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October 2005 „ Special Focus „ Humanitarian Reports „ Humanitarian Assistance in the oPt „ Humanitarian Events „ Monitoring Issues

Special Focus:

The Jordan Valley

The Jordon Valley has become increasingly out of bounds for Palestinians living in other parts of the West Bank. A series of new permit restrictions introduced in the past six months have severely tightened access for both people and goods to get in and out.

to landowners are not for overnight stays, and people are obliged to travel back and forth daily. They frequently face delays at either Tayasir or Hamra checkpoints that connect the Jordan Valley with the rest of the West Bank.

These permit restrictions add to a movement regime within the Jordan Valley that was already very restricted. A combination of military zones, military bases, settlements and Israeli-declared conservation areas within the Jordan Valley impedes movement for Palestinians residents and permit holders alike.

Workers: Workers who want to work in the Jordan Valley are required to have a permit. Permits for workers in the agricultural areas of the Jordan valley are issued by the Israeli District Coordination Office (DCO) or by settlements on which farm hands work. The permits are valid only for a limited period of time, and are subject to security restrictions.1

The Jordan Valley is a stretch of fertile land located at the base of a mountain ridge that runs adjacent to the Jordan River. The valley crosses Israel and the West Bank; reaching from the Sea of Galilee in the North to the Dead Sea in the South. Since 1967, 5 military outposts and approximately 21 settlements have been established throughout the Jordan Valley on either side of Road 90. Approximately 6,250 settlers live in the area and 53,000 Palestinians, (including the population of Jericho).

iii. Military zones, Israeli-declared conservation areas and Israeli settlements Palestinian non-residents of the Jordan Valley even with permits are prohibited to travel on Road 90 (the main highway running through the Jordan Valley) north of Al ‘Auja partial checkpoint. Access to water sources and grazing areas is also increasingly limited because of the presence of extensive Israeli-declared conservation areas and military zones, particularly in the northern areas of the Jordon Valley. The example of Al Jiftlik village (see map on page 3) clearly illustrates these difficulties Straddled on all sides by settlements, military closed areas and military bases, villagers have difficulties leaving their village to graze their animals or even market their crops within the West Bank. Compounding this problem is the restriction on workers from Tammoun and Tubas to travel to this area, preventing optimal work on the land and reducing income even further.

There are 21 physical obstacles in the Jordon Valley, including a series of checkpoints, earth mounds, road gates, earth trenches and road blocks restricting movement into and within the area.

The semi nomadic Bedouin populations that live in communities scattered throughout the Valley, rely on water springs and open grazing areas but are being forced to remain in more limited areas. The result is that farmers are forced to sell their animals as they can no longer graze and water them. This loss of income is exacerbated by the low price of meat on local markets and difficulties faced marketing cheese and milk products – again, in large part due to access and transportation constraints.

i.

Checkpoints into the Jordan Valley

1.

Movement restrictions in the Jordan Valley

Residence restrictions

Since May 2005, only Palestinians with an address on their identification card from the north of the Jordan Valley are allowed to reside there. This has affected many people who have lived in the Jordan Valley for many years, but may not have that address on their identification card. Women who have married into a family from the Jordon valley for example, or others who were born in other areas of the West Bank but now live there are most affected. Residents of the Jordon Valley without the corrected address on their identification card fear traveling to other areas of the West Bank in case they are prohibited from returning to their homes. ii.

Permits to Access work and land

Non-resident landowners: Palestinians who own land or property in the Jordan Valley, but live in the Tubas areas of the West Bank can no longer access their property without a permit. The permits issued

Checkpoint Hamra

Tayasir Ma’ale Efrayim Al ‘Auja

Permit needed (by car / bus / truck) All vehicles and pedestrians (excluding residents of the north Jordan Valley with the appropriate identification card) As above As above As above

Remarks Since 19 Oct, only Jordan Valley residents are permitted to use this checkpoint. Workers in the Jordan Valley and nonresident landowners obtain a permit to pass through the checkpoint. As above As above As above


Qabatiya Telfit

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

Bisan

90

W e s t B a n k - J or d a n V a l l e y

Mirka Bardala

Raba

November 2005

Misliya

Kardala

Az Zababida

'Ein el Beida

Closures

Mekhola Sanur 'Aqqaba

Meithalun

Tayasir

Tayasir

Al Jadida

Area (B)

Area (C)3 1-Full Palestinian civil and military control.

Al Malih

Tubas

Road gate

WEST BANK Yasid

Partial checkpoint Observation tower

Ath Thaghra

Siris

Area (A)1 2

Al Farisiya Shadmot Mekhola

Al 'Aqaba

Oslo Agreement

Checkpoint

90

2-Full Palestinian civil control and joint Israeli-Palestinian military control.

Roadblock Earth mound

El Far'a Camp 578

3-Full Israeli civil and military control.

Earth wall

Tammun Khirbet ar Ras al Ahmar Al Badhan

Nature Reserve

Trench

Al 'Aqrabaniya

Special Case (H2) Khirbet Humsa

Road Network

Ro'i Beka'ot

Restricted road

90

An Nassariya

Elon More

Road with restrictions for Palestinian vehicle use.

'Ein Shibli

Regional or main road

Nablus Deir al Hatab Salim

Other road

Hamra 57

557

At Tur Nablus Berakhya

Beit Furik

Rujeib

Burin

Beit Dajan

90

90

Khamra Furush Beit Dajan

Barrier

'Awarta

Huwwara

Tel Hayim

Road number

Constructed Barrier

Beit Furik

Yits'har

57

Mekhora

'Awarta

Argaman Az Zubeidat

Under construction Projected Barrier

Al Jiftlik

Huwwara

Planned Barrier - path based on Israeli Government (Ministry of Defence - Seam Zone Authority) maps, published 30 June 2004 and IDF land seizure orders.

Beita

Aqraba

Za'tara Kfar Tapu'akh

90 508

Migdalim Qusra

Qaryut

I V E R

505

Eli

Israeli military base

Ma'ale Efrayim

Ma'ale Efrayim

60

Yafit

0

5

10 Kilometers

A

Shilo

N

505

Duma

Ma'ale Levona

Area of settlement municipal boundary

R

60 As Sawiya

Israeli settlement

Gitit

505

Qabalan

60

Palestinian built-up area

Masu'a

Zaatara (Tappuah)

D

Petsa'el (Fatsa'el)

Al Mughayyir

Tomer

WEST BANK V a l l e y

Netiv Ha-Gdud

Silwad 449

Na'aran (Niran) Kokhav Ha-Shakhar

Al 'Auja

At Tayba

Yitav

Rammun

Yitav

Rimonim

60

Beitin

Al 'Auja

90

At Tayba "Ramallah" Deir Dibwan

J o r d a n

Ofra 'Ein Yabrud

449

90

An Nuwei'ma

Na'ama (No'omi)

ISRAEL

Psagot 457

Jericho

Ma'ale Mikhmas

SEA

Allenby Bridge

An Nuwei'ma

Kokhav Ya'akov

Elisha

DEA D

Mikhmas Geva Binyamin Jericho (Ariha) Geva Binyamin (Adam)

458

Neve Ya'akov

Aqbat Jaber Camp Allon Almon (Anatot)

Kfar Adumim Nofei Prat

Pisgat Ze'ev Military Base 437 1

1

Shu'fat Camp

rusalem

Az Za'ayyem

Ma'ale Adumim

Mitspe Yerikho

Jericho DCO Beit Ha-Arava

1

1

French Hill

90

Vered Yerikho

1

Mishor Adumin Almog

OCHA

Hizma

The designations employed and the presentation of material on this map do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

'Ein Samiya

60

WEST BANK-Jordan Valley

Gilgal

Al Mazra'a ash Sharqiya

466

90

90

J O

Fasayil

JORDAN

R

Shvut Rakhel Turmus'ayya

Cartography: OCHA oPt - November 2005. Base data: PA MoP, July 2000, OCHA update 2005. For comments contact <ochaopt@un.org> or Tel. +972 (02) 582-9962. http://www.ochaopt.org


U N O f f ic e f o r t h e C o o r d in at i o n o f H u m an i t a ri an A f f a i rs

Military Base

AL JIFTLIK VILLAGE IN THE JORDAN VALLEY November 2005 Marj Na'ja

CLOSED MILITARY AREA Az Zubeidat Argaman Settlement

Gr e e

CLOSED MILITARY AREA

nL i ne

90

JORDAN

90

Th e d e s ig n a tio n s e m p lo y ed a n d the p re s e nta ti o n o f m a ter ia l on th i s m a p d o n o t im p ly the e x pr e ss io n o f a n y op i n io n w h a ts o e ve r o n th e p a rt o f th e Se cr e tar ia t o f th e U n ite d N a tio n s c o n ce rn i n g th e le g a l s ta tus o f an y co u n try, te rr ito ry , ci ty o r a re a o r o f its a u th o ri tie s, o r c o n ce rn i ng th e d el i mi ta tio n o f i ts fr on ti e rs o r b o u n d a rie s .

Argaman Settlement

AL JIFTLIK

90 Massu'a Settlement

Al Jifltik village and surrounding agricultural land

CLOSED MILITARY AREA

Israeli settlement and surrounding agricultural land Israeli military base

CLOSED MILITARY AREA

Israeli Settlement Regional Council

Road with restrictions for Palestinian vehicle use

WE S T B A N K - A l J i f t l ik A r e a

Fence 0

WE S T BA NK

0.5

1

2

Kilometers

Al

Jif A r t lik ea

Massu'a Settlement

90

OCHA

DE A D

SEA

ISR AEL

Copyright: Space Imaging Middle East (LLC) 2003, all rights reserved. Image Date: 31 December 2003 Satellite sensor: IKONOS (USA). Note: Not for circulation or duplication, printed by OCHA-oPt For more information contact OCHA-oPt (Tel. +972 (02) 582-9962) http://www.ochaopt.org Cartography: OCHA oPt - November 2005. Base data: PA MoP, J uly 2000, OCHA update 2005. For comments c ontact <oc haopt@un.org> or Tel. +972 (02) 582-9962. http://www.oc haopt.org


Humanitarian Update | October 2005

2.

crop as workers are not available to harvest a field or the goods are not able to leave the area. Agricultural goods are subject to the same restrictions as other goods during periods of closure; however the impact is higher due to the perishable nature of milk, cheese, fresh fruit and vegetables. Delays in transportation due to security checks and delays at checkpoints can result in spoilage and therefore a reduction in value.

A vulnerable economy

The economy of the Jordan Valley is based on tourism, mainly focusing in and around Jericho, whereas the rest of the Valley depends primarily on agriculture. A large number of the Palestinian communities in the Jordan Valley are farmers and/or Bedouins who traditionally graze their animals across the desert valley in search of water and fresh feed. However, if shepherds and farmers are caught crossing through the national reserves they can be fined between NIS 750 - 800 for trespassing. Movement of people through military areas is not only prohibited, but can also be dangerous. Movement restrictions are undermining the livelihoods of the communities, as well as impacting on their traditions and daily life.

The permit system can cause difficulties for workers to access their place of work, impacting not only their own household income, but also the productivity of the farms upon which they work. Landowners who do have access cannot take on fully the burden of farming the land without hired labour. Problems with marketing also undermine agriculture’s viability.

More than 90% of the Jordan Valley is in Area C (i.e. under Israeli military and administrative control) except for Al Auja and Jericho in the south which are Area A and five villages which are Area B (under Palestinian administrative control). As a result, in most of the area little Palestinian infrastructure has been authorized since 1967, and many communities dotted throughout the Jordan Valley do not have an electricity or water network. Palestinian construction within Area C without a permit risks demolition by the IDF.

The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) regularly patrol the northern area and if Palestinians are found in the Jordan Valley without a Jordan Valley address on their identity card, they are brought or sent to Tayasir checkpoint, regardless of where their place of residence or work may be. Their identification cards are confiscated and must be collected within four days from the Palestinian district liaison office in Jericho, incurring further costs and difficulties. When identification cards are confiscated, people from Kardala, Bardala and ‘Ein al Beida have been known to cross through the hills from Tayasir, on foot, through a military area, avoiding Road 90 to get home without encountering the IDF.

Jericho’s tourism sector, central to the Jordan Valley economy, was devastated following September 2000. Elsewhere in the valley, agriculture plays a prominent role but has suffered under the movement restrictions. Closure can result in the complete loss of a

II. Monitoring Issues2 Casualties From 28 September to 1 November 2005, 31 Palestinians were killed and 81 injured. Most of these casualties occurred during Israel Defence Forces (IDF) search and arrest campaigns in the West Bank and Israel Air Force (IAF) aerial strikes in the Gaza Strip after 19 October.

Casualties: Palestinian and Israeli Deaths Palestinian deaths

Israeli deaths

80 70

70 60 49

50 40

31 27

30 20

18

15

10

14

10

7

5

3

9

7

4

2

0

12

10

8 0

1

0

0 Dec-04

Jan-05

Feb-05

Mar-05

Apr-05

May-05

Jun-05

Jul-05

Aug-05

Sep-05

Oct-05

Source: OCHA Weekly Briefing Notes Palestinain injuries

Israeli injuries

250

192

200

Casualty figures in the month following Israeli disengagement from the Gaza Strip are higher than reported in the previous month (September 2005) and are the highest Palestinian and Israeli fatalities reported since February 2005.

183 165

164

150

Nine Israelis were killed and further 46 injured. The majority of these casualties occurred after a suicide bombing in the Israeli town of Hadera on 26 October.

130

129 116 105

100

50

90

81 62

61

81

68 46

42

39 27

17

19

17

20

16

25

0 Nov-04

Dec-04

Jan-05

Feb-05

Mar-05

Apr-05

May-05

Jun-05

Jul-05

Aug-05

Sep-05

Oct-05

Source: OCHA Weekly Briefing Notes

OCHA – Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs P.O. Box 38712 Jerusalem | Phone: +972 (0)2 5829962 / 5825853 | Fax: +972 (0)2 5825841 | eMail: ochaopt@un.org | Web: www.ochaopt.org

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Humanitarian Update | October 2005

Structures demolished

Structures demolished / people affected For the same period (28 September to 1 November 2005), two structures were demolished by the IDF in the West Bank (Tubas governorate) for reportedly being built without permits. A further six structures were damaged, four of these during IAF aerial strikes in the Gaza Strip. The number of structures demolished is significantly lower than in September 2005 and the lowest number of structures demolished since November 2004.

Structures Demolished

120 99

100

97

80

71

60 33

40

24

25

Apr-05

May-05

30

30 20

13

20

5

2

0 Nov-04

Dec-04

Jan-05

Feb-05

Mar-05

Jun-05

Jul-05

Aug-05

Sep-05

Oct-05

Source: OCHA Weekly Briefing Notes

Land Requisition Orders Land Requisition Orders (in dunums) 4000 3557.3

3500 2,918.30

3000 2450

2500 2056

2000 )

1500 1000

1276.6

1,130 786

792

761

575.6

500

500 70

Land levelling/requisition/trees destroyed IDF military orders requisitioned 1276.6 dunums (127.7 hectares) of land between 28 September and 1 November 2005.3 This includes large requisition orders totalling 929 dunums (92.9 hectares) for land in three villages north of Ramallah for the construction of the Barrier around Arâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;iel and Emmanuel settlements. Large requisition orders were also issued in Tulkarm governorate (totalling 164.1 dunums/16.4 hectares) for the construction of a new fence around Avnei Khefets and Enav settlements. The amount of land requisitioned remains comparatively high in 2005.

0 Nov-04

Dec-04

Jan-05

Feb-05

Mar-05

Apr-05

May-05

Jun-05

Jul-05

Aug-05

Sep-05

Oct-05

Source: OCHA Weekly Briefing Notes

Ambulance Incidents Denial

18

Ambulance incidents4 The number of reported incidents involving denials and delays (in excess of 30 minutes) at IDF checkpoints for Palestinian ambulances providers remained low in October 2005. Three denials of access and three delays of access were reported by the Palestinian Red Crescent Society (PRCS) in the West Bank.

Delay 16

16

15

15

15

15

14 12

11 10

10

9

8

9

7

6

6 4

10

9

Land levelling continued for the construction of the Barrier in Qalqiliya, Salfit, Ramallah/Al Bireh, Jerusalem, Bethlehem and Hebron governorates.

4

4

4

3

3

3

3

2

3 3 2

2 0 Nov-04

Dec-04

Jan-05

Feb-05

Mar-05

Apr-05

May-05

Jun-05

Jul-05

Aug-05

Sep-05

Source: PRCS

Oct-05

Since 24 September, the Gaza Strip has been sealed off with the closure of all four major crossing points (Erez, Karni, Sufa and Rafah crossings). Gazans referred for medical treatment outside the Gaza Strip experienced access restrictions during this period with Rafah crossing predominately closed and Erez crossing only open for emergency medical referrals after prior coordination.

Access for Palestinian workers and traders into Israel from the Gaza Strip5 Erez crossing point is the only access point for Gazan workers and traders with valid permits to enter Israel. According to the Palestinian Ministry of Labour, as of 9 September, 278 work permits were issued for Palestinians in the Gaza Strip to work in Israel, including 124 with overnight stay. The average daily crossing for Palestinian workers and traders through Erez crossing in the Gaza Strip in September 2005 fell to 128 workers and 120 traders.6 This is lower than reported in the previous month (August 2005). Movement for workers and traders has been severely restricted since 13 August 2005 (coinciding with Israeli preparations for disengagement). Following Palestinian militant rocket attacks on 24 September that injured six Israelis, the crossing has been closed to all Palestinian workers and traders. This closure continued throughout the month of October, coinciding with several Jewish holidays.7 Erez Crossing: Average Daily Labour Movement Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar 04 04 05 05 05 Workers to Israel 0 72 49 390 1,451 Traders to Israel N/A N/A 17 70 158

Apr 05 3,200 224

May 05 2,067 103

Jun 05 3,588 362

Jul 05 1,767 175

Aug 05 281 168

Sep 05 128 120

Oct 05 0 0

Source: Palestinian National Security Forces, Data for 2004 obtained from UNSCO.

OCHA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs P.O. Box 38712 Jerusalem | Phone: +972 (0)2 5829962 / 5825853 | Fax: +972 (0)2 5825841 | eMail: ochaopt@un.org | Web: www.ochaopt.org

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Humanitarian Update | October 2005

Karni Crossing: Average Daily Truckloads of Imports / Exports Import

Export

250 219 194

200 162

150

190

189

163

123

111

122

100

90

77 47

50

32

22

17

34

29

17

8

33

28

27

20

Access for Gazan trade movement through Karni crossing8 Karni crossing is the principle point for transporting commercial goods to/from the Gaza Strip. The average daily number of truckloads of imported and exported goods through Karni crossing fell in October 2005 for the second consecutive month.9 Karni crossing was completely closed between 24 September – 9 October. Outside of usual closing hours (Saturdays) it was completely closed for a further six days (including half days) after 10 October and was open for another four days for imported goods only.10

8

0 Nov 04

Dec 04

Jan 05

Feb 05

Mar 05

Apr 05

May 05

Jun 05

Jul 05

Aug Sep- Oct05 05 05

Source: Data Nov 04 -May 05 UNSCO. Jun 05 onwards OCHA. All data received from Ministry of National Economy.

Rafah Passenger Terminal: Average Daily Arrivals / Departures 800

Arrivals

Departures

749

700 600

533

542

531 508

556

500 400 300 200

360

332 265

263

285 290

346 325

213

190166

International Palestinians’ access from the Gaza Strip Rafah Passenger Terminal is the principal point of access for Gazans travelling overseas and is located on the Egyptian border. Following the Israeli disengagement from the Gaza Strip, Israel has closed the terminal since 7 September. Since this time it has been opened sporadically (one day in September and six days in October).11 The closure of passenger terminal is reflected in the low average number of daily arrivals and departures in October 2005.

186 178

98 116

107 88

100

0

0 Nov- Dec- Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- May- Jun- Jul- Aug- Sep- Oct04 04 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05

Source: Data Nov 04 -Feb 05 UNSCO. Mar 05 onwards OCHA. All data received from Ministry of Civilian Affairs.

Humanitarian Incidents 120

113

100 88 80 74

80 68

78

71

62

60

49

36

40 20

50

12

0 Nov-04 Dec-04 Jan-05 Feb-05 Mar-05 Apr-05 Ma y-05 Jun-05

Jul-05

Aug-05 Sep-05 Oct-05

Source: Access and Closure Information System (ACIS) and UNRWA monthly reports

H u m a n i t a r i a n A c c e s s 12 In October 2005, international organisations reported 78 access incidents. UNRWA filed 76 reports (compared to 79 in September 2005) in which the delivery of aid and/or the movement of personnel were obstructed by the IDF or Israeli Border Police. The humanitarian access incidents reported by UNRWA involved delay and/or denial of access at fixed and mobile checkpoints throughout the West Bank. The incidents predominately occurred at checkpoints at the entrance to Jerusalem. On the evening of 24 October, Erez crossing in the Gaza Strip was closed to all internationals, including UN agencies and international diplomatic passport holders. The crossing re-opened on the 25 October but was closed again on the 26 October following the Hadera suicide bombing. It was again re-opened at 2 pm on 27 October.

A c c e s s f o r w a t e r t r a n s p o r t e r s / t a n k e r s 13 Closure measures and the West Bank Barrier continue to have a severe effect on water transport; closures can result in the inability of water tankers to reach their destination. According to a WaSH MP survey in 2005, 200 Palestinian communities are not connected to water networks and in 11 other communities, over half of the households are not connected to a network. A c c e s s f o r G a z a f i s h e r f o l k 14 Since January 2005, the Israeli authorities have restricted Palestinian fishing up to ten nautical miles from the Gaza Strip coastline. Between 24 September and 6 October, all fishing from the Gaza Strip coastline was prohibited.

OCHA – Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs P.O. Box 38712 Jerusalem | Phone: +972 (0)2 5829962 / 5825853 | Fax: +972 (0)2 5825841 | eMail: ochaopt@un.org | Web: www.ochaopt.org

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Humanitarian Update | October 2005

P a l e s t i n i a n o l i v e h a r v e s t 15 The olive harvest began in the West Bank in September 2005 and will continue until mid-November. OCHA reported a limited number of access incidents in September and October for Palestinian farmers trying to access their land during the olive harvest. The incidents primarily involved Palestinian farmers in the northern West Bank not being able to access their land in the closed areas (areas between the Barrier and the 1949 Armistice Line or ‘Green Line’) due to denial of permits, the closure of Barrier gates and Israeli settlers preventing access for Palestinians to olive groves near settlements.

III. New humanitarian reports Palestinian Perceptions Issue Paper No. 2 – Children and Youth in the Gaza Strip. The Swiss

IV. Humanitarian assistance to the oPt European Commission proposes EU strategy for support to Palestinians. The EC’s post-

Development Corporation, UNDP and Near East Consulting reported that poverty and economic welfare in the Gaza Strip are not conducive to child and youth welfare. Children and youth living in poor households are more like to face challenges to their education, their health, their nutritional status or their psychological well-being. See [www.palestinianperceptions.ps].

disengagement strategy is medium-term and builds on the €60 million post-disengagement plan already being implemented. The strategy is conditioned on progress being made towards the Road Map and in the six priority areas identified by the UN Special Envoy to the Quartet on Gaza Disengagement.

Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics Press Release on unemployment. PCBS Labour Force Survey

Saudi Arabia contributes more than USD 7.5 million to UNESCO. The contribution to UNESCO of over SR

results (July – September 2005) found that unemployment (relaxed definition) increased to 28.4% in the 3rd quarter of 2005 (an increase in 2.1% from 2nd quarter 2005). Unemployment is highest in Jenin governorate in the West Bank and in Gaza North governorate in the Gaza Strip. The average daily net wage increased slightly to 74.5 NIS (USD 15.74) while the percentage of employees whose monthly wages are below the poverty line increased to 57%. See [http://www.pcbs.org].

Palestinian Monitoring Group – Education Under Occupation. PHG released a report analysing trends in the disruption to Palestinians’ schooling resulting from Israeli military and settler activity between during the 2003-05. See [http://www.phrmg.org].

28 million is to support educational programmes in the oPt.

USAID project supporting mothers and newborns in Bethlehem. USAID concluded a USD 3.5 million project with the Holy Family Hospital of Bethlehem to build a new labour and delivery ward, expand its Emergency Department Services, renovate a larger nursery and create a day care centre.

UNICEF Appeals for Additional Funding. UNICEF has highlighted that an additional USD 3.2 million is urgently needed for health services, educational and psychosocial support in the oPt. US 15.3 million has already been received in 2005 but more funding is needed.

New FAO project on food insecurity. FAO announced a new project to provide the PA with updated information on food insecurity. The new project will update a 2003 assessment by FAO that found that food insecurity is a reality for 40 percent of the 3.6 million people living in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.

1 Palestinian farmers are in the Jordan valley are more vulnerable to the fluctuations in the security situation. For example, workers from Tammun with a permit issued by the Ro’i settlement were able to travel through Tayasir or Hamra checkpoint, along Road 90 during the close imposed in October 2005. This permission was not granted to DCO permit holders, implying that workers in Palestinian farms were prevent from travelling to work and those working in settlements could work. 2 OCHA monitors a number of indicators related to the protection of civilians in our Weekly Briefing Notes. OCHA is also tasked with monitoring the specific commitments given by the Government of Israel to Ms Caroline Bertini in August 2002 in her capacity as Personal Humanitarian Envoy of the UN Secretary-General. Ms Bertini’s mission was in response to the deteriorating humanitarian situation and was to assess the nature and scale of the humanitarian needs and to clarify the respective responsibilities of those actors involved. The Government of Israel made and/or confirmed a number of humanitarian commitments to Ms Bertini during her mission. Since this time OCHA has produced monthly reports monitoring the Government of Israel’s actions in relation these commitments. The monitoring of the Bertini Commitments is now included in the Monitoring Section of the Humanitarian Update. 3 The amount of land requisitioned in September 2005 has been updated to include a previously unreported military order (18 September) to requisition land belonging to Palestinian farmers from the villages of Al Jab’a (Bethlehem governorate) and Surif (Hebron governorate) to create a new terminal crossing. 4 Government of Israel Bertini Commitments (2002): (1) Palestinian ambulances will wait no more than 30 minutes at any checkpoints; and (2) Effective mechanisms will be put in place to ensure that Palestinians seeking critical medical services (child delivery, dialysis, chemotherapy etc) can quickly pass all checkpoints. 5 Government of Israel Bertini Commitment (2002) (confirmed during the Bertini mission): Increase in the number of work permits for Palestinian workers in Israel from the Gaza Strip. 6 The average daily Palestinian labour movement through Erez crossing is calculated excluding weekends i.e. Fridays and Saturdays. 7 Rosh Hashanah (4 – 5 Oct.), Yom Kippur (13 Oct.), Sukkot (18 – 24 Oct.) and Simcaht Torah (25 Oct.). 8 Government of Israel Bertini Commitment (2002)(confirmed during the Bertini mission): Increase in the shipments at Karni crossing in the Gaza Strip. For more information see OCHA Gaza Access report (October 2005). 9 The average daily number of truckloads of imported and exported goods is calculated on the basis of 30 days per month. 10 For more information see OCHA Gaza Access report (October 2005). 11 For more information see OCHA Gaza Access report (October 2005).

OCHA – Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs P.O. Box 38712 Jerusalem | Phone: +972 (0)2 5829962 / 5825853 | Fax: +972 (0)2 5825841 | eMail: ochaopt@un.org | Web: www.ochaopt.org

7


Humanitarian Update | October 2005

Government of Israel Bertini Commitments (2002) - Facilitation of International Organisations: (1) Israel will fully facilitate the assistance activities of international organisations with particular reference to UNRWA; (2) Israel agrees to review and strengthen the liaison arrangements between international agencies and the IDF to facilitate assistance activities; and (3) Israel will improve the situation at checkpoints, including the deployment of more experienced IDF personnel. 13 Government of Israel Bertini Commitment (2002): Problems related to water deliveries to Palestinian towns and villages will be addressed to ensure that daily water deliveries in proper quantities can be supplied by Palestinian water tankers. 14 Government of Israel Bertini Commitment (2002)(confirmed during the Bertini mission): The fishing zone for Palestinian fishing boats of the Gaza Strip will be extended to 12 nautical miles. For more information see OCHA Gaza Access report (October 2005). 15 Government of Israel Bertini Commitment (2002)(confirmed during the Bertini mission): Facilitation of the Palestinian Olive Harvest. 12

OCHA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs P.O. Box 38712 Jerusalem | Phone: +972 (0)2 5829962 / 5825853 | Fax: +972 (0)2 5825841 | eMail: ochaopt@un.org | Web: www.ochaopt.org

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http://www.ochaopt.org/documents/ochaHU1005_En  

http://www.ochaopt.org/documents/ochaHU1005_En.pdf

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