Issuu on Google+

Revista Enfoque 29

Dedicada a la memoria de Xabier Gorostiaga S.J. +

human development and capability association

CONFERENCIA INTERNACIONAL SOBRE DESARROLLO HUMANO Y ENFOQUE DE CAPACIDAD

1


2

Revista Enfoque 29

HDCA 2013Annual Conference Confirmed keynote speakers:

Articles /Artículos 5

Amartya Sen University of Harvard

Luis Felipe López Calva World Bank

2013 Annual conference Human development and capability association

40 2013 Conferencia anual Desarrollo humano y la asociación de capacidad

nd capability association

RNACIONAL SOBRE ENFOQUE DE CAPACIDAD

Revista Enfoque 29

3

2

Tony Atkinson Nuffield College,University of Oxford

Martha Nussbaum University of Chicago

George Gray Molina UNDP Latin America and the Caribbean Of.

15

Using the Capability Approach

Joshua Cohen University of Stanford

24

Short biographies of main speakers

41 La conferencia HDCA 2013 Inscripciones

Breves biografías de los principales oradores

Approach a Theory of Justice: 17 TheasCapability Clarifications and

19

How has the Capability Approach been put into Practice?

Operationalising Human Development: A Programmatic Approach

53

51

¿Cómo se ha puesto en práctica el enfoque de las capacidades?

El enfoque de las capacidades como teoría de la justicia: Aclaraciones y desafíos

28

HDCA 2013 Annual Conference

32

Jakarta: A window to the global human development agenda

José Antonio Ocampo Columbia University, New York (To be confirmed)

Realización y redacción Claudia Rodríguez G.

Edición Hebé Zamora R.

Diseño y diagramación Paul Acosta García

Consejo editorial Renata Rodrigues Guillermo Bornemann Odily Calero Silva

Portada Alejandra Pérez castillo

7

José Pineda UNDP – Human Development Report Office

Utilización del enfoque de las capacidades

Susan Pick Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

6

HDCA 2013 Conference Inscription

Challenges

49 Kaushik Basu World Bank Vice-President

6

CORREO comunicacionfcee@ns.uca.edu.ni FACEBOOK enfoque.uca TWITTER @EnfoqueU Dirección www.enfoque.uca.edu.ni

Cuerpo técnico José Luis Solórzano

58

Puesta en práctica del desarrollo humano: Un enfoque programático

62 La conferencia HDCA 2013

66 Jakarta: Una ventana a la agenda global de desarrollo humano.

3


4

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Dear readers of Enfoque,

T

he Human Development and Capability Association is thrilled with the preparations for its 2013 annual international conference, which will take place in Managua from 9-12 September.

E ditorial

Launched in September 2004, the Human Development and Capability Association is an academic association which promotes research on issues of social justice within many disciplines, such as economics, philosophy, sociology, politics, anthropology, law and development studies. It takes the capability approach as a normative framework for its research. The capability approach was pioneered by Economics Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen in the late 1970s to assess inequality from the perspective of a person’s capabilities rather than by utility or income, which had been the standard measures employed by economists. ‘The standard of living lies in the living and not in the possession in commodities’ Sen wrote in 1985 in his book Capabilities and Commodities. Capabilities are opportunities people have to be or do what they have reason to value in life, such as participating in the life of the community, being healthy, being educated, walking safely in the street, being adequately fed, having decent housing, enjoying fulfilling relationships, pursuing meaningful work, etc. Despite huge economic progress, many people in the world today still lack these opportunities. India for example had an average of 5% annual economic growth over the last 20 years but half of its child population does not have the opportunity to be healthy and suffers from malnutrition, with all the consequences that we know child malnutrition has for a child’s future life. A malnourished child is more likely to suffer from lack of concentration at school and poor educational achievement, which will limit her ability to find secure employment in later life. Child malnutrition is also likely to lead to greater incidence of ill health in adulthood. Latin America does not escape this policy narrative. Despite high rates of economic growth for some Latin American countries, such as Nicaragua, many people lack opportunities to live well because of their gender, the color of their skin or the family or place they were born. Some groups may even have experienced a reduction in opportunities to live well, in other words, capability losses. HDCA looks forward to a stimulating conference at the Universidad Centroamericana in Managua. The conference promises high-level discussions on the themes of vulnerability, inclusion and wellbeing and on how to design better policies so that people’s opportunities to lead valuable human lives will be enhanced rather than undermined. In preparation for the conference, we offer a short summary of the biography of the main speakers, as well as four contributions from members of HDCA on the uses of the capability approach to build a more just world: Krushil Watene of New Zealand on the capability approach as a theory of justice, Sabina Alkire of the United Kingdom on how to use the capability approach in research and policy, Ingrid Robeyns of the Netherlands on how to put the capability approach in practice, and Seeta Prahbu of India on how to conduct development programming from a human development perspective. We look forward to seeing you in Managua in September! The members of the Executive Council of HDCA

