improve educator administrator decision making. During this workshop, par cipants will learn about school districts that are trying to implement PBIS and the difficul es encountered while facing an incompa ble zero tolerance state law. There will also be discussion about how children’s advocates joined together as a team to rescind the confinement policy and how others organiza ons can do some zero tolerance policies. In order to close achievement gas system changes to disciplinary policies must be addressed. These change can have a great impact on increasing gradua on rates of kids of color. This includes star ng from the top down with passing cur‐ rently pending legisla on and influencing the Ohio Department rules.

For more informa on:

h ps://www.pbis.org/school

24


La no Outreach at Ohio State FREDERICK ALDAMA Ohio State’s LASER High School Mentoring Program

LASER (La no & La n American Space for Enrichment and Research) is a mul ‐pronged ini a ve of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion that provides a forum for faculty, students, and staff to build a scholarly community on campus for preparing, recrui ng, and retaining La no scholars. The model is based on well‐established and replicable men‐ toring principles. Rela onships of trust between college/university partners and La no families are fundamental to success. Mentors are trained, use established curricular materials, and receive compensa‐ on for their commitment. Specifically, the mentee objec ves are to: Gain an understanding of and plan for college admission require‐ ments, work intensively on mastering college entrances exams, navi‐ gate the en re college applica on process and develop a brad under‐ standing of the college experience and its opportuni es. LASER ex‐ pands the number of La no college applicants to Ohio State and other area colleges and universi es, and its ac vi es are raising awareness of La no talent pools among Ohio State personnel.

For more informa on:

h ps://laser.osu.edu/about/mentor‐program

25


El Puente Learning Center ALYSSA WAGNER C. RICHELE O’CONNOR, PH.D. Wright State University

El Puente’s goal is to help students from La no families in grades K‐6, succeed in their schoolwork. We focus heavily on reading and wri ng in English. Many of the students we serve are bilingual, but come from families where English is not read or wri en very o en. We also serve as liaisons between the parents and the schools, advoca ng for the unique needs for each student. We also have a drop out preven‐ on program for grades 7‐12, Camino de Vida, sponsored by Ford Driving Dreams/LULAC (League of United La no American Ci zens). We also have an adult program, Conexiones, for computer and lan‐ guage acquisi ons. Our program is collabora on of many partners including, Wright State University, University of Dayton, Dayton Schools, Hispanic Catholic Ministry and LULAC.

For more informa on: h p://ochla.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Educa on/ElPuenteLearningCenter_Dayton.pdf

26


Hispanic Outreach Program DR. DAVID ESTROP LOURDES NARVAEZ SHARON WATKINS Springfield City School District

Two years ago, the Springfield City School District (SCSD) embarked in a ambi ous and necessary program to meet the significant and grow‐ ing challenge of educa ng a growing number of Hispanic students in the District. The SCSD’s inten on is to fully embrace and meet this challenge by extending our beliefs to the Hispanic popula on of our community; primarily by helping our Hispanic students achieve aca‐ demic success and preparing them to be produc ve ci zens for our community. The Hispanic Outreach program (HOP) was created to as‐ sist the district with designing, implemen ng and managing efforts to achieve this goal. There are underlying and fundamental differences, most notably cultural and socio‐economic, that had to be immediately and consistently addressed in order to meet our responsibility of edu‐ ca ng this segment of our children. One important factor in the suc‐ cess of our students performance is the complete support of their parents. Considering the characteris cs of most of our family’s socio‐ economic background, it was impera ve to work toward the crea on of a program that included adult educa on. For more informa on: h p://ochla.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Educa on/Hispanic%20Outreach%20Program_Springfield.pdf

27


Tackling the La no Achievement Gap Star ng with a Winning Lineup ESTHER KRAFT SYLVIA OYLE Tri‐C Hispanic Council

Created in 1992, the Hispanic Council (HC) develops and implements Hispanic ini a ves that mutually benefits Cuyahoga Community Col‐ lege (Tri‐C) and the Hispanic community. The council also serves as liaison between the College and the Greater Cleveland area Hispanic community by linking Hispanics with Tri‐C programs and services. Due to the passion and ini a ves of the Hispanic Council, Tri‐C has experienced con nuous and significant growth in Hispanic student enrollment with a 12.4% college‐wide increase from fall 2011 to fall 2012. In addi on, the Council has also formed strong partnerships with local La no organiza ons such as Esperanza, EL Barrio, and the Hispanic Roundtable, in a effort to work collec vely on community ini a ves that support Hispanic success and prosperity including the La no Youth Summit, Career Explora on, Saturday Academy and Convencion Hispana Cleveland.

For more informa on: h p://ochla.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Educa on/Tackling%20the%20La no%20Achievement%20Gap_Cleveland.pdf

28


Championing La no Higher Educa on Success: Preparing the Next Genera on of Global Leaders LEO CALDERON IRENE F. ENCACION Northern Kentucky University

“Championing La no Higher Educa on Success: Preparing the Next Genera on of Ohio Global Leaders” will highlight innova ve higher educa on strategies as they relate to recrui ng, retaining La no stu‐ dents, and crea ng more vibrant communi es. Since the establish‐ ment of the La no student Affairs Office at Nothern Kentucky Univer‐ sity (NKU) almost twelve years ago, the La no student enrollment has increased by 577 percent. Also, thanks, in part, to the effec veness of the La no Student Affairs Mentor Program, our service efforts have increased exponen ally. The presenter will share effec ve en‐ rollment and reten on prac ces that encourage the development of an a rac ve learning environment for underrepresented students. In addi on, the presenter will share informa on about innova ve com‐ munity outreach models like the Saturday Program for Access to Re‐ warding Knowledge (SPARK), La no Fun with Science Camp, YMCA Black/La no Achievers, etc.

For more informa on: h p://ochla.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Educa on/Northern%20Kentucky%20University_Office%20of%20La no%

29


Hispanic Enrollment in Ohio Higher Educa on and Examples of Best Prac ces to Recruit and Retain Hispanic Students DEAN ALTSTAETTER Ohio Northern University

RUDOLPH CHAVEZ College Now Greater University MARIA SANCHEZ Ohio State University

ECCHO (educators and Community Helping Hispanics Onward) has been in existence since 1983. This group advocates to increase the number of Hispanics in Ohio higher educa on. ECHOO members will share “best prac ces” to recruit and retain Ohio Hispanic students. The Hispanic popula on in Ohio has increased 63.4% from the year 2000 to 2010 from 217,123 to 354,674 residents while the total popu‐ la on in the state of Ohio increased 1.6% during the same dura on from 11,353,140 to 11,536,504 residents. Hispanics now make up 3% of the state of Ohio popula on but only 1.6% (1,922 graduates) oh Ohio high school graduates. The number of Ohio Hispanic residents is con nued to rise, which will mean an increase of Hispanics students residents is con nued to rise, which will mean an increase of Hispan‐ ics students in K‐12. ECHHO’s efforts are to reach out to Hispanic stu‐ dents in high school to inform them that higher educa on is afforda‐ ble and accessible in Ohio and what possibili es area available to bridge the gap between Hispanics and other racial/ethnic groups. For more informa on: h p://ochla.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Educa on/ECHHO_Educators%20and%20Com%20Helping%20Hispanics% 20Onward.pdf

30


Race to the Top Program Ohio Department of Educa on

In 2009, 35 states wrote applica ons to reform their educa onal sys� tems through a federal grant referred to as Race to the Top (R T). Ohio was one of ten recipients of this $500 million dollar program and entered an era of unprecedented change focused on student, teacher and principal performance and accountability. During this same tome the Ohio legislature has also passed several bills that have specifically addressed teacher evalua on. These laws require school districts to use value added metrics and other student growth measures as part of a teachers and principal evalua on. Ohio’s new system for evalua ng teachers and principals will provide educators with a richer and more detailed view of their performance, with a focus on specific strengths and opportuni es for improvement. The new system relies on two key evalua on components, each weighted at 50 percent: a ra ng of teacher/principal performance (based on classroom observa ons and other factors), an a ra ng of student/ building academic growth. This presenta on will be an overview of the recent changes and how these changes will aect local districts. For more informa on: h ps://r tnews.wordpress.com/about/

31


The Ohio State University L.A.S.E.R. Program and College 101 Program The Ohio State University

L.A.S.E.R., or the La no & La n American Space for Enrichment and Research is the country’s first hub for scholarship and mentoring that centers on La nos and the knowledge and cultural produc on of the La n/o Americas. L.A.S.E.R. provides the forum for faculty, students, and staff to build a scholarly community on campus, to make visible OSU as a center for knowledge produc on in and around the study of La no and La n Americas, and as a space for preparing, recrui ng, and retaining La no scholars from high school through graduate school. “College 101”, covers all the logis cal aspects of high school college prep, but also goes into depth about roles and responsibili es parents need to be aware of from the elementary to the secondary school levels. The main goal of this presenta on is to provide La no parents with informa on and best prac ces they can use to be more involved with their children and their schools to ins ll and maintain an environment which help children to develop a posi ve a tude to‐ ward educa on. For more informa on: h p://odi.osu.edu/laser/

32


Cincinna Public Schools

Cincinna , Ohio

This presenta on will discuss some of the educa onal challenges, barriers, and stereotypes that Hispanic/La no students and their fam‐ ilies are currently facing in the state of Ohio and how Cincinna Public Schools (CPS) has been using the best prac ce educa onal supports and services to help overcome them. Presenters will provide par ci‐ pants with specific examples on how schools have promoted diverse students’ agencies within the community. CPS’s supports and collabo‐ ra ve efforts have led to significant gains in the academics achieve‐ ment of ALL of its diverse students, including its Hispanic/La no stu‐ dents. This is why Cincinna Public Schools is the highest rated urban school district in the state.

For more informa on: h p://www.cps‐k12.org/academics

33


Core Values Building coopera on and understanding between Hispanic Ohioans and Gov‐ ernment by providing Hispanics with informa on, resources and by informing the Governor, Legislature and state agencies about Hispanic issues throughout the State. Collabora ng with the community by promo ng community awareness, educa on, engagement and inclusion in mainstream society to ensure La nos are part of the founda on and fabric of the state. Partnering with state agencies to create ins tu onal change to assure equity and access to culturally competent programs and services for La nos. Iden fying Hispanic Ohioans issues and concerns through public policy analysis and data driven outcome‐based research in order to create aware‐ ness of issues to form the founda on for ins tu onal and systemic change in the Ohio state government. Engaging with the Na onal La no Agenda and aligning our ini a ves with the efforts that seek the integra on and empowerment of Hispanic and La nos in the United States. Planning the work of the commission based on strategic priori es that con‐ sistently impact and address the needs of the La no community in Ohio. The strategic plan will be the roadmap that will guide the Commission in iden fying future ini a ves and goals. Encouraging new ideas and suppor ng openness and acceptance of differing ideas or beliefs. The commission respects the opinions of others and will pro‐ vide a safe environment for all voices, opinions, ideas and beliefs.

34


2013 Education Summit

35


36

Ohio Latino Education Summit Abstract  

Best Practices Abstracts from 2013-2015

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you