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May 3rd-16th, 2013 // VOL. 1 // ISSUE 2

TOMS RIVER AREA • JACKSON • BRICK

• COASTAL BAR RIER ISLAND

LAKEWOOD, NJ PERMIT NO. 181

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www.OceanCountySignal.com


The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Toms River

Small South Carolina Town Repays Toms River For Generous Donations After 1989 Hurricane by Phil Stilton TOMS RIVER - In September 1989, Hurricane Hugo, a Category Four hurricane with 140 mile-per-hour winds made landfall near Charleston Harbor in South Carolina, damaging or destroying nearly 50,000 homes statewide. Like Hurricane Sandy, strong winds and a powerful storm surge were responsible for the majority of the damage, which also took 35 lives. Shortly after Hugo left, a truck driver from Toms River, passing through the small town of McClellanville, population 500, noticed how the small town resembled his hometown. McClellanville lies about 40 miles northeast of Charleston and is a 700 mile drive from Toms River. According to McClellanville Mayor Rutledge B. Leland III, who has served as the town leader since 1976, that truck driver went on to call WOBM and tell the story of his town. Soon after, through Hometown Heroes, WOBM was able to raise donations including food, water, clothing, toiletries and workers which were dispatched in a caravan of 38 trucks. “A lot of help came down here from Toms River,” Mayor Leland said. “It started out small, but it became huge and a lot of people came to help financially and personally. It was incredible, the number of people who helped us out. “ Twenty-three years later, Mayor Leland said when residents of his town heard about Superstorm Sandy hitting Toms River, they knew they had to respond in kind. “Our goal was to raise as much as we could,” he said. “The circumstances were different, we’re a town of 500 and Toms River, nearly

100,000, so we didn’t know how much we could raise, so we set a goal of $10,000. We ended up raising $118,000.” The mayor said that the bulk of the donations came from an anonymous donor from nearby Isle of Palm, South Carolina, who wrote a $100,000 check to the fund set up by the town. The people of McClellanville to this day still remember the assistance provided in the weeks after Hurricane Hugo. “The name Toms River is held in high esteem here in McClellanville,” said Daniel

Bates, a real estate agent and operator of a McClellanville community website. “I was 9 at the time and it was an amazing thing for a child to

need to say a big thank you to McClellanville for your generous donation.” “Many of us in Toms River remember reaching out to you in 1989 when Hurricane Hugo struck your area,” he continued. “We appreciate the reciprocity you have returned to us in our time of need.” “Your thoughtful gift will help many residents with their Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts,” Mayor Kelaher wrote. “We have used the funds for our non-profit Toms River Schools Hurricane Relief Fund... we will be donating the money to families who are on a lower

Gilford Park Yacht Club Demolished by Garrett Greb TOMS RIVER—This past March the Gilford Park Yacht Club was demolished after sustaining severe damage during Hurricane Sandy. Members pitched in to assist in the demolition and volunteered their time. “We’re going to raise it up and put it on pilings,” said Bill, a volunteer at the club tasked with overseeing the demolition process who declined to give his last name. “The layout is essentially going to be the same, no major changes, but it’s pretty much the same.” If there was any good news to be found at the demolition site of the historic building, it is that the beach and boat ramp will be open this season. “A lot of people use this boat ramp in the

summer, it’s one of the few left in operation along the river,” he added. Dave Felton, also a member of the club, utilized his Felton Trucking Company to haul debris away for the club. Anthony Perrone, a driver at Felton Trucking said, “Dave’s part of the yacht club and he’s doing what he can here to help out and he’s been involved in

helping out with a lot of debris removal projects around Ocean County.” The Gilford Park Yacht Club is a private yacht club that usually has a waiting list for boat owners wanting to dock their boats there, but this year could be different as many have lost their boats and those spots may open up this year, if only temporarily.

Toms River Marine Recounts Life and Death in Afghanistan

see, the way total strangers lined up to help us out.” “Everybody in town felt like we needed to do something when we heard the news about Toms River,” he continued. “We really wanted to make sure whatever we did here went to help Toms River.” “It does get better,” Mr. Bates added, recalling that for five to ten years after the storm ravaged their town, conversations were framed as either being topics beforeHugo or after-Hugo. In Toms River, Mayor Thomas F. Kelaher remembered well the spirit that united the township behind the Hurricane Hugo effort. Mayor Leland said that McClellanville has been in con-

tact with Mayor Kelaher to thank us for our generosity as their town recovered from Hugo, and now they are returning the favor. “Our township is still reeling from the devastation of Hurricane Sandy. It has been a challenge to listen to the struggles that our residents face,” Mr. Kelaher wrote in a letter to McClellanville, “Over 10,500 homes had some form of flood or wind damage and the rebuilding process is still underway. Many residents lost their valuables and treasures. As we continue to put the pieces back together, we

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

income level, and we feel that this is the best way possible to help the people most in need. WOBM, which spearheaded the effort to bring supplies to McClellanville, then included station employee Bill Mecca who remembered the hurricane recovery effort. Shortly after Hurricane Hugo, WOBM produced a documentary called “Hurricane Hugo: It Could Have Been New Jersey.” “I had been working at WOBM about eight months, after working in TV news, when Hugo happened,” Mr. Mecca said. “I was sent down to McClellanville to coordinate things on that end and report [and] spent a lot of time in the Emergency Command Center in Charleston and in McClellanville.” Toms River residents eventually loaded the 38 truckloads of goods and money. Mr. Mecca said driving through some of the shore towns today bears an eerie resemblance to McClellanville in 1989. “It reminds me of the scene in South Carolina. Homes picked up off their foundations, fishing boats tossed around like toys,” he said. “In many ways the storms are similar, it was the storm surge that did the bulk of the damage.” When Mr. Mecca returned to Ocean County from the southern state, he said he convinced the station to produce a documentary. “I got tape from the stations in South Carolina, shot some here, and was given some edit time at Jackson Cable. It was ¾ inch tape back then,” he said. “I was able to do the final mix at my old station in Pennsylvania. I found one of the VHS copies recently after Sandy and posted it on Youtube.” Now, nearly 25 years later, Mayor Leland says scars of Hugo are hard to find and his community has recovered. “Things eventually did get better and even though it may seem impossible right now, things will improve.”

TOMS RIVER - Township native and resident Robert M. Tanner III recently completed work on and published his first book, “Memoirs of an Outlaw: Life in the Sandbox,” a look at the unbreakable bonds formed between U.S. Marines overseas and the hardships our service members endure fighting for our freedom. In the book, Tanner gives civilians a unique and personal look into the life of a Marine Corps infantryman who was a part of the elite Delta Company Outlaws. It was written for those with an interest in military life as well as history, this memoir takes readers through the life of a Marine infantryman living and fighting in Fallujah, Iraq, during the height of the war on terror. “The Outlaws experienced so much together – training, combat, life and death - which formed a bond that’s stronger than family,” said Mr. Tanner. “Whether it was playing pranks on one another or being a shoulder to lean on when times got tough, these events formed a friendship that will last a lifetime.” Tanner recently shared his story which inspired him to write his book: On the morning of September 11, 2001, I sat in the confines of a receiving bay on Parris Island in South Carolina and wondered what I had gotten myself into. I heard a brief commotion coming from the drill instructors in our room, so I looked up to see what they were talking about. I glanced at the only television in the room and was shocked to see an image of the World Trade Center on fire. As 21-year-old Toms River, N.J., native, I naively joined the Marine Corps looking for a new adventure and a fresh beginning. After watching the towers crumble to the ground, my world would be turned upside down and the

adventure I so eagerly wanted would escalate to a new level, one that I never anticipated. Three years later, in February 2004, I was deployed to  Fallujah, Iraq, with the Delta Company Outlaws, 2ndLight Armored Reconnaissance Battaltion, 2nd  Marine Division. I had the honor of serving as a corporal in the scout section leader role for 1st Platoon. Day in and day out for seven months, our company would conduct operations in some of the most dangerous places in Al Anbar province. As a company, we experienced many things most civilians could never fathom. By the end of our deployment, we lost eight fine Marines in total, men whom I consider my brothers. As we began to take on losses within our company, a makeshift memorial was built in our section of Camp Baharia to honor the ultimate sacrifice that so many of our comrades made. This memorial came to represent a bond, one which will never be forgotten or taken lightly. It brought us closer together as a family, making us shed our differences and realize that we were all in it together, not as individuals, but as one big, diverse family. It’s been nine years since I came back from Iraq. In that time, I’ve moved back to my hometown of Toms River, married a wonderful woman, Melissa, and become a father to two perfect boys, Gavin, 9 months, and Joshua, who is turning 3 in April. I’ve had the opportunity to complete two college degrees, wrote a book about my time overseas, entitled “Memoirs of an Outlaw,” and was fortunate to find a job working for the Department of Veterans Affairs as a business systems analyst. But every time I think of all that I’ve accomplished, I realize that eight of my brothers, along with thou-

sands of other fallen service members, will never get to have those experiences. They will not get to experience the satisfaction of graduating from college, the butterflies they feel when they marry the woman of their dreams, or the overwhelming joy felt

when their child is born. This daily guilt is my scar, a constant reminder that life is finite and could end tomorrow. My experiences have greatly humbled me, bringing my naïve aspirations of worldly adventure back down to earth. Rather than worry about what tomorrow will bring, I focus on what is before me, ensuring that all those I encounter on a daily basis know that I care for them, whether I agree with them or not. Because, if tomorrow doesn’t come for me, I want my last impression to be my best. There are many things I wish I could take back. I wish my brothers were still with me today. I wish I could see pictures of their weddings or children on Facebook. I wish I could read their daily rants in my news feed. But, in the end, I would never wish away my time in Iraq. It made me a better man, scars and all.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Toms River Elks Lodge #1875: Elks Care, Elks Share by Christa Riddle TOMS RIVER - Although many people have heard of the Elks, most are unaware of the fraternal organization’s intense dedication to volunteerism and extending assistance throughout communities nationwide. The Elks, whose motto is “Elks care, Elks share,” are the largest non-profit organization in New Jersey, using lodge-earned and fundraised money to support various groups in need. In total, there are 39 Elks lodges in New Jersey and 11 lodges in the Monmouth and Ocean County district, including the Toms River Elks Lodge #1875. “In every Elks organization, 75 percent of the money raised, whether it be from fundraising or any other lodge activities, goes back to help the local community in some way,” tells Leonard “Len” Tarnowski, past district deputy and past exalted ruler of Elks Lodge #1875, which divides its profits to support many local factions, such as veterans, youth sports, scholastics, special needs children, and drug awareness programs. The lodge also donates money to Cooley’s anemia research and the Children’s Specialized Hospital. In 2013, Elks Lodge #1875 celebrates its 60th anniversary; 2013 is also the 100th anniversary of the New Jersey Elks. “Always remember, you’re not in this world alone; give a helping hand to the person standing beside you,” reminds Norvella “Pug” Lightbody, exalted ruler of Elks Lodge #1875, in the March, 2013 edition of the lodge’s newsletter, Elks Talk: News of the Lodge. Due to their philanthropic vision, in May, 2012, Elks Lodge #1875 earned the Excellence in Philanthropy Award from the New Jersey Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals. With honor, they were nominated for the award by the Children’s Specialized Hospital, to whom Elks Lodge #1875 has donated $15,000 six years in a row. The lodge was one of only six award recipients statewide recognized with

various honors. In August, 2012, the lodge’s special needs committee, chaired by Patty Gillich and assisted by 25 helpers, members, special needs teachers, and special needs specialty advisors, held Pirate’s Weekend to raise money for special needs children. Starting with a fishing trip donated as part of a raffle, Gillich and her committee grew the raffle into a weekend-long event incorporating a host of pirate and island-themed activities, complete with a pig roast and other refreshments; DJ entertainment; a “pirate boat” and bounce house; tiki islands featuring hair wraps, face painting, and a variety of games; and plenty of pirate treasures, loot, and costumes. Gillich and her team re-created for the kids what you would find at Disney World’s Pirates of the Caribbean, scouring the area for cost-free props and re-purposing and reusing what the Elks already had from previous events to minimize expenses and maximize profits to donate. The Elks invited children from local area special needs schools and camps to attend and partake in the fun. “Live with passion, play with purpose is our committee’s motto,” quotes Gillich. Fundraised money from events such as Pirate’s Weekend goes toward the lodge’s annual funding to send special needs children from the area to the Elks’ Camp Moore, “The Miracle on the Mountain,” in Haskell, New Jersey. Each summer season, about 700 special needs campers, all sponsored by local Elks lodges such as Toms River’s Elks Lodge #1875, enjoy time participating in recreational and social activities at Camp Moore. Last year, Elks Lodge #1875 proudly sponsored 14 children at $500 each to attend Camp Moore, paying for each camper in full. At the camp, each camper has an assigned staff member, and the kids enjoy a variety of typical summer camp activities geared to accommodate their special needs. There are even aquatic wheelchairs so that wheelchair-bound

18 YEAR OLD AWARDED CITIZENS HEROISM AWARD By Robert Abrams Jr. On Tuesday July 10, 2012 at 4:13 am the East Dover Fire Company was dispatched to a structure fire at 969 Hazelwood Rd. Upon arrival Chief Robert Abrams observed heavy fire conditions emanating from the southwest area of the structure. It was learned that all occupants were out of the residence and that Debra Luster sustained burn injuries. It was further learned that the Mrs. Luster’s 18 year old daughter, Danielle Luster removed her from the house along

with the victim’s 12 year old granddaughter, Jodeci White. Subsequently Mrs. Luster was transported to Brick hospital where she was treated for second and third degree burns. Through Police and Fire investigator’s interviews it was learned that Danielle Luster was in her bedroom sleeping when she started smelling and seeing smoke. Danielle went to the living room located on the first floor of the residence and observed her mother on the couch partially on fire. Danielle attempted to ex-

campers can get the chance to swim. A team of Elks from the local lodge visited Camp Moore to prepare dinner for the campers with food donated by Applebee’s. Elks Lodge #1875’s largest fundraiser is their Halloween Haunted Charity Ball. From the proceeds of this annual fall event, the lodge purchases three speciallyequipped bicycles adapted for each recipient’s personal needs. In addition to their multitude of fundraiser events throughout the year to help special needs children and many other community sectors, Elks Lodge #1875regularly hosts bingo every Wednesday night at 7 p.m., which is open to the public and gathers nearly 140 players some nights. They also sponsor Toms River’s Boy Scout Troop #50 and are hoping to sponsor a Girl Scout troop in the near future. They extend boating safety classes and participate in community service projects and fundraisers with other volunteer organizations. For more information, please contact the Toms River Elks Lodge #1875, 600 Washington Avenue in Toms River, at 732-3499660, or visit www.tomsriverelks.com. The Elks Lodge #1875 welcomes anyone to stop by to talk and learn more about their organization. Their newsletter, Elks Talk: News of the Lodge can also be viewed online, along with the lodge’s calendar and information about the lodge’s officers, members, and charitable events. “When you join the Elks, we become your second family,” shares Exalted Ruler Lightbody. “If you want to laugh, we’ll laugh with you. If you want to cry, we’ll cry with you. We have all types of members and different committees, and everyone is accepted for what they can give. Our main goal all year long is to raise money so we can give it away and serve people. We are not just a social club, like some might think. We know that helping is contagious; it grows inside of you.” tinguish the fire but was unable to. Danielle observed her mother’s oxygen supply line on fire and removed her mother from the residence. Danielle also removed her cousin, Jodeci White from the residence bringing both to a safe location. It is Danielle’s selfless act, putting herself in danger to rescue and help her mother and cousin that this writer wishes to submit Danielle Luster for the citizen’s heroism award for saving the life of her mother and cousin. Danielle showed great courage and didn’t panic enabling her to remove her mother and cousin from the residence to safety.

Pleasant Plains 60th Annual Flapjack Breakfast The Pleasant Plains Volunteer Fire Company hosted their 60th annual all you can eat flapjack breakfast on March 24th. The event is a bi-annual fundraiser by the department to raise funds for operations. The department also accepted food donations for the food pantry.

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People’s Pantry Helps Storm Victims by Christa Riddle TOMS RIVER - In the half a year that has passed since Hurricane Sandy marred the Jersey Shore, resilient and determined New Jersey residents and business owners have relentlessly forged ahead, desperately trying to reassemble the lives and storefronts left shredded by the hurricane’s 80-mile-per-hour winds and fierce storm surges. With winds spanning over 1,000 miles, Hurricane Sandy went down as the largest Atlantic hurricane on record; it also holds title as the second costliest hurricane in America’s history, producing an estimated damage toll of over $50 billion

had the skill set necessary to help a vulnerable population,” commented Donaghue. “Instead of asking for donations for education, I shifted my focus to donations for living. We see a tremendous amount of need here on a daily basis, and every day, all of us volunteers learn as we go. We are all able to shift gears and make changes as we go so that we can meet the needs of the people. It is a process.” Originally, The People’s Pantry opened its doors in Bellcrest Plaza near the FEMA office; to accommodate the community’s need for ongoing assistance and the large tractor-trailer loads of donations coming in from around

in tents, provide free labor and cleanup assistance to residents and were incremental in cleaning up the barrier island area. They are still very much needed in New Jersey, and Courtney Chibarro, a community activist, volunteer coordinator, and South Seaside Park resident, is asking Congress and Governor Chris Christie for an Americorp’s extension for New Jersey under the longterm recovery bill. The People’s Pantry serves up to 800 families per week, and 5,000-plus families are registered there to receive supplies. To provide families with a bit of normalcy and an escape from hard times, donation drives for children’s

The People’s Pantry Executive Director, Patricia Donaghue (center), is joined by volunteers from Americorp and The Corporation for National and Community Service. Volunteers work around the clock assisting those devastated by Hurricane Sandy. With an increase in demand six months after the disaster, The People’s Pantry received donated devices, including tablets and smart phones, from Verizon Wireless. in the United States1. In Toms River alone, 8,800 families were affected by the storm. Behind the sobering numbers and statistics left in Hurricane Sandy’s wake rests the painful personal stories of the families who lost their homes and personal property. It is hard for most people removed from the Jersey Shore to fathom that there are still, six months later, families rendered homeless by the hurricane and floods, people still living out of their cars, still wondering where their next meal will come from. Families remain split apart and living separately, wherever they are able to find accommodations; area residents continue to debate if raising their damaged homes is an affordable option. Displaced homeowners struggle to pay rent in addition to the mortgages they still owe on unlivable houses. Although many media sources have since moved on from covering Hurricane Sandy, the lives of the families so greatly impacted by the devastation have not moved on as easily. As a result, The People’s Pantry of Toms River has become more important than ever as a lifeline for food, supplies, and resources. “When we first set up after the hurricane, we thought it would be a temporary situation, a location to distribute supplies and food collected throughout the community. No one knew the extent of what had happened,” shared Pat Donaghue, president of the Toms River Regional School District’s special education PTA and coordinator of The People’s Pantry. “Soon, we realized we would need to provide ongoing relief to help all of those in need.” The People’s Pantry began through the Toms River Regional School District under Tammi Millar, the district’s communications coordinator. Once everyone initially running the pantry returned to work, volunteers were needed to keep it going. Donaghue immediately stepped up and took over. “As a special needs advocate for many years, I already

the country, the pantry moved to its current location at 1001 Fischer Boulevard in the Dollar General Plaza, complete with loading docks. Donaghue and the pantry’s volunteers constantly assess what is needed by the community’s people, then make adjustments to provide whatever assistance they can to meet those demands. They aim to become a comprehensive resource center, a one-stop location covering the spectrum of assistance, from food, clothing, and supplies to information on how to receive assistance from government and other agencies. New Jersey Hope and Healing, whose professionals provide assistance and guidance for those experiencing severe emotional reactions to the storm and subsequent flooding, have been at The People’s Pantry during all open hours, helping storm victims cope with their changed lives and losses. Donaghue commented, “We have had severe flooding four times since the storm. At the end of March, rain caused flooding that washed out Fischer Boulevard. It is a far-reaching, domino effect. The bay has debris from the storm, so it is higher than usual. As it rises, there is no protection because the barriers and dunes are gone. We have kids as young as the elementary school grades suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, caregiver stress, and survival stress.” The Americorps response team, serving Ocean County since Hurricane Sandy’s onset, needed a local-organization sponsorship to stay in the area for long-term assistance; The People’s Pantry provided that, and Americorps is also working out of the pantry. Americorps was not granted longterm funding in the Ocean County area, despite the fact that they were granted longterm funding in New York after Hurricane Sandy, as well as for Hurricane Katrina and the Joplin tornado; volunteers still remain in those areas to date. The organization’s volunteers, young adults who sleep

snacks, hair care products, breakfast foods, and movie nights have proven to be great successes. Eventually, Donaghue plans to host a sit-down dinner for the families, where they can rejoin to relax and eat a home-cooked meal. Aside from the regular donations of food and clothing, The People’s Pantry collects laundry, paper products, and cleaning supplies during their rolling donation drives in the Toms River schools. Two to three pickup-truck loads of supplies will come in from one school at a clip, and teachers, many of whom have lost homes and personal property themselves, have pitched in by delivering collections to the pantry using their own cars. Even the victims using the pantry have stepped up to help others in need. The pantry also accepts donations of books and gently used toys. Donaghue, who says she normally is not the crying type, shared, “I have literally been reduced to tears by donations, like the pallet of hand sanitizer that came all the way from Ohio during flu season. People from around the country realize the amount of goods we need to help all of those in need. Right here, a teacher raised 22 boxes of snacks, cookies, and juice boxes. The children hadn’t had a typical kids’ snack in months, something we usually take for granted. Paper products, kids’ snacks, and cleaning supplies are like gold now.” When the pantry experiences an overflow of supplies, they welcome the opportunity to donate to other area centers in need. Donaghue, who proudly puts in about 60 hours a week at the pantry, commented, “Every minute I volunteer at the pantry is an honor. I have lived in Toms River for 20 years, and this is not the first time I have seen this community come together. I am proud to say I live here with such incredible people.” As the rebuilding and reconstructing stretch on in the months ahead, The People’s Pantry welcomes donations and volunteers.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Brits See Block House Battle In Different Light by Mark Mutter, Toms River Historian The battle of Toms River occurred on March 24, 1782 here on the present day grounds of Town Hall. For we, the Americans, the nine men who were killed that day are patriots—defending our village in the waning days of the Revolutionary War. Here is the British version of what happened: An authentic Account of the Expedition against the Rebel Post on Tom’s River, New Jersey, under the Orders of the Honourable Board of Directors of Associated Loyalists “On Wednesday the 20th, Lieutenant Blanchard, of the armed whale-boats, and about 80 men belonging to them, with Captain Thomas, and Lieutenant Roberts, both of the late Buck’s County Volunteers, and between 30 and 40 others Refugee Loyalists; the whole under the command of Lieutenant Blanchard, proceeded to Sandy Hook, under convoy of Captain Stewart Rois,

in the armed brig Arrogant, where they were detained by unfavourable winds until the 23rd; about 12 o’clock on that night the party landed near the mouth of Tom’s River, and marched to the Block-House, at the town of Dover, and reached it just at day-light. On the way they were challenged and fired upon, and when they came to the works, they found the Rebels, consisting of 25 or 26 twelve-months men and militia, apprised of their coming, and prepared for defence. “The post into which they had thrown themselves was about six or seven feet high, made of large logs, with loopholes between, and a number of brass swivels on the top, which was entirely open, nor was there any way of entering but by climbing over. They had, besides swivels, muskets with bayonets and long pikes for their defence. Lieutenant Blanchard summoned them to surrender, which they not only refused, but bid the party defiance; on which he immediately ordered the place

Silverton Chief Presented With Award Of Merit By John Mount, Jr. Bob Sinnott has been a member of the Silverton Fire Department for over 20 years. During that time, Bob has served as a fire officer for a majority of his firefighting career. This included serving as the Fire Chief for 5 of those 20 years. At the end of October, 2012 Super Storm Sandy hit the New Jersey coast devastating a large part of the Toms River Township waterfront properties. Most of the attention was focused on the barrier island area. No one except those who resided on the mainland waterfront properties knew of the destruction there. The Silverton Fire Department was dispatched and had to deal with various incidents of fire, water rescue, hazardous conditions etc. starting that night. Over the next couple of months, Chief Sinnott would command one of the largest fire operations in the history of Toms River. During this time, his leadership skills would be to the ultimate test. The storm started with structure fires, loss of apparatus, rising water making it almost impossible to make it down the streets of Silverton. The Green Island area truly became an island of its own. The Silver Bay and South Shore Drive properties were under water. Chief Sinnott and the Silverton Fire Company started doing what they were trained to do, act courageously and professionally no matter what they faced. They were the rescuers, the firefighter, the friend, the people that were there to help no matter what the task was. This company did whatever it took to get the job done and left no man behind. No internet, no television, no warm house none of the things that we take for granted in our everyday lives were available. Well over 600 homes were overrun by the rising tidal waters. 30 firefighter’s homes

were affected by the storm. 15 of these firefighter’s houses were damaged extensively. Chief Sinnott was one of those firefighters. His house will probably have to be torn down and rebuilt. It’s just not the material structure that was washed away here but the pieces of our everyday lives that we now have to pick up and try to place back together. During this time, Chief Sinnott never left his command in Silverton. He as well as many others remained there and became “Silverton Strong”. As a Chief Officer, Bob knew what he had to do to keep everyone together. Staying there over the next couple of months leaving, only to take care of his family and basic necessities of life. Although totally drained himself, he still remained supportive to his company and his community. In making sure that all available equipment was being utilized to the maximum potential, Chief Sinnott made arrangements for law enforcement to utilize their fireboat patrolling the areas around Silverton. Firefighters from other areas arrived at Station 29 to assist in the various operations that needed to be completed. Chief Sinnott made sure this was a coordinated effort by all involved. Chief Sinnott realized that he did needed help to get through these troubling times. He enlisted help from several of the surrounding fire companies and their officers. He opened his arms and welcomed everyone and made them feel like part of the community. Firefighters from all over the east coast arrived to help out. It was amazing to see such a brotherhood. Although a large amount of attention was being placed on the flood ravaged areas there was still a large section of Silverton not affected by water, although those areas were affected by power outages and other hazardous conditions

to be stormed, which was accordingly done, and though defended with obstinancy, it was soon carried. The Rebels had nine men killed in the assault, and 12 made prisoners, two of whom are wounded, the rest made their escape in the confusion. Among the killed was a Major of the militia, two Captains, and one Lieutenant. The Captain of the Twelvemonth’s Men, stationed there, is amongst the prisoners, who are all brought safe to town. On our side two were killed, Lieutenant Irdell of the armed boatmen, and Lieutenant Inflee of the Loyalists, both very brave Officers, who distinguished themselves on the attack, and whose loss is much lamented. Lieutenant Roberts and five others are wounded, but it is thought none of them are in a dangerous way. “The Town, as it is called, consisting of about a dozen houses, in which none but a piratical set of bandits resided, together with a grist and saw mill, were, with the blockhouse, burned to the ground, and an iron can-

non spiked and thrown into the river. A fine large barge, called Hyler’s Barge, and another boat, in which the Rebels used to make their excursions on the coast, were brought off. Some other attempts were

intended to have been made, but the appearance of bad weather, and the situation of the wounded, being without either surgeon or medicines, induced the party to return to New York, where they arrived

Ocean Signal Marks Launch With Historic Donation to Toms River

such as trees and wires down, gas leaks etc. Chief Sinnott made sure there was coverage for these calls as well. Chief Sinnott is always there willing to lend a hand no matter what time or day it is. If Bob is available he will make it happen. If he is not available, he will still make sure it gets done. Bob has shown what it takes not only to be a great human being but a dynamic leader.

by Erik Weber TOMS RIVER-In coordination with the official launch of the Ocean Signal newspaper and in conjunction with the 231st anniversary of the Battle of the Toms River Block House, Ocean Signal partner, Phil Stilton donated an original March 30th, 1782 copy of the London Chronicle to the Township of Toms River. The action signifies the Signal’s commitment to the preservation of history and the paper’s dedication and commitment to the communities it serves. “We feel information and history is something that should be freely shared with everyone,” Mr. Stilton said. “It’s why we started this newspaper and teamed up with the Riverside Signal, a newspaper that also values the importance of history in the news reporting process.” The paper was presented to Mayor Thomas Kelaher and is currently on display outside the L. Manuel Hirschblond Meeting Room in town hall. Mayor Kelaher thanked

the Ocean Signal and wished the paper good luck in the future. Mr. Stilton added, “As the new newspaper in town, I think it’s fitting to put something that has been hiding

on the 25th.” The British may have won the battle, but, we, the Americans, won the war. A peace treaty came in 1783—and the United States of America was formally recognized by Great Britain to be a free, sovereign and independent nation. in my office for months on display for everyone in town to view. I can only hope that in 231 years, copies of our newspaper today are still available. This paper is a testament to the long term survival and to the importance of newspapers in society… You can’t mount and display an internet blog or Facebook post in a museum showcase.”

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Ocean County Toms River Helicopter Pilot Donated Hours Of Flight Time After Sandy Turns Passion For Aerial Photography Into New Form Of Urban Art After Storm by Christa Riddle In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the viciously bruised and battered Jersey Shore faces the arduous task of putting life back together again, one family and one building at a time, a true testament to the well-known adage, Jersey Strong. Sandy’s wrath of murderous winds and ripping tides stripped away treasured landmarks by the dozen, ferociously gobbling up entire boats, buildings, boardwalks, bridges, amusement parks,

and family homes, then spitting them out into unrecognizable splatterings of splintered, weathered wood hundreds of feet from where

they originally stood. With widespread evacuations and roads closed to access, washed away and angrily blockaded by insurmountable mountains of transplanted sand, many could not comprehend the full magnitude of Sandy’s devastation to the area or even to their own personal property; we could only imagine. Although we still faced many unknowns weeks later, with seemingly endless tasks of clean up and reconstruction looming ahead, helicopter pilot Patrick Day, vice presi-

dent of charter and aircraft management at Liberty Helicopters, managed to find a silver lining, a sentiment shared by many: “This tragedy has

brought us together. I have gotten to meet neighbors I had never met before, to witness the entire community coming together at centers and shelters,” shares Day. “A third of our community has been displaced, yet we are united, hopeful, and strong.” Day, a Jersey Shore native, recalls his own childhood memories at the shore, sorry that Sandy cut short his own four children’s Jersey Shore summers of fun. Day was commissioned by the Ocean Signal to take photographs of the barrier island to post photographs on the company’s “Ocean County Police Blotter” page. The two companies worked together to report on the situation on the barrier island at a time when access via the ground was not permitted. “The Wednesday after the storm, I went up in my helicopter with a camera, taking pictures. The devastation was absolutely unbelievable. I kept taking pictures, then posted them on the Ocean County Police Blotter page to give perspective to the devastation,” tells Day. After, he met with an overwhelming response from people who were thankful for the pictures. “The pictures helped to quell a little bit of their uncertainty. Some people were able to see their immediate areas, their homes, familiar areas for the first time,” says Day. Once in the air, Day also witnessed the dedicated first responders working amidst a sea of perils: downed wires, masses of rubble, collapsing buildings. He then offered aerial views of specific areas to first responders so they could assess situations and damage and properly prepare before deploying to help. Some of

those using the aerial view shots included the Silverton Fire Department, Emergency Management, and the Seaside Police Department. The Facebook pictures,

of the Jersey Shore, taking pictures from the sky as the community comes back to life. Day and his helicopter have been serving as an extension of the U.S. Coast Guard as

threaded together with personal comments and reactions to tell a community-wide story from multiple perspectives, were able to be viewed on both Patrick Day’s page and the Ocean County Police Blotter page. Day plans to also chronicle the reconstruction

well, providing assistance to manage the gas and oil spills from destroyed marinas. Since many of his regular helicopter charters involve celebrities, he has tapped into these relationships to garner support for the Jersey Shore and its state of devastation. Famous ath-

letes and actors, such as Mark Sanchez, Todd Frazier, the cast of the Jersey Shore, Tom Cruise, and Russell Crowe, have gone up with Day, even flying with first responders to see the destruction and loss first-hand. “Once you see the damage, you can’t help but get involved,” comments Day. In the months after Hurricane Sandy, after immediate need for photos and information had subsided, Day used his experience photographing the Jersey Shore to New York City and began photographing stunning views of New York City. He has since launched a new business, NY On Air, which offers exceptional one of a kind photographs of the Big Apple. Day and the Ocean Signal plan on returning to the skies over Ocean County in the coming weeks to document the recovery process and to photograph many of the county’s treasures from the air. You can visit NY On Air on Facebook and browse through dozens of Day’s photographs.

With Looming Federal Legislation, Gun Application Increases Overwhelm Local Police Departments by Phil Stilton OCEAN COUNTY—Despite the rejection of President Obama’s gun control legislation by the U.S. Senate, residents are still flocking in record numbers to local police stations to apply for firearms permits. In Jackson Township, Captain Richard Wagner said there were 817 firearms permit applications processed by his agency. From September through December of last year, his department processed 333 applications, a more than 100% increase from 2011, when there were just 148 during the same period. In Brick Township, Sgt. Keith Reinhard says his department experienced a 128% increase in January and a 229% increase in De-

cember over previous years. The increase in Brick began in November when Reinhard noted a 53% increase. The increase in legal gun permits doesn’t worry local police officers. “There have been no reports of safety concerns with either the officers or residents of Brick Township,” Reinhard said of the increase in gun permits. In Jackson, Police Chief Matthew Kunz said, “Residents who lawfully possess firearms do not present an increased safety concern.” One concern Chief Kunz faces is the task of staffing his department to process the increase in requests. “The volume of permit applications has created delays as clerical staff have other duties to attend to also,” he said. “Captain Wagner has also had to reassign detec-

tives from other details at times to assist with the background checks when there was a large backlog of applications.” According to Captain Wagner, the average wait time for a permit in Jackson is about three months before the application gets to him before background checks can begin. This step is only started after the applicant has submitted all the required paperwork and has been fingerprinted and all letters from references have been received. Then, “It depends on having the available detectives to complete the investigation,” Wagner said. Delays in processing are also evident in Brick Township. “The increase in applications has created processing delays for Brick

Township Police Department,” Sgt. Reinhard said. “In the past the wait time was approximately 6 to 8 weeks. Currently with the increase in applicants, it is taking approximately three months or longer to fully process and investigate the applicants.” Both police departments stressed the importance of properly completed permits and said residents seeking permits should ensure the accuracy of the information provided and they take all of the necessary steps such as making and keeping their appointments to be fingerprinted. Lt. Steven Laskiewicz, of Jackson, also reminds applicants to be patient because of the high volume of requests the department is currently receiving.

Grant Facilitates Purchase of Thermal Camera for Mantoloking Fire Dept. MANTOLOKING - Mantoloking Fire Chief Larry Gilman traveled to accept a special $9,028 grant from Apollo General Insurance and Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company to purchase equipment to support the town’s rebuilding efforts.  The grant was awarded at the National Demolition Convention. The grant funded a thermal imaging camera, which enables firefighters to see through smoke and darkness and help them quickly locate anyone trapped in a building during a fire. The camera can also play a major role in reducing property damage. With a thermal imager in hand, firefighters can often locate hot spots inside walls and extinguish them before they spread. It also allows rescuers to better scout collapsed floors and other dan-

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gerous situations that could result in serious injury or death. ~ courtesy Melissa Queen, Apollo General

(From left) Fire Chief Larry Gilman, Sally Archbold of Fireman’s Fund, and Bob Elster, President of Apollo General. For advertising, call 732-833-2365


The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

The Lakewood Scoop

Author Shares Pinelands Stories In Book Series by Christa Riddle

Mass Transit Coming to Lakewood

NJ Transit approved the purchase of six buses to begin the operation of its own mass transit system to begin this year. The purchase was made through grant money by the Federal Transit Administration and called for four standard transit buses costing a total of $598,000 and two mini buses, which cost a total of $298,000. The buses are expected to operate on a route north and south on Route 9 between Toms River and Howell.

Drunk Driver Caught on Video

After crashing into a parked car on Somerset Avenue and fleeing the scene on foot, the driver, a Hispanic male was later caught by the Lakewood Civilian Safety Watch. The owner of the vehicle which was crashed into told The Lakewood Scoop he and his wife were walking nearby when they heard the incident. He immediately called Lakewood Police and the LCSW. After being brought back to the scene of the incident, the driver failed a field sobriety test.

Crossing Guards Recognized at Luncheon

During a late-morning brunch on April 11, at the township Municipal Building, the Mayor Albert Ackerman and other Committeeman and officials thanked Lakewood’s crossing guards for their professionalism and dedication to their duties – which are performed in the most extreme weather conditions of each season. The brunch, founded by Committeeman Menashe Miller, was also attended by Police Chief Rob Lawson, and Lakewood’s Traffic & Safety division, which oversees the Crossing Guards department.

College Students Volunteer Time for DART

About ten students from the Georgian Court College on Thursday volunteered their time to join DART’s mission in educating others about the dangers of legalities of underage drinking and the purchasing of alcohol for those below the legal age. The students, along with DART member Captain Gregory Meyer and son, Officer Steven Meyer, made stops in several liquor shops around Lakewood and placed stickers on boxes and shelves, bringing awareness to the shoppers. D.A.R.T, Developing Alcohol Responsibility Together, is a project of Saint Barnabas, and is a State-funded grant program aimed at protecting young adults between the ages of 18-25, from the dangers of underage and excessive drinking, prescription drugs, heroin and more. Shots Fired Into Home Police reported shots fired into a Woodlake Manor

home on April 28th. Two shots were reported around midnight. Nobody was reported struck by the bullets, police are investigating.

Ella G. Clarke School Celebrates Arbor Day

Students at the Ella G. Clarke School celebrated Arbor Day by planting 25 new trees around the school’s property.

LCSW Gets New Patrol Vehicle

The Lakewood Civilian Safety Watch (LCSW) in welcomed a new vehicle to their fleet of patrol vehicles on April 26th. The event, held at the town’s Red Square on Clifton Avenue, unveiled the new marked vehicle which was sponsored by the UEZ, and private donations. Mayor Albert Akerman, Senator Robert Singer, Chief Robert Lawson and other officials took the opportunity to thank the volunteer organization for their dedicated service , which has been recognized as vital tool for the town, and particularly for the Lakewood Police Department. Since its inception several years ago, the volunteer organization – which serves as the eyes and ears to the Police Department – has assisted authorities with dozens of arrests – some of which were high profile.

Thermometer Leak Prompts Haz-Mat Response

The Berkeley Township Haz-Mat team responded to Lakewood on April 25th after t a mercury thermometer broken and leaked in a home. The homeowner reportedly called Poison Control after noticing the substance leaking from the broken device. The Coventry Square home was evacuated as Haz-Mat officials removed the mercury.

Lakewood Police to get Tough on Pedestrian Safety

In the coming weeks, if you fail to stop for a pedestrian attempting to cross the road, you will be issued an actual summons, and not just a warning. Similar to the ones conducted on Clifton Avenue, Monmouth Avenue, and Forest Avenue, police on April 24th stopped dozens of drivers who violated the pedestrian crossing law and issued verbal warnings, while handing them a pamphlet explaining the violation they’ve com-

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mitted. Police Chief Rober Lawson said the educational initiative, will be the last. “By the end of today, we will have issued about 1,000 to 1,200 warnings in total and educational material,” Police also note that an intersection does not need to be painted with stripes to require drivers to be required to stop for crossing pedestrians.

War Memorial Vandalized with Gang Graffiti

The War Memorial on North Lake Drive was vandalized with gang graffiti, noticed on April 23rd. The memorial, near the amphitheatre along Lake Carasaljo, was tagged with ‘MS’ and ’13′ along its two sides. Department of Public Works employees cleaned the memorial.

What started as a challenge to halt the development of a stretch of woods across from her New Egypt home inspired author Karen Riley to pen three books on the Pine Barrens and its unique culture. Riley, a lifelong writer with experience in journalism and freelance writing, knew that the surveyors combing the adjacent wooded property foretold its demise. As a member of the Plumsted Environmental Commission and the New Egypt Historical Society, Riley became curious about the land’s environmental and historical value. Riley’s five years of extensive research on the Pine Barrens uncovered the area’s rich history, distinctive background, and many interesting life stories. For example, her investigations revealed that the famous female aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart had jumped from a parachute tower that Riley could have seen today from her window if the tower still existed. Amazingly, most of the locals with which Riley shared this interesting fact had no clue that Earhart ever even set foot in the Pine Barrens. Although the initial battle against the land’s development ended in victory, on May 20, 2005, the day that Riley’s first Pine Barrens book was released on the market, builders broke ground on the property. However, thanks to the efforts of Riley and other supporters, ten acres of the land were preserved and not developed. Riley had always wanted

to write a book, but she was unsure of what the subject would be until she developed a passion for the historical Pine Barrens. “I learned about the area’s villages and industries that once existed. I felt like I had unearthed an ecological and historical gem, more than just a place, and I wanted to share it with others,” tells Riley. Riley’s first book, Whispers in the Pines: The Secrets of Colliers Mills, was produced by a local publisher and dealt mainly with the history and environment of the Colliers Mills area, situated at the Jackson and New Egypt border. It also presented an overview of the Pine Barrens. Still uncovering more information of interest during her continued research, Riley fervently wrote her second book, Voices in the Pines: True Stories from the New Jersey Pine Barrens, released in May, 2009. Her third book, Images of America: The Pine Barrens of New Jersey, debuted in October, 2010. “The publisher initially feared there wouldn’t be enough buyers in such a secluded, wooded area to justify publishing costs. I convinced them that would not be the case, and I was right. We sold 1,200 copies within the first 14 days of the book’s release, shattering records among Arcadia Publishing’s 7,000-plus titles,” informs Riley. Currently, the author is writing her fourth Pine Barrens book, Legendary Locals of the New Jersey Pine Barrens, the first book of a series featuring the life stories of the unsung heroes and heroines who forged the

area’s rich, distinctive history. Thanks to the success of her three other Pine Barrens publications, this book is eagerly anticipated. In addition to her Pine Barrens publications, Riley wrote a book about her relationship with God and her personal journey of healing, Healing in the Hurting Places, published in August, 2011. “My childhood was very painful because I was a victim of mental and sexual abuse. I feel this book was my calling, something I had to do so that I could help other victims have hope and heal,” shares Riley. As a child, Riley spent as much time as possible away from home. “The library, church, and the oceanside became my retreats, places where I could escape from the pain,” tells Riley. She also started writing at the young age of eight as a means to escape from her harrowing childhood. The author’s first published story for pay appeared in a national magazine when she was only 11 years old. Today, Riley, a stage-four cancer survivor, is also an inspirational speaker and childhood sexual abuse advocate. She values each day as a gift, an opportunity to share her strength and empower others through her words, understanding, and actions.

School Bus Erupts in Flames

A bus with Special needs children on board went up in flames on April 22, but nobody was injured, police said. The school bus was transporting children back home from the SCHI school when it apparently overheated and started smoking. The children were quickly removed from the bus just before it went up in flames, a witness said. The children, one of them in a wheelchair, were transferred to another bus.

Lakewood PBA Defeats Lakewood Teachers in Baseball

Public school teachers of the Lakewood Teachers Association were defeated 3-0 in a charity baseball game April 22 against off-duty police of the PBA Local 71. The approximately two hour game at First Energy Park was the first of its kind, and comes at the heels of the winter basketball game featuring the same teams. In the basketball game, the teachers defeated the PBA. Funds raised at the event, were donated to the PTO (Parents Teachers Organization) program of the Clifton Avenue Grade School.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Ocean County STATE TROOPER NAMED PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER Al Della Fave a longtime resident of Ocean County, with more than 30 years of law enforcement experience, will be tasked with guiding press communications and public relations concerning the functions and activities of the Prosecutor’s office. Recognized in 2009 by the Ocean County 200 Club for Meritorious service, Della Fave’s career includes 17 years as press officer for the New Jersey State Police. During that time he was directly responsible for training hundreds of chiefs, prosecutors, police executives, and emer-

gency service personnel in media relations. Under his supervision, the organization’s approach to public information was transformed from reactive to proactive. He built trusting, two-way relationships with reporters that raised the bar for law enforcement press management. In 2008, Al Della Fave was promoted to the rank of major and assigned as the Regional Operations Intelligence Center Task Force Commander, which also encompassed the Office of Cease Fire Operations. The Cease Fire initiative worked to reduce urban street

Lakehurst Police Department Swears in New Officer LAKEHURST--The Lakehurst Police Department swore in their newest officer in April. Roberta A. Brooks of Lakehurst was sworn in at a regular meeting of the Lakehurst Borough Council. Her husband, Charles Brooks, and son, Charles Brooks jr., held the bible for her while she took her oath of office that was administered by Borough Attorney Sean Gertner. In attendance were many of her friends, family, Police Chief Eric Higgins and members of the Lakehurst Police Department. At the end of the ceremony she was congratulated by the

Mayor and Council who wished her many years of success with the Lakehurst

violence through intelligenceled policing, partnerships with social services, and community outreach activities. “It has long been my wish to serve my home community,” Della Fave said. “I look forward to building a successful media and community relations program for the Office of the Ocean County Prosecutor.” Police Department.   Officer Brooks will now attend the Ocean County Police Academy and upon successful completion will be assigned to Officer Matthew Kline for Field training.

(From left) Officer Matthew Kline, Officer Roberta Brooks, Chief Eric Higgins

Hurricane Sandy Six Months Later: Toms River Police Chief Looks Back at Rescue and Reocvery by Christa Riddle Michael Mastronardy has been the chief of the Toms River Police Department for over 20 years, and during his over two decades of service to the township and its population of 90,000, he has never experienced anything as crippling and devastating as the widespread wreckage resulting from Hurricane Sandy’s wildly surging tides and severe winds. Toms River may have found itself bruised and battered, but it certainly was not broken. With evacuation and rescue plans firmly in place right after initial mention of the storm, the township braced for the worst, but even then, the storm’s unparalleled sweep of destruction was beyond anticipation. “Thanks to planning and cooperation, as well as organized first responses after the storm arrived, Toms River had zero deaths and no major casualties,” shares Chief Mastronardy. “By 1 p.m. on October 29th, we had 90 percent of our Barrier Island communities evacuated. But even though we heeded warnings about the storm, we were shocked at how rapidly the surf rose in so many areas. Water just came out of nowhere.” As the eighth most populous municipality in state with an area spanning over 52 square miles of land and water, Toms River was left reeling from the

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insurmountable damage of Superstorm Sandy, bearing a huge brunt of the hurricane’s punishment. Its Barrier Island community of Ortley Beach was left with 70 percent of its homes damaged beyond repair; Northern Beaches, also on the Barrier Island, found around 40 percent of its homes damaged beyond repair. In addition, coastal communities such as Shelter Cove, Snug Harbor, Silverton, and Bayshore received unprecedented levels of damage and destruction. Losses of power, communication, and utilities were widespread, and roads and infrastructure in the barrier island communities are still being repaired and reconstructed. “When you have flooding that extensive, it impedes typical four-wheel-drive vehicle rescues and slows response time during a crisis when an overwhelming number of people needed help, especially in complete darkness with wires down everywhere. We had people climbing onto rooftops, waiting to be rescued by kayaks and canoes. Our rescue efforts switched from vehicles to boats and front-end loaders. Rescuers had to stay calm, focusing on helping one family at a time until we reached everyone,” says Chief Mastronardy. The chief himself worked tirelessly to assist in any way his community needed: rescuing pets left behind during evacua t i o n ; making sure people with chronic illnesses secured their proper medications left behind during evacuation; pho-

tographing homes using his own cell phone so evacuated people not allowed re-entry due to hazardous conditions could see their homes; meeting with Governor Chris Christie and President Barak Obama to assess damage. Chief Mastronardy credits the dedication and planning of Captain Steve Harvey with the township’s successful rescue efforts, and under Captain Bruce Burgess and Captain Henry, an organized re-entry plan with three phases has implemented and clearly delineated (the detailed re-entry plan is posted on the Toms River Township website, www.tomsrivertownship. com). “Severe structural and infrastructure damage, extensive road damage, a loss of all utilities, and no open facilities made our Barrier Island communities unsafe, which is why the re-entry plan was developed. We had to keep track of who came and went, with a police officer on every bus coming into and leaving the island to make sure everyone was safe and secure,” explains Chief Mastronardy. The officers also had to protect against looting, which never became an issue. The chief also extends praises to the 911 operators who remained calm and patient, tirelessly giving out solid advice and making hysterical people feel secure and comforted in the middle of a disaster. In addition, he expresses thanks to the Massachusetts and Pennsylvania police forces that came out to assist, as well as all of the emergency services, fire departments, first responders, and department of public works. “Thanks to the efforts of our community and everyone helping us, we are making remarkable progress. Each day is 100 percent better than the day before,” praises Chief Mastronardy.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

POLICE BLOTTER OCEAN COUNTY

On April 15, 2013 Officer’s from the Seaside Park Police Department along with Detective’s from the Prosecutor’s Special Operations Group conducted a cooperative investigation into the illicit drug distribution activities of a Newark NJ man identified as Ibnballah Pitman. During the course of the investigation Detectives conducted a motor vehicle stop of Mr. Pittman who was an occupant of a 2001 White Honda Accord. The motor vehicle stop took place in the area of O Street and Central Avenue in Seaside Park NJ. The Officers obtained and executed a search warrant for the 2001 White Honda Accord. As a result of the search warrant police seized approximately 1000 bags of heroin from Mr. Pitman. The seized heroin has an approximate street value of $5,000. Ibnballah Pitman age 34 of 511 South 16th Street, Apartment #3 Newark NJ was arrested. Prosecutor Joseph D. Coronato announced the arrest of several individuals as a result of a cooperative multi-jurisdictional investigation conducted by the Prosecutor’s Special Operations Group, the Drug Enforcement Administration, Newark Division, the South Brunswick Police Department along with other state, county and local law enforcement agencies. The investigation, identified as “Operation Road Runner” began in August of 2012 and culminated on Friday April 5, 2013. Over a four day period beginning Tuesday April 2, 2013, Police executed search warrants in Ocean, Mercer, Essex and Monmouth counties resulting in the arrest of 25 area men and women on various drug, weapons and money laundering charges. Included among the arrestees was a Lavallette Police Dispatcher identified as Kathy Anne Graham age 57 of Toms River as well as an employee of the Manalapan School District identified as Shawn Hannon age 26 of Tinton Falls. Steven Rosado, age 21, of 254 Warren Avenue in Lakewood is charged with first degree murder, possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose, unlawful possession of a weapon, both third degree crimes and obstructing the administration of law, a fourth degree offense . He is currently being held in the Ocean County Jail in lieu of $1 million dollars, cash only. Fernando Reyes, age 19, of 1416 Stark Street in Lakewood is charged with the third degree offense of hindering the apprehension of another. He is charged with assisting and accompanying Mr. Rosado during the trip from New Jersey to Florida. Mr. Reyes has posted bail. Jonathan Rosado, age 19, of 5 Pinehurst Drive in Lakewood is charged with the second degree offense of hindering the apprehension of another. Jennyfer Moncada, age 19, of 5 Pinehurst Drive in Lakewood is also

charged with the second degree crime of hindering the apprehension of another. Zahid Evans, age 24, of 1532 Chatham Drive in Toms River is also charged with the second degree crime of hindering the apprehension of another. New Jersey State Police arrested four people in connection with a commercial burglary ring that is believed to have been responsible for more than 20 burglaries, and used lookouts, two-way radios, and other means to avoid detection by law enforcement. On Friday, April 12, State Police detectives interviewed Francisco Chadwick, 25, of New Egypt, at the Ocean County Jail, where he was incarcerated for a drug court probation violation.  Chadwick was then charged with six counts of Burglary and Theft for the burglaries that occurred in State Police patrolled areas.  He remains in the Ocean County Jail on $150,000 full cash bail in reference to the new charges. Three coconspirators were interviewed and arrested Monday, April 15, at the Hamilton State Police Barracks.  Heather Yesuvida, 24, of Cream Ridge, was charged with Conspiracy to Commit Burglary, Receiving Stolen Property, and Possession of Burglary Tools she was lodged in the Monmouth County Jail in lieu of $40,000 full cash bail.  Walter Ivans, 22, of Cookstown was charged with Conspiracy to Commit Burglary and lodged in the Monmouth County Jail in lieu of $30,000 full cash bail. Adam Laczny was charged with Conspiracy to Commit Burglary and lodged in the Monmouth County Jail in lieu of $10,000 full cash bail.

BRICK-LAKEWOOD

On April 18a vehicle driven by Ronald DeFreitas was stopped in the parking lot of Drum Point School, 41 Drum Point Road. The vehicle had been stopped by the Brick Township Police Department for suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs. As Ptl. Nixon advised DeFreitas to exit the vehicle, DeFreitas reached to put the vehicle in drive and flee. Ptl. Nixon reached into the vehicle in an attempt to prevent him from doing so. DeFreitas was able to put the vehicle in drive and began to proceed eastbound in the parking lot, rapidly accelerating. Ptl. Nixon who was partially in the vehicle while attempting to prevent DeFreitas from fleeing, had latched onto the driver’s side door after the vehicle began dragging him. DeFreitas traveled for approximately 250 feet at a high rate of speed dragging Ptl. Nixon. DeFreitas then abruptly made a left turn causing Ptl. Nixon to be thrown from the vehicle onto the pavement. DeFreitas then drove over a curb and across the grass of school property before fleeing eastbound on

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Drum Point Road. Although injured, Ptl. Nixon returned to his vehicle and he and Sgt. Talty began to look for DeFreitas. A vehicle description was put out by dispatch. DeFreitas was located by Ptl. DeMaio #194 driving at a high rate of speed on Mantoloking Road eastbound. Ptl. DeMaio attempted to stop the vehicle with negative results. DeFreitas’ vehice reached speeds of up to 90 miles per hour. At that point the pursuit was terminated and a BOLO (Be on the Lookout Bulletin) was issued to surrounding towns for DeFreitas and the Ford F-150 described above. Shortly thereafter, the vehicle was located by the Lakewood Police Department, unoccupied on Airport Road. A search of the area was conducted and DeFreitas was located near the ramp of the Garden State Parkway. DeFreitas resisted arrest however was placed into custody without further incident. Following the apprehension of DeFreitas, Ptl. Nixon was transported by ambulance to Jersey Shore University Medical Center-Neptune, NJ to be treated for his injuries. DeFreitas was charged with Aggravated Assault on a Law Enforcement Officer, Aggravated Assault, Aggravated Assault by Auto, Eluding,Resisting Arrest and multiple Motor Vehicle Charges. $150,000 no 10% bail was placed on DeFreitas. DeFreitas was transported to the Ocean County Jail. An ongoing investigation is being conducted by Ptl.Lampiasi of the Brick Township Police Department’s Traffic Safety Unit and the Ocean County Prosecutors Office. Additional charges are pending

OCEAN GATE

Sergeant Kristopher Ganley responded to a report of a theft on Newport Avenue. The victim reported that items had been removed from his vehicle during the overnight hours between Friday, April 19th and Saturday, April 20th. Items missing from the vehicle included $30 in change, a black metal buck knife, a cordless drill and $10 cash. Anyone with information regarding this incident or any other incidents may call the Ocean Gate Police Department at (732) 269-3166.

JACKSON

On Friday April 26, 2013 at 10:37 pm, Officers were dispatched to a report of a suspicious person. A member of the Jackson First Aid Squad had called to report he observed what appeared to be a male subject wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt and mask hiding in some bushes in Bennetts Mills Plaza near the Lukoil Gas Station. Responding officers checked the area and located a subject which matched the description. The subject was observed wearing the gray sweatshirt with a hood pulled down over the top of his face and a dark cloth covering the lower portion of his face. When the of-

ficers arrived, he began walking away from the area on Bennetts Mills Road. As they exited their patrol cars to speak with him, he fled on foot from the officers. The male ran through the parking lot of the TD Bank on North Countyline Road and as he did, he was observed reaching into his waistband and throwing an object into landscape bushes at the bank. Officers pursued as the male then ran across North Countyline Road while disregarding their orders to stop. He ran into a wooded area behind the Century 21 building on North Countyline Road where the officers were then able to catch up with him. After a struggle in the woods behind the Century 21, officers were able to take the male into custody. Other officers who had responded to the incident checked the landscaping where the male was seen throwing an object away. They recovered a Crossman BB gun which resembled a semi automatic handgun. Police arrested Elijah Hinze, age 22, of Jackson. On April 25, officers responded to a report of a Burglary and Theft at the Monmouth Rehab Professionals located on West Countyline Road. It was reported that unknown person(s) made entry to the building and stole a laptop valued at $300.00; At 8:45 am, officers responded to the Magic Touch Cleaners on South New Prospect Road on the report of an Attempted Burglary. It was reported that unknown person(s) attempted to make entry to the business through a door but were unable to; At 11:33 am, officers responded to the Rite Aid on South Hope Chapel Road on the report of an Attempted Burglary. It was reported that unknown person(s) had attempted to make entry to the business through a door but were unable to. On April 26, officers responded to the report of a suspicious person in a vehicle in the parking lot of the Prospect Pointe Apartments on Brewers Bridge Road. Officers located the subject and during the investigation, recovered marijuana and a glass pipe. A 20 year old male resident of Jackson was placed under arrest and charged with Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance in a Motor Vehicle. He was processed and released on summons pending a court appearance; At 4:08 pm, officers responded to the Supergym on South New Prospect Road on the report of an Assault. During the investigation it was learned that a victim had been assaulted by another person with a ten pound dumbbell, causing injury which required medical attention. A 23 year old male resident was later arrested and charged with the assault. He was processed at headquarters and released after posting bond on the charges;At 10:40 pm, officers responded to the area of North Cooks Bridge Road on the report of a male and female arguing in the roadway. During the investigation, a 31 year old male was placed

under arrest and charged with Harassment. He was processed at headquarters and later lodged in the Ocean County Jail on $5,000.00 bail. On April 27, a resident of Bates Road called to report a suspicious person. It was reported that the caller had observed a male carrying a backpack near the caller’s vehicle and when the male was questioned, he walked away. At 6:12 am, a resident of Bennetts Mills Road reported a male in the caller’s yard. When the male was confronted, he claimed he was looking for a lost cell phone and left the area. The male was described as wearing a black baseball hat, dark blue hoodie, blue jeans and carrying a black back pack. Anyone observing any suspicious activity like this is asked to contact the Jackson Police at 732-928-1111; At 5:40 pm, officers responded to Six Flags Great Adventure on the report of a Theft. A resident of New York reported that a bag containing credit cards, money and cell phones were stolen from a locker at the park.; Officers responded to a residence on Ashford Road and arrested a 36 year old female on an outstanding warrant out of Ewing Township. She was processed and released after posting bail; At 8:35 pm, while conducting a motor vehicle stop on West Countyline Road, a Jackson Police patrol car was struck by a Toyota Camry driven by a 91 year old resident of Lakewood. The patrol car was parked on the side of the road with its emergency lights activated while conducting the traffic stop when the Toyota struck the front end of the car. There were no injuries received by the driver of the Toyota or the officer; At 10:35 pm, while checking on a vehicle parked in a wooded area in a parking lot for trail access on Frank Applegate Road, officers placed two juvenile males into custody. They were later charged with Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. They were released to their parents. On April 28, officers responded to the report of a one vehicle motor vehicle crash involving a motorcycle. It was learned that the driver of the motorcycle had lost control of the bike and had crashed, receiving minor injuries. During the investigation, officers also recovered suspected marijuana and a glass pipe at the scene. The 24 year old male who was operating the motor cycle was charged with Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. He was released on summons pending a court appearance; At 6:03 pm, officers responded to Bittersweet Drive on the report of a suspicious vehicle containing several people parked in the area. During the investigation, a 23 year old male resident of Jackson was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of Jackson. He was processed and released after posting bail.

TOMS RIVER

After investigating a strong armed robbery on April 29th police arrested two men, Keith worthy, 22,   with robbery and Pedro Valentin 22, of

with conspiracy to commit robbery.   Both men were held on $50,000 bail no 10%. Investigation by Detective Roger Hull and Brian Lomer and Officer Charlie Grainger. Officer Mike Gallipoli is investigating the theft of a three foot white vinyl gate from a residence on Kenton drive on April 27.  Unknown suspects entered the property and unbolted the gate from the fence and left with the gate and all the hardware for same. Officer Chris Leighton is investigating the Burglary of the First Baptist Church sometime over the weekend of April 26th.  The unknown suspects entered through a basement window and removed over $6000 worth of property, including an Apple Mac Book and two guitars,   a 1988 Les Paul and Yamaha Bass. On April 27th at 1 p.m. Detective Thomas Dimichele observed a suspicious 2002 Lexus on Main Street.  As the Detective went to stop the vehicle the vehicle fled but was soon found at the Toms River Apartments  and the driver fled into a wooded area but was quickly apprehended.  The vehicle was stolen earlier in the week from a home on Division Street.  Arrested was Barry Lewis 32 of 1041 Driftwood Avenue , Manahawkin.   Assisting Detective Dimichele was Detective Roger Hull and Officer Carl Basile. Toms River Police are investigating a fatal pedestrian accident that occurred in the morning of April 27th at Route 37 and Oakridge parkway. An Earle dump truck being driving by John Walton ,37, of Neptune was westbound on Route 37 when it struck a pedestrian.  The pedestrian, a 47 year old Minnesota man was crossing from south to north when he was struck and killed. John Smith, 54, of Pleasantville was driving a truck southbound on Bayview Drive  in the Green Island section at on April 26th when his truck made contact with overhead utility wires. The wires then snapped a utility pole causing a power outage and blocking the roadway for over three hours. A vehicle struck a utility pole at Route 9 and Church Road at 7am on April 26th.  There was one person injured with a leg injury. Power outages were reported in area,  including traffic lights out along route 9 in Pleasant Plains. On April 24th, Toms River Police arrested Eric Scharff,22 ,Toms Rier just after midnight on April 24th  after he was stopped in Ortley Beach   by officers Tim Sysol   and Al Dellabella who were on proactive anti looting patrol.  The Officers observed Scharff driving a truck on Route 35 and a short time later located his unattended vehicle parked on Nichols avenue in Ortley Beach.  Officers then located Mr. Scharff walking by the starlight Hotel.  He was placed under arrest for a $250 outstanding warrant out of Tinton Falls. Subsequent investigation by the Officers and Detective John Turner discovered that over $10,000 worth of stolen property was recovered from the truck. 

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Beachwood Jakes Branch County Park Programs Calendar

drink and wear sneakers. Fee: $14.00 per child

Bootie Bag Registration #115186-1B

Children ages 6 – 10 will be taught the rules and fundamentals needed to play basketball along with learning drills and playing games. This program is scheduled for Sunday, May 5th from 3 – 4 pm at the Basketball Court. Please wear sneakers and bring a basketball, a cold drink and good sportsmanship. Fee: $14.00 per child.

Turn your old pair of jeans into a unique and useful carryall on Saturday, May 4th from 10 – 11:30 am at the Nature Center. Jeans will be cut and stitched into an eye-catching accessory. This program is recommended for ages 9 – Adult. Bootie Bag will also be held on Tuesday, May 7th from 6:30 – 8 pm under Registration #115186-1C.

Drop-In Family Programs

Drop in when you have the time for short nature programs at the park. On Saturdays, May 4th, 11th and 18th from 12:30 – 3 pm participants will make a craft, hear a story or take part in a quick experiment. This is a free program and no registration is required.

Live Animal Talks

Meet the animals and get an up close look at the park’s inhabitants on Sundays, May 5th and 12th at 1 pm. No registration is required and the program is free.

“Kick It” Program Registration #113332-1A

On Sunday, May 5th from 1:30 – 2:30 pm, children will learn the fundamentals of soccer as well as strategy, teamwork and sportsmanship. This program is designed for 4 – 8 year olds with little or no experience in soccer. Please bring a soccer ball, cold

Hoop It Up! Program Registration #113332-3A

Lightening Bug Jars Registration #115326-3C

On Sunday, May 5th at 1:30 pm and Monday, May 6th at 3:30 pm, learn about lightening bugs and make a jar so that you can catch your own lightening bugs at home. This program is recommended for ages 5 – 7. Registration is required.

Kids Tennis Lessons Program Registration #113332-4A

On Mondays, May 7th, 13th and 20th from 4:30 – 5:30 pm, children ages 6 – 10 years old will be introduced to the sport of tennis. They will work on drills to develop coordination and will learn the rules and fundamental needed to play tennis. Registration is required. Please remember to bring a cold drink. The fee for this program is $14.00 per child.

Fireside Story and Craft Registration #115326-2C

At this program, children ages 2 ½ to 5 with their caregivers sit by the warm fire and

read children’s stories. Afterwards, participants make a nature themed craft related to the story. This program is being held on Thursday, May 9th from 10:30 – 11:30 am at the Nature Center. Fee is $3.00 per person. Registration is required.

Railroads in the Pines Registration #115166-1B

Through pictures and maps, railroads of the past, present and possible future will be discussed in this Power-Point presentation on Saturday, May 11th from 10 – 11:30 am at the Nature Center. The Blue Comet, Barnegat Branch, Tuckerton Railroad, Pennsylvania Railroad and the Jersey Devil Railroad are among the subjects covered in this presentation. This program is recommended for ages 14 – Adult for a fee of $3.00 per person. Registration is required.

Registration Information

Unless otherwise stated, all programs require registration along with payment in full at time of registration. Anyone attending a program or trip without registering in advance must pay by check or money order (cash in not acceptable). Participants will only be permitted upon availability. Registration for programs designated as “FREE” may be placed by calling Cattus Island County Park at 732-270-6960. Special assistance accommodations are available upon request. Registration location: Jakes Branch County Park, Beachwood (732) 281-2750 For program availability or a newsletter, please call 1-877-OCPARKS (627-2757) Toll Free or visit www.oceancountyparks.org.

Beachwood Police Report Recent Activity by Jeri Morris BEACHWOOD - Chief Robert Tapp reported the following recent activity of the Borough of Beachwood Police Department: • Ryan Palazza, 36 of Toms River was arrested and charged with DWI, as well as several other motor vehicle violations, as a result of a one-car accident occurring in the early afternoon on Wednesday, April 10th on the corner of Beachwood Boulevard and Route 166. Apparently Mr. Palazza’s vehicle left the roadway and struck a tree and light pole in front of Clancy’s News & Tobacco. The responding officers, Sergeant Frank Melillo and Patrolman Chad Anthony are conducting the accident investigation. • Anthony Wilson, 30 of Bayville was arrested and charged with DWI as a result of a motor vehicle stop conducted by

Officer Dennis Allen at approximately 1 am on Sunday, April 7th. • On Friday, April 5th, a resident on Wave Street reported that a section of orange caution fencing was stolen from their front yard. Patrolman Chad Anthony responded to the call and took a report. • On Thursday, April 4th, Patrolman Keith Meissner responded to the 1100 block of Mizzen in response to a call that a tailgate was stolen from a 1996 Ford pickup truck. Detective Sean Langan is following up on the investigation. • On Tuesday, April 2nd a resident on the 700 block of Spar Avenue reported that two computers were stolen from the front of his residence. Apparently, the computers were dropped off by a friend and were stolen some time between 1 and 3 pm. Patrolman Thomas Prince was the responding officer and Detective

Sean Langan is following up the investigation. • On Sunday, March 31st, a resident on the 1200 block of Longboat Avenue reported that someone entered their vehicle some time during the evening. A GPS unit and the victim’s wallet were reported to be stolen. Patrolman Allen Magory responded to the call. Detective Sean Langan will follow up on the investigation. • On Wednesday, March 27th a resident on Railroad Avenue reported that a black metal fire pit was stolen some time during the overnight hours. Officer Phil Schena responded to the call. • On Monday, March 25th, Officer Dan Altman took a report of criminal mischief occurring at the intersection of Beachwood Boulevard and Atlantic City Boulevard where the plexiglass on the NJ Transit bus stop vestibule was broken.

Mayor Ron Roma threw the first pitch at BeachwoodPine Beach Little League's opening day ceremony on Saturday morning, April 5th, as league president Eric Diaz and players look on. The mayor was actively involved in the league for many years as a coach and parent. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

Newly-appointed Chief Robert Tapp was pinned with his new badge by his wife, Dawn. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

Outgoing Chief William Cairns embraced incoming Chief Robert Tapp as the latter presented the departing chief with his retirement badge on Wednesday evening, April 3rd. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Ocean Gate Beach Prisms Considered for Ocean Gate Riverfront by Erik Weber OCEAN GATE - A decade after a beach replenishment project failed to sustain a thick band of beachfront after multiple truckloads of sand were delivered, the governing body here is working with the Army Corps of Engineers on a plan that may reverse its erosion woes once and for all with a device that could have its origin in World War II. During a council meeting last month, two representatives of the Virginia-based precast concrete firm SmithMidland gave a presentation on beach prisms to a council chambers packed with residents and interested parties from around the area. The pair were invited by the governing body to speak on the topic, though any firm interested in providing the structures to Ocean Gate would have to go through the normal public bidding process if the town chose to move forward with the project. It was noted numerous times during their presentation that the beach prisms were being looked into as they reduce wave action and thus erosion, and increase the amount of sand deposited by the moving water, but do not act to halt the flooding along the riverfront that has occurred since last October’s Hurricane Sandy. That flooding, which several officials and residents have speculated occurs due to the higher water levels in the Barnegat Bay watershed as a result of storm debris and new submerged sand deposits, is being looked into for other solutions, including constructing backflow prevention technology on the outflow of the municipal storm drains.

War-Era Beach Protection

According to Smith-Midland accounts, the creation of beach prisms dates back to the European Theater of the Second World War and one British woman, Silvia

Gouldsborough, who lived along the English Channel in the years immediately following the Allied victory over Axis forces. In the company lore, Mrs. Gouldsborough walked along the waterway one day, near where the Royal Navy years earlier had erected steel bulwarks and concrete obstacles to stave off German landing boats, and noticed that the beachfront appeared to be growing wider directly behind the remaining wartime defenses. Intrigued, she asked her husband, a marine biologist, about what she saw occurring and as a result he confirmed the sand accretion and developed a prototype to replicate it but did not bring it into a marketplace where it could be further tested and developed. Three decades later, the Smith-Midland account continues, the couple had immigrated to America and lived near the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland when Mrs. Gouldsborough noticed erosion working its way along the shoreline as she walked nearby. Reconsidering their early prototype, she reportedly began seeking a firm to research it further and possibly develop a product that could be taken to market and reverse beach erosion wherever installed. The concept behind the prism was to build a series of prism-shaped concrete blocks spaced approximately 6 inches apart, sitting parallel to the shore in shallow water. As the waves and tides move over them, fastmoving water would have its energy absorbed by the barrier and particles suspended in the water - sand - would then drop and accumulate along its base. After being tested first on the Chesapeake Bay and then in over two dozen other locations over the past 30 years, the firm began producing the prisms for the market with a portfolio of past coastal studies and test subjects to prove

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

their ability. Several case studies offered as evidence by the representatives present in Ocean Gate that day showed dramatic before and after photos of the beach prisms when they were first installed and then the increased height and width of the beachfronts from several to many months later.

Beach Prisms Today

John Klein, a consulting coastal engineer with experience in the Army Corps of Engineers, stated that several years ago he was approached by Smith-Midland to conduct an independent study on prior applications of the prisms along shorelines in Maryland and Virginia. Upon its completion, it was reviewed by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) and appeared to support the finding that the prisms restore beachfronts “under certain circumstances. It’s not a cure-all.” “We put these things in a high energy environment with significant wave action,” he said, noting that the tested areas were often exposed to storms. “The second thing is that these things aren’t light - the four-foot model weights 9,100 pounds - and the ground needs to be substantial enough to withstand that foot pressure.” Other factors included the prisms’ placement in relation to the predominant wave action and the existence of an “offshore sand source,” such as already eroded beach sand offshore that likely already existed in the Toms River off Ocean Gate. Using aerial photography and shoreline mapping dating back 80 years, Mr. Klein then presented an example of a coastal area in Virginia that had gradually eroded over time before finally being severely affected by a 2006 hurricane that swept away nearly 100 feet of beach. Clicking through photographs of prisms being installed following that storm event, the coastal engineer then came upon an image that was stated to be approximately six months later and showed a significant of sand build up around the structures. Mr. Klein’s associate, Jay McKenna, a national sales manager with Smith-Midland, then introduced a

second past study involving beach prisms, in Calvert County, Maryland, where a nor’easter had swept away 150 feet of shoreline in four days. The prisms, which were installed there in March 2010, were then shown in successive photographs approximately one month apart until nearly present day, where a new 250-foot beach could be seen where the prisms stand, now covered by two feet of sand.

Restoring Ocean Gate’s Shore

Mr. McKenna reported that following studies of the borough riverfront, it was determined that four proposed locations for beach prisms would be the easternmost beach near the borough’s border, the Angelsea Avenue beachfront, the wood groin on the eastern side of the Ocean Gate Yacht Club and at the end of the bulkhead to the west of the yacht club. Mr. Klein stated that with the past and recent erosion of the waterfront beach areas, it was very likely that an offshore sand deposit existed that would aid in making the prism projects successful in rebuilding sand along the shoreline over time, though as each project area was different, neither representative could state exactly how much would collect at the base of the prisms and in what amount of time. “I came up and flew over at the [Army Corps of Engineers’] invitation after [Hurricane] Sandy, and we tried to identify places that had significant beaches before,” he continued, adding that where the beach was lost in the storm was “not far off where the beach is, so the beach prisms are designed once it gets normal wave action to recapture sand once it migrates back in.” The coastal engineer stated that with such deposits, a beach prism project had “strong potential to recapture that sand onto the beach” and that past attempts to pump sand directly from those locations onto the beachfront, costing “tens and hundreds of millions of dollars,” were far more expensive and less successful than the prisms could be. “What happens is the next nor’easter comes along and half of it goes back out to sea, and what’s left is your

tax bill,” said Mr. McKenna, who later stated that a single 4-feet-wide, 10-feet long section of beach prism cost $1,275 in comparison. The representatives added that studies also showed marine life was also attracted to the beach prisms in the time that they remained submerged in water, thus possibly improving the offshore environment as well.

Questions and Answers

Prior to closing the presentation, the floor was opened to any members of the public who had questions or concerns about the beachfront structures. Several area residents present questioned boating and navigation safety around the objects. “What safety mechanism is there to prevent a liability of kids playing on it or jet skiers crashing into it?” one woman among the packed audience asked. Mr. Klein stated that navigation markers and signage identifying the submerged structures would be installed along with the prisms to “mark these things in such a way that they’re very visible.” adding that once installed, they are also inserted into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) coastal maps with the next successive revision. Ocean Gate Avenue resident Katherine Ranuro asked whether the prisms, in attracting marine life, could possibly attract more sea nettles, a type of stinging jellyfish that has plagued the Chesapeake Bay for years and has recently caused headaches for the Toms River and Barnegat Bay region. Mr. McKenna stated that it was not possible to see an increase in the sea nettle population due to the prisms as the jellyfish arrived based on other factors within the water itself and with no regard for the upright structures. East Chelsea Avenue resident Edward Dickerson asked if prisms could be installed at the beachfront on Asbury and East Riviera avenues as “the beach has really eroded terribly the last several years.” Mayor Paul Kennedy stated that that area hadn’t been directly addressed as part of the beach prism project but that if the four proposed locations were accepted

and successful, the project would likely be seen as a pilot project for the state to review and later on more areas could receive prisms. Correction: In the previous edition of the Ocean Signal, it was reported that Mrs. Ranuro stated she had no knowledge of discussions regarding the beach prism project. The Ocean Gate Avenue resident has since stated that she was referring to a Coastal Area Facilities Review Act (CAFRA) permit for the project filed last December that the public and several members of the council were allegedly not aware of, not the project as a whole.

OCEAN GATE POLICE REPORT RECENT ACTIVITY by Jeri Morris Officer Barry Wohl reported the following recent activity of the police department: On Friday, March 15th, Patrolman Kevin Frizziola responded to a report of burglary on East Lakewood Avenue. The victim advised Patrolman Frizziola that some time between Thursday, March 14th at approximately 5 pm and Friday, March 15th at 9:30 am persons unknown pushed through the door, entered the premises and went through drawers. The victim did not report any items missing but noted that a $20 light fixture had been damaged, and the floor was scratched. On Monday, March 11th at approximately 7 am, Patrolman Lightbody responded to a residence on Navesink Avenue regarding an attempted burglary. The victim advised that a screen had been removed from the front window and was laying in the driveway. The victim also advised Patrolman Lightbody that a file cabinet was moved from the side of the driveway and placed under a window. After further investigation, it was determined that nothing was disturbed or reported missing from inside the home.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Brick Shoplifting Spree Nets Multiple Charges Against Toms River Man by Jeri Morris Brick Township: Detec-

tive Dan Waleski arrested Nicholas Fisher, 33 of Brand Road in Toms River, on Thursday, April 4th for a shoplifting incident that occurred at the Target store on March 27th. Mr. Fisher and another male suspect stole over $500 worth of merchandise from the store. Also on Thursday, Mr. Fisher was a suspect in a shoplifting incident in the Lowes store in Manchester where he shoplifted two DeWalt drills that were later recovered in Tom River. On Friday, April 5th, it was reported by the Home De-

Brick Mayor Acropolis Putting Recovery Before Politics, Not Seeking Re-election By Phil Stilton BRICK—  In an attempt to remove politics from the equation during the rebuilding process here, Mayor Steven Acropolis announced he will not be seeking re-election this November. “This is the most important year – I believe in our town’s history – because this is when all of those programs are going to have to be done this year and I

mance in his current role, added that he was concerned about partisan politics returning once again in the middle of this fragile period. “One of my fears was that this issue of rebuilding Brick Township was going to become a political football,” he said. In 2011, when he was criticized by opponents and threatened by the Democrat-led council with a forced pay reduction for

Photo by Jason Allentoff / Townsquare Media, WOBM thought it was really important to concentrate on that,” he said at a March 25th standing room only press conference. “I decided not to seek reelection as mayor of the Township of Brick and I’m going to dedicate the remainder of my time in office to concentrate on the rebuilding of this town.” The mayor, who is a Republican and has found himself under fire by opponents through his years of service for almost everything except his perfor-

his position as mayor, he voluntarily cut his salary to $1 per year for the final two years of his term. “Just like when they came after me for that, I removed it from the equation by removing my salary,” Mayor Acropolis said, adding following the expiration of his term, he would also continue his efforts as a community watchdog when it came to topics as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and governmental regulations he felt hindered the rebuilding

Chief Osborn Retires

TOMS RIVER—After a 22 year career with the Ocean County Sheriff’s Department, Chief Michael Osborn has announced his retirement. He was by Sheriff Wil-

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liam L. Polhemus in December of 2008. Under the direction of the Sheriff, the position of Chief is the highest ranking uniformed officer responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of in which there are six divisions. In his final media interview in 2012 before his passing, Sheriff William Polhemus told the Ocean Signal that Chief Osborn was ready for the job of Sheriff and said he would be able to step in and do the job at any time. “He’s more than qualified to do my job,” Polhemus said

pot in Brick that the same man, Nicholas Fisher, was captured on store surveillance shoplifting two DeWalt Power Drills valued at over $500. According to police, Fisher also had shoplifting charges against him in Toms River for stealing drills at the Sears store earlier in March. Charges are presently pending against Fisher in Manchester and other surrounding towns. Mr. Fisher was processed at Brick headquarters and then transported to Ocean County Jail where he is being held on $25,000 bail. process to date. The mayor was one of three people who went through the screening process within the Brick Township Republican Club for the nomination of mayor, the others being Joe Sangiovanni and Dan Toth. Mr. Sangiovanni was expected to get the nomination by the club on Wednesday. Though he had screened for the position, Mayor Acropolis cited a February plan by the council that could have placed liens on homeowners seeking hurricane relief assistance as a contributing factor in his decision to not run this year. “I was afraid the situation would deteriorate and name calling would ensue,” he said. “I didn’t want anyone to think my actions during rebuilding have anything to do with the upcoming election. It’s important that when your top elected official says something, people have the confidence knowing that he’s making those decisions for what’s best for the township and not what’s best for his reelection.” Despite his decision not to run, the mayor said he was determined to continue to lead the fight in Brick Township against FEMA. “No matter who is sitting in the mayor’s seat in the future, I’ll be here to help,” he said, adding that he did not rule out a run for mayor or another office in the future. “I just didn’t want the most important thing in the town’s history to become political,” Mayor Acropolis concluded. “I’m not going anywhere.”

during that interview. At one point the Ocean County Board of Freeholders discussed the possibility of appointing Osborn to the position of sheriff in an executive session, but no appointment has been made. Undersheriff William Sommeling remains the acting sheriff of Ocean County. Before becoming chief, Osborn was Deputy Coordinator/Division Commander of the Office of Emergency Management. He ran the K-9 Unit since the rank of Sergeant and was a handler for two explosive detection dogs. He and his explosive detection canine, Sam, assisted after the attacks on the World Trade Center September 11, 2001. Under the direction of Sheriff Polhemus, Chief Osborn initiated the Project Lifesaver Program and the D.A.R.E. Program within the sheriff’s department and contributed to its success within the community.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

BRICK Community Calendar

is for special needs children of all ages and abilities. Please register.

Board of Adjustment Meeting

On Mondays, May 6th, 13th, & 20th, at 10:30 am, join the library staff for stories and fun. This program is for children up to five years old with their caregiver. No registration is required, just stop in and enjoy a story.

On Wednesday, May 1st at 7 pm, the Board of Adjustment will hold their next meeting. Meetings are held in the municipal building and are open to the public.

Family Movie Night

Drop-In Storytime

Toddler Funtime

DreamWorks Animation’s Rise of the Guardians will be featured at the Dept. of Parks and Recreation’s Family Movie Night on Friday, May 3rd from 7 – 9 pm at the Civic Plaza. Rise of the Guardians is a story of a group of heroes, each with extraordinary abilities, who join forces to protect the hopes, beliefs and imagination of children all over the world. Admission is free for all ages; children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. To register, please call (732) 262-1074.

Toddler Funtime-Tuesdays and Wednesdays begin May 7th & 8th at 9:30 am. This program is recommended for children ages 1 – 2 to enjoy special stories, music and other fun for the month of May. Registration is required.

Council Meeting

Looking for a new hobby? Try your hand at needlework on Tuesday, May 7th at 3:30 pm. This program is for anyone over 7 years old that would like to learn a new craft. Please register.

Planning Board Meeting

Attendance at this program will enlighten you on the warning signs of gang affiliation, why kids join gangs, gang markings (colors, symbols, & clothing known as gang identifiers), gangs in schools, gang graffiti, paraphernalia and language. This free program is funded through a community collaboration of the Ocean County Board of Freeholders, O.C. Youth Service Commission, O.C. Health Department, N.J.S.C. Ocean County Probation - Juvenile Supervision, O.C. Library, Municipal Alliance Project, and N.J. Governors Council on Alcoholism & Drug Abuse. This presentation will be held on Tuesday, May 7th at 6:30 pm. Advice will be offered to parents and teens on avoiding gangs, what to look for once gang involvement is confirmed and where to go for help. Please register – sign in begins at 6 pm and program begins promptly at 6:30 pm.

The next meeting of the Mayor and Council will be held on Tuesday, May 7th at 7 pm. Meetings take place at the municipal building and are always open to the public to share their questions and/or opinions.

The next meeting of the Planning Board will be held on Wednesday, May 8th at 7 pm at the municipal building. Meetings are always open to the public.

Senior Dinner & Movie

The Department of Parks will be hosting a pasta dinner followed by a showing of High Society, starring Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly and Frank Sinatra on Friday, May 17th from 4 – 7 pm at the Civic Plaza. This is a free event for residents ages 65 and over. Please call (732) 262-1076 for reservations as seating is limited.

Brick Library Programs & Events Book Discussion: The Lace Reader

The topic for this book discussion will be The Lace Reader by Brunonia Berry. The Lace Reader is a haunting tale told by a woman from a Salem family who can tell the future in patterns of lace. This discussion will be held on Thursday, May 2 at 10 am.

Book discussion: Just Take My Heart

On Friday, May 3rd at 2 pm, join others for a discussion on Just Take My Heart by Mary Higgins Clark. This story is a suspenseful thriller regarding a legal battle over the guilt or innocence of a man accused of murdering his wife.

Loud and Rowdy Folk Tales

Join International storyteller, Julia Pasqual on Saturday, May 4th at 3:30 pm as she performs her African-American Loud and Rowdy Folk Tales. Please register.

Special Needs Story & Craft Time

Ms. Wendy Warner will share unique fun with children on Saturday, May 4th at 10 am. This program

Pre-School Storytime

On Tuesdays and Wednesdays for the month of May, beginning May 7th and May 8th at 10:30 am, children, ages three to five can listen to special stories and have other fun at the library. Please register.

Busy Fingers

book is Ruby Lu, Brave and True by Lenore Look. Copies of the book are available at the Children’s Desk.

Teen Advisory Board (TAB) Meeting

On Thursday, May 16th from 6:30 to 8 pm, come in and chat with your fellow teens about the library. This is a fun way to meet other teens in the neighborhood, earn community service hours and work on programs for your favorite place in town. Recommended for ages 13 – 18 only. New members are always welcome.

Fortune Cookies Party

Celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month by listening to stories and enjoying true Asian American snacks on Saturday, May 18th at 10:30 am. This program is recommended for ages 4 and up. Registration is required.

Please call (732) 4774513 to register or visit www.theoceancountylibrary.org

Harbour Yacht Club’s Long Road to Recovery by Phil Schmidt BRICK - With nearly four feet of water rushing through his home and business on October 29th, Jimmy Ryan, owner of the Harbour Yacht Club and Marina here said a party was the only thing that kept him away that night. He had attended the affair earlier that evening in Brielle and as the situation worsened, he realized he wasn’t going to be heading back to the barrier island. The next morning, he took a boat to his marina and couldn’t believe what he was looking at. Houses and boats were piled on top of each other in the marina and in the parking lot. Mr. Ryan, who lives in the upstairs apartment of the office in the marina said the water had rushed through his downstairs office was about waist high according to the water marks on the walls. As the Atlantic Ocean storm surge knocked nearby houses off the foundation, he said pieces of neighbors’ homes and vehicles floated by, landing in his

marina, where boats were tossed like toys in a bathtub. After Sandy came and went, the marina owner was determined to stay and rebuild. After being forced to rent an apartment in Point Pleasant for three months, he returned in February and was one of the few people who chose to live among the rubble as he rebuilt his home and business once he was allowed back. He was fortunate enough to have power restored long before neighbors with his location directly on Route 35. As for his business, Ryan said 25% of the boats in his marina were totaled. The rest were taken to Forge

Landing across the Barnegat Bay on the mainland while he replaced the bulkhead and fixed his slips over the winter. “When we got to the marina that morning in the boat, as I climbed over all the boats and pieces of houses to get on land, I walked up to the surf, I thought nobody would ever live on this island again,” he said. “It looked like Hiroshima. There was no dune, no beach, I stood on the beach looking directly across the island at my front door.” Mr. Ryan said his marina should be open in time for the summer.

Gangwise

Young Origami Club

On Wednesday, May 8th at 3:30 pm, learn how to turn a piece of paper into a work of art. This program is for ages 8 and up. Please register.

Craft Fun

Celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month by making different crafts. This is a drop in program for children and their families and will be held on Thursday, May 9th from 2:30 – 4:30 pm. No registration is required.

Read to the Dogs

Sam, Trooper & Maggie will be anxiously waiting for their friends (ages 6 & up) to come in and read them a story on Friday, May 10th at 3:30 pm. Please register.

Bookworm Club

On Thursday, May 16th at 3:30 pm join other bookworms to discuss the book of the month and do a fun activity. This month’s

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Barrier Island Samaritan’s Purse Shifts into Rebuild Mode by Phil Stilton SEASIDE HEIGHTS - Tom Kluender, a pastor at the Church of Grace and Peace in Toms River has been working to help area residents who lost their homes during Superstorm Sandy rebuild through his work with Samaritan’s Purse. On Friday, April 5th, Mr. Kluender met with residents seeking help at the Toms River municipal annex in Ortley Beach where a disaster recovery workshop was setup for one day for barrier island residents.

After having nearly 3,500 volunteers helping out across Ocean County in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, Samaritan’s Purse, which operates out of the Church of Grace and Peace in Toms River has now switched its operations into rebuild mode, Samaritan’s Purse volunteers logged over 55,000 hours with the county in the weeks after the storm. “Rebuild mode is different than recovery mode, we now have 25 to 35 volunteers working on one or two jobs at a time,” said Kluender, who is

now working as a case manager for Samaritan’s Purse. “It’s a little bit of smaller workforce but they’re in it for the long haul now to help people out.” In order to qualify for assistance from Samaritan’s Purse, your home must be a primary residence of less than 1,600 square feet and homeowners must be up to date with their mortgage payments and property taxes. Kluender added that those who accept donations must remain in their homes for at least 5 years. “Our ministry is donor driven and we want to make sure we’re steering the donors’ money properly,” he added. To learn more about Samaritan’s Purse, call 732-349-1550 x500.

Tom Kluender meets with Toms River Assistant Business Administrator Lou Amoruso.

Best Spring Break Ever by Laura Cole Gonzalez OCEAN COUNTY - By far this was the best spring break month ever. This month I had the privilege to work with middle school, high school and college students from across the country as well as students from our Garden State. During this month I worked with several organizations that have made a concerted effort to help our state and its citizens in need. One such organization was Community Collaborations International. This organization works with over 450 college students during this spring break. These organizations are very selective and have a very thorough selection process when students apply. Many students had to pay a fee to participate in this alternative spring break which covered housing and meals. The students slept on cots in a single room setting which felt very much like an emergency shelter. They even had to travel to take a shower at the local YMCA. Once the students began working with our residents, their energy invigorated our community and was contagious as they took on community service projects each day. They came each day full of energy and a willingness to learn and serve our communities. When going on tours of the areas affected by Superstorm Sandy, the student’s predominant reaction was disbelief at the amount of wide spread devastation since it had not been clearly displayed on their local media. One of the teachers, Adam Jones who coordinated this service trip for his Proctor High School from New Hampshire and partnered

with Cambridge middle School students from Princeton, NJ Middle School: “The scale of the devastation is staggering. Truly. Whole communities have been whipped off the map. Sand covers streets.   Debris is everywhere.   Houses are missing. Some houses floated across the street and into their neighbor’s homes. Everywhere you look, trucks are moving sand.   Houses sit at odd angles.  Chain link fences and orange barriers block passage here and there. Houses are hanging from their foundations, ripped apart. Even though it has been 5 months, it looks like the storm was here yesterday. Businesses haven’t returned. Entire towns are empty. Buildings are boarded up. Ghost towns. There is a 5:00pm curfew for fear of robbery. Some people haven’t even come back to the barrier islands to check out their homes. They are too distraught. Additionally, while there is immense physical destruction – there is also tremendous emotional pain that permeates the affected towns. It is real. It is palpable. Even the students could feel the weight and uneasiness of the post-apocalyptic Jersey shore world. Mile after mile is hard to comprehend and put into context.” This group stayed in a home in Long Beach Island because housing for volunteers in our area was hard to find. While there, they had many projects including East Dover Firehouse and several home rebuilding projects. During their stay, it was a must that the children experienced the fun aspects of our community. They visited the penguins and sharks at the Point Pleasant Aquarium and spent time with the lions

Mercy Vocational High School Courtesy Laura Cole Gonzalez

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and goats at the Popcorn Zoo. They were intrigued at the variety and large numbers of animals at this sanctuary for abandoned and abused wildlife. Mercy Vocational High School and Gwynedd Mercy Academy  from Philadelphia, PA stayed in Sea Isle and drove 90 minutes to help homeowners on the Barrier Islands in Ortley and surrounding areas. They also did work in Long Beach Island, Brigantine, Ocean City and Beach Haven. Housing for volunteers has been one of the largest challenges since the storm. These students came each day with purpose and enjoyed using their skill sets and knowledge to learn and serve our communities. The volunteers stated their biggest challenge was finding community projects. This month was a collaborative effort with many grass root organizations and community leaders throughout NJ to coordinate community projects. The NJ state website has recently addressed this issue and lists by county organizations that can facilitate managing volunteers and community projects. As Spring Break came to end each week I hugged the students and told them that this would not be goodbye it would be until we met again. I told them that each of them was now an honorary REAL Jersey Girl and Boy and that they were welcome any time to come back to our shores and visit. Many have already contacted me to let me know they are planning to come back this summer to continue to spread their love to our New Jersey Communities. I know I speak for those they helped that we are forever grateful to them for sharing their spring break with us and for making it the best spring break ever that made a huge difference in our community.

and Gwynedd Mercy Academy

from Philadelphia.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Ocean Beach Assistant Fire Chief Presented with Award of Merit by Brian Doyle Assistant Chief Bill Giordano of the Ocean Beach Fire Company has acted above and beyond his call of duty and the following is a record of his actions and why in my opinion he should be recognized. Assistant Chief Giordano began preparations for Hurricane Sandy like most of the other Officers in the Toms River Fire Department. He surveyed his staff for availability, ensured his apparatus was ready for service and also made sure he had the needed resources at his disposal for an extended period of time. The storm rapidly approached and as the acting chief of the Company he spear headed the evacuation efforts of all district fire equipment to safe staging areas and coordinated where his available staff would be used in the response

efforts on the mainland. Once the storm hit he knew right away that things were not going to be good on the barrier island and he never lost focus of what was needed to be accomplished during and after the storm was over. Asst. Chief Giordano worked continuously on the mainland for 2 days straight helping Companies 1 & 2 answer alarms in their response area and then led the 1st Engine Company back over to the barrier island. Once first over the bridge it was obvious that things were not like anything he or anyone else in the area had ever seen before. The destruction was devastating and his fear of what his own home looked like loomed in his mind. In the beginning the tasks were minimal and by the middle of the afternoon Engine Company 2701 was released

from its decontamination detail and moved towards staffing Station 27 once again and helping its community. Once arriving at the station it was obvious the station suffered some flooding and loss of power. Evacuees from the area had come to the station for refuge and assistance. Asst. Chief Giordano never lost sight of public safety and simultaneously secured the station for a command post and obtained a means of evacuation for those members of the public. Asst. Chief Giordano directed his crew to begin obtaining necessities needed to last yet a 3rd night away from home still not knowing if he even had a home to go back to mind. It was then he and the members of Station 27 were blessed with the arrival of Task Force 1 from Morris County. He quick-

ly briefed them of what the game plan was going to be and how he wanted to handle operations for the time being. The District Chief later arrived with refreshments and he was informed of the limitations to which Station 27 had to work with. At this time Asst. Chief Giordano was advised of several outstanding requests for service in the area that needed to still be handled. Once members of these companies were directed by Asst. Chief Giordano on how he wanted these alarms answered and what the potential hazards were going to be, the crews headed out. Due to the condition and the lack of power at Station 27 District Chief Lightbody directed Asst. Chief Giordano to take his crew and the Taskforce to Station 44 for temporary staging. During this time Asst. Chief Giordano secured the remaining calls and then directed his crew & Taskforce to the safe haven at Station 44. Over the next 2 nights Asst. Chief

Giordano continued to lead his members and the Taskforces assigned to him without ever getting relieved or even getting an opportunity to check on his own home or property. Prior to getting relief and checking his home and securing some personal belongings Asst. Chief Giordano sat in on another meeting in which he contributed input and represented Station 27

for a Barrier Island Regional Fire Suppression Plan. In all Asst. Chief Giordano operated for 7 continuous days & nights before getting relieved and then returned to work at his full time job and had to secure temporary housing. Even while at work Asst. Chief Giordano began the efforts in assisting his company to get back on its feet.

almost as soon as they were built, the Texas Towers had been rendered obsolete by the advent of Soviet long range missiles. Towers 2 and 3 were decommissioned and dismantled in 1963. The wreck of Tower 4 still lies under 60m of frigid water, inhabited by sharks, dolphins, turtles, and the occasional visiting diver. In

1999, a plaque was fixed to the submerged leg of the tower. It lists the names of the 28 victims who perished on that cold January night, victims of military and engineering hubris.

Death at Sea: The Tragedy of Texas Tower 4 by Frank Swain On January 15, 1961, the US coastguard raced through the darkness toward a tiny point 84 miles southeast of New York City. There, 28 crew members of Texas Tower 4 were waiting desperately to be evacuated from their station. As huge swells and high winds pounded the hull of the ship, their radios picked up a frantic transmission from the tower: “We’re breaking up”. And with that, Texas Tower 4 and all of its occupants were pulled beneath the waves. Built in 1957, the five Texas Towers were intended to become part of the USA’s advanced early warning system against Soviet bombers. Named for their resemblance to oil platforms found in the Gulf of Mexico, the towers were radar platforms designed to be placed out to sea. Towers 1 and 5 were never built. Towers 2 and 3 were situated on the rocky seabed off Nantucket and Boston respectively. Tower 4 posed a much greater challenge,

as it needed to be placed in waters twice as deep and on a soft bed of sand and mud. Nevertheless, engineers described the final design as a “triumph”. The 3,200 ton triangular structure stood on three legs, each 100m long and 4m thick. These were supported by cross braces and were hollow so that they could be used to store fuel and freshwater. It cost $21 million, and would be manned by 50 Air Force officers and enlisted men. However, floated out to location in 1957, things went wrong immediately. Foreshadowing what was in store, the tugs towing the structure were hit by a vicious gale. During the storm, two of the huge leg braces were torn off. Engineers decided it would be better to fix the rig at sea rather than tow it back to shore for repairs. Divers attached new braces to the legs, but the first crew members found the entire tower unstable, rolling and bucking in the swell. In August of 1959, Hurricane Daisy battered the isolated base,

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causing severe damage. The crew were evacuated while $500,000 of repairs were carried out. You can see the modifications for yourself – in the video and illustration three slender legs are above the waterline; while the other pictures show a skirt of metal reinforcements added at a later date. The following year, Hurricane Donna pounded the tower with 130mph winds, weakening the legs further. By this point, Texas Tower 4 had acquired a new name: Old Shaky, told with grim humour. As well as rocking from side to side, the platform twisted and leaned, creaking horribly as it did. The hollow legs amplified the sound of waves slapping against them, creating a constant booming cacophony. Visitors were warned not to shave with straight edged razors lest a sudden lurch cause them to slit their throat. Texas Tower 4 was an unpleasant, scary place to live, with the crew in constant fear that they would be pitched into the freezing ocean. In November 1960,

all but 14 crew members were evacuated from the tower and 14 civilian workers were brought in to carry out emergency repairs. They attempted to fill the legs with sand and concrete, hoping to stabilise the platform. Conditions worsened throughout winter. The tower bucked and heaved, throwing the airmen and contractors to the ground. The movements were so violent the welders couldn’t work on the damaged legs. Commanding officer Captain Gordon Phelan made repeated requests to have the platform evacuated, in vain. Air Force heads refused to abandon the tower, fearing that nearby Russian trawlers harboured spies eager to steal the radar technology. Commander Sheppard later wrote “you don’t just walk off and leave millions of dollars of radar equipment lying around untended”. On January 14, weather forecasts warned of squalls developing with winds reaching 60 knots. On board Texas Tower 4, a deafening crack echoed across the platform, and Old Shaky began to sway horribly – another brace had snapped. An evacuation order was finally granted at 4pm, too late. Coastguard and Air Force rescue helicopters were grounded, waiting for a lull in the storm. Nearby vessels rushed to the stricken tower’s aid. At 6:45pm, Texas Tower 4 made its final transmission. From the bridge of the Navy supply ship T-AKL 17, just a few miles away, Captain Mangual watched the radar image of Tower 4 fade from view as the structure crumbled into the sea. When the rescue ships arrived, just one body was pulled from the water. The remaining 27 had been dragged to the bottom with the remains of Old Shaky. The regional commanding officer in charge of the Texas Towers faced a court martial but was acquitted. A subsequent Senate investigation found serious errors and lapses in judgement along the entire command chain. To make matters worse,

Photo and painting reproduction courtesy of the New Jersey Maritime History Museum, Beach Haven.

Barrier Island Businesses Bouncing Back from Sandy By Phil Stilton TOMS RIVER—Business is returning to Ocean County’s barrier islands. Ocean County Freeholder, Jerry Little says, “On Long Beach Island, there are approximately 240 retail food establishments, about 56 of them have reopened, and the others, about 2 of them are not going to return to business out of the 240. The others will open as the season progresses and as their rehabilitation contin-

ues and they get rehabilitated and ready to open for the season. On the northern barrier island, there are about 365 food establishments. About 126 have opened, Freeholder, out of the 365 and 239 are not yet ready to open.” The Ocean County Health Department is the government agency responsible for inspecting the county’s food based businesses. Little said figures were attained from the department.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

The Real Jersey Girls Put Pink Boots On The Ground During Recovery By Christa Riddle In January, 2013, three like-minded, life-long community advocates and Jersey Shore residents joined forces, post-Hurricane Sandy, to celebrate, honor, and support the real New Jersey women making a difference in their communities. Led by a commitment to helping others in need, The Real Jersey Girls’ founders, Laura Gonzalez, Gina Leigh, and Michelle Leonard have focused on coordinating volunteer resources and efficiently disseminating in-

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formation on what needs to be done for the good of the community and its people so that New Jersey can revive, rebuild, and restore. “Hurricane Sandy was the catalyst that united us and brought forward what we were already seeing a need for and addressing in our shore communities,” shared co-founder Gonzalez. “To be honest, we had grown tired of the typical New Jersey stereotypes portrayed on television and in the media. Those images are not consistent with a Real Jersey Girl. Real Jersey Girls

are hands-on, resilient, and independent. We are not afraid to jump in and help, even if it means getting dirty. We are all about using our strengths and resources, and we will do whatever it takes to accomplish what really matters. We want others to embrace The Real Jersey Girl as an organization that other Real Jersey Girls identify with and say, ‘That’s me, I am a Real Jersey Girl, too.’ The Real Jersey Girls isn’t just the three of us; it is every woman out there that is making a difference in her New Jersey community.”

Each of the three The Real Jersey Girls founders embodies the persona of a Real Jersey Girl, and although they asked to remain out of the spotlight and behind the scenes to maintain a focus on the dedicated group efforts that keep The Real Jersey Girls and other volunteer organizations going strong, they cannot go without mention. Gonzalez is a business visionary, wife, mother, transformational author, and inspirational speaker who shares what got her through her own difficult times to extend support and advice for people navigating through challenging times on a personal, professional, and business level. In addition, Gonzalez also hosts the Internet radio show  “Live with Laura” and has written her first book, Healthy Business, Healthy You: Transformational Tools for Your Life and Business. Proceeds from the book will be used to purchase complimentary copies for Hurricane Sandy survivors. Gina Leigh is a singer, songwriter, mother, business owner, and visionary leader, whose Hurricane Sandy benefit song “Not Alone” conveys a message of hope for storm survivors and sits at the heart of The Real Jersey Girls coming together this past January. “Not Alone” debuted on You Tube; Gonzalez contacted Leigh after hearing it and learned more about Leigh’s advocacy, discovering that she and Leigh shared the same passion and purpose. The two women decided to join forces in their efforts. Leigh’s “Not Alone” video performance can be enjoyed on The Real Jersey Girls’ website, www.realjerseygirls.org. All of the song’s proceeds are donated to Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. It was a natural progression for Gonzalez and Leigh to reach out to Michelle Leonard, a mutual friend, as both recognized that Leonard shared their tenacity for helping with community relief efforts. Leonard, a soldier’s wife, mother, positive living visionary, optimal wellness educator, and business woman, focuses all aspects of her life on her personal mission to make other people happy. She believes in building stronger communities and empowering citizens with lifesaving positive knowledge about green and natural health modalities that promote personal and environmental wellness. This past Christmas season, Leonard assumed the role of Mrs. Claus as part of her “Santa’s Sandy Hands” gift drive, which collected and wrapped over 100,000 presents for children affected by Hurricane Sandy so that survivors could experience the joy of Christmas despite their losses. Leonard is also the founder and director of Live Positive Today and the annual Soulsational Festival.  

Soulsational, along with The Real Jersey Girls, have organized a special “Superstorm Sandy Survivor Tribute” at the upcoming July 27th festival to be celebrated at Veterans Park in Bayville.   This special production has become the catalyst movement to transform Hurricane Sandy victims into empowered Sandy Soulvivors™. More information about Soulsational can be found online at www. Soulsational.info. Although The Real Jersey Girls have been an integral part of Hurricane Sandy resources and communication, their efforts extend beyond the recent storm; they also rally the troops to help anyone they can in the community who needs assistance, focusing on what really matters at both the individual and group levels. Placing a high value on strengthening and empowering those in need of assistance, The Real Jersey Girls never recognize anyone as a victim, but focus on allowing survivors to play an active role in their own recovery. They are also very much aware that Hurricane Sandy’s devastation is more far-reaching than anticipated. Gonzalez commented, “The waves of Sandy continue to batter the survivors as they meet the challenges of the storm’s aftermath. For a long while, people will continue to need support in many ways. Our volunteers and survivors have already had their boots on the ground for six months straight of physical labor, cleaning up, ripping out, and rebuilding. The waves of Sandy are far from over, and the need goes way beyond the physical damage. Behind what we see is the emotional damage. If you have no business, there is no income, and with no money, there is no home. The needs are physical, emotional, and financial.” Securing long-term disaster relief and assistance in New Jersey has not been a definite guarantee. The Real Jersey Girls reveal the pressing need for continued support using social media. For example, one Facebook post reached 275,000 Facebook members and then continued to be shared through friend networks. In this way, The Real Jersey Girls call to the forefront what still needs to be done for recovery from the widespread damage and devastation of Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey. Many residences and businesses appear unscathed judging by their intact exteriors; meanwhile, their interiors have been destroyed by flooding. On January 12th, 2013, The Real Jersey Girls coordinated and hosted “Walk a Mile in Our Shoes,” an event organized to show the media why Congress should pass the Sandy Relief Bill. Seaside Heights, Brigantine, Union Beach, and Long Beach communities walked simultaneously to show their support.

Addressing the need for unity and communication during times of widespread devastation, one of The Real Jersey Girls’ goals is to pool volunteer resources throughout the local, state, and even national levels, offering unity and the power of numbers through connecting, communicating, and sharing information and resources. The Real Jersey Girls also saw that volunteers and grassroots organization leaders need their own source of strength to keep going as trying times stretch on, as isolation can weaken even the most vigorous volunteers, despite their dedication and best of intentions. The Real Jersey Girls organizes meetings with governors’ office representatives and grassroots organization leaders to share the latest information and keep an open line of communication about current needs and what is being done to meet them. In this way, groups can act in unison and garner support from one another so that everyone benefits and learns. As volunteer organization leaders stay strong and disseminate information, it has a positive impact and trickledown effect on the local volunteers and survivors working in the trenches. The Real Jersey Girls’ website, www.realjerseygirls. org, also offers an invaluable directory, “Hurricane Sandy NJ: Where to Get Help and Where to Give Help,” created and maintained by volunteer Coleen Markey of My Soul Shack. The directory provides categorized sub-links with contributions from individuals, grassroots groups, non-profits, agencies, volunteer organizations, and businesses providing Hurricane Sandy survivor assistance in many capacities. Information is updated weekly and includes disaster assistance, supplies, social services, distribution centers, donations (where to give and receive help), house raising, insurance, tax relief, mold remediation, recovery groups, unemployment, and more. “After Hurricane Sandy left its trail of disaster, people waited for the cavalry to come. However, as time passed, we soon realized we were it! We realized that the one thing we knew for Shore, was that our community would rally behind one another. We knew for Shore that we could help each other and ourselves, and this has gotten us through,” explained Gonzalez. With their boots firmly on the ground, The Real Jersey Girls look ahead; in unity with the coalition of volunteer organizations, they will continue to hold their vision of New Jersey moving forward towards recovery, making a difference and unifying for the common good of New Jersey as a brighter future awaits.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Sandy 6 Months Later Nationwide Police Response In Ocean County Louisiana State Police Bring Katrina Experience To Sandy Recovery by Christa Riddle “New Jersey was one of the first state police agencies to respond after Hurricane Katrina. When Hurricane Sandy hit, it was our duty to repay New Jersey for their support here in New Orleans,” shares Captain Doug Cain, Public Affairs Commander of the Louisiana State Police. “Although Hurricane Sandy brought back many difficult memories for us, the people of New Jersey took great comfort in the fact that we had survived our disaster, that we recovered and grew even stronger as a community after our tragedy in New Orleans. For them, we became a source of hope.” On Friday, November 2nd, the Louisiana State Police received a call for assistance from Colonel Joseph “Rick” Fuentes, superintendent of the New Jersey State Police, through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) after the wrath of Hurricane Sandy pummeled the Jersey Shore. The EMAC, established in 1996, provides mutual aid to its member states and U.S. territories during governordeclared states of emergency. It is a response system for states to send disaster-relief personnel, equipment, and commodities to other states during times of need. During the early morning hours of Sunday, November 4th, a convoy of 25 Louisiana

troopers began their 20-hour drive to New Jersey to serve an eight to 30-day tour of duty; over 300 troopers had volunteered to go. The troopers, many of which had direct hurricane recovery experience, arrived at Fort Dix at 1 a.m. on Monday, November 5th and were immediately sworn in as New Jersey State Police so they could serve in the same capacities as their New Jersey counterparts. The officers were immedi-

ately deployed in the Ocean County area to provide law enforcement support and emergency management

security; they also offered optimism that these times of anguish and distress would pass. “The Louisiana troopers spent time talking with the citizens hit hardest by Sandy. We recognized that familiar look of despair on the citizens’ faces. It was the same look of despair we had experienced after Katrina. Giving people hope that their homes, their towns, and their lives would eventually return to normalcy became our mission beyond safety and security,” recalls Captain Cain. On November 8th, Captain Cain flew into New Jersey with Colonel Michael Ed-

monson, superintendent of the Louisiana State Police, and Lieutenant Colonel Charles Dupuy, deputy superintendent and chief of staff of the Louisiana State Police. They met with Colonel Fuentes, spent time with their troopers, and went into the air via helicopter to assess damage along the barrier islands. “Before the aerial view, I had no idea of the extent of damage to New Jersey’s barrier islands. The devastation was reminiscent

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of what we witnessed in Katrina’s aftermath. It brought back many difficult memories,” shares Captain Cain.

Aside from their duty to maintain order, protect life and property, promote recovery, and represent their home state of Louisiana, the troopers created many lifelasting memories for both themselves and the people whose lives they touched. While here, the troopers reunited people with their pets and helped a displaced family of four who had lost their home and all of their belongings during the disaster. Meeting the family in a shelter, the troopers headed to Walmart to buy the family clothes and supplies; there, they met a generous wom-

an who offered the family housing in one of her rental properties. The troopers also attended a middle school student job fair and were asked to call the coin toss for a local high school football game as a gesture of thanks for their dedication and service. Before heading back to Louisiana on November 17th, some of the troopers cooked a huge batch of Louisiana gumbo for 200 first responders in Ocean County. The Louisiana State Police chronicled their New Jersey tour of duty from November 4th through 19th on Facebook, where they have many “friends” and “likes” from the thankful citizens of the Jersey Shore. Be sure to check out their Facebook page for personal stories, photos, and details at https://www.facebook. com/LouisianaStatePolice. The Township of Long Beach Island recognized the troopers’ dedication with a proclamation for their courageous and humanitarian efforts during the Hurricane Sandy disaster.

Massachusetts State Police Went Above And Beyond After Sandy By Christa Riddle On Saturday, November 3rd, Lieutenant Michael

nardy and the Toms River Police Department. “When we arrived, the area’s people were calm because

Habel of the Massachusetts State Police, along with his contingent of 25 fellow officers, received word that they would head to the hurricane-ravaged areas of

time had passed since the hurricane,” recalls Lieutenant Habel. “They were resigned to the fact that they had lost everything, and they were strong and ready

amazed at the number of refrigerators tipped over and displaced by the hurricane’s flooding. I had no idea they would float because they are so large. We found ourselves helping in any way we could, just doing what people needed. We moved so many refrigerators, we felt like appliance delivery guys,” remembers Lieutenant Habel. In addition to uprighting refrigerators, Lieutenant Habel and the other officers from Massachusetts assisted with moving furniture, carting personal belongings, and getting residents back into their homes during phase one of Toms River’s three-phase re-entry plan. Their main focus was security and patrolling to prevent looting, which they did not encounter at all. The Massachusetts of-

New Jersey Shore the following Saturday. Through the Office of Emergency Management (OEM), calls for help after disasters such as Hurricane Sandy are routed to all state police departments throughout the country, with a standard request to send 25 officers to assist during the time of need. “Although we had been on stand-by before during Hurricane Katrina and the Alabama tornadoes, this was the first time we were actually deployed to help,” shares Lieutenant Habel. By OEM order, Lieutenant Habel and the Massachusetts State Police were split up into three groups upon arriving in New Jersey on November 10th, heading off to areas needing assistance, such as Brick, Monmouth County, and Hazlet. On Tuesday, November 13th, the 25 officers reunited and were dispatched by the OEM to Ortley Beach to serve under the command of Chief Michael Mastro-

to move ahead.” Although Lieutenant Habel and the same contingent of officers had helped in Springfield Massachusetts, the second largest city in the state, after its 2011 tornado, he was

ficers also helped the Toms River Police Department with checking identifications for re-entry onto the Barrier Island. “The people in Ortley Beach and the whole area were super appreciative and friendly,

shocked by the devastation Hurricane Sandy left behind. “After the tornado, there was water and wind damage, but this was much more widespread, affecting so many people. I was

even though many of them had just lost everything. It was difficult being away from home and our families, but I felt lucky we had homes to return to after seeing this. The whole experience was very rewarding,” shares Lieutenant Habel, who was very impressed by the dedication of the Toms River Police Department. “Officers who had lost their own homes were out there helping others, working 24/7 to help their community. If we got called back tomorrow to help, we would definitely head back and do it all over again.” The Toms River Police Department and community extend thanks to the Massachusetts State Police for their assistance and support.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Beaches Opened; Volunteers Clean Up by Erik Weber SEASIDE PARK – The beachfront and bayside here bustled with activity Saturday with beaches opened to the public at 7 am and volunteers from the borough and beyond participating in both Clean Ocean Action’s Beach Sweep and an official municipal day of service. Beginning at 9 am, the statewide environmental volunteer organization facilitated the collection and compilation of various debris remaining across the beaches from last October’s hurricane and subsequent storms. At 10 am, borough officials kicked off their day of service, with dunegrass planting on the oceanfront and the painting of benches and lifeguard supply boxes corralled at the marina for the work. Metered parking enforcement was suspended for the duration of the day so volunteers wouldn’t have to “feed the meters” between their duties. Though beaches are now open to the public, swimming is prohibited and patrons are expected to follow the normal rules and regulations posted at beach entrances. Council Meeting Notes At the council meeting last Thursday, April 25th: • Mayor Robert W. Matthies was absent from the meeting and Council President Michael Tierney ran the proceedings in his place. • A bond ordinance was introduced authorizing the issuance of $285,000 in bonds or notes for the acquisition of pick-up trucks totaling an estimated $150,000, a wheel loader broom and fork

totaling an estimated $100,000 and approximately $50,000 in fire equipment. Fifteen thousand dollars would be used toward the equipment from the capital improvement fund. • The second reading of an ordinance amending ranges for salaries and wages was passed on second reading, with I Street resident Faye Haring inquiring how many employees were already nearing the high end of the salary ranges. “Actually most are at the low end but we did something different – before we moved these, if you go back to the last year’s ordinance, just about every one of our non-union employees are up against the high end,” said Mr. Tierney, who is also the chair of the finance committee and added that after speaking with Borough Administrator Bob Martucci they “widened” the ranges in the event that they would need to bring someone into a position like the administrator and could offer a better range based upon their experience than the narrow ones that preceded it in past ordinances. Councilwoman Nancy Koury asked Chief Francis Larkin whether the pay ranges for the special classes of police officers were as low as they were last year. “They look pretty low for what they have to do,” she said. “I kept the Class I at minimum wage just because Class I [officers] are just starting out,” he replied. “When they come out and become Class II [officer] in the police academy I gave them a bump up.” In the new ordinance, a Class I police officer is able to make between $7.25 and $9 per hour, while a Class II officer can make

between $7.25 and $19 per hour. The chief noted that the “bump up” was to add retention value to positions for officers in the borough. Mrs. Koury added that construction office officials reflected a new department created after last October’s hurricane and that the positions were not yet filled. • Among the resolutions approved by the governing body were two that included fee waivers and slip rental refunds for the borough marina due to the effects of last October’s hurricane, including the specific refund to two slip rentals because the holder’s vessel was destroyed. • One additional resolution was added to the original list to pay $12,500 to Manchester Township-based ASAP Multimedia for public relations consultant services specifically linked with a television commercial that would be shot in May and aired in large markets around the state Memorial Day weekend through the July 4th holiday to promote tourism to the borough. Mr. Tierney stated that borough business owners interested to be featured in the taping would be included. • Mrs. Koury asked Chief Larkin what a “confidential fund operation” cost of $1,500 was in the certified bills list. “It’s a confidential trust fund the prosecutor sets up for seized monies and uses them on confidential things,” he replied, at which moment everyone in the room erupted with laughter. “We learned a lot there, didn’t we?” joked Mr. Tierney. • During her operations report, Mrs. Koury praised Public Works Supervisor Eric Wojciechowski for his diligent efforts in bringing thousands of dunegrass plants into the borough for planting by volunteers and members of his department. • Chief Larkin reported that the county health department was working with local municipalities to determine whether the ar-

eas offshore were clear of debris before formally reopening swimming and other activities to the public. “They’re pretty gung ho about it and I’m sure they want to remove [the debris] so we can get open,” he said, adding that lifeguards this summer would likely be trained to spot debris and that he did not see an issue with swimming being open by Memorial Day weekend. • Charlroy Motel owner Cheryl Borton Raley stated she was concerned about the amount of sand still present along sidewalks in the borough and wondered how many homes “have not been touched yet” since the storm. Mrs. Koury said that letters had gone out to homeowners reminding them of an April 30th deadline to remove sand from their sidewalks otherwise the borough would do the work and bill them. • Ms. Raley also noted a problem with motorists turning left from the right lane on Lafayette Avenue, adding that the arrows

showing them they need to be in the left lane to do so were faded and too close to the corner. “It’s a constant thing,” she said. • 11th Avenue resident Bob Hopkins approached the governing body with concern over the reconstruction of the dune system along the oceanfront, stating that he felt too much time was passing without noticeable progress while the dangerous possibility of a second deadly hurricane loomed large in his view. Mr. Tierney stated that he spoke with the public works department and that the dunes were being rebuilt according to current rules and regulations but that the state was going to come in and install and maintain one continuous dune from the southern end of Island Beach State Park north with walkovers for access instead of cut-throughs. Mr. Martucci said the plans were in place and the dune would be 35 feet wide, 25 feet high, have a 45 degree slope and include 100 feet more beach in front of

them pumped from barges offshore. He added that of 37 easements requiring authorization in the borough, 36 were held by the municipality and one was held by the owner of Funtown Pier, but that after multiple meetings he was “just about ready to sign.” • Ocean Avenue resident Paul Barna urged Mr. Hopkins and others from the borough to get involved in planting dunegrass provided by the town as a way to help shore up the beachfront protection in the interim. • 11th Avenue resident Maureen Hopkins thanked Chief Larkin for his regular updates in the weeks and months following the storm through the town’s reverse 9-1-1 system and asked whether that same system could be used to garner volunteers for municipal projects. “I have spoken with the mayor and he and I have an understanding that it’s just for emergency purposes,” he replied.

Volunteers from the Seaside Park Volunteer Fire Company and Tri-Boro First Aid Squad posed for a quick photo amid a busy breakfast fundraiser on Sunday morning, April 21st. A total of 193 people attended throughout the morning. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

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Mayor Robert W. Matthies was among the volunteers planting dunegrass along the beachfront on Saturday morning, April 13th. Note the Funtown Pier Ferris wheel still standing in the far right background; it was pulled down for demolition five days later. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Central Regional News: Humanities Academy, Test Scores, Uniforms & More by Erik Weber BERKELEY - Conducting a town-by-town tour of governing body meetings within the Central Regional Schools District in recent weeks, Superintendent Triantafillos “Tom” Parlapanides gave residents and town officials a look at the district’s future under his guidance, often showcased by his characteristic high energy and competitive streak for all things Central.

Below is a breakdown of these updates: Test Scores

“The last four years - 2012, 2011, 2010 and 2009 - scores have steadily gone up, beating the state average or being right there,” said Dr. Parlapanides. “They have risen every year I’ve been superintendant, beating the state average and definitely the district factor group, outscoring that quite a bit.” Scores returned from the High School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA) and the New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (NJASK) largely supported his statements, with the majority of the scores being far higher than the district factor group (DFG), or statewide assessment by demographically similar districts, and 15 out of 24 listed score groups coming in at greater than the state average. Of those nine scores groups below state average, five were within three points of the state average, three were within six points of the state average, and one was within seven points of the state average. The superintendent stated that when students arrive for 7th grade, their first year in the district, they receive 90 minutes of mathematics training daily, and add to that an additional 90 minutes of language arts the following year to help build a “foundation” of learning within the Central Regional School District, which is reflected in the rising test scores. “So the blocks are working, students are writing well and the block time is really helping,” he added.

emy model for their first three years of high school, including: Freshmen: English Honors, World History Honors, Biology Honors Sophmores: English Honors, United States History I AP, Law and Society Juniors: English AP, United States History II AP, Economics Seniors would then enroll in Georgian Court University courses worth 18 credits; students who score a three or higher in their advanced placement (AP) courses would be eligible to take 30 college credits their senior year. “College now costs $30,000 to $50,000 per year,” said the superintendant, adding that his goal was to “give kids every advantage possible” in Central Regional, including, through the academy, offering possibly a full free year of college to seniors. “Senior year they also have to do an internship December 15th to January 15th,” he said, including, depending on the students’ interest and chosen career path, in local law firms, schools and even Berkeley Township municipal offices.

R.O.T.C. Program

Central Regional also signed on to begin a Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program within the district next year, with that first year being paid for by the district but later likely picked up by the military as the superintendent reported that the government does not usually start new ROTC programs during wartime. “Not only will our students graduate ‘CR Strong’ but they will also graduate ‘Army Strong,’” said Dr. Parlapanides, adding that it would give participating students the advantage of their college degrees paid for in exchange for military service. The local community would also benefit, he stated, as the uniformed students would be available for area volunteer

service, parades and more as part of their training, which could include opportunities and competitions on campus and at Joint Base McGuireDix-Lakehurst facilities.

Academic Letters & Hall of Fame

Academic letters and a new Central Regional Hall of Fame will be available to students, with those achieving high honor roll at the end of 8th grade receiving an academic lantern pin - “because they’re bright,” the superintendent half-joked - and a second pin if they remain on the high honor roll all four years of high school, plus a varsity jacket in academics. Dr. Parlapanides stated that the district “this year had a phenomenal year - students did a great job and really raised the bar” and that a new academic hall of fame was being established, which would include the photos of all valedictorians and any students that receive a score of five on their advanced placement test or perfect scores on the SAT or HSPA sections. He added that currently the district had students going on to the United States Military Academy at West Point, Cornell University and possibly the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “We’ve really had kids stepping up and challenging themselves,” the superintendent said.

School Uniforms

Citing safety concerns atop the idea that concentrating less on clothing and more on academics would further improve students’ success, Dr. Parlapanides joked “I know I’m the antichrist” prior to introducing the likely move to require all students within Central Regional wear uniforms. “We have, at the high school, the world’s largest ranch - it couldn’t be designed more poorly. It has to be a half-mile point to point and have about 70 entrances and exits.” Besides offering school personnel and students the ability to immediately tell if an

individual belongs or does not belong on campus, the superintendent added that with families in the district hit so hard financially by last October’s Hurricane Sandy, he felt it would offer them the ability to spend less money on clothing for their children. “This way, instead of buying the $200 Nike shores, they can buy the wonderful Central shoes for $20 or $10,” he said, noting that talks were ongoing with parents and students about the transition, which was not yet firmly decided upon but likely to be adopted.

School Choice Funds

Dr. Parlapanides stated that the majority of improvements at the district were thanks to school choice funds, which allows students from any district to attend Central Regional with the state picking up the bill. Some of those improvements thus far include: wireless internet access at the middle and high school; new math, science and Spanish books; technology upgrades; a new student center in the high school; the new video marquee at the entrance to the high school that the superintendent could feature public events from local towns and be rented out by parents of graduates to congratulate them, or even to allow someone a unique way to make a marriage proposal, he half-joked; band uniforms and equipment upgrade - “some trumpets might be a little too 1956-ish,” the year the school opened, he said; plus the R.O.T.C. program and Humanities Academy.

Athletics

In school athletics, Dr. Parlapanides reported the district had signed a three-year contract with Adidas, which includes $11,000 worth of free equipment plus a 40 percent discount on all items purchased by the school or the athlete’s parents; had poached a new girls’ lacrosse coach - Chris Raichle - from Shore Regional High School, in West Long Branch, which was nationally ranked 18th and 21st; launched a new varsity ice hockey program and signed on a new head football coach, Willie Jacobs.

Humanities Academy

Citing his competitive nature of wanting the best for Central Regional, which is also his alma mater, Dr. Parlapanides introduced the creation of a Humanities Academy as a way to compete with M.A.T.E.S., or Marine Academy of Technology and Environmental Science, which is administered by the Ocean County Vocational Technical School District. M.A.T.E.S. “takes our brightest students and throws salt in the wound on top with the county charging $500 for each kid that leaves Central Regional,” he said. “So we created the Humanities Academy - students are taught by Georgian Court University professors and get 18 free college credits, and also [Apple MacBook Air laptop computers] paid through school choice funds, now expanded from the 12th to the 9th grades.” Through this unique partnership with the university in Lakewood, students entering the academy would be dually enrolled in Central Regional and Georgian Court University, thus opening the doors to all university campus facilities and events. Students would also take at least three classes per year in the acadRead the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Seaside Honors Centenarian With First Centennial Beach Badge SEASIDE HEIGHTS—To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Borough of Seaside Heights, centennial beach badges are now on sale Saturdays and Sun-

days until 3 o’clock at the Borough Hall. At a recent council meeting, the borough presented Rosealeena Rosetti Rinaldi, “Rosie” with the first Centennial

Beach Bar Demolished

Beach Badge shortly after her 100th birthday. Rosie has been spending her summers in Seaside Heights for 67 years and moved here permanently in 1965. Seaside Heights Mayor William Akers presented the badge and a proclamation to Rosie’s daughter Ann Morgante. Mrs. Rinaldi, now lives in a senior assisted living community according to Morgante. “Most people who remember her, remember her walking her dog, strutting around walking her dog, she thought she was Miss America,” Morgante said. “To this day she still thinks she’s Miss America, she’s classy and she’s wonderful and the thing she loves more than anything in the world is Seaside Heights.” The Beach Bar, formerlly the Beachcomber Bar & Grill, badly damaged during Hurricane Sandy was demolished on March 16th.

Seaside Heights Included In Latest Round Of Robin Hood Funding The Borough of Seaside Heights will receive $400,000 in grants, according to Mayor William Akers. “The grant will

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come in the form of two $200,000 payments and is to be used for residents only,” he said. “It can’t go to anything commercial or

the town.” In the last round of funding on March 19th, several other local recipients were awarded grants by the Robin Hood foundation. Hometown Heroes for Toms River Township will also receive $400,000. Toms River was one of the hardest hit areas in New Jersey with 14,285 “mainland” homes having some form of wind or water damage and 7,083 impacted homes on the Barrier Island. The Township has partnered with Hometown Heroes to assist residents with rebuilding and the purchase of building materials and essential home contents such as furniture, cabinets and appliances. Berkeley Township will also receive a $200,000 grant. Homes for All, Inc. will receive $575,000. This grant will fund 15 significant rebuilds and minor home repairs to another 85 homes in Ocean County which lack or have insufficient insurance/ FEMA coverage. Other Ocean County recipients included in this latest round of funding include the Northern Ocean Habitat for Humanity ($150,000), Toms River Regional Schools Hurricane Relief Fund ($75,000), Hometown Heroes Ocean County ($150,000), St, Francis Community Center ($35,000) and Senior Citizens Activities Network of Monmouth & Ocean Counties ($30,000). With its latest slate of grants totaling nearly $7 million, the Robin Hood Hurricane Sandy Relief Fund has made more than $62 million in grants since Sandy devastated the region in late October. To date, approximately 42% of the funds have been allocated to New Jersey-based organizations, 42% to organizations based in New York City, 14% to Long Island/Westchester, and 2% to Connecticut. The vast majority of funds (60%) have been devoted to housing-related groups that are helping residents repair and rebuild their damaged homes. In total, the Robin Hood Relief Fund has made grants to more than 400 different organizations in the tri-state area

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Seaide Heights Borough Briefs BAYSIDE CONSTRUCTION TO BEGIN

The borough has awarded a contract to begin rebuilding the Barnegat Bay side of the town, which also suffered damage in Hurricane Sandy. The entire Bay Boulevard boardwalk, pier and parking lot was hard hit by the bay side tidal surge that caused damage all across the county. The boardwalk was demolished this past winter and the dock remains without decking. The parking lot pavement has been torn up in several areas and will be repaved. The project is expected to be completed by June 1st. “People don’t understand that while, yes, we did suffer a lot of damage on the ocean front, the bay front is just as important to our summer season because many people use it,” Mayor Akers said. “Whether it’s for boating, fishing, jetski and other forms of recreation it’s our connection to the Barnegat Bay.” The project was awarded to Albert Marine Construction, Inc.

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES CHEERLEADER CALENDAR SHOOT

The borough council discussed the intent of the Philadelphia Eagles cheerleaders coming to town to shoot photos for their 2013 calendar. The council members agreed it was a good way to create awareness for the borough. MAYOR REFLECTS BACK ON POST SANDY AERIAL SURVEY The day after Hurricane Sandy ravaged his town, Seaside

Heights Mayor Bill Akers assembled with other local leaders at Miller Air Park. Upon the arrival of New Jersey State Police Colonel Rick Fuentes, Akers said he was given the opportunity to see his battered town from the air, still unable to access by ground due to flooding and downed power lines and utility poles on the Route 37 causeway. “We were fortunate to get a ride up in the helicopter,” Mr. Akers said, “When I was looking at it, it was hard to take in, it was hard to believe exactly the amount of devastation we had.” “When I was looking at the break in Route 35 in Mantoloking, all I thought was that you have to build a bridge over that and as I looked two blocks down, there was another breach and I thought there was no way we could repair this,” he added. “DOT was phenomenal in what they did and what they had to work with to fix all the breaks out there.”

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

While discussing how to draw attention to the borough this summer through advertising and marketing, the mayor and council discussed possible advertising grants from the State of New Jersey. Mayor Akers joked, “What would kick it off better is if we can get the governor in a bathing suit and jump into the ocean, but I don’t know if that one’s going to fly.” “I gotta tell you something, he’s been our biggest cheerleader, I don’t know where we’d be without the gover-

nor of New Jersey,” Akers added. “He’s been unbelievable. I know he’s fond of Seaside Heights, but he cares about every single community in New Jersey rebuilding.”

MUSIC FESTIVAL APPROVED

The Jersey Shore Music Festival will be in Seaside Heights May 16-20th. Mike Grachien, the borough improvement director said the borough has had great pre-season events and will be ready for tourists come Memorial Day weekend.

BID AWARDED FOR BOARDWALK FENCE AND GATES

Sidd & Associates, the contractor building the new boardwalk was awarded the contract to construct the beachfront fences and gates along the boardwalk.

FLOWERS ON THE BOARDWALK

Steve Whalen, owner of Lucky Leos on the boardwalk, suggested the town adds flower pots and flag poles at each beach entry and to leave planting spaces at the end of each street end.

GRANT FROM NEW YORK YANKEES

The New York Yankees have awarded the borough a $5,000 grant to help rebuild the softball field and playground. The field had been used after the storm as one of two transfer facilities in the borough for Hurricane Sandy debris removal. The field has been cleared of debris and reseeded, but is still in need of repair.

Seaside Heights Boardwalk Reopens

Verizon Volunteers Give Hugh J. Boyd Elementary School a Makeover By Kate Hunter SEASIDE HEIGHTS-More than 160 employees from the Verizon Leadership Development Program, along with senior leaders from Verizon, participated in a day of volunteer work at the Hugh J. Boyd Elementary School in Seaside Heights, organized by Jersey Cares. Seaside Heights Mayor Williams Akers also will be on hand. The volunteers painted classrooms; removed weeds and planted flowers around the school; built new picnic tables to create an outdoor learning environment; painted planter murals and painted line games on the school’s blacktop to be used during recess; and built new benches to be installed along the Seaside Heights boardwalk. The volunteers are part of a group of newly hired college graduates at Verizon who were chosen to be part of the Verizon Leadership Development Program “We’ve embedded volunteerism into Verizon’s leadership development programs,” said Theresa Torres, director of workplace performance at Verizon. “Our employees understand that we run to a crisis, not away. As the future leaders of Verizon, it’s important our participants embrace corporate responsibility early so that they continue to build on it throughout their careers.” Jersey Cares, a Newarkbased nonprofit organization that coordinates volun-

teer opportunities and promotes civic engagement throughout New Jersey, worked with the Verizon Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Verizon, to plan the volunteer event and to lead the day’s activities. Mayor Akers said, “On behalf of the citizens of Seaside Heights, I want to thank Verizon and Jersey Cares for their volunteer efforts at Hugh J. Boyd Jr.

Elementary School. While our community continues to recover from the effects of Sandy, the dedicated work of these volunteers shows that Seaside Heights is on its way back and will be better than ever.”

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The Seaside Heights boardwalk was partially reopened on Wednesday May 1st from Seaside Park border north to the casino Pier

Workers from SIDD & Associates of Millstone installed decking on the Seaside Heights boardwalk in mid-April Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Island Heights River Avenue Garbage Cans Removed from Public Areas by Erik Weber

ISLAND HEIGHTS - Following heated discussions dating back to the previous summer, governing body officials here unanimously approved a measure to remove all garbage cans from public areas along River Avenue, citing abuse by waterfront patrons. At their late April meeting, Councilman Brian Taboada noted that during warm seasons the cans were regularly overflowing with refuse from the interior of visitors’ cars along the waterfront, to the point that public works would clean them out and they would be full several hours later during busy weekends. “I’m thinking if we move them then people wouldn’t see a place to throw the trash and there might be less trash and people will be responsible for taking the trash out,” he said, adding that people were “dumping more than just McDonald’s bags they brought to the boardwalk; a lot of garbage we’re finding is household trash and bags.” The councilman added that removing the cans would be in line with the growing movement begun in national parks “that you carry out what you bring in.” Council President Jeff Silver, who lives on the bluff overlooking Boy Scout Island and Holly Cove, reported that last October’s hurricane had wiped out all garbage cans at that popular local waterfront drive-in spot and that ever since, “there’s no trash for me to clean up on a daily basis. No beer cans, pizza boxes and also no raccoons or opossums. It’s worked and looks terrific.” Former councilman and local code enforcement official Al Gabriel, present during the meeting, disagreed. “Why don’t you dump those cans more often?” he asked, adding that if there was a trash overflow problem, it made more sense to add more cans to the waterfront rather than take those there away. Mr. Taboada stated that during a busy summer weekend, public works could clean them out on Saturday afternoon and they would be filled Saturday night. River Avenue resident Ann Kempton agreed and requested the town post signage promoting ‘Carry in, carry out.’ A final resolution was unanimously approved by the mayor and council, authorizing the cans to be removed for a 30day trial period beginning May 1st but that if it appeared to not work prior June, the cans would be returned. Anti-littering signage was also to be installed and public works was to patrol the area more regularly for litter.

In Other Governing Body News:

• The 2013 budget was unanimously adopted at its second reading and included a 2.38 cent increase per $100 of assessed value, representing a 5.3% increase in the borough tax rate from 2012. As a result, a house assessed at $350,000 would see an increase of $83.30 in property taxes this year, billed in the third and fourth quarters. Of the 2.38 cent increase, 1.8 cents were due to the increase in the amount to be raised by taxation and municipal operations, and 0.58 cents were a direct result of the decrease in total assessed value in the bor-

ough from last year to this year. In 2012, ratables in Island Heights totaled $349,984,800. This year that amount decreased by $4,250,000, or 1.21 percent, to $345,734,800. In 2012, municipal appropriations totaled $2,317,696.25 and this year were increased by $37,537.39 to $2,355,233.64, or 1.62 percent. At the same time, anticipated revenues from 2012’s $744,696.25 dropped 3.42 percent to $719,233.64, a loss of $25,462.61. As a result, the amount to be raised by taxation increased from $1.573 million last year to $1.636 this year, or $63,000; 4.01 percent. • A resolution was adopted to cancel out a number of outstanding checks from payroll that exceeded the six month stale date period. Chief Financial Officer Louis Palazzo reported that following research on the checks, it was determined best to clean up the account, as some were from five or six years ago, and if anyone were to come forward requesting payment the money would remain in the account to do so. Mayor Jim Biggs joked that he thanked all those with outdated checks for their “generosity and gift” to the borough. • Purchase order requests included $1,063.34 to ERS Fleet Repair for repairs to damage on a municipal dump truck commandeered by the Island Heights Office of Emergency Management to assist with evacuations during Hurricane Sandy and $1,103.20 to Woodhaven Lumber for 35 2x12x16” treated lumber caps for repairs to the River Avenue bulkhead and ramp joists to the Summit Avenue pavilion, now located beside Dillon’s Creek. • Approval to submit an application to enter the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Emergency Watershed Protection Program was unanimously granted. The program exists, according to its website, to “undertake emergency measures, including the purchase of flood plain easements, for runoff retardation and soil erosion prevention to safeguard lives and property from floods, drought, and the products of erosion on any watershed whenever fire, flood or any other natural occurrence is causing or has caused a sudden impairment of the watershed.” Mr. Taboada stated that the program would not cost the borough any money and that they were seeking to possibly use it to halt erosion ongoing at the Camp Meeting Ground bluff. Former councilman Brian Hall was present at the meeting and asked whether the program could also cover the cost of the Garden Court culvert, which is a growing problem beneath the roadway there as it is in need of replacement or repairs. Mr. Taboada said that officials with the program would not cover that project and that the town was looking into the county handling that project. Weekend hours at the borough recycling yard were expanded to allow working residents more time to bring their yard debris. The new hours are 9 am to 6 pm on Saturday and Sunday. • A road closing application made by the Island Heights Yacht Club for Simpson Avenue south of Ocean Avenue and River Avenue between the south end of Simpson Avenue to the front of the clubhouse during their an-

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

nual Junior Olympic Sailing Championship on Sunday, July 21st to Tuesday, July 23rd was approved. As a result, River Avenue would be closed that Sunday night beginning at 6 pm to allow early arrivals with trailers the ability to unload and park along the riverfront to ease congestion the following morning when festivities would officially begin, and the town ramp would be unlocked from noon that Sunday until Tuesday at 5 pm to allow guests and parents with motorboats the ability to launch. • Hydrant flushing will commence across the borough during daytime hours the week of May 6th. Mr. Taboada urged residents doing laundry or generally using the water system those days to check its color first to avoid any issues. ��� The public works department began repairs and reconstruction on the Central Avenue pavilion, and this week joists on the ground floor would be installed. Mr. Gabriel asked if any plans were present for the work being performed and noted that he “wanted to see it done right.” Mr. Silver stated that they were rebuilding the lower level flooring with an approved permit under new temporary guidelines for facilities damaged by last October’s hurricane. • The Toms River Municipal Utilities Authority is continuing to research and study the water and sewer lines in the borough for possible future consolidation into that township’s system. • Borough Attorney William T. Hiering is working on an amendment to the borough property maintenance code that will address the cleanup of properties and be presented to the governing body for consideration in May. • The public park area on Longpoint will be filled with soil and compost and tilled by the county in the near future and afterward will have plants installed. • Mr. Hall asked the governing body to consider a possible storm debris ordinance that would spell out to residents what would and would not be picked up by the public works department, and noted that many insurance companies provided funds for the rental of bins that could be carted away by outside firms without putting a strain on borough services. He also noted that in the months since the storm he had seen instances of abuse in debris pickup by property owners who had used the opportunity to clean out their basements or yards of trees and brush and left piles at the curb, citing the storm, and added that the condos on Central Avenue left a pile of trash on that roadway until the town notified them that they were obligated to dispose of it themselves. • Following a closed session, the mayor and council approved the promotion of one police officer and hiring of two more. As a result, Luke Tirondola will move to a full time position within the department, while Dominique D’Amico and Timothy Geoghegan are brought on board as part time regular / Class II officers to be trained and then provide coverage on shifts as needed. In a letter to the governing body, Lt. Kevin Arnold wrote that “this will prepare the department in case of a shortage or if an officer leaves.”

June 8th is Town-Wide Garage Sale ISLAND HEIGHTS - The annual borough-wide garage sale will be held here on Saturday, June 8th from 9 am to 3 pm and carry the theme of “Help Out by Cleaning Out.” From the official release: As our communities get ready for summer at the shore, it’s a great time to sell those things that might help someone else

redecorate or replace their treasures and household goods lost in Sandy. By reselling and reusing, we put less stress on our overburdened landfills and a little money in our pockets - a win-win for everyone! Anyone interested in participating must obtain a $10 permit at borough offices between 9 am and 3 pm, Monday through Fri-

day, and 6 pm to 8 pm on Monday evenings. Permits obtained prior to June 5th will be included in the full garage sale map available to the public on June 7th at various locations, including borough hall, the New Corner Deli and Market, and the Island Heights Post Office. Rain date of the sale is Saturday, June 15th.

Take Control of Your Health Free Workshop for Seniors 60+ ISLAND HEIGHTS - A new free workshop for seniors over the age of 60 will run here Thursdays from 1 to 3:30 pm May 16th to June 20th in borough hall at the Wanamaker Complex on East End and Van Sant avenues. From the release: Did you know that a chronic condition is one that is not going to be cured; it is a lifetime situation that needs to be managed to overcome the challenges and lead an active, fulfilling life. People with long-term health issues have similar concerns and problems. They have to deal not only with their condition, but with the impact that their condition creates in their lives and in their emotions. What if there were tools and resources you could use that would improve the quality of your life? An evidence-based program called “Take Control of Your Health” was cre-

ated by Stanford University for this purpose. It is led by trained individuals who have chronic diseases themselves, and provides a supportive environment for attendees. The workshop is provided free of charge (funded by grants) through Community Services Inc. of Ocean County, The Office of Senior Services and the Ocean County Health Department. Class size is limited to 15 people to allow for interaction among the participants. Each class is 2 ½ hours long. Attendees receive a book entitled “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions” & relaxation CD. Refreshments are served at each meeting. You will learn techniques to help you deal your chronic condition. Some of the techniques include problem solving, pain management, communication skills, healthy eating, understanding and dealing

with your emotions, proper use of medications, and fatigue and stress management. You will design your own plan of action. Each goal achieved gives a sense of accomplishment and control in your life. It allows you to determine who you are, and what you want from your life now. The results from Stanford’s research, based on interviews with participants over a two year period, revealed improved health conditions, increased energy, reduced fatigue and pain, increased socialization, better psychological well-being, and greater confidence in their ability to manage their condition. If you have a chronic condition or are caring for someone with a chronic condition and would like to attend a the workshop please contact Louanne Kane 732-281-8391 to register.

Progress continued on the new water sphere being constructed beside the old standpipe on Van Sant Avenue. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

USS Akron 80th Memorial

Lieutenant Commander Craig Speer, USN XO Naval Support Activities for the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (left) and William A. Moffett III saluted the flag presented by a color guard from the nearby base. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

(From right) William A. Moffett III and his son, Alex, of Alexandria, Virginia, with a salvaged piece of the U.S.S. Akron’s superstructure. RADM Wm. A. Moffett was their grandfather and great-grandfather. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

(from left) William A. Moffett III, Lt. Cmdr. Craig Speer and Manchester Mayor Michael Fressola presented memorial wreaths on the Grand Army of the Republic / USS Akron monument. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

Navy Lakehurst Historical Society President Carl Jablonski spoke briefly about the airship before presenting the special guests present. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Pine Beach Wayne Avenue Group Home Concern Draws 75+ Residents to Boro Hall by Erik Weber PINE BEACH - Earlier this month, Wayne Avenue resident James “Jim” Keesling and several other neighbors here learned that recently a non-profit assisted living home was established on their street by Bayville-based Ocean Mental Health Services, Inc. for individuals suffering from mental disease or disorders. Concerned for the safety of their children, Mr. Keesling began an information campaign against the home that resulted in over 75 residents attending the regularly scheduled town council work meeting on Monday evening, April 22nd.

Online Posts and an Unsigned Flyer

The information campaign began publicly on Facebook in the second week of April, and an April 10th post to the Pine Beach Yacht Club’s Facebook page by Mr. Keesling called for other residents to “support us and our fight to stop this half way house from remaining in our town” by attending the April 22nd meeting. That post was later deleted after another member criticized him for posting a non-club issue. Mr. Keesling is the vice-commodore of that organization and apologized for the post being made there. In the nearly two weeks that followed, an unsigned flyer was distributed across lawns and at several area establishments, including the 7-11 convenience store here and the L Gourmet eatery in Beachwood, that stated the town was “only 6/10ths of a mile yet we have 6 group home housing units within the Pine Beach mailing address area. These group homes certainly serve a much needed population and offer a valuable social and medical purpose” but that “the newest group home on Wayne Avenue houses residents diagnosed with serious mental conditions that can include schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.” It added that the author was advised there would not be round the clock supervision and that the safety of surrounding residents depended on the individuals housed there ingesting their medication, and that removing the home from the neighborhood was “all about minimizing the potential impacts and risks to our most vulnerable residents (children and the elderly) and ceasing the clustering of these homes which negatively impact the fabric of our community.” Further, the flyer continued, “these group homes do not pay taxes to the town yet are afforded every town provided service that ‘we all’ pay for” and questioned why it was not required that residents be notified when such a facility is established. It closed by urging residents to attend the meeting and stating that “Pine Beach has been, and should continue to be an inviting community for all while maintaining a safe balance between tax paying residents and the number of group homes permitted. Our town which is ‘A neat place to live’ is turning into a group home haven which is not conducive to raising family and living in a healthy and safe atmosphere.”

Fair Housing for Disabled Persons

At the Monday night council meeting and following regular municipal business matters, Council President Richard “Ritty” Polhemus, who is also a Wayne Avenue resident, opened

the floor to discussion on the assisted living home by first reading parts of a 1999 report by the Community Health Law Project posted on the state’s Department of Human Services website that outlines state and federal protections for citizens with disabilities, including that “a community residence for persons with disabilities is defined as any residential facility, including apartments, group homes, halfway houses and other facilities that are licensed... [and] from a zoning perspective, they may be located in any zone in which residential uses are permitted and have the same rights and limitations as single-family dwellings.” It also states that state municipal land use law that permits such “community residences in residential districts is a state law that dictates how municipalities can regulate land use [and] because it is a state law, it cannot be superseded by local municipalities.” Further, it continues, federal law provides similar protection for disabled people and that the Fair Housing Act, originally passed as part of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 to “protect certain classes of persons from discrimination in real estate transactions,” was amended in 1988 to “add two new classes of protected persons: persons with disabilities and families with children.” A frequently asked questions portion of the report also states that community residences and the organizations that operate them are not required to notify a municipality prior to purchasing or renting a home under an opinion written by the New Jersey Attorney General, citing “the history of community opposition and delay that resulted from prior notification and which tended to limit the housing opportunities for persons with disabilities.” Further, such community residences cannot be required to be a minimal distance from each other or limited in number per municipality; dangerous persons who pose a direct threat to others or to property based upon current evidence and assessments can be excluded from residing in such homes; requiring such residences to obtain a conditional or special use permits from the municipality is prohibited; and a municipality cannot regulate the internal operations of the community residence in terms of amount of staff on duty, amount of supervision or admission or discharge procedures. On the question of whether “there is a limit on how many community residences can be placed in one municipality,” while the report states there cannot be a municipal quota or limit as it would violate the Fair Housing Act but that “state law requiring licensing of community residences requires that such residences be available statewide without unnecessary concentration. Although this provision of the licensing law has not been tested in the courts [at least as of 1999], there is at least good authority that the state does have a legitimate interest in assuring that community residences are available statewide.” According to information available, there are at least four assisted living homes within Pine Beach Borough, including the newly installed one on Wayne Avenue. Two of the known assisted living homes are operated by the Association for the Multiple Impaired Blind, a Brick Township-based organization that currently operates six group homes in the region and serves

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

34 individuals in Ocean and Monmouth counties. A third also located on Wayne Avenue is operated by 21 Plus, Inc. of Toms River, which seeks to “provide diversified opportunities to enhance the quality of life for people with disabilities through a strategic plan” and includes eight listed group homes in the region where each resident “has an individualized plan with goals that they are working on throughout the year. All of these goals help the person acquire new skills or experience a dream that they have.” The websites of both organizations feature photos of their residents engaged in various home and offsite activities, from using a computer to fishing in a nearby waterfront area. One last section from the 1999 report under “Local Regulation of Community Residences” began on an ominous note: “Municipal efforts to regulate community residences are likely to fail.” Outlined within are numerous failed attempts by other municipalities to stop or limit the ability and operations of assisted living facilities, from “zoning out” such uses from their zoning maps to notifying neighbors about their establishment and requiring the community be able to choose the home location and hand-pick its residents.

Community Reaction

Mr. Polhemus said that in light of the great deal of community reaction to the Wayne Avenue assisted living home, borough officials and municipal lawyers had been going over the issue carefully and reviewing all possibilities and aspects of it. Mayor Lawrence Cuneo stated that upon reviewing the situation with municipal attorney Michael McKenna and the borough’s Council on Affordable Housing (COAH) attorney, Michael Jedziniak - both of whom are also Pine Beach residents - it “comes down to nothing can stop a group home from coming into your town.” He added that he received a call from a mayor of a Hunterdon County town that heard about the group home backlash in Pine Beach and told him that “as much as you may or may not want the homes, if you try to sue you’re swimming upstream. It’s a losing battle.” “These are considered single family residences and must be treated as single family residences,” Mayor Cuneo added. Avon Road resident Cathy Costino asked whether the operating firms in charge of the group homes pay property taxes or whether that lost money was then spread out among other property owners in town. Mayor Cuneo stated that most of the operating companies are non-profits and that they do not pay property taxes as a result. Ocean Mental Health Services, Inc., is a legally registered nonprofit corporation. “So Ocean Mental Health can bankrupt the town if it keeps buying houses?” asked Ms. Costino. Councilman Robert Budesa stated that there was no set limitation on the number of homes in a municipality but that the law includes vague terms about not allowing a concentration or cluster of homes in a single area as they must be available statewide and not in specific areas. Mayor Cuneo added that as a smaller municipality, each additional group home affects the borough tax base more than it would a larger municipality like nearby Toms River Township. “I contacted our local legislators and said that we were a small town and this fourth group home does affect us taxwise,” he said. “Their response was, ‘Sorry.’ Most are former mayors also of small towns and they understand what the impact of losing [taxes from] one, two or three houses does for a small town.”

Others present stated concern over a lack of assurance that there would be supervision at the home 24 hours a day by licensed professionals. Mayor Cuneo stated that he attended a voluntarily held open house at the home by Ocean Mental Health Services the previous week and that one of the questions asked to the company official present was on that topic, and that his response was to “be careful what you ask for” because requesting round the clock coverage could mean the state could require residents with a greater need for such supervision be installed at the home. Mr. Keesling, who was present at the meeting, called that statement “misleading.” “If I can make a comment, I also live on Wayne Avenue and have three daughters under the age of 16,” said Mr. Polhemus. “Am I concerned? Absolutely, but I also know if we try to fight an uphill battle against the federal government it’s going to be quite a costly expense which, I’m not sure if we’re even able to go that route.” Both Mr. Polhemus and Mr. Budesa cited past court cases where restrictions and attempts to kick group homes out of communities were roundly defeated on every level. Councilman Matthew Abatemarco added that most likely in each of those cases a fee reversal on the municipalities were or could have been imposed, thus greatly increasing the cost of fighting such a legal battle. Mr. Keesling questioned why Mr. Abatemarco would state that and added that he did not live on Wayne Avenue and that the borough officials “can’t tell me, ‘Let’s not try’ because of this or ‘it’s never been tested.’” It is a vague law, we all know it up there and why not test it or, conversely, there’s a home down on [Riverside Drive] - why don’t we suggest they relocate from Wayne Avenue. It’d be a lot cheaper than hiring an attorney.” Mayor Cuneo said he empathized with the feelings of Wayne Avenue residents and added, “would I like to get rid of group homes in town? I can say yes just for dollar reasons. We lose tax revenue and it costs us more money, and for that I can say I don’t want them, but unfortunately my opinion on this doesn’t matter.” “In talking to the attorney and both attorneys and the other mayor, and their caution is ‘Don’t do it - don’t sue, if someone wants to sue let the private citizen sue but don’t sue’” due to the past record of failed attempts by other municipalities and high costs possibly incurred. Hillside Avenue resident and L Gourmet proprietor Lori Samul said she didn’t think “the council in Bay Head would let that happen or Mantoloking or any of these other towns.” She added that their presence

would affect the resale value of nearby homes and that “this is what we sink our hard-earned money into.” Councilwoman Susan Coletti stated that she understood assisted living homes were not just coming into Pine Beach but that the neighboring borough of “Beachwood is getting hit just as hard.” Mr. Keesling restated his concern for his children and the children in the same neighborhood as the assisted living home and announced that he currently works for a pharmaceutical company and read a written opinion he received from a doctor in his company that he felt affirmed the high risk of having the individuals in the neighborhood without round the clock supervision. He added that he felt there was a chance to win a court case as a result of the perceived risk. “What if something does happen? Are you prepared to accept responsibility for that?” he asked. Mr. Budesa pointed out that due to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) laws passed in 1996, it was not possible to know the “affliction” of those in the home and that such a letter as he read describing the risks of certain individuals “may be appropriate or may not be appropriate,” but that they wouldn’t know because they “cannot find out the medical condition of the people living there.” “What I feel - I have kids, grown up at this point - and if something were to happen to one of the kids I would feel terrible,” he said.” Would I take responsibility? No, it wouldn’t be my responsibility and I’m telling you, none of us are happy with this situation, but the question is what to do rationally and not

emotionally.” “I would be emotional in your situation too,” the councilman continued, but restated that every case he and the town attorneys had looked at showed every attempt to limit any functions or place restrictions upon assisted living homes in residential areas was “kicked out” by the court. Mr. Keesling accused Mr. Budesa of putting a price on the safety of children in the borough by not agreeing to enter into a lawsuit against the presence of the assisted living home. Mr. Budesa restated that he would be willing to try and fight such a battle if “I feel rationally we have a chance to win, but I’ll never vote to file a lawsuit just for the sake of filing a lawsuit.” Other public comments the mayor and council said they would look into included determining whether the home would be required to install a sprinkler system by the law already in place for assisted living homes and whether Ocean Mental Health Services could provide 24 hour supervision to those living in the home. The governing body and Chief John Sgro have also, over the past several months, been looking into an ordinance that would address repeated false alarms from any homes within the borough by incurring fines and fees at a certain number, noting that one assisted living home established prior to Ocean Mental Health’s facility had been setting off fire alarms on a semi-regular basis from the burned cooking of supervising personnel. Several attempts were made to contact officials who would be able to speak on this matter from Ocean Mental Health Services, Inc., but none were made available at the time of this report.

Wayne Avenue resident James R. “Jim” Keesling spearheaded an information campaign about the newly installed group home on his street and actively lobbied other residents and the borough governing body to oppose it for various reasons. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

Over 75 residents crowded into borough hall for the Pine Beach council work meeting on Monday evening, April 22nd. Most, if not all, of those present came to hear and discuss a group home that had been established on Wayne Avenue. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Jackson Mitch Leigh Shares Impossible Dream with Jackson Business Owners

JACKSON—If you have witnessed the commercial on television about Jackson 21 and noticed Broadway composer turned real estate visionary Mitch Leigh pitching his dream of a town square for “nice people”, you might be asking yourself, “What’s this all about?”. Mitch Leigh, most notably known as the composer of the music in the Broadway hit, ‘Man of La Mancha’ and the jingle for the 1960’s “Nobody Doesn’t Like Sarah Lee” commercials is once again

trying to build his dream town here in Jackson. After nearly a decade of resistance from town officials and residents, phase one of his project has been approved, 1,541 housing units. This time, Leigh, now 85 years old, says the project isn’t so much about leaving a legacy, but to build something that people will enjoy and something that will help Jackson Township grow and be a place people want to visit. That’s why he took his pitch for Jackson 21 to the business

and leadership community of Jackson Township’s Chamber of Commerce. Jackson 21 is a vision created by Leigh of a community that combines a downtown setting with quality commercial opportunities and simple, yet fun living. In what he calls his own “Impossible Dream”, Leigh said that Jackson 21 would be a nice place for nice people to live and work. “I’m here, wanting to take care of a bunch of fallacies,” Mr. Leigh said to open the meeting, “I never got involved with Jackson thinking about my legacy which a lot of people claim is what I wanted to do with this great town. I wanted to do this great town because I love doing great towns. I want to have fun doing it. I’m in the position where I can afford it. I am. I’m a crazy composer, that’s what I do for a living.” Leaving his mark on the world is something Leigh has already done through his music and he doesn’t think building Jackson 21 is going to change that. “I got a couple of degrees from Yale. The music school at Yale is called Leigh Hall, I got a bunch of Tony’ Awards. Do you think I’m worried about my legacy? I don’t think so.” he added. His project has been met with skepticism in the past in Jackson. Then, Jackson was just coming off a record growth period where residential development far surpassed commercial ratables. It was a growth period that saw Jackson’s school district boom and taxes rise as middle class families moved into residential tract devel-

Holbrook LL; Mayor Is Night In Shining Armor by Phil Stilton JACKSON-Until this past year, the Jackson Recreation Softball League, managed by the Township of Jackson has been under constant fire, caught in the middle of a nearly five year political battle. In 2010, individuals who were against spending money on the fading girls youth program, which once was home to nearly 1,000 township girls at one point, battled attempts by Mayor Mike Reina to upgrade facilities for the girls’ program to match the accommodations provided to the town’s two predominantly boys’ Little League programs, Holbrook and Jackson Little Leagues. After a year-long battle, the fields at the Bartley Softball Complex were eventually upgraded after months of township council in-fighting which landed the town in an embarrassing News 12 segment.   The project was approved by a 4-1 vote on the township council. Through the hard work of Mayor Mike Reina and Councilman Scott Martin, the girls received a new state of the art concession stand and a real bathroom with running water to replace unsanitary port-o-potties. After winning the fight for fields and facility upgrades for the girls’ program, the township came under fire several more times during subsequent political campaigns which put the softball program and township recreation department in the middle of a fierce political war.   The latest came in the spring of 2012 after the resignation of former

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opments. These are things Leigh said he was fully aware of and took into consideration before planning Jackson 21. He said planning for Jackson 21 took the existing problems in Jackson into consideration. No time for critics. “The other thing is that I said I wanted to do a green village. And there are some greens. Some negative greens that said ‘That’s malarkey’. The cynics of the world aren’t going to explain it to you. They’re the losers,” he said of negative sentiments regarding the project. “We are the winners because we have hope and even if the cynic wins, the cynic loses. If he was right and this is going to be garbage, he loses.” “But we came back we did it again, that’s what an optimist does. That’s what we have in this, a town of love and of nice. People and having a good life and being kind to each other. It’s as square as can be and so am I, because if you don’t have that, what have you got?” “The basic idea is it’s a dream, I know it sounds square and all that, but the fact of the matter is that when I said I wanted to do a green village, the guy said to me, it’s expensive. They didn’t know my wife was on the environmental defense fund board of directors for years and I said it’s not as expensive as a divorce,” he said of the project. Jackson 21 will be Disney-

land for adults, Leigh said. “I’m 85 years old, and I ain’t going to be around that long. But while I’m here and while I have some power to do something, I want to do just that kind of square thing, nice people living, working, having fun, I want to do is create Disneyland for adults…I got stuff for people to walk around and have a great time for the rest of their lives.” He added. He admitted the lifestyle in Jackson 21 is not for everyone, but for people who want to relax, slow down and enjoy life with other people. “You want to sit in the backyard forever?” Leigh said, “I don’t think you want to be in my town. In my town you want to walk around and talk to people and have a great time and we’re going to have it.” He explained the project as having top level shops set upon a village green. There will be apartment quads set up so residents will have private parks, small apartments, “so people have to spend the rest of their lives cleaning.” he added. Leigh said he didn’t choose Jackson, Jackson chose him when a real estate broker sold him acreage in the town back in the 1960’s. As an investment, he bought the land with the intent to flip it in a few years after building a residential development. That never happened and 50 years later, he describes him-

self as a land baron with barren land. The crowd of several hundred listened intently to Leigh’s presentation. The project will have a large impact on Jackson, but he says not in the way critics see it. Leigh said his development attracts younger and older individuals to live there more than large families with children, which could overburden the school district. The location is situated near Route 195, so though traffic in the township would be minimal and it could provide the township with much needed and sought after tax relief. Mayor Michael Reina, a supporter of Jackson 21 said, “What is there bad to say about this project? It will bring in business and put Jackson on the map as a destination people want to come to. We can attract businesses and ratables this town so desperately needs.” “It’s a very innovative idea and it will bring tremendous growth and tax revenues to Jackson,” said Jackson Township Councilman Barry Calogero. “Given the alternative to meet our low income COHA obligations, I welcome the opportunity to have commercial ratables its place. If this project comes to fruition, Mr. Leigh feels we’ll be one of the richest towns in the state and I hope he’s right. We look forward to ground breaking on this project.”

Jackson Parks Ready For Spring by Erin Stilton

recreation softball administrator, Bonnie Barrington.   Barrington resigned from the program less than 24 hours prior to the league’s opening day ceremony. After a rough spring and summer in which Barrington and township council candidate and political running mate, Raymond Cattonar lodged accusations and wrongdoings against the township and the mayor, Reina decided that in the fall of 2012, the Jackson Recreation Softball League would find a new home as part of the Holbrook Little League. Reina’s support for the girls’ program has been on public display since he took office.   Despite years of constant struggles, political in-fighting and accusations, Reina made sure the program remained in a forward motion and that the troubles which surrounded the program remained invisible to the girls who

played in the league, who range from 5 to 18 years old. The mayor never let politics interfere with his goal to provide a quality program to the girls of Jackson Township, no matter what opponents threw at him. That’s why at opening day on Saturday, April 13th, Tony Del Vecchio, President of Holbrook Little League said “Mike Reina is a man, I’m glad to be able to call a friend.”   He then presented the Mayor with a pink baseball bat on behalf of the league and the girls in the league that read, “Mayor Michael Reina, Holbrook LL – Girls Softball. Knight in Shining Armor”. Reina said he was proud of the fact that he stayed behind the program through the difficult years and that he would be putting the bat on display in his office at town hall beside other items given to him by different sports leagues over the years.

JAC K S O N — J a c k s o n public works have been busy working to get the town’s parks ready for spring. They’ve added new mulch to the Jackson Jungle playground but the sandbox remains closed. “It’s not a safety issue why the sandbox was closed,” according to Fred Rasiewicz, Director of Public Works. “We closed the sandbox because cats have gotten into it and used it as a litter box which was unsanitary for the children.” The volleyball court is being worked on and is scheduled to be open before Memorial Day. To keep children safe, the public works have extended the fence on the baseball field, added a fence over the playground and soon will be installing a new fence over the soccer field. “We get ready for spring by cleaning up branches, raking leaves, reseeding grass, and planting more trees and other plants, too,” Mr. Rasiewicz added, noting that this spring has been a than others due to

cleanup related to Hurricane Sandy. “The parks newest feature, a playground built for handicapped children is expected to be open by May 4th.We’ll be holding opening ceremonies for both the playground and the volleyball court.” The Director said. “We will be holding opening ceremonies for both the playground and the volleyball court.” he said. This article was written by Erin Stilton, Age 10, of Lucy N. Holman Elementary School as part of “Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day”

on April 25th. Erin, the daughter of Ocean Signal Digital Editor Phil Stilton got to work as a reporter, interviewing Jackson DPW Director Fred Rasiewicz; a delivery person with a visit to the US Post Office and as a maintenance worker, helping deliver Ocean Signal newspaper boxes. The Ocean Signal encourages student journalism and welcomes student journalists to send their news. Aspiring journalists can send their stories to news@ocsignal.com. If you’re under 18, please be sure to have your parent or teacher’s permission.

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Grim Reaper Program Helps Jackson Police with Teen Drunk Driving JACKSON—Students at Jackson Memorial High School in conjunction with Officer Colin Menafra and

the Jackson Police Department hosted a week long “Grim Reaper” event. The program which Menafra

helped enact within the district had the Grim Reaper randomly choose students each day throughout the week. Once a student was touched by the Reaper, they were essentially dead. They were not allowed to talk to other students or interact in class. At the end of the program, students told their stories about how they died to general student population. We’ll have a full story on the Grim Reaper and Project Graduation programs and how the Jackson School district has partnered with the Jackson Police Department to create drunk driving awareness for students in the next issue of the Ocean Signal.

Young Gymnast Has Eyes Set On Olympics JACKSON—Eight year old Savannah Carson of Jackson Township was recently given a proclamation by the Jackson Township Council and Mayor Michael Reina for being selected to the USA Gymnastics TOP Diamond Team. She is one of two New Jersey gymnasts to make the team of 40 nationwide. Savannah says she loves gymnastics and said her favorite thing to do after school is to practice at her school, Action Gymnastics in Howell. How does Savannah feel about her accomplishment? “Super good!” she said, offering other young girls some words of wisdom about overcoming obstacles and challenges in life, “If you’re scared of something, just go for it, it will be fun.” Savannah isn’t just one of

America’s top young gymnasts, she’s a straight A student at Sylvia Rosenauer Elementary School, despite training five days per week, she finds plenty of time to study and do well in school. Savannah says she has no

interest in playing video games like many others her age and loves her training, where her coach, Jess calls her “Little Bit”. Savannah says her goal is to one day be part of the United States Olympic Gymnastics Team.

Officer Patrick Mackin Promoted to Sargent JACKSON—Officer Patrick Mackin, of the Jackson Township Police Department was given a long overdue promotion to the rank of Sargent in March 29th. Sgt. Mackin was born in the Bronx, New York and raised in Holmdel Township NJ. He moved into his first home in Jackson Township in 1987. He Graduated from St John Vianney HS, Holmdel, NJ in 1979 Hired by the Asbury Park Police Department in 1984. He attended the New Jersey State Police Academy for Municipal Officers where he graduated in January 1985. In 1990 he was assigned, on loan, to the Monmouth County Prosecutors Office Narcotics Strike force where he worked as undercover narcotics officer. After completing his assignment with the strike force he was assigned to the Tactical Narcotics Team (TNT) working specifically in Asbury Park and Neptune Township. He received the President’s Award by the Monmouth/ Ocean Crime Intelligence Bu-

reau (MOCIB) for his work with the TNT unit. After completing his undercover work he took an interest in traffic safety and crash investigation. He was assigned to the Asbury Park Police Department Traffic Unit. During this time he completed over 300 hours of training in crash reconstruction. In 1997 he was hired by the Jackson Township Police Department. Eight months after being hired he was assigned to the Traffic Safety Unit where he remained until 2011. He is a member of the Ocean County Prosecutors Office Fatal Accident Support Team, NJ State Traffic Officers Association and the Ocean County Traffic Association. He has received numerous awards and commendations during his years of service including two Excellent Police Duty Ribbons. He was awarded an Achievement Ribbon for his work in New York City after 911. He is most proud of his three Life Saving Ribbons including one where he performed CPR

on a person while off duty. The person, who suffered a heart attack, turned out to be a police Lt from the Jersey City Police Department. The officer survived and resumed a normal life. He is a Life Member of the Jackson Mills Volunteer Fire Company. He is a published photographer and has sold some of his photos on canvas. He enjoys auto racing and traveling with his live partner of 25 years George DeStories.

Looking Back at One of Ocean County’s Worst Fires 50 Years Later By Matt Genovese JACKSON--On a spring night, fifty years ago, Ocean County seemingly burst into flames. It was April 20, 1963 and the area was struck with the worst possible mix of conditions. Newspaper accounts of the time described the woods in Ocean County as “tinder dry” and reported winds in excess of 40 miles per hour. It was a recipe for disaster if even the smallest brush fire wasn’t extinguished quickly. The New York TImes in their coverage of the fires described the first day as “Black Saturday.” The Times reported that over 190,000 acres burned in the county from April 2024th. One of the many fires that started that day was in the Cassville section of Jackson. According to the report in the Asbury Park Press, by 8 pm on the 20th in Cassville “the hamlet itself was described as an inferno... when houses, stores, and other buildings burned.” At the height of the fire in Cassville the fire line stretched 15 miles long. Hundreds of firefighters from the State Forest Fire Service and all of Jackson’s fire companies were unable to stop the fire. Reinforcements were brought in from Fort Dix and Lakehurst Naval Air Station to provide more manpower to operate bull dozers in the woods attempting to control the blaze. Six Firefighters were seriously injured fighting the fire and were transported to Burlington County Hospital. Three Firefighters were volunteers from the Cassville Volunteer Fire Company and three were State Forest Fire Service Firefighters. By 9 PM the State Forest Fire Service had reported that the fire had

burned from Archers Corner, now known as Hawkin Road and West Veterans Highway all the way to Whitesville Road. At least 15 homes burned as well as over 40 chicken coops and other farm buildings. The Glory Poultry Farm on Route 527 was destroyed in the fire. They lost the farmhouse, barns and other buildings. The Cassville fire was the largest single fire in the county that day burning over 2,500 acres on the first day of the fire alone. At the same time, fires were raging in Manchester, Lacey, Berkeley, Stafford and Brick. Brick was the hardest hit in terms of property loss. The West Mantoloking section of Brick Township lost 22 homes in the first day of the fires. There were also a number of fires burning in Middlesex and Monmouth Counties. A fire that started in Burlington County burned through Manchester and all the way to Waretown; a distance of 22.5 miles before being halted by firefighters at the Garden State Parkway. Throughout the county, numerous Firefighters were burned or suffered smoke inhalation. One volunteer firefighter, Alfred M. MacMoyle, who collapsed while fighting a fire in Eatontown along the Garden State Parkway, later died at his home. In Jackson, three residents died when their home on Lakewood-New Egypt Road, now know as West Veterans Highway was destroyed by the blaze. Mrs. Alice McQueen, 53, her daughter Alice, 19, and her son, Istobel, 29, perished that Saturday. The victims were the wife and children on Reverend Melbourne McQueen. A third child, Melbourne Jr. escaped the blaze and thought that his family

was following behind his car as he fled. Reverend McQueen theorized to the Asbury Park Press that he believed that since his son’s car was discovered running in the driveway that his wife must have forgotten something and gone back into the home and was overcome by smoke. He believed that the children went in after their mother and were also overcome. In the past 50 years Jackson has not seen a fire that large in the township again. Experts in the firefighting community fear what would be the outcome of a fire of that size and intensity ever occurred here again. Since 1963, Jackson is much more densely populated. While the town still has large swaths of uninhabited lands covering County and State preservation space in which large brush fires can develop, there are now countless neighborhoods and communities that stand in the path where the 1963 fire once raged. State Forest Fire District Warden Gary Poppe, who is also a Past Chief of the Cassville Volunteer Fire Company, said he worries that a fire even a fraction of the size of the ‘63 fire would cause far greater property loss than that fire just because of Jackson’s growth over the past fifty years. In attempts to try to help residents protect their property in the event of a wildland fire, the Forest Fire Service has begun to utilize outreach programs to educate homeowners about how to safeguard their homes. One of the most popular programs is Firewise Communities which is a program created by the USDA Forest Service. For information about how to protect your home from wildland fires visit www. firewise.org

Jackson Police Sargent Matusz Retires JACKSON - After working as a police officer since the age of 21, Jackson Police Sgt. Lisa Matusz has announced her retirement. Sgt. Matusz was born Linden NJ, moved to the shore area in 1984 Sgt. Matusz started working in 1988 at the New Jersey State Police ABC Enforcement Bureau working in an undercover capacity within liquor licensed establishments pursuing underage drinking,

narcotics, prostitution, gambling and wiretapping. Along with five other ABC Officers, she was hired by Jackson Twp Police Department in 1991 after being laid off from the NJSP. Each of those hired had also finished their careers in Jackson. In 1991, she was one of the first two female officers hired in Jackson Township Police Deptartment history.

On Friday, April 26, June Farrington of the Ocean County Sheriff’s Department was on hand with her team from the Child Passenger Safety Program at the Goddard School in Jackson Township. CKO Kickboxing in Jackson Township hosted “Kicks for Angelina” a fundraiser for Angelina Roberto, the grandaughter of Mayor Michael Reina, diagnosed in 2012 with Leukemia. Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

South Toms River Wawa Application Faces Clashing Support and Opposition by Erik Weber SOUTH TOMS RIVER The application to construct a Wawa food and fuel dispensing retail location on Dover Road, here, was again heard in an April 16th land use board meeting at the special location of the South Toms River Elementary School cafeteria as a previous February meeting was canceled when too many members of the public filled borough hall and violated its fire code. As with that earlier meeting, the hearing took on the air of a court proceeding, with Edward J. Liston, Jr., an attorney based on Hooper Avenue in Toms River representing Sunil “Sonny” Dhir, and Steven Nehmad, representing Wawa Inc. from the Egg Harbor Township, Atlantic County-based legal firm of Nehmad, Perillo and Davis, verbally sparring through numerous points of the hearing. Mr. Dhir is the owner of the nearby 7-11 convenience store as well as a gas dispensing franchise located directly across from the proposed Wawa site on Dover Road, now a barren, partly-wooded tract between Chamberlain Street and Railroad Avenue formerly used by the Clayton Block Company. Wawa, Inc. is seeking a use variance and major site plan approval that would bring a new 5,051 square foot combination retail food and 8-pump, 16-dispenser fuel service operation there. The variance was requested as the land is located in both the Highway Development (HD) and single family residential zoning districts under the current borough ordinance. An additional minor bulk variance was also requested. Mr. Dhir had twice sued the corporation in 2011 for allegedly filing an incorrect request with the Pinelands Commission for a certificate of completeness to allow it to move forward to an application hearing with the borough land use board and for allegedly filing an incorrect notice to surrounding property owners. The lawsuits were withdrawn in March 2012. Mr. Nehmad stated that it was the first time in his 37year career of practicing land use law that a client of his was ever sued before an application was even brought before a land use board. At the previous meeting, Mr. Nehmad had stated that as the site was located west of the Garden State Parkway it was in the boundaries of the protected pinelands region that permitted the use of the site for their proposal as at the time of the application’s filing the borough ordinances were not certified by the commission. According to the Comprehensive Management Plan of the Pinelands Commission, as authorized by the 1979 Pinelands Protection Act and federal National Parks and Recreation Act of 1978, “local governments will be primarily responsible for implementing the Plan. to attain that degree of local involvement and responsibility, the Act set forth a procedure under which county and municipal master plans and land use ordinances are made consistent with the Plan. While some of the Plan’s provisions are mandatory, such as the den-

sity limitations and the requirement that growth areas accept development credits, many other aspects are intended to give municipalities resource management goals to work toward as they revise their land use regulations... if a municipality does not revise its plan and ordinances as required by the Pinelands Protection Act, the Commission is required by law to enforce the Plan’s minimum standards verbatim.” In the past several months, borough officials have been quick to have their ordinances certified by the commission and are now having their zoning map adjusted to meet certification requirements. At the start of the meeting, Chairwoman Carla Kearney announced that regardless the progress made on the application’s hearing, the meeting, which started at 7 pm, would end at 10 pm, with the hearing being carried to the next meeting beginning at 9:45 pm to allow for the board to conduct regular business. By 7 pm, most of the cafeteria tables and benches were filled with interested residents and general members of the public, and approximately one dozen of those present wore black t-shirts with “I (heart) Wawa” on the front. Patrolman John Wissel also spoke prior to the meeting’s official start, warning those present to watch their conduct during the meeting. During the February meeting, numerous individuals shouted over or through the proceedings, often in opposition of anything Mr. Nehmad had stated. “I don’t care how upset or mad you get if things don’t go your way,” he said. “It doesn’t matter – nothing happens here on this property.” From the moment the hearing opened, Mr. Liston and Mr. Nehmad argued over various objections, requests and legal references over the meeting notice, variance requests and more by Mr. Liston to the point that Michael Elward, attorney for the board, had to state that the procedure of the hearing would be that Mr. Nehmad would present the application, including calling the various professionals for statements on the site plan, after which time Mr. Liston would be able to respond to those same professionals, and finally the public would be able to comment. Afterward, Mr. Liston would be permitted to present his argument on behalf of Mr. Dhir against the application, including calling his own professionals to speak on the same, to which Mr. Nehmad would be able to respond in full, and then the public. By the time the meeting was called and the application carried to the next meeting at 9:45 pm, Mr. Nehmad had not completed his initial presentation of the application, and numerous officials and residents present openly derided the likelihood that the hearing would drag on until the end of the year. The South Toms River Land Use Board meets once per month.

“A Responsible Corporate Citizen”

Mr. Nehmad began his statements by first calling Wawa a “responsible corporate citizen” of over 30 years who wanted to develop the

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approximately three acre portion of a 20 acre site as a “single use [for] the sale of convenience-related items food and fuel.” He added that the combined food and fuel dispensing use first appeared in New Jersey in 1996 and that today “there are just over 100 sites in New Jersey that Wawa owns and operates.” The lawyer continued that if approved, Wawa would “invest approximately $6 million into this endeavor in the community” and that the proposed site plan was “consistent with the most recently adopted master plan that this land use board adopted” in 2012, even though it is not currently certified by the Pinelands Commission. Mr. Nehmad also addressed Mr. Dhir’s opposition to the Wawa application, stating that he “is a business competitor of ours who operates a gas station across the street and also the 7-11 that he owns and operates.” He then referred to a lawsuit between the Shop-Rite and Mayfair supermarket chains that he said stated “whenever a business competitor funds opposition in a land use case, you as a board can take into consideration the fact that the competitor is funding the opposition in assessing the credibility of witnesses you hear.” Mr. Nehmad then referenced the New Jersey Antitrust Act, which he said “reflects the strong public policy of showing that competition is good for the public because competition is good for the consumer.” He also stated that the argument that the Wawa was proposing multiple uses on the same site was incorrect, as the food and fuel were convenience items would be provided by the same corporate entity and not two separate businesses. Mr. Liston teased Mr. Nehmad about how many times he had called Wawa a “responsible corporate citizen” and asked that the board not be fooled by the Pineland Commission’s certificate of completeness as a stamp of approval as “all it says is you can go forward here in South Toms River” with the hearing. “Second thing - counsel is trying to run my client down by saying he is a competitor and doesn’t have the right of free speech here in the United States,” he continued. “That’s just wrong - yes he’s a competitor as are other people in the room whose business will face extinction if Wawa is approved. go out to Manchester Township and see what the Wawa gas station did to the Exxon on Route 70.” “You know they can’t consider anything like that,” protested Mr. Elward. “I understand that, but on the other hand everyone has the right to be heard and the right to protect their own economic interest,” replied Mr. Liston, who added that his client was only trying to do the same “where in our view, Wawa is trying to put every other small merchant in this town out of business.”

The Architect

Mark Whitaker, PE, a principal in the Lake Como firm Dynamic Engineering Consultants, was the first professional called to testify on behalf of the application and

had provided its design. With 20 years of experience in both environmental engineering and real estate development fields, Mr. Whitaker was involved in the investigation and remediation of contaminated properties from 1993 to 2002. For the past 11 years, he has been responsible for the design of and land use approvals for commercial, retail and residential development properties in the northeast, including various site plan designs for Wawa, Inc., including several in Toms River, Brick and Stafford townships. Other local sites designed by Mr. Whitaker within the protected pinelands zone include a business park in Stafford Township, BMW car dealership in Egg Harbor Township and a Wawa in Hammonton. Mr. Whitaker described various attributes of the site, surrounding area and structure as previously stated above and further stated that the pumps and nozzles present at the fuel dispensers were not large enough to handle tractor trailers, and that if constructed all employees were instructed to deny service to such large vehicles as to avoid causing traffic hazards on site and off. The primary access driveway would be located in the center of the site between the convenience store and fueling canopy, which is also the center point between Chamberlain Street and Railroad Avenue. Further road improvements would be made to Dover Road that are conditionally approved by Ocean County officials, including the establishment of a twoway left turn lane to service both the Wawa and all commercial properties across the street as a way to reduce traffic hazards. Two other vehicle access points were also proposed on the site on Chamberlain Street and Railroad Avenue. There would be 42 parking spaces on the site that meet the borough’s required 10’ by 20’ requirement, and a variance was requested on seven spots that are one foot short, at 10’ by 19,’ in order to facilitate a wider aisle for vehicles on a portion of the site. Mr. Whitaker pointed out that under borough code, only 26 parking spots were required for the size of the convenience store proposed, but that the applicant was providing nearly double that amount, and that even the seven 10’ by 19’ size were larger than the industry standard 9’ by 18.’ The site also would comply with borough and pinelands storm water management guidelines and offer sufficient and proper drainage throughout the developed portion of the property. Fifteen light-emitting diode ( LED) light fixtures would be placed 20.5 feet high in a low profile to allow the full cutoff of evenly distributed light and reduce light pollution. Twelve wallpacks applied to the convenience store would also provide illumination to the site, as would 24 recessed fixtures beneath the canopy. A mixture of oaks, evergreens, shrubs and various other ornamental grasses would be planted around the site “to create visual interest” that would also be irrigated, and a sidewalk along the site would also be constructed to promote pedestrian access through the area. Another variance was requested by the applicant to provide a larger freestanding sign than is currently allowed by borough ordinance that Mr. Whitaker said would provide motorists a better ease of seeing the fueling prices

down the roadway, which is required by law. He added that signage at commercial properties across and up and down Dover Road were regularly much larger than the borough ordinance allowed.

The Traffic Engineer

Nicholas Verderese, a principal in the Lake Comobased Dynamic Traffic, LLC, was the second professional called to testify on behalf of the applicant, as he had provided the traffic study portion of the plan. A traffic engineer and transportation planner, his experience goes back nearly 23 years and includes positions as a highway/structural project engineer, civil/structural project engineer and a principal in traffic engineering and transportation planning for much of that time. He stated that he had appeared before approximately half the municipalities in Ocean County on prior applications, including one in South Toms River, for The Learning Experience on Double Trouble Road several years ago. Mr. Verderese also said that he had appeared for a different Wawa application four times in the past year to two years but had completed traffic studies and other work for approximately 50 sites for the corporation. Upon studying the traffic along Dover Road, Railroad Avenue and Chamberlain Street - including existing roadway traffic, speed limits, right of ways, striping, signalization and more - in March and April 2011, he learned that they reached their general commuter peak times between 7 and 9 am and 4 and 6 pm, with peak hours existing from 7:30 to 8:30 am and 4 to 5 pm. Upon meeting with county engineers, Mr. Verderese stated the proposal for a twoway left turn lane was first brought up at their request to reduce a possible traffic hazard with the increased access points into the Wawa site. After studying existing traffic, projections were then made to determine what increase in traffic could be expected with the convenience store and fueling dispensers by using a nationallyaccepted standard land use designation that relates to

expected traffic increase for convenience stores with fuel pumps. His study estimated that in a one non-peak hour period, 110 vehicles would come on and off the property, while at morning and evening peak hours, that number would increase to 150. Mr. Verderese stated that the study also allowed for an estimate of “pass-by trips,” or stops into the site where a vehicle was already traveling to or from a destination regardless the convenience store and fueling station’s existence. That amount, he said, was that approximately 60 percent of traffic would already be on the roadway traveling to and from another destination, and therefore only 40 or 50 new vehicles would be found on the roadway per hour on off- and on-peak travel hours, or approximately one per every minute. “If you sat there, you probably wouldn’t even notice the new traffic in the area,” he said, adding that his study showed the increase in traffic would be minimal on Chamberlain and Railroad Avenue - approximately five percent - as neither of those roadways act as through streets for regular traffic flow. As a result, he said he did not find a need for any additional signalizing of nearby intersections, such as Chamberlain Street at Dover Road, which currently utilizes a stop sign. On-site traffic was also designed with wider aisles than industry standards 30 feet to the industry’s 24 feet - according to Mr. Verderese, who said that as a result fueling trucks would be able to flow in and out of the site easier to service the gas pumps and if an emergency were to occur, firetrucks would also be able to easily flow throughout the entire site to response to the incident. Following the statements made by Mr. Verderese on the application, the hearing was closed and carried to May’s land use board hearing, tentatively scheduled on May 21st at 7 pm in the elementary school cafeteria if borough officials are able to obtain permission for its use, which was not yet clear at the time of this publication.

Long Drive resident William Gleason looked over a photocopied site plan of the proposed Wawa on Dover Road during the April 16th land use board meeting. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

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The Ocean Signal | April 26th - May 10th, 2013

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

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Little League Baseball

Play Ball

See scores on page B4

High School Baseball

Top Five See page B3

Photos courtesy Cincinatti Reds, MLB

Little League Opening Day 2013

Courtesy MLB

Frazier Gets the Job as Reds Starting Third Baseman by Phil Stilton Cincinatti, OH--After being plagued with injuries over the past few seasons, Cincinatti Reds third baseman Scott Rolen made a last minute decision not to return to the team prior to the start of spring training. It was good news for Toms River native Todd Frazier who spent most of the 2012 season as a stop gap solution for an injured Rolen at third base and Joey Vatto at first base. Had it not been for the injuries to Votto and Rolen, manager Dusty Baker may not have given Frazier a chance to prove himself. This year, Frazier will be the starting third baseman

for the National League Central champions. Last season, Frazier played 128 games, hit 19 homeruns and batted .273, finishing third place in the National League Rookie of the Year voting, behind Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals and Wade Miley of the Arizona Diamondbacks. It was a vote Frazier didn’t put too much thought into, after all, the Rookie of the Year award is voted by sportswriters. When it came time for Frazier’s peers to cast their vote in the Major League Baseball Player’s Choice Awards, he was voted Outstanding Rookie of the Year in the National League.

April was opening day across Ocean County for Little League baseball , ringing in the unofficial start of spring. The Phillies, Pirates and Orioles of the Pine Beach Beachwood Little League celebrated on April 13th. Top: Players from Toms River Little League’s Cardinals stand at attention as the Star Spangled Banner was played and the new baseball season began. On April 20th, Holbrook Little League of Jackson kicked off the first full spring season of their girls softball league. In the fall of 2012, Holbrook took ownership of the previous Jackson Recreation Softball League and hosted their first season as an instructional fall softball league. This year, the girls in the program will be playing their first full regular season of Little League baseball.

“The Player’s Choice award is more important to me, because it’s the guys who play against you voting, so to me, I’d rather (Frazier See Page 7)

Santos Wins National Title

Jackson Little League welcome the new baseball season on an unseasonably cold March 13th morning, but that didn’t deter the hundreds of boys and girls in the program. After the opening ceremonies, the Jackson Little League hosted their annual challenger baseball showcase game. The challenger division provides an outlet for children with special needs and the challenger game has been a fixture at Jackson Little League for several years.

by Columbia University

Photo by Doug Bostwick, Sports Shots WLB.

Columbia senior wrestler Steve Santos brought his prolific career to a close Saturday with a pair of victories to claim third place at the 2013 NCAA Wrestling Championships. In front of a sellout crowd of 16,131 at the Wells Fargo Arena, Santos picked up a pair of decisions to claim (Santos See Page 7)

Jersey Shore Wrestling News

Holbrook Little League’s baseball program is coming off a championship year in 2012 which saw their 10 year old District 18 All-Stars won the state championship and finished their season in the Mid-Atlantic Region tournament in Rhode Island. The league is now in their 51st season of operations and showcased their new state of the art field house and concession stand this year. Additionally, the league created a new t-ball field and extended their fences on their farm field.

By Steve Rivera of Elite Wrestling Page B6

Spring Football at the Jersey Shore Youth football action heats up in May in the Jersey Shore American

Youth Football (AYF) League. Heading into week four, the season remains wide open as teams from Toms River, Brick, Jackson and Berkeley compete against the rest of the Jersey Shore Conference of the NJ AYF. In the 4th/5th grade division, Jackson and Toms River Raiders remain undefeated with

3-0 records at the top of their conference. Jackson also maintains an perfect 3-0 record in the 6th/7th grade division as Berkeley and Brick battle it out for the top spot in their division, each with 2-1 records. The Toms River Indians have so far dominated the National Division of the 8th grade bracket with Jackson close behind with a 2-1 record. Check out the complete Jersey Shore AYF scores and standings on page B4.

Mariners Softball at the top of A-South The Lady Mariners have dominated their opponents so far this spring, with a season record of 9-1 heading into May. Their lone loss was at the hands of Toms River South in a close 2-0 matchup. After the first trip through their A South division, the Mariners found themselves at the top of the field after having defeated Jackson Memorial twice, a 10-0 shutout against Southern Regional and a 1-0 squeaker against rivals Toms River East.


The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May 17th, 2013

Jackson Jaguars Red Travel Baseball Team Wins Middletown High School South Spring Baseball Tournament

2012 Little League Champions Honored at Opening Day Events

By Tim Halasnik The Jackson Jaguars Red travel baseball team won the Middletown High School South 4th annual baseball tournament over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The Jaguars braved a wintery weather mix Saturday morning to defeat the Lincroft Knights 7 to 4 in what seemed like a blizzard at times. The Middletown High School South organization were forced to stop play after the first games of the day due to safety but started up again Sunday morning. The Jags had to play through some cold weather but managed a come from behind win over the Freehold Falcons 8 to 5. After about an hour of rest the Jags went back to work and defeated the

Branchburg Bulldogs 4 to 2. The win against Branchburg brought them to face the Hopewell Valley Bulldogs in the championship game. The Jags went onto victory after 7 innings, defeating the Hopewell Valley Bulldogs 8 to 3. Jaguars Red team players are: Aaron McCulligh, AJ Tolmachewich, Chris DeMetro, Chris

Kossman, CollinMcCulligh, David DeJesus, Dominic Billotti, Jake Tischler, Jesse Raffa, TomSeixas Jr., Tyler Bakri, Zach DeMetro and Tim Halasnik Jr. Coaches: Manager Tom Seixas Sr., third base coach Tim Halasnik Sr., first base coach Mike Tischler and bench coach Brian McCulligh.

The Beachwood Bombers, 2012 District 18 Little League Competitive Fall Baseball League champions were honored at the Beachwood, PineBeach Little League opening day event.

“Tag Em” Spring Kick Off Champions The Jackson Coyotes won the Tag ‘em Kick Off Classic 11 U Championship in April.

Jackson’s Holbrook Little League 8U All Stars were recognized at the 51st annual Holbrook Little League opening day in Jackson Township. The 2012 9 & 10 year old all-star state champion team were also given a b anner that will be hung at the league fields. Jackson Lions compete at the Tag ‘em Kick Off Classic at Holbrook Little League in Jackson Township.

8th Annual Jackson Lacrosse Tournament

The Jackson Pride Lacrosse team hosted their 8th annual “Tribes Along the Shore” regional lacrosse tournament that drew teams from all over the tri-state area. The Brick 3rd and 4th grade boys team came out winners along with the 7th and 8th grade girls from Lacey and Howell, who were named co-champions. Pictured: Jackson Pride.

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May17th, 2013

Ocean County

High School Baseball Top 5

All-Shore Media keeps their finger on the pulse of Shore Conference high school baseball action from spring training through the state championships. Below is the 2013 preseason Ocean County top 5. Visit www.allshoremedia.net for the Shore Conference Top 10.

By Matt Manley

1. Jackson Memorial

Although the Jaguars slipped up against eventual Group IV champion Manalapan, they finished the season as the Shore Conference’s No. 1 team after losing only three games all season while showcasing a balanced roster that hit, pitched and fielded better than any team on a game-to-game basis. Jackson Memorial returns University of Virginia recruit Matt Thaiss behind the plate and his experience will help bring along a somewhat unproven pitching staff. Coach Frank Malta and pitching coach J.M. Gold have been able to come

up with pitching year after year and if the pitching is just solid this year, Jackson Memorial will have as good a chance as any other team to win in the postseason.

are key pieces in place that should make the Mariners a contender. Duke University recruit Karl Blum is poised for his best season after an up-and-down junior season on the mound. Fellow senior Ron Marinaccio missed the first three weeks of the season and still went 5-0 on the mound while hitting .444 at the plate. Jackson Memorial has had Toms River North’s number over the last few years, but the Mariners return more pitching than the Jaguars do and that could be the key to Toms River North reclaiming the top spot in Class A South.

3. Toms River South

This ranking is a program rank more than a roster rank because the Indians will once again have to reload af-

2. Toms River North

The Mariners came on strong at the end of last season, advancing to the Shore Conference Tournament final, where they ran into Jackson Memorial and red-hot right-hander Brandon Holup. Toms River North will try to carry that momentum into this season and although it will have to replace five starters and two starting pitchers, there Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

ter graduating a number of key pieces. The good news for Toms River South is that it was in the same position heading into the last year and the Indians overcame inexperience around the diamond to finish in the final top five in the Shore Conference. The bad news is that Toms

River South had a Division I pitcher and shortstop – Rutgers players Kyle Driscoll and R.J. Devish – heading into last year and there is no obvious, ready-made Di-

vision I arm to anchor the rotation this year. Junior Russell Messler had a breakout sophomore season last year and will be one of the top players in the Shore Conference, and a deep program should produce a good season, but it remains to be seen how far a relatively unproven Indians roster can go this year.

4. Jackson Liberty

On returning talent, Jackson Liberty is arguably a top-five team. Right-handers Tyler

Pallante and James Sofield give the Lions a formidable one-two punch on the mound and senior catcher Brendan Benecke and shortstop Angel Garced make the Lions strong up the middle. Where the Lions still need to prove themselves is against top teams in big games, where Jackson Liberty has been close over the last three years but has ultimately come up just short. Wall has been a major stumbling block for the Lions in each of the past two seasons, but with division realignment, the Lions no longer play Wall twice a season. The Class B South division is theirs for the taking, but the Lions would undoubtedly like to take the next step and advance deep into the Shore Conference and NJSIAA Group III tournaments. With a good,

balanced core of players back this year, Jackson Liberty could be poised for that kind of season.

5. Brick Memorial

The final spot in the top 10 goes to a Mustangs team that returns most of its impressive pitching staff from last year, led by right-hander Brian Cottrell. Brick Memorial will need to replace some quality position-player talent after losing five starters in the field, but a deep junior class led by center fielder Kyle Cala should help provide some support for the solid pitching staff. There are plenty of teams throughout the Shore Conference that can make a strong claim for a top 10 spot and Brick Memorial will have its hands full in a tough Class A South division, but with their pitching, the Mustangs get the nod.

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May 17th, 2013

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Home Run Leaders Eliot Daks, Giants, 3; Nick Straub, Giants 3; Samuel Angelo, Giants 2; Jason Kapp, White Sox, 2; Tommy Spiwak, White Sox, 1.

BRICK LITTLE LEAGUE MAJOR LEAGUE

Recent Game Results Giants 5 White Sox 1 Tommy S both hit and pitched well for the TRLL Majors White Sox, but it wasn’t enough as the TRLL Majors White Sox fell to the Giants 5-1 at Scavuzzo Field. White Sox 19 A’s 4 The TRLL Majors White Sox refused to relinquish the lead after grabbing it early against A’s, recording a 19-4 victory on Tuesday at Scavuzzo Field. Yankees 9 Cardinals 8 Dodgers 8 Diamondbacks 1 Giants 7 Mariners 5 Cardinals 4 Dodgers 3 Yankees 8 Diamondbacks 1 Dodgers 13 Athletics 3 Giants 10 Yankees 0 White Sox 6 Mariners 3

Recent Game Results

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Thunder

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SUBMIT YOUR WEEKLY SCORES AND STANDINGS TO NEWS@OCSIGNAL.COM We Welcome: Photos, Game Recaps, Stories, League Leaders, Individual and Team Accomplishments.

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Pro Skills

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0

Jackson Lions

2

1

NY CP Stars

4

1

CP Stars

2

1

J-Town

3

1

Bonnie Orioles

1

2

A’s Nations

3

1

On Deck Warriors

0

3

Frozen Ropes

2

1

Stafford Stallions

2

1

NJ Rangers

2

1

MENS ICE HOCKEY LEAGUE CHAMPIONS

9 teams unlisted

9U DIVISION

Rockies 11 Dodgers 3 Phillies 17 Pirates 5 Brewers 5 Cubs 3 Reds 4 Astros 3 Rockies 8 Pirates 3 Astros 8 Phillies 1 Reds 10 Cubs 5 Brewers 15 Dodgers 5 Astros 12 Cubs 6 Rockies 10 Brewers 7 Cubs 5 Phillies 3 Reds 7 Dodgers 5 Astros 15 Pirates 0

Brewers 1 Rangers 0 White Sox 8 Yankees 7 Padres 8 Reds 7 White Sox 10 Brewers 3 White Sox 6 Rangers 1 Padres 5 Yankees 1 Reds 4 Rangers 3 Brewers 5 Yankees 1 Padres 5 White Sox 2 Brewers 12 Reds 3 Brewers 7 Yankees 3 Padres 9 Raners 3 Reds 4 White Sox 2

Get Your Team Or League In The Next

*NY Dynasty

Recent Game Results L

L

12U DIVISION

Semi-Final Jackson Lions 6 B.Orioles 5 NY Dynasty 16 CP Stars 6 Final NY Dynasty 11 Jackson 1

W

W

TAG ‘EM HOLBROOK TOURNAMENT

HOLBROOK LITTLE LEAGUE

Recent Game Results

MAJOR LEAGUE

Storm 11Grasshopers 1 Lugnuts 8 Bees 1 Iron Pigs 6 Bulls 2 BlueClaws 12 Express 2 Volcanoes 8 Thunder 4 BlueClaws 11 Bees 6 Storm 7 Iron Pigs 3 Volcanoes 18 Express 5 Thunder 12 Bulls 5 Grasshoppers 10 Lugnuts 1 Iron Pigs 4 Volcanoes 3 Bulls 14 Express 2 BlueClaws 11 Grasshopers 6 Bees 11 Thunder 4 Iron Pigs 11 Express 1 Grasshoppers 9 Bulls 9 (SPD) BlueClaws 12 Volcanoes 9 Storm 15 Bees 4

8U DIVISION

MAJOR LEAGUE

JACKSON LITTLE LEAGUE

Semi-Final Pro Skills 4 A’s Nation 1 NY CP Stars 4 J-Town 2 Final Pro Skills 3 CP Sars 2

W

L

*Bonnie Rangers

3

1

C.PA Cougars

2

1

Port City Outlaws

2

1

W

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Jackson Wildcats

2

3

CP Stars

5

0

Baskin Ridge

0

3

Brick Jackals

4

1

SEPA Knights

3

1

RCBC Falcons

3

1

Ocean County

2

1

Bullets

2

1

Frozen Ropes

2

2

11U DIVISION W

L

SJ Bulldogs

3

1

*Jackson Coyotes

3

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Bullets Baseball

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Bulldogs White

0

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Final Jackson Coyotes 3 SJ 2

13U DIVISION

7 teams unlisted

Semi-Final Brick Jackals 10 RCBC 3 CP Stars 10 Frozen Ropes 2 Final CP Stars 4 Brick Jackals 2

FIRST HOME RUNS HIT IN HOLBROOK SOFTBALL HISTORY SOFTBALL MAJOR LEAGUE

SOFTBALL SENIOR LEAGUE

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Auburn

1

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N. Carolina

2

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Alabama

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Arkansas

2

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Michigan

1

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Nebraska

1

2

LSU

0

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Kentucky

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3

Recent Game Results

Recent Game Results

Auburn 17 Michigan 8 Michigan 17 LSU 16 Alabama 16 Michigan 15

Nebraska 22 Kentucky 13 Arkansas 14 Kenucky 13 North Carolina 13 Nebraska 12 North Carolina 13 Kentucky 10 Arkansas 17 Nebraska 15

GOLDEN GLOVES BOXING April 13 Global Gym, North Bergen 141 Sub/Nov - Jaquan Smith (Aspira BC) over Garrett Dugan (Checkmate BC TR) - W-3

(Checkmate BC TR) ADVANCES!!! Lewis Herrea (Elizabeth Rec) 165 Sub-Nov - Andrew Noormon (Nick Catones MMA) over Ryan Lee (Elite Heat BC) - W-3

April 6 P.A.C.B.O JFK Center, Newark

IBN Ali BC, Newark, NJ 141 SN - Dareal Valentine (Brick PAL) Advances Gianfranco Quinones (Brunswick Boxing) 141 SN - Raymond Sanchez (Jersey City Rec.) over Francisco Rudd (Brick PAL) - W-3

March 30 Middletown PAL, Middletown 106 JO/SN - Yohenry Rosario (Passaic PAL) over Francis Leonard (Brick PAL) - RSC-1 (1:11) March 15 Hudson Catholic HS, Jersey City 141 Sub-Nov - Raymond Sanchez (Jersey City Rec) over Dereal Valentine (Brick PAL) - W-3 141 Sub-Nov - Garret Dugan

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On Sunday, April 14th, the first home run in the history of Holbrook Girls Softball were hit by Gina Ghigna and Heather Jones, pictured above. Ghigna’s home run was an inside the park home run. Ms. Jones hit the first home run over the fence for the new league. For the boys, the first home run of the season was hit by Zachary Schmidt of the Reds. Connor Keenan and David Melfi also went yard on opening day.

JERSEY SHORE AMERICAN YOUTH FOOTBALL 4/5 GRADE AMERICAN

6/7 GRADE AMERICAN

8th GRADE AMERICAN

W

L

W

L

W

L

Morgan

3

0

Morgan

3

0

Holmdel

3

0

Jackson

3

0

Jackson

3

0

Morgan

2

1

Manalapan

2

1

Manalapan

2

1

Manalapan

2

1

Hazlet

0

3

Matawan

1

2

Matawan

1

2

Howell

0

3

Hazlet

0

3

Colts Neck

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3

4/5 GRADE NATIONAL W

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TR Raiders

3

0

Wall

3

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TR Indians

1

2

Brick Dragons

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Howell

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3

6/7 GRADE NATIONAL W

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Berkeley

2

1

Brick Dragons

2

1

Hazlet

2

1

Ocean (Mon.)

1

2

TR Raiders

1

2

Southern

0

3

8th GRADE NATIONAL W

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TR Indians

3

0

Jackson

2

1

TR Raiders

1

2

Brick

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3

Southern

0

3

NOT SEEING YOUR TEAM OR ACCOMPLISHMENT IN THE OCEAN SIGNAL? Not seeing your own team, league or accomplishments in the Ocean Signal? That’s because nobody has told us yet. We welcome sports scores, standings, news, stories or game recaps at any time. Simply have your coach or team designated photographer or writer email your team’s news to sports@ocisgnal.com. You can include pictures, spreadsheets and whatever else is necessary for us to tell the story. Always include your name, phone number and email address when you send your news. You must be 18 or older to send us news, so make sure you tell your parent or coach to get in the next issue of the Ocean Signal!

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May17th, 2013

HIGH SCHOOL SOFTBALL SHORE CONF BASEBALL

SHORE CONF BASEBALL

CLASS A SOUTH

CLASS B SOUTH

TR North

W

L

W

L

7

1

6

1

Lacey

HIGH SCHOOL LACROSSE

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W

L

8

0

6

0

BOYS LACROSSE

GIRLS LACROSSE

CLASS A SOUTH

CLASS A SOUTH

TR East

8

3

6

1

Central

5

1

4

1

Jax Mem

5

2

5

2

Jax Lib

3

1

3

1

W

L

W

L

W

L

W

L

7

0

5

0

TR South

6

0

5

0

TR South

5

4

4

3

Pinelands

3

3

2

3

Southern

Lacey

4

6

4

3

Manchester

3

4

1

4

Jax Mem

5

1

4

1

TR North

4

1

4

1

Brick Mem

2

5

2

5

Barnegat

3

5

1

4

Brick

3

3

3

1

TR East

3

3

3

3

Southern

1

7

1

6

MonDon

1

4

1

4

Brick Mem

3

3

2

2

Southern

3

3

3

3

Brick

0

7

0

7

TR North

2

3

2

2

Jax Mem

2

4

2

3

TR South

1

4

1

2

Brick Mem

1

5

1

4

TR East

2

4

1

3

Brick

0

4

0

4

Barnegat

4

3

1

3

Lacey

4

4

1

4

Jax Lib

2

3

0

2

IS YOUR TEAM OR LEAGUE MISSING? Email sports@ocsignal.com

HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL

SHORE CONF BASEBALL

SHORE CONF BASEBALL

CLASS A SOUTH

CLASS B SOUTH

W

L

W

L

W

L

W

L

Jax Mem

7

1

7

0

Brick

5

2

4

2

Jax Lib

4

2

4

1

Mon Don

6

1

4

TR South

6

3

4

1

3

Manchester

4

4

4

3

TR East

4

3

TR North

6

3

4

3

Central

4

4

4

3

4

3

Point Boro

4

4

3

4

Brick Mem.

4

Southern

1

4

3

3

Barnegat

3

4

2

4

6

1

6

Lakewood

2

4

2

4

Lacey

0

8

0

7

Pinelands

2

5

2

5

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

Jackson Lacrosse Rivals Team up to Support America’s Wounded Warriors In their first game of the season the Jackson Liberty Lions hosted cross-town opponents, Jackson Memorial. All of the money raised from the concession stands including food, clothing and donations were given to the Wounded Warriors. ”Coach Sharples and Coach

Lax from Jackson Liberty were kind enough to let us use their snack stand, and facilities to sell the merchandise,” said Jackson Memorial coach Joe Pienkowski, “Even though we are rivals on the lacrosse field, we can come together for such a great cause.”

Reader Photo of the Week This lacrosse photo of Brick Memorial, taken by Doug Bostwick of SportsShotsWLB. com, is our reader photo of the week.

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May 17th, 2013

Jackson Mourns Loss of Beloved Teacher and Coach

by Scott Stump All Shore Media JACKSON--Jackson Liberty football coach Tim Osborn, the only coach in the program's six-year history, died at 53 years old on Saturday, April 13th while working out at a fitness center in Brick Township. This past fall, Osborn led the Lions to their first state playoff appearance and

first winning season (6-4) in school history. He had a career record of 23-37 at Jackson Liberty, and previously was an assistant on championship teams under Bob Nani at Toms River North. Osborn also played for Shore Conference legend Warren Wolf at Brick, winning the inaugural South Jersey Group IV title in the first year of the state playoff system in 1974, and

served as an assistant for the Green Dragons from 1982-99. Tim Osborn, the only coach in Jackson Liberty's six-year varsity football history, collapsed and died on Saturday morning. According to several witnesses, Osborn was reportedly running on a treadmill at Bally on Saturday morning when he collapsed. He was taken by Brick Township First Aid to Brick Hospital, where he was pronounced dead after he could not be resuscitated at the scene. Last summer, Osborn survived a terrible car wreck to return to coach the Lions in the fall without missing a game. "It's really disbelief,'' senior quarterback Bob Davies said. "It's almost like folkore. He was like this invincible man, especially after the car accident. "I remember him as a man who was incredibly passionate about everything he did, dedicated to his team and his players, and the first person to help if you

Jersey Shore Wrestling Report by Steve Rivera Elite Wrestling Congratulations go out to Toms River East graduate Vincent Dellefave of Rutgers Wrestling who celebrated after winning his first round match against Penn State #12 Seed in the 2013 NCAA D1 Wrestling Championship in DeMoines, IA. Brick Memorial graduate Steve Santos, Columbia University, earned All American Status at the 2013 Division 1 NCAA Wrestling Championships held in DesMoines, IA. TRWC USAW-NJ KID STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS PLACEWINNERS STATE CHAMPS: Dean Hestowski, Intermediate (4X), AJ Meyers, Intermediate (2X) Johnny O'donnell, Novice (2X), GianCarlo Crivelli ,HS Cadet. RUNNER-UPS Zach Martin, Intermediate , Cole Corrigan, Intermediate. PLACE WINNERS Reece Curtis 5th Place Bantam, Sage Mosco, 5th Place Junior, Jake Rosenthal 6th

Place Bantam, Domenic Tangredi, 7th Place Novice, Patrick O'donnell ,8th Place Intermediate JERSEY SHORE WRESTLING LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIPS TRWC 1 2X JSJWL LEAGUE CHAMPS (34-0), JSJWL A DIVISION TOURNAMENT CHAMPS (270 PTS) , TOURNAMENT "OW" AWARD: ZACH MARTIN, TRWC 2 A NATIONAL REGULAR SEASON CHAMPS (7-0), A NATIONAL PLAYOFF RUNNER-UPS NJSIAA HIGH SCHOOL STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS shore conference place winners 1st Place 145: (Sr) BJ Clagon (TR South), 2nd Place 113: (Sr) Kevin Corrigan (TR South). 3rd Place 138: (Sr) Rich Lewis (TR East), Hwt: (Sr) John Appice (Manalapan), 4th Place 106: (So) Mike Russo (Jackson Liberty), 132: (So) Zach Hertling (Ocean Township), 170: (Sr) Dae'Sean Brown (Neptune), 195: (Sr) Matt Moore (Brick Memorial), 5th Place 138: (Sr) Brian Hamann (Jack-

son Memorial), 6th Place 160: (Sr) Dan Wojtaszek (Brick Twp), 170: (Sr) Tyler Richardson (Brick Memorial), 7th Place 145: (Sr) Ashanti Maurice (Howell), 182: (Jr) Nick Costa (Brick Memorial), 8th Place 113: (So) Nasiyr Brown (Neptune), 126: (Sr) Alec Huxford (Jackson Memorial) Frankie Edgar Still Top Ranked UFC Contender Frankie Edgar Toms River East graduate, former UFC World Champion and a long

Vikings Region XIX Champions OCC women’s basketball team makes first national tournament appearance since 1999

OCC women’s basketball team wins 2012-13 NJCAA Region XIX championship title after defeating Cumberland by a score of 67-62 at Brookdale Community College. Photo by OCC Athletic Dept. Staff Report / Viking News Toms River-- Staging an epic comeback for the ages, the fourth-seeded Ocean County College women’s basketball team upended second-seeded Cumberland, 67-62 in the NJCSAADivision III Region XIX Final.

B6

Hitting four clutch free throws in the final seconds to secure the victory, Amber Nafziger was named the 2013 Region XIX Division III women’s basketball tournament’s most valuable player. Nafziger scored 20 total points, 14 of which came in the second half.

Ocean head coach Dana Kovich was named the 2013 Region XIX Division III coach of the year. The win paved the way for OCC’s first trip to the National tournament since 1999. The team traveled to Rochester, Minnesota to compete in the NJCAA Division III Women’s Basketball championships, which began on March 14th where the top eight teams from Division III competed in the tournament. In the first quarterfinal game, OCC lost to Rock Valley College of Illinois, 84-64. Heather Tice led the Vikings with 20 points, was 6 for 7 at the

ever needed it. He was hard on the outside, but he was a great man on the inside.'' "RIP Osborn you were like a father to me,'' 2012 graduate and former star lineman Remy Martin tweeted. Osborn was also the athletic coordinator at Jackson Liberty and was a history and special education teacher at Jackson Liberty for seven years after previously working as a New Jersey state trooper for 25 years. A candlelight vigil in his honor was planned for 8 p.m. Saturday night at the football field at Jackson Liberty. "Tim Osborn was a man beyond a teacher and head football coach, but a mentor and father figure for so many students, not only here at Jackson Liberty but the entire shore community,'' Jackson Liberty principal Maureen Butler said in a statement. "He went above and beyond for everyone, especially our students and staff, and was an integral part of making Jackson Liberty what it is today. Our Liberty family is so deeply time friend of mine is still a top ranked contender in the fight game. After a disappointing Title Fight loss to Brazil’s Jose Aldo, Frankie is rested and back in the gym for normal routine training as he waits for his next posted opponent. We have heard that the UFC offered and Frankie accepted a short notice fight versus highly regarded Cub Swanson but Cub was unwilling to sign on the dotted line stating six weeks wasn’t enough time to prepare for Frankie. Frankie is hopeful that he will be back in the Octagon by mid-summer vying for his next run at the title. Shore Conference Shout Outs! Congratulations go to: Brick Memorial’s Dan O’Cone NJSIAA Coach of Year Toms River East’s Warren Reid National Hall of Fame Inductee; Toms River South’s Ron Laycock Shore Conference Coach of the Year; Toms River South’s BJ Clagon Shore Conference Wrestler of the Year. For more Jersey Shore wrestling news, visit www. elitewrestling.net. free throw line and sunk 4 three point shots. Amber Nafziger scored 18 points. In the semifinal round, the Vikings were outscored 84-42 by Anoka Ramsey Community College of Minnesota. In the final consolation round, the Vikings lost to Northland CTC by a score of 72-60, despite a 21 point performance by Tice. Despite coming up empty handed at Nationals, the Vikings placed eighth in the nation in their division. The unexpected division championship came from a team that finished the season with an 18-14 record in 6th place out of 17 teams. Their championship run began on February 23rd, defeating GSAC Middlesex 70-67. In round two, the Vikings unseated first place Northampton who had a 24-2 overall season record with a perfect 10-0 region record. After Northampton, the Vikings knocked off the tournament top seed, Passaic.

saddened by his passing and will miss him more than words can express. "Tim was a dynamic, dedicated teacher and coach who was incredibly passionate about his students and the Jackson community," Jackson School District Deputy Superintendent Lu Anne Meinders said in a statement. "I had the pleasure of knowing him as a fellow district staff member, but also as a parent of a child who played for him in the inaugural year of the Jackson Liberty High School football program and I can tell you that his vibrant personality and enthusiasm endeared him to so many people, including myself. His loss will be felt by so many of us." Osborn was also a key member of the Shore Football Coaches Foundation and the U.S. Army AllShore Gridiron Classic who worked to promote Shore

Conference football. He started the Jackson Liberty program from scratch after coaching his sons at Toms River North, and the Lions showed steady improvement before a breakthrough season this past fall. "People look at this year as the first winning season and say it took six years, but they don't know how much work it took to build the program,'' Davies said. "He got us to buy in and that's what great coaches do. "I think it's incredibly fitting that he goes out with the first winning class in Jackson Liberty history. On behalf of all the seniors and all the current and former Jackson Liberty players, I want to thank everyone for their condolences. It's a tough time, but he always said to go all out all the time, and he certainly would want us to keep giving everything in our lives every day, so that's what we'll continue to do.''

Jacobs Named Head Coach at Central

Only African American Head Coach in the Shore Conference Willie Jacobs, a 1990 Central graduate, replaces Vincent Casale, who held the position for 5 years while also serving as the district’s athletic director. Casale will remain as the school’s athletic director. Kevin Williams of Shore Sports Network points out that the 41-year old Jacobs is the only African American head coach in the Shore Conference.

Jacobs spent the last two seasons on Casale’s staff as defensive coordinator. Before coming to Central, Jacobs worked at Long Branch High School under Head Coach Dan George. Jacobs was the defensive coordinator during Long Branch’s State Championship runs and also served as an assistant coach in Franklin Township. Willie Jacobs is a College of New Jersey graduate and former player who currently teaches health & physical education at Central Regional High School. Jacobs stated at the board meeting that being named head coach at his alma mater is a “dream come true” and he is looking forward to building the football program. Dr. Triantafillos Parlapanides, superintendent, stated, “I am excited for Central Football. I believe Mr. Jacobs can take the momentum gained over the past several years and bring the program to a new level. I wish him, his staff and all the players a great 2013 football campaign”!

LaBarca Not Returning as Head Coach for Mariners

Chip LaBarca. Photo by Bill Normile. by Scott Stump All Shore Media Chip LaBarca Jr., who led Toms River North to the 2007 NJSIAA South Jersey Group IV title and four state playoff appearances in his seven seasons, said that he will not return as head coach for the

2013 season. The Toms River Board of Education has changed its philosophy to no longer allow administrators in the district to be coaches, according to LaBarca, who is a vice principal at Toms River North. LaBarca declined further comment. LaBarca, who starred at Toms River South in the 1980s and played wide receiver at Penn State, has a career record of 57-34 after also coaching at Lakewood. In his tenure at Toms River North from 2006-2012, his teams went 50-22. He led the Mariners to their fifth overall sectional title and first in 10 years during an undefeated 2007 season. Toms River North also won division titles in 2007 and 2008 under LaBarca, who is the son of Chip LaBarca Sr., a Shore Football Coaches Foundation Hall of Famer from stints at Keansburg and Toms River South.

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May17th, 2013

1998 TRELL Champ Rutgers Coach

by Rutgers University Former standout Rutgers pitcher Casey Gaynor is in his first season as the pitching coach for the Scarlet Knights. Gaynor was hired by head coach Fred Hill Oct. 8, 2012. “It’s an honor coming back after playing for Coach Hill,” Gaynor said. “To be able to return to Rutgers and coach is a privilege. I am excited to work with this talented pitching staff.” The Toms River native, who graduated in 2010, spent two years playing baseball professionally. After proving highly successful on the mound for Rutgers, the Cleveland Indians signed the right-hander. Gaynor spent one season with the Indians’ Class A affiliate Mahoning Valley Scrappers of the New York Penn League. With the Scrappers, he compiled a 4.04 ERA with a 5-2 record, appearing in 16 games and starting in five. Following his year with the Indians organization, Gaynor spent the summer of 2011 pitching for the Newark Bears in an independent baseball league. There, he started 13 games and compiled a 5-4 record. While he was not pitching over the past two years, Gaynor has been teaching the game to stay involved, offering his knowledge and guidance to pitchers at camps and clinics. The Toms River East High School graduate (’06) was one of the best and most reliable pitchers to take the rubber for the Scarlet Knights. Gaynor covers

the baseball record books, ranking first all-time at Rutgers in starts (52) and innings (317.0). He also ranks second in career strikeouts, punching out 227 hitters in four seasons. As a senior in 2010, Gaynor tallied eight wins to tie him for sixth all-time on the Rutgers single-season list. That year, he helped lead the Scarlet Knights to a 30-26 record, which placed sixth in the BIG EAST. Rutgers reached the semifinals of the conference tournament that year. Gaynor was a member of the squad gave Coach Fred Hill his 1,000th career victory that season. In the same year, Gaynor pitched 97.1 innings, fifth on the all-time list, while starting 15 games, third all-time at Rutgers. Gaynor was also a Cape Cod AllStar in 2009 when he played for the Orleans Firebirds in a summer baseball league. His baseball success dates back to Little League. As an 11-year-old, Gaynor played with former Rutgers teammate Todd Frazier, who is now a member of the Cincinnati Reds, on the Toms River East Little League All-Star team that captured the World Championship at the Little League World Series in 1998. Baseball runs in his family as well, as his brother Colin played for the Scarlet Knights baseball team from 2003-05. Gaynor graduated from Rutgers with a major in History and a minor in Psychology. He currently resides in Toms River and was born on April 10, 1987.

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

Santos

(Continued from page 1) the best individual finish in Columbia wrestling history. “Coming out today I wanted to wrestle strong, wrestle my best and getting these two wins is a great way to end my career,” said Santos in the tunnel following the third-place bout. “Representing Columbia is a great experience for me. We have a great support system and our coaches are great. I believed in them and going out there and getting to represent my team and being the highest finisher just shows all the hard work we put in.” “Steve, he deserves it,” said Andrew F. Barth Head Coach of Wrestling Carl Fronhofer after Santos’ victory. “I’ve never been around a kid that works the way he does and competes as hard as he does.” After winning his first bout in the wrestleback semifinals, Santos earned the right to compete for third against Minnesota’s Dylan Ness, the sixth seed, in the third-place bout. Ness (20-6), the Big 10 champion at 149 pounds, reached the third-place match through the wrestleback bracket after falling in the round of 16 to Missouri’s Drake Houdashelt. After winning four bouts after the loss, a rematch with Houdashelt was set for the wrestleback quarterfinals. This time it was Ness that came away with the decision, 5-2, sending Houdashelt home and setting up the bout against Santos. Santos and Ness wrestled the first three minutes of the bout to a 2-2 tie. Santos tallied the first two points with a takedown 58 seconds in, but Ness responded with a reversal in the final minute of the first period. In the second period, Santos choose to start on the bottom, which proved to be the perfect strategy as he scored a reversal 31 seconds in. He would ride the rest of the period out and take 1:41 of riding time into the final two minutes. Santos extended his lead to 6-2 10 seconds into the third period with his second takedown of the bout. Santos would continue to add riding time until

the last 10 seconds when Ness finally escaped, but it would be too late for the Gopher. Santos would tack on the riding time point for the 7-3 decision. After the bout, Santos was asked whether he believed the win was more important to him our the program. “I think its equally weighted. Definitely for me I wanted to go out on top and finishing with a win is great, but I think it definitely shows a lot about our program, how tough we are. I’m happy I got to represent my school and to just show Columbia can wrestle out there with the best.” In his first match of the day and with a trip to the third-place match on the line, Santos went up against the seventh-seed, Scott Sakaguchi from Oregon State, in the wrestleback semifinals. The first meeting between the two wrestlers started out in favor of Sakaguchi. After the first 90 seconds passed without any scoring, Sakaguchi was able to get Santos to the mat and score two points with a takedown. Santos was able to wrestle free 18 seconds later and the grapplers wrestled out the remaining time on their feet. The second period cleared without any scoring, but Santos was able to accumulate 1:41 of riding time. In the final stanza, it was all Santos, as he wasted little time setting up Sakaguchi for a reversal just 16 seconds in. The Columbia senior showed his strength and endurance over the remainder of the period, riding Sakaguchi out to bring the final score to 4-2 to set up the third-place bout against Ness. Santos finishes his recordsetting career with 91 total victories. The two-time NCAA qualifier is the fifth All-American to wear the Columbia blue and white and first since Matt Palmer finished eighth in 2007. Prior to the 2013 NCAA Championships, Bob Hartman’s fourth-place showing was the highest Columbia finisher in program history. In team scoring, Columbia tallied 17 points to finish the 2013 NCAA Championships in 26th out of 66 teams.

Frazier

(Continued from page 1) win that,” Frazier told the Ocean Signal in the off-season. In the off-season, Frazier was active in helping out his hometown which was struck hard by Superstorm Sandy. In November, he and New York Jets QB Mark Sanchez teamed up to raise awareness for the area when they took a helicopter ride together over the barrier island. In December, ESPN aired a five minute segment with Frazier to create national awareness for the tragedy. When spring came, it was back to baseball for the 27-year-old slugger.

He finished spring training with a .263 batting average, hitting 5 home runs and driving in 12 runs batted in during his 23 game appearances. Frazier’s number one critic is manager Dusty Baker. After giving Frazier some off-season workout advice that seems to be paying off, Baker says Todd now needs to speed up and slow down. Baker said in an interview during spring training, Todd will need to speed up at third base and slow down at the plate. In the off season, he advised Frazier to work on his first step, which he did at Toms River’s All-Star Sports Academy. “We gotta slow Fraiz down,” Baker said.

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B7


The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May 17th, 2013

Toms River Percussion Ensemble Takes First at Championship

Helping Restore the Shore with Song and Dance Lucy N. Holman School Showcases Talent to Raise Money for Beach Haven School By Phil Stilton Six months ago, Superstorm Sandy struck Ocean County, but aside from a prolonged power outage and fallen trees, damage in Jackson Township community of 54,000 people

was relatively minimal, and it was spared the distress of long term damage to infrastructure and housing. While the township missed the full brunt of Sandy, the Beach Haven School in Long Beach Island was not as fortunate.   The school, which was preparing to celebrate its 100th anniversary this year, was flooded and everything on the first floor was lost. The staff at Holman Ele-

mentary decided to use their due to different policies.”   annual talent show as a ve- He explained that the talent hicle to raise money for the show was a great opportunity Beach Haven School and to for a fund raiser.   Proceeds create awareness for the stu- from boardwalk style games, ories that are near and dear to dents who attend Holman.   photos and a video of the per- my heart,” she said. In past years, themes for the formance will be donated to Fifth grade teacher Jason talent show have ranged from the Beach Haven School. McEwan, who assisted WenFive of Holman’s teachers dolek in the performance were affected by the storm, also enjoys summers on Long three of whom lost their Beach Island. house while others had imTo donate or purchase the mediate family members who video, visit  holman.jacksonwere displaced, according to sd.org Burgos. See more pictures online: Mr. Burgos said the school photos.oceancountysignal. has previously held fundraisers to help several of its own staff members, three of whom lost their homes during Sandy. He added Motown to country. This that the decision to year, the theme was “Restore choose the Beach the Shore.”   Students had to Haven School was choose a song that was either a request by first performed by a New Jersey grade teacher Elizaartist or one that was beach beth Wendolek. themed. Mrs. Wendolek, “Since the storm, our school who resides in has had the desire to do Jackson, said she has an af- com/p514793419   Any prothings to help and give back,” finity for Long Beach Island ceeds from that gallery will be said Principal Michael Bur- and the school and her fami- donated to Holman’s H.O.P.E gos. “There’s been a lot of re- lies has vacationed there for parent teacher organization. quests for different fundrais- years. ers, but we couldn’t do them “We have many happy mem-

byToms River Schools TOMS RIVER – The Toms River Regional Schools Indoor Percussion Ensemble celebrated first in their division and third overall at the USBands Championships, on April 6th, at Hunterdon-Central Regional High School in Flemington, Hunterdon County where they used an original percussion piece written by Director Joe Russomano titled “Rise Above,” which was

inspired by the devastation and resiliency of the Toms River area community in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. The band consists of members from Toms River High School East, North and South. Marc Mangino assisted in directing the performance, and sponsorship was provided by Mark Figueroa, Jessica Sanford, Jon Grill and Nichole Delnero.

Got School News to Share? We welcome news from the calssroom by teachers and schools in Ocean County. Stories can be either public or private schools. We cannot accept photos of students by non-school officials due to privacy laws without the expressed written consent of their parent or guardian. Send your school news to news@ocsignal.com today!

After completing a biographical book report, the 4th grade students at St. Aloysidressed in character and posed as wax figures that suddenly came to life at the touch of a button

Toms River Schools Superintendent Announces Retirement by Phil Stilton Academic Decathlon Moderator Kathleen D’Andrea and Principal, Dr. Edward Gere with the Division III State Champion Academic Decathlon Team from Monsignor Donovan High School

TOMS RIVER—After being hospitalized on March 2nd, Toms River School District Superintendent Frank Roselli announced he will be retiring after the current school year. Roselli, who succeeded Michael Ritacco as superintendent of the district in 2011, had previously served as assistant superintendent under Ritacco for nearly nine years.

Roselli announced his retirement in a letter to the Board of Education at the March 21st board meeting. Mr. Roselli’s letter is as follows: Dear members of the Toms River Regional School District Board of Education. It is with strong mixed emotions that I write this letter of retirement to the Toms River School District Board of Education. I was sincerely looking forward to completing the final two years on my commit-

ment to our school district; however health concerns necessitate my retirement at the end of this school year. I truly feel blessed to have had the opportunity to be an educator for the past forty years, with thirty-two years in the Toms River Regional School District. I am fortunate to have many meaningful and fond memories of students, parents, teachers, administrators, board members and numerous other people that I have had the pleasure working with. I will cherish these memories for the rest of my life. In closing, I am hopeful that the children, our children will always come first for all the stakeholders in our school and community.

High School East teammates William Caruso, Isabelle Ingato, Vanessa Rotondo, Jennifer Sweeney, and Maria Gomez won an Honorable Mention award in the Moody’s Mega Math Challenge and will receive a scholarship prize in the amount of $1,000. This year’s problem asked teams to address the issue of plastic waste filling our nation’s landfills, come up with the best recycling methods for U.S. cities to implement based on their demographics, and recommend guidelines for nationwide recycling standards.

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May17th, 2013

Enrichment Grant Provided to Toms River Schools

by Toms River Schools

TOMS RIVER-At the April 16th meeting of the Toms River Regional Schools Board of Education, the recipients of $10,000 in

sionate these educators are about engaging students in inventive ways. We can’t wait to hear the results of the projects.” . The winning projects were:

River High School East “Outdoor Learning Center: Part 1 Butterfly Garden” by Cherri Worth and Donna Matlosz of Intermediate South Middle School “Sculpture Garden: Trea-

Britton, Melinda D’Addario, Lisa Marino, Maryann LoGrasso, and Tracey Squirini of Walnut Street Elementary School “iPod Literature: Because of Winn Dixie Project” by Mary Hammill of East Dover Elementary “Project E.A.S.E.” by Candice Waszkiewicz of Toms River High School North

Three Jackson Students Score Perfect on SAT Test

by Allison Erwin, Jackson Schools

enrichment grants were announced. The grant, by Teachers Auto Insurance Company of New Jersey will fund 14 proposals submitted by Toms River’s educators. “Teachers’ Insurance is honored to support such creative interdisciplinary projects in Toms River classrooms,” said Marc V. Buro, President, Teachers Auto Insurance Company of New Jersey. “We are truly impressed by how pas-

“Issues and Controversies to Help Stimulate Critical Thinking” by Diane Harz, Donald Stellhorn, and Alison Mika of Toms River High School East “BrainPOP” by Amanda Scanlon of Intermediate East Middle School “Special Prom” by Shane McCloskey and Frances Crowell of Toms River High School East “Future Careers in Graphic Design” by Susan Werner and Beth Basile of Toms

sures and Totems” by Melissa Niemierowski, Allison Berman, Jess Pomeroy, and Kevin McCormick of Intermediate East Middle School “Battle of the Books” by Kim Biehler and Jean High of Intermediate North Middle School “Claymation Public Service Announcements” by Kevin McCormick of Intermediate East Middle School “Letters Alive in Kindergarten” by Jaime Johnston, Heather Bieber, Michele

“Incorporating Original Microbiology Research as a STEM Initiative in the Authentic Science Research Program” by Pamela Dixon Kuhn of Toms River High School North “Ready Set Read!” by Jennifer Gottlieb of North Dover Elementary “Technology in Speech and Language” by Laura Wenz of North Dover Elementary.

JACKSON – Three students who earned perfect 800 SAT scores on various portions of the test were recognized by the Jackson Board of Education for their academic excellence. “It’s such a privilege to be able to recognize these students for such a remarkable achievement,’’ said Board President Barbara Fiero. Kyle Albany, a senior, earned a perfect 800 score on the SAT II Subject Area Test in Math.

“Kyle is such a brilliant student, very well disciplined and gives 110 percent in all he does,’’ said guidance counselor Jean Ciner. “I know his life will be full of great accomplishments.’’ Juniors Noah Panitch and Lindsey Reist also earned perfect 800 scores, but on the writing portion of the SAT. “They are both such excellent students who really strive to challenge themselves academically,’’ said guidance counselor Eve Caruso. “I’m very proud of them.’’

Saint John Vianney High School Student Wins Scholastic Art and Writing Award By Jillian Chandler

Toms River Intermediate South’s Interact Club took a trip to the Make-A-Wish castle on 4/17/13, where they presented the foundation with a check in the amount of $2,500.00. Interact will be adopting a wish of a child with a life threatening medical condition in Ocean County. Monies were raised through popcorn sales and Interact will be selling bracelets that read “Seminoles Make Wishes Come True.”

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

Holmdel Saint John Vianney High School Junior Danielle Radeke, of Jackson has won the Silver Key and Honorable Mention Regional Awards in the 2013 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards sponsored by the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers. More than 230,000 works were submitted to The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards nationwide and only the top 40% receive some level of recognition (Gold Key, Silver Key, or Honorable Mention). Danielle submitted a short story, “The House,” and a poem, “Love’s Gamble/

Sammy.” For her short story, she received a Silver Key Award and an Honorable Mention Award for her poetry.

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May 17th, 2013

School District Board Meeting Briefs BRICK SCHOOL DISTRICT The Board of Education has approved a bid for HVAC upgrades at Veterans Memorial Middle School, Drum Point Elementary School, Osbornville Elementary School and Lake Riviera Middle School. The project will also include asbestos abatement and the replacement of a boiler at the Herbertsville Elementary School. The cost of the project is estimated at approximately $565,000. A 5th grade school field trip was approved to Liberty Science Center for Midstreams Elementary School. The board approved placements for college students from Kean University, Georgian Court College, Monmouth University and Rutgers for classroom internships and observations. In an attempt to recoup costs on obsolete equipment, the district approved the sale of items including computers, projectors and furniture on govdeals.com. The district accepted the following donations: A Tree valued at $75 for the grounds of the Educational Enrichment Center from the Ocean County Tree Commission. A check in the amount of $2,499.56 for Lake Riviera Middle School from the Rutgers Inclusive Schools Climate Initiative. A check in the amount of $100 for Veterans Memorial Middle School Cafe’ from the Knights of Columbus Council No. 836. Three (3) IPads for the Emma Havens Young Elementary School

from the DonorsChoose Grant. A contract was awarded to Panoramic Windows and Doors in the amount of $414,000 for the replacement of windows at Brick Township High School and window repairs at Lake Riviera Middle School.

TOMS RIVER SCHOOL DISTRICT Board President Ben Giovine stated he received a call from Mr. Roselli who expressed to him, the board and administration his intention to submit a letter of retirement this evening. Mr. Giovine said he will read Mr. Roselli’s letter of retirement and then the Board will take a vote. Personally I regret that we have to do this but at the Superintendent’s request we will take a vote to accept his letter of retirement. Mr. Roselli’s letter is as follows: Dear members of the Toms River Regional School District Board of Education. It is with strong mixed emotions that I write this letter of retirement to the Toms River School District Board of Education. I was sincerely looking forward to completing the final two years on my commitment to our school district; however health concerns necessitate my retirement at the end of this school year. I truly feel blessed to have had the opportunity to be an educator for the past forty years, with thirty-two years in the Toms River Regional School District. I am fortunate to have many meaningful and fond memories of students, parents, teachers, administrators, board members and numerous other people that I have had the pleasure

working with. I will cherish these memories for the rest of my life. In closing, I am hopeful that the children, our children will always come first for all the stakeholders in our school and community. The board announced they will be going out to bid to replace the boiler at Silver Bay Elementary School which has been in operation since 1972. The board chose not to appeal a sexual bullying and harassment lawsuit. Esparza, Torrone, Torrone, Giovine voted yes. Gearity, Rhine, Pavliv voted no. The board voted for the creation of a personnel committee to oversee the district’s hiring process. The board decided to create the board despite a scheduled April 8th meeting with the New Jersey School Board Association on the subject. Former board member Linda Garvey criticized the sitting board, stating she had concerns empowering the board with the hiring process, saying the board has already hired an attorney with no school board experience. The 2013-14 district calendar has been released. Visit the district website to view it.

JACKSON SCHOOL DISTRICT The board vote on March 21st for Schwartz, Simon, Edlestein and Celso for district legal counsel did not pass. The board voted 3-3 with one board member abstaining. Krakower, Hanlon and Lackey voted yes to the appointment. Schiazza, Silvan and Dey voted no. Board President

HS North ASR (Authentic Science Research) student Ashley Winters attended the Perry Outreach Program at UPenn where she met Katie Reuther, a North graduate and PhD candidate. The program inspires young women interested in orthopaedic surgery and engineering.” Barbara Fiero abstained from the vote. In 2012, the law firm represented Nutel Broadband, a Nevada based company which Mrs. Fiero held an officer position of Secretary. Mr. Edlestein represented Nutel Broadband in conjunction with a Missouri based fraud judgment against the company which is owned by Fiero’s husband, Joseph Fiero, in the amount of $237,000. In 2012, a motion to dismiss prior judgments in the amount of $495,000 was dismissed by Judge William Sylerof the Supreme Court of Missouri. The board heard public comment from members of the Jackson Memorial Ice Hockey team. The team which was created as no cost to the board initially, sought financial support from the board. Parents pleaded for equality for all sports programs to include the hockey team. Superintendent Gialanella explained the hockey program was a very expen-

sive program with rising yearly costs. The board approved a motion for an amendment to the 2013-14 budget to provide $12,000 for coaches for both high school hockey teams. The school board discussed an outstanding $78,000 water and sewer bill it claimed was owed by the Township of Jackson. Superintendent Gialanella stated the bill goes back 10 years when questioned by board member Marvin Krakower. Krakower questioned the bill during a discussion regarding the use of school busses for the township’s summer camp. Jackson Township Business Administrator Joey Torres said that he had met with school district officials several years ago regarding this bill. “I told the school district when I took this job, that the township would gladly submit any debts owed to the council,” Torres said. “I asked them to send my office a copy of a contract that shows the

township owes this money, but I have not received it to date.” Mr. Krakower asked about wear and tear on buses through the program and asked the board attorney if there was anything that can be done to force the township to pay for it. The attorney recommended normal collections avenues. Torres said the claim by the school board member was a non-issue because the township reimburses the school board for the use of the buses and pays for fuel, maintenance and payroll for the service, in addition to other fees. Adam Silvan, who became a board member in 2013 said of the debate, “They put wear and tear on our buses, we put wear and tear on their fields, so it is pretty much even.” The township will use 15 buses for the summer camp program between June 24th and August 9th.

Representatives from Harrowgate presented the National Honor Society from High School North with a $500 scholarship for winning The Jeopardy Challenge. Accepting the award with Principal Edward Keller are: Abhishek Gupta, Michael Pavliv, Josh Musicant, Janis Tumaliuan, Raagni Kumar, and Lauren McGowan.

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BUSINESS

Uncle Dood’s Donuts: A Downtown Delight by Erik Weber TOMS RIVER - French Toast, Violet Beauregard, PBJ, Funky Monkey, and Prince Akeem are just some of the names thrown around among residents and workers in downtown Toms River since late January, when a new confection shop, Uncle Dood’s Donuts, opened on Robbins Street near Water Street in what was previously a flower boutique. Fans of the hot hand-made donuts, which are made to order using a variety of glazes and toppings and a changing monthly menu of signature concoctions, can trace the origin of their new craze to a fateful trip proprietors Dominic Livolsi and his fiancée, Jennifer Manukas took to Ocean City, Maryland several years ago. “We were walking by a donut shop down there, and we saw a line out the door,” recalled Mr. Livolsi. “I’d never waited in line for a donut ever in my life, so we gotta see what it’s about we wait in line.” One taste was all it took to change the future for these soon-to-be newlyweds and now business partners. “I’d never had anything like it in my life, never seen anything like it in New Jersey, so I said, ‘I gotta do this,’” he continued, noting that neither of them come from a baking background, “so we started learning. We were making scratchmade donuts in our apartment, coming up with glaze recipes, coming up with different flavor combinations, just trying

Dominic Livolsi prepares a fresh batch of donuts for customers who just arrived in his shop. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal on Water Street, said it was a long journey getting to where they are today. Reading through the Uncle Dood’s Donuts business page on Facebook shows part of that journey, which last summer included selling custom tshirts promoting the business to friends, family and early fans to help out with some of the bills rushing at the firsttime small business owners, which ran the gamut from refrigeration equipment to mul-

Uncle Dood’s Donuts popular March flavor, Violet Beauregarde, named for the famous character from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Erik Weber / Ocean Signal to come up with good stuff and learning along the way.” He added that his brother, a graduate of Johnson and Wales University, also helped in part of the process. Mr. Livolsi, who until opening his shop worked for his father, Robert, in their Copy Center fronting in the same building

tiple inspections by municipal and county departments prior to being given the go-ahead to open. One post from last June 1st, the first Friday of that month, which is National Doughnut Day, had Mr. Livolsi lamenting, “I wish we could have been open to share some sweet treats with you but there is al-

ways next year... Did I mention there are still shirts left?” Photos from then through the end of the year traced the couple’s journey as the barren storefront populated with equipment, construction permits were posted, and friends posed with the t-shirts and tested early incarnations of the treats. By early January, setup was just about complete, and starting the last week of that month, a soft opening date was slated for Monday the 21st, with a grand opening and free donuts the following Saturday, the 26th. In the three short months that have followed, their fan page on the social media giant saw new clients joining in droves and today boasts 642 people who regularly check in to see the couple’s latest donut themes (strawberry glaze and Lucky Charms cereal topping for St. Patrick’s Day, Girl Scout Cookie-inspired flavors for their April menu) and ideas ($1 Taco Tuesdays and “Doninis,” or Donut Paninis, with - so far - Porkroll, Bacon and Cheese or BBQ Pulled Pork). But who is Uncle Dood? “My nephew had a hard time saying Dominic, so he’d be like, “Dood! Dood!” So, okay, that works, I’m Uncle Dood and have been for the past 11 years now,” he said. “He still calls me Uncle Dood.” Commenting on their location, Mr. Livolsi professed his love for the downtown area. “Townsquare Media and WOBM are right next door [in

the former Observer-Reporter building, now fully renovated and upgraded], Hooper Avenue and Route 9 are nearby, and the parking garage is right across the street so we have ample parking,” he said. “I love Huddy Park, the festivals, and the people who work down here, who are proud they work down here as well.” He added his hope that Huddy Park would become the center of more activities in the future, and his interest in working with others downtown to bring it more attention for state, county and local activities. “It’s a beautiful park, it’s beautifully landscaped,” he said. Speculating on why people might hold such a confection in such high regard and popularity, Mr. Livolsi considered for a moment, then said, “it’s a little ring of fat-fried goodness. There’s nothing not to love about the donut: it’s sweet, it’s got a great texture, it’s fluffy, it’s airy; it’s crunchy on the outside and when it’s warm - to have a warm donut like we serve here, it’s a life-changing experience. For me it was, anyway.” Uncle Dood’s Donuts is located at 4 Robbins Street in downtown Toms River. Metered parking is available in front of the shop as well as directly across the street in both a municipal lot and metered parking garage. Hours Monday through Friday are 6:30 am to 3 pm; Saturday and Sunday are 6:30 am to 1 pm. They can be found and followed on Facebook at facebook.com/UncleDoodsDonuts

The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May17th, 2013

Quaker Steak & Lube

by Phil Stilton BRICK—Where Chevy’s Fresh Mex once stood on Cedar Bridge Avenue here, a new restaurant stands today, enticing automotive and racing fans with a mix of Americana, automobiles and comfort food. Quaker Steak & Lube is a motorsports theme casual dining experience in a family atmosphere. The Brick location, one of sixty nationwide, was the first opened by the chain in New Jersey. The grand opening was held on October 10th, just two weeks prior to the arrival of Superstorm Sandy and like most businesses in the county, it was shut down due to the prolonged power outages in the area. “We got closed down during the hurricane, just like everyone else around here,” said Victor Russomano, the area director for the chain. “We were fortunate to be able to reopen soon after and we’ve made it a point to help out the surrounding community in any way we can since.” When the restaurant was able to open after Sandy, the staff at Quaker Steak and

Lube rolled up their sleeves and assisted in the best way they thought possible, feeding those who needed to be fed. During the recovery period after Sandy, the restaurant fed the New Jersey National Guard, the Brick Police Department, rescue workers and provided food for nearby shelters every Friday through April. In December, “The Lube” as it is affectionately called by employees, hosted a touch a truck event where police cars, fire trucks, race cars and military vehicles were on display for children to interact with. The event raised $1,000 for a Brick Township hurricane relief fund. Quaker Steak & Lube began in 1974 and was the brainchild of George “Jig” Warren III and Gary “Moe” Meszaros. During the gasoline crisis, the pair sought to find a home a preserve the declining muscle car culture. With a 1936 Chevrolet on an original hydraulic grease rack, the first Quaker Steak & Lube restaurant was opened. To this day, the tradition remains, vintage cars and motorcycles adorn every restaurant location.

Now in its seventh year, Chevy Youth Baseball is a grassroots initiative that establishes a positive relationship between local dealers and the communities they serve. Chevy Dealers sponsor their local youth baseball leagues as a part of Chevrolet’s nationwide commitment to support youth sports, one community at a time. TRLL would like to thank the Chevy Youth Baseball program and Lester Glenn on Route 37 in Toms River for their continued support of Toms River Little League in 2013! Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May 17th, 2013

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May 17th, 2013

We are getting ready to put our house on the market. Can you please give us some tips that we can do to make our house more appealing? By Steve Fostek There are many things that you can do to spruce up your house in preparation for sale. This winter has been pretty rough. The first thing I would do is to get out there and clean up the yard. Start by picking up all the sticks, and trim any split branches. Rake the yard, and put down some fertilizer. First impressions are important, and a nice green lawn helps. The second thing I would do would be to power wash the house to get any dirt or stains off. This would include the deck, patio, etc. When the weather warms a bit I would paint the front entry area as you walk up to the house if needed. If you have an asphalt driveway I would seal coat it to give it that fresh look. You should also freshen up the shrubbery in

the yard especially the front. This does not have to be real expensive. Get a couple of bags of stone or mulch and freshen up those areas. Get a few plants with a little bit of color and plant them to help dress up the curb appeal. This gets the basics on the outside taken care of. Then we move to the inside. On rainy or cold days when you can’t work outside you can do some of these on the inside. First give the house a regular good old fashioned spring cleaning. Pull out the stove, turn over the couch, and really scrub everything. Get those cob webs that are hard to reach, and clean the heating ducts. Yes even do the windows. Also remember de-clutter and de-personalize. Don’t think hiding things in a closet is a safe haven. Buyers are going to want to open up everything including the

closets. What we all hang on our walls and keep in our house is very personal. It is hard for prospective buyers to visualize having their stuff hung on the walls with all of your stuff on the walls. It does not necessarily have to be a blank slate, but in this case less is more. Have you been meaning to hang that piece of trim and just haven’t? Now is the time. Get all of those small little tasks done. Hang that molding, replace the banister, and finish that built in shelving unit. You get the picture. Then patch any holes in walls from pictures and such. A good fresh coat of paint always looks well no matter what color. Try to stay with neutrals. If you can’t or don’t want to paint every room then at least paint the entry way and any rooms really showing wear like maybe the family room.

A good idea is to have your own home inspection. This helps in a couple of ways. First it gives you an idea of what may need to be fixed or needs attention. Next if the buyers have their own home inspection and find a problem, you will be able to counter with your home inspection. Some people may just use your home inspection as long as it was done by a licensed home inspector. This is a good basic start. Everyone’s house is different so there will be differences in what to do. Make a list of questions that you will want to ask your prospective listing agent. Then interview a couple of agents and ask your questions that you wrote down. Once you have selected your agent ask him or her for what tips and or recommendations that they may have. Good luck.

Mayor Mike Reina showed his support for new business in Jackson Township on April 13th when he presented a proclamation welcoming Inspirations dance studio to the township.   The studio is located in Jackson Crossing and provides youth and adult classes.

McGinns Helps Restore The Shore

McGinns South, located in Jackson would like to thank everyone who came out and supported our From Cape To Coney Hurricane Relief Benefit Concert Series March 24th. Our 3rd show was the best by far but we are not stopping here. Too much work to be done. A special thanks to my partner and friend Nikki Briar. Nikki does an amazing job getting all the bands. Angelo Martinez for putting in so much time to help and my wife and family for just being awesome. Our friends from the Bucket Brigade NJ came out all night and glad they got to see what we do. We will continue to grow and we will see ya in May.

Have Your Bar or Band in the Next Ocean Signal Recently, Garden State Radio played live in Jackson at 21 South. In each issue of the Signal, our goal is to showcase local bands and events held around the county, espicially as we get closer to the summer season. Bands and bar owners are welcome to submit nightcaps to the Signal to tell us how the night went. We welcome pictures and stories. If you raised money for a fundraiser for a local charity, even better, because you would get priority placement over non-charity events. Send your band or bar stories to news@ocsignal. com to be included in next week’s paper!

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May17th, 2013

MTV HOSTS SPRING FIX IN JACKSON, SEASIDE HEIGHTS “Jersey Shore” Stars Show their Support

see our boardwalk and favorite spots ruined. My prayers go out to everyone affected by the storm.” “My thoughts and prayers go out to everyone affected by Hurricane Sandy, especially our friends and family in Seaside Heights,” Paul “Pauly D” DelVecchio added. “A huge thank you to all the men and women who have been working around the clock to pro-

STAFF REPORT JACKSON - Long before the hit MTV reality television show “Jersey Shore,” Seaside Heights and the shore have welcomed spring breakers for as long as the tradition has existed in the modern era. The area has welcomed MTV over the years through many projects, including several seasons of “MTV’s Spring Break” where Seaside Heights was home to one of MTV’s storied television beach houses. This year, spring break at the shore was not the same, with many still recovering from the damage inflicted by Hurricane Sandy. With the boardwalk in Seaside Heights in ruins, MTV chose earlier this year to host a “Spring Fix” instead of the traditional spring break. “Spring Fix,” they decided, would be about fixing what Sandy had broken and about helping to rebuild the Jersey Shore and

other shore area communities. Vinny Guadagnino and Andrew Jenks would accompany 50 students from around the country during spring break to help rebuild the communities Sandy left in shambles. MTV partnered with the United Way on the project. The week long project began on March 17 and culminated with a March 23rd

concert at Six Flags Great Adventure here, headlined by Grammy Award winning R&B star, Ne-Yo. “I feel privileged to be part of an event that not only recognizes young people who are volunteering their time to help people affected by Hurricane

Sandy, but that is also continuing to raise awareness of the effect Sandy has had on many communities,” said the rap artist. The weeklong “Spring Fix” was highlighted by service projects for the group of 50 and their celebrity companions, hosted by the United Way. Aside from here in Ocean County, they also helped out in Long Island, the

Rockaways and Staten Island in New York as part of the United Way’s Alternative Spring Break. Official sponsors of “Spring Fix” included AT&T and State Farm Insurance. “Our 50 college students didn’t just volunteer. They truly understood what it means to ‘live united’,” the United Way said in a statement. “When they heard about an elementary

school in need of school supplies, they created a donation page that raised over $1,000 in 24 hours to support kids in Staten Island. They advocated every day to spread the word about the need to rebuild areas affected by Hurricane Sandy and continue to do so now that the project is over.” “Sandy destroyed Seaside — our second home,” Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi said in a statement to MTV News. “It’s devastating to

tect and help everyone, true heroes!” “Over the last few years, it feels like Seaside Heights has become my second home,” Vinny Guadagnino said. “My thoughts and prayers go out to everyone who was affected by this disaster in Seaside and all across the Northeast. I’m here to support in any way I can.” “This is a devastating time for the East Coast

and my prayers are with everyone,” added Jenni “JWoww” Farley. “I am thinking about my second family at the Jersey Shore and know that we can rebuild and come back stronger.” “The impact Hurricane Sandy had on the Jersey Shore is beyond devastating,” Sammi Giancola said. “So many families and homes were destroyed and my heart and prayers go out to everyone affected by this storm.”

Seaside Heights Makes Pitch for “Boardwalk Empire” by Phil Stilton SEASIDE HEIGHTS–This week the Asbury Park Sun reported that the HBO original series “Boardwalk Empire” was considering Asbury Park as a future filming location. Today officials here reported that they, too, were trying to urge producers from the popular cable series to consider their boardwalk exclusively or possibly in conjunction with that Monmouth County shore city. Through three seasons of the show, which depicts

2012 alone to the town’s film friendly policies and nominal filming permit fee of just $25. “We understand the publicity and promotion filming in our town brings, so we’re very supportive of these kinds of things – in some other towns, the filming permit is astronomical,” the community improvement director said. “We understand what we get out of it here and the permit and fee is there just so we can know who’s filming, when and how many people they’ll be bringing.”

Roaring Twenties-era Atlantic City during Prohibition, Leverage, its production company, relied on special effects and several locations in New York City to recreate the essence of those times, including a 300-foot, $5 million replica boardwalk built in Steiner Studios at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Now, according the the Sun, the show is in talks with the City of Asbury Park to film the fourth season there. While Asbury Park may be a fitting choice with several buildings of the style and period, including the Convention Center, which opened in 1930, Seaside Heights officials today told the Ocean Signal that they are now lobbying HBO and the show’s producers to consider their boardwalk also. Seaside Heights Community Improvement Director Michael Grachien asked, ‘Why not Seaside Heights?’ He credited the borough’s 100 filming permits in

The town most notably and recently was home to MTV”s controversial hit series “Jersey Shore” and past seasons of “MTV’s Spring Break.” “We read some articles saying Boardwalk Empire is coming, so we contacted the producers of the show through our contacts at HBO so we can pitch Seaside Heights,” he continued. “If nothing else, we’d like to even partner up with Asbury Park and make it something that can benefit both towns.” Seaside Heights is currently engaged in an approximately $6 million boardwalk rebuilding project following severe damage as a result of Hurricane Sandy on October 29th. Borough officials anticipate a Memorial Day reopening. “Most of the major networks have filmed here over the years and they appreciate what’s here and what we do” Mr. Grachien added. “And we appreciate them.”

ry and his unit delivered toys to children in Brick Township and Toms River as they marched on foot, with packs full of toys along Hooper Avenue and Brick

Boulevard. The WWE has raised over $500,000 for the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund, sponsored by First Lady Mary Pat Christie.

WWE Teams Up With National Guards For Sandy Victims by Phil Stilton SEASIDE HEIGHTS - Ted DiBiase Jr., the son of Ted DiBiase, or World Wrestling Entertainment’s “Million Dollar Man,” came to Seaside Heights on April 5th on a dual mission: to show support for the WWE fans who were impacted by Hurricane Sandy and to promote the weekend’s Wrestlemania events at the Meadowlands. “What happened here is

horrible. I live in Mississippi, so I was privy to what happened during Hurricane Katrina. I personally went down there and did some work and it’s awesome to see all the people around here pulling together and rebuilding this place,” DiBiase said after he surveyed some of the damage to barrier island communities. In conjunction with the New Jersey National Guard, DiBiase Jr. and the WWE

Read the Ocean Signal online: www.oceancountysignal.com

used the opportunity to raise awareness and to help the WWE raise money for Hurricane Sandy victims in the tri-state area. “We’re here to let people know, there’s still help out there and there’s still things that need to be done, that’s why we’re here,” the professional wrestler said. “I’m honored to have the opportunity to play a very small role in all of this.” The WWE hosted a free

hour long meet and greet with DiBiase at Captain Hooks Bar and on the boardwalk at Jimbo’s. New Jersey National Guard Sgt. First Class Theodore Berry, of the Toms River Armory said, “The National Guard and WWE wanted to come out here and show their support for the Seaside area community.” After Hurricane Sandy and before Christmas, Ber-

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The Ocean Signal | May 3rd - May 17th, 2013

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Ocean Signal - May 3rd 2013 - Vol. 1 Issue 2