2013 ANNUAL CONFERENCE HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND CAPABILITY ASSOCIATION Human Development: Vulnerability, Inclusion and Wellbeing

H

olding the 2013 Annual Conference of the Human Development and Capability Association (HDCA) in Nicaragua, with the Central American University (UCA) as venue, signifies a step forward on the educational trajectory whose genesis lies in the classical spirit, which put forth the good as a fundamental feature in the education of conscience. This is an educational impulse which has highlighted the human in its totality, with academe defined as a place of both word and action. The latter, in the current context and in light of those humanist ethical values we have inherited through 500 years of Ignatian legacy, are made manifest in the rescue of the basic features of the modern social utopia, intended to lead us to peace and development by means of knowledge, justice and solidarity as life experiences. The 2013 Annual HDCA Conference, titled “Human Development: Vulnerability, Inclusion and Wellbeing”, provides an extraordinary opportunity for taking a close look at where we stand today as concerns our daily activities, and to approach, in realistic fashion, this social utopia with an ethical seal, seen through the prism of education, analysis, research and discussion on the most important issues pending as regards the organization of society. The task at hand is to outline a human development paradigm based on new interpersonal and social relationships, in a context of structural complementarity stretching beyond geographic, economic, political, racial boundaries.

This was a vision shared by Father Xabier Gorostiaga, who while he was President of our University, promoted a concept of education as a path toward human development which will one day take shape and bear fruit in Central American social reality. Continuous education is the first condition to achieve such a stage of development. And this is so because it is the best possible instrument to revert the hegemony of a system which, while contributing innovations beneficial to our lives, simultaneously runs counter to the balance needed in the scientific and technological advancement which in turn is necessary to exert a positive influence on the enormous asymmetries existing between countries, regions and social groups. With this shared conviction, the Central American University is proud to open its doors to the world as host of the 2013 Annual Conference of the Human Development and Capability Association, aware that through this space a contribution will be made by the intelligence and heart of all participants, in the creation of new knowledge and approaches which, on one way or another, will exert an influence on public policy and thus situate us, as citizens of the Global South, in a new social context buttressed by the right to justice and freedom. Mayra Luz Pérez Díaz President Central American University Managua, Nicaragua

5


6

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF MAIN SPEAKERS

human development and capability association

7


8

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Amartya Sen

A

martya Sen is Lamont University Professor, and Professor of Economics and Philosophy, at Harvard University and was until recently the Master of Trinity College, Cambridge. He has served as President of the Econometric Society, the Indian Economic Association, the American Economic Association and the International Economic Association. He was formerly Honorary President of OXFAM and is now its Honorary Advisor. Born in Santiniketan, India, Amartya Sen studied at Presidency College in Calcutta, India, and at Trinity College, Cambridge.

He is an Indian citizen. He was Lamont University Professor at Harvard also earlier, from1988 – 1998, and previous to that he was the Drummond Professor of Political Economy at Oxford University, and a Fellow of All Souls College (he is now a Distinguished Fellow of All Souls). Prior to that he was Professor of Economics at Delhi University and at the London School of Economics. Amartya Sen’s books have been translated into more than thirty languages, and include Collective Choice and Social Welfare (1970), On Economic Inequality (1973, 1997), Poverty and Famines (1981), Choice, Welfare and Measurement (1982), Resources, Values and Development (1984), On Ethics and Economics (1987), The Standard of Living (1987), Inequality Reexamined (1992), Development as Freedom (1999), and Rationality and Freedom (2002),the Argumentative Indian (2005), and Identity and Violence: The Illusion of Destiny (2006), among others. His research has ranged over a number of fields in economics, philosophy, and decision theory, including social choice theory, welfare economics, theory of measurement, development economics, public health, gender studies, moral and political philosophy, and the economics of peace and war. Amartya Sen has received honorary doctorates from major universities in North America, Europe, Asia and Africa. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the American Philosophical Society. Among the awards he has received are the “Bharat Ratna” (the highest honour awarded by the President of India); the Senator Giovanni Agnelli International Prize in Ethics; the Alan Shawn Feinstein World Hunger Award; the Edinburgh Medal; the Brazilian Ordem do Merito Cientifico (Grã-Cruz); the Presidency of the Italian Republic Medal; the Eisenhower Medal; Honorary Companion of Honour (U.K.); The George C. Marshall Award, and the Nobel Prize in Economics. (Biography taken from http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~phildept/sen.html)

9


10

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

She has chaired the American Philosophical Association’s Committee on International Cooperation, the Committee on the Status of Women, and the Committee for Public Philosophy. In 1999-2000 she was one of the three Presidents of the Association, delivering the Presidential Address in the Central Division. Ms. Nussbaum has been a member of the Council of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the Board of the American Council of Learned Societies. She received the Brandeis Creative Arts Award in Non-Fiction for 1990, and the PEN Spielvogel-Diamondstein Award for the best collection of essays in 1991; Cultivating Humanity won the Ness Book Award of the Association of American Colleges and Universities in 1998, and the Grawemeyer Award in Education in 2002. Sex and Social Justice won the book award of the North American Society for Social Philosophy in 2000. Hiding From Humanity won the Association of American University Publishers Professional and Scholarly Book Award for Law in 2004. She has received honorary degrees from over forty colleges and universities in the U. S., Canada, Asia, Africa, and Europe, including Grinnell College, Williams College, the University of Athens (Greece), the University of St. Andrews (Scotland), the University of Edinburgh (Scotland), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium), the University of Toronto, the Ecole Normale Supérieure (Paris), the New School University, the University of Haifa, Emory University, the University of Bielefeld (Germany), Ohio State University, Georgetown University, and the University of the Free State (South Africa).

Martha Nussbaum

M

artha Nussbaum received her BA from NYU and her MA and PhD from Harvard. She has taught at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford Universities. From 1986 to 1993, Ms. Nussbaum was a research advisor at the World Institute for Development Economics Research, Helsinki, a part of the United Nations University.

She received the Grawemeyer Award in Education in 2002, the Barnard College Medal of Distinction in 2003, the Radcliffe Alumnae Recognition Award in 2007, and the Centennial Medal of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University in 2010. She is an Academician in the Academy of Finland. In 2009 she won the A.SK award from the German Social Science Research Council (WZB) for her contributions to “social system reform,” and the American Philosophical Society’s Henry M. Phillips Prize in Jurisprudence. In 2012 she was awarded the Prince of Asturias Prize in the Social Sciences.

Professor Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, appointed in the Law School and Philosophy Department. She is an Associate in the Classics Department, the Divinity School, and the Political Science Department, a Member of the Committee on Southern Asian Studies, and a Board Member of the Human Rights Program. Her publications include Aristotle’s De Motu Animalium (1978), The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy (1986, updated edition 2000), Love’s Knowledge (1990), The Therapy of Desire (1994), Poetic Justice (1996), For Love of Country (1996), Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education (1997), Sex and Social Justice (1998), Women and Human Development (2000), Upheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of Emotions (2001), Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law (2004), Frontiers of Justice:Disability, Nationality, Species Membership (2006), The Clash Within: Democracy, Religious Violence, and India’s Future (2007), Liberty of Conscience: In Defense of America’s Tradition of Religious Equality (2008), From Disgust to Humanity: Sexual Orientation and Constitutional Law (2010), Not For Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities (2010), Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach (2011), The New Religious Intolerance: Overcoming the Politics of Fear in an Anxious Age (2012), and Philosophical Interventions: Book Reviews 1985-2011 (2012). She has also edited fifteen books. Her current book in progress is Political Emotions: Why Love Matters for Justice, which will be published by Harvard in 2013. Education: BA, 1969, New York University; MA, 1971, PhD, 1975, Harvard University (Biography taken from http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/nussbaum)

11


12

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

J

osé Antonio Ocampo is Professor of Professional Practice, Director of the Economic and Political Development Concentration at and a Member of the Committee on Global Thought at Columbia University. He also currently heads a Commission to review the activities of the International Monetary Fund’s Independent Evaluation Office. In 2008-2010, he served as co-director of the UNDP/OAS Project on “Agenda for a Citizens’ Democracy in Latin America”, and in 2009 as a Member of the Commission of Experts of the UN General Assembly on Reforms of the International Monetary and Financial System.

Sir Tony Atkinson

S

ir Tony Atkinson is a Fellow of Nuffield College, of which he was Warden from 1994 to 2005. He is currently Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics. He has been President of the Royal Economic Society, of the Econometric Society, of the European Economic Association, and of the International Economic Association. He has served in the UK on the Royal Commission on the Distribution of Income and Wealth, the Pension Law Review Committee, and the Commission on Social Justice. He was responsible for the Atkinson Review of Measurement of Government Output. He has been a member of the Conseil d’Analyse Economique, advising the French Prime Minister, and of the European Statistics Governance Advisory Board, appointed by the EU Council of Ministers. He was knighted on 2001 for services to economics, and is a Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur. His most recent books are The Changing Distribution of Earnings in OECD Countries, Top incomes: A global perspective (edited with T Piketty), and Income and living conditions in Europe (edited with E Marlier). Biography taken from http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/economics/people/atkinson.htm

Joshua Cohen

J

oshua Cohen is Marta Sutton Weeks Professor of Ethics in Society and professor of political science, philosophy, and law. Cohen is also program leader for the Program on Global Justice at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, where he is a principal investigator in the program on Liberation Technology. A political theorist trained in philosophy, Cohen has written on issues of democratic theory, particularly deliberative democracy and the implications for personal liberty, freedom of expression, and campaign finance. He has also written on global justice, including the foundations of human rights, distributive fairness, and supranational democratic governance. Among his recent publications are Philosophy, Politics, Democracy (Harvard University Press, 2009); Rousseau: A Free Community of Equals (Oxford University Press); The Arc of the Moral Universe and Other Essays (Harvard University Press, 2011); and “Establishment, Exclusion, and Democracy’s Public Reason.” He is also editor of Boston Review, a bi-monthly magazine of political, cultural, and literary ideas, and a member of the Apple University faculty. biography taken from https://politicalscience.stanford.edu/faculty/joshua-cohen

José Antonio Ocampo (To be Confirmed) Publications: The Economic Development of Latin America since Independence, with Luis Bértola (2012). Oxford Handbook of Latin American Economics, edited with Jaime Ros (2011). Development Cooperation in Times of Crisis, edited with José Antonio Alonso (2012) Time for a Visible Hand: Lessons from the 2008 World Financial Crisis, edited with Stephany Griffith-Jones and Joseph E. Stiglitz (2010). Growth and Policy in Developing Countries: A Structuralist Approach, with Lance Taylor and Codrina Rada (2009).

Prior to his appointment, Ocampo served in a number of positions in the United Nations and the Government of Colombia, most notably as United Nations UnderSecretary General for Economic and Social Affairs; Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC); Minister of Finance and Public Credit and Chairman of the Board of Banco del República (Central Bank of Colombia); Director of the National Planning Department (Minister of Planning); Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, and Executive Director of FEDESARROLLO. Ocampo has published extensively on macroeconomic theory and policy, international financial issues, economic and social development, international trade, global economic governance, and Colombian and Latin American economic history. Ocampo received his BA in economics and sociology from the University of Notre Dame in 1972 and his PhD in economics from Yale University in 1976. He served as Professor of Economics at Universidad de los Andes and of Economic History at the National University of Colombia, as well as visiting Professor at Universities of Cambridge, Oxford and Yale. He has received a number of personal honors and distinctions, including the 2012 Jaume Vivens Vives Prize for the best book on Spanish and Latin American economic history of the biennium 2010-11, the 2008 Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought and the 1988 Alejandro Angel Escobar National Science Award of Colombia. http://sipa.columbia.edu/academics/directory/jao2128-fac.html

13


14

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

George Gray Molina

G

eorge Gray Molina is Chief Economist for UNDPLatin America and the Caribbean, based in New York. As an Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow, his research focused on pockets of economic growth in low-growth economies. Before coming to Oxford, George was the coordinator of the Human Development Report at UNDP in Bolivia, director of the Unit for Economic Policy Analysis (UDAPE) at the Bolivian Ministry of the Presidency, and director of the Catholic University’s Public Policy Masters Programme. He cofounded a think tank on green development in Bolivia (Instituto Alternativo) and was a research partner of Oxford’s Centre for Research on Inequality, Ethnicity and Human Security (CRISE) as well as a member of the Inter-American Dialogue in Washington DC. George is co-editor of Tensiones Irresueltas, Bolivia, pasado y presente with Laurence Whitehead and John Crabtree (Plural 2010), La otra frontera (UNDP 2009), El estado del Estado (UNDP 2007), La economia mas alla del gas (UNDP 2005) and author of a number of articles on politics, economics and development. He has a Dphil from the University of Oxford (Politics), an MPP degree from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government (Public Policy) and a BA from Cornell University (Economics and Anthropology).

(Biography taken from http://www.globaleconomicgovernance.org/dr-george-graymolina-oxford-princeton-global-leaders-fellow)

Using the Capability Approach 1 Sabina Alkire OPHI, Oxford

T

he focal question of the Conference that gave rise to this volume was how Amartya Sen’s capability approach, which appears to have captured the interest of many, could be put to use in confronting poverties and injustices systematically and at a significant level. The often-discussed issue beneath that question is whether the research sparked by the capability approach gives rise to more effective practical methodologies to address pressing social problems. Of course ensuing applications are not the only grounds on which to examine a proposition -its theoretical implications, its measurability, or its conceptual coherence might also be fruitfully examined, for example. This article has been taken from Maitreyee, the e-bulletin of HDCA, of October 2008.

15


Revista Enfoque 29

16

Measurability, or its conceptual coherence might also be fruitfully examined, for example. The extent to which specific applications and techniques embody the conceptual approach – their accuracy and limitations – might also be of interest. But in the context of poverty and justice it would appear directly relevant to evaluate concrete applications and consequences, whatever else we also examine. Such a sharp focus might generate anxiety. For even if income approaches to poverty reduction shed but a pale light on the subject, it may be that, after scrutiny, we must concede that the capability approach in practice can do no better – or, perhaps, that we do not yet know. Yet this seems a necessary question. Many have been attracted to the ‘promise’ that the capability approach and Development as Freedom seem to hold. Some writings assert its benefits (at times with rather more enthusiasm than evidence) or suggest that the approach be extended in a particular direction, or respond to certain pressing questions. The studies in this volume often demonstrate a more constructive and proactive tack. They view the capability approach as a work in progress, develop various applications of it, critically examine which insights various techniques embody, and/or debate whether and how these analyses demonstrably differ from alternative approaches. If this matter-offact methodology is adopted, it does not matter one whit whether the authors of such research were ostensibly ‘critical of’ Sen’s capability approach or appeared to harbor some affection for it. The valueadded of the capability approach in comparison with alternative approaches would be (or fail to be) evident in the empirical analyses and applications and policies to which it gives rise – indeed in the capabilities that were (or were not) expanded. The proof would be in the pudding.While the demand for exquisite pudding seems inexhaustible, the demand for a more robust approach to poverty reduction is not too feeble either. There seems to be a confluence of political and intellectual forces seeking to advance development activities in ways not unsympathetic to the capability approach.

Revista Enfoque 29

For example some development agencies, NGOs, and governments are sustaining their support for the Millennium Declaration and associated Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – in which poverty is defined as multidimensional, and encompasses a range of functionings rather than income alone. Some national poverty reduction strategies are harnessing democratic public debate about priorities and processes, and including the poor in the debate. Some direct poverty reduction activities seek to empower poor persons to be active agents in social and political structures, as well as within the home. However imperfect the initiatives are that advance the MDGs, democratic practices, or empowerment (for example), they signal that there might be a demand for adequate applications of the capability approach. Further, they signal the value of using the approach well, lest the practical applications settle for something less. However, the focal question is actually quite difficult to assess: does the research sparked by the capability approach give rise to more effective practical methodologies to address significant social problems. More to the point, the question might be mistakenly construed. The difficulty in part relates to the different views of what in fact the capability approach is – for there are broader and narrower interpretations of it – and what aspects of it various applications or techniques instantiate. It also overlooks some lacunae in the approach, where it needs to borrow from other areas of research or where cross-fertilization with parallel new literature has not yet taken place. But most of all, the question, in the commonly articulated way that I have phrased it, is not actually an appropriate question for assessing the capability approach – at least not when this is understood as an evaluative framework. Rather, the question is, itself, a fundamental application of the capability approach. A primary evaluative role of the capability approach is precisely to assess which of two states of affairs have expanded human freedoms to a greater extent or what kinds of freedoms they have, respectively, expanded (or contracted). Is the capability approach a baker or a taster; a pudding-maker, or the puddings’ judge?

This is the first section of the introductory chapter ‘Using the Capability Approach: Prospective and Evaluative Analyses’ published in Sabina Alkire and Mozaffar Qizilbash (eds), The Capability Approach: Concepts, Measures and Applications (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008). We thank Cambridge University Press for kind permission for reproduction of this extract in Maitreyee. 1

The Capability Approach as a Theory of Justice: Clarifications and Challenges Krushil Watene University of Auckland

T

heories of social and global justice constitute an important and influential body of work in contemporary political philosophy. Concerned with how we ought to distribute the benefits and burdens within and between societies – and concerned with asking what social arrangements can be justified – theories of justice diverge on some key questions: 1) On what grounds are principles justified?; 2) What principles are they?; 3) What should the metric of justice be?; 4) Who is obligated to pursue and to realise just social arrangements?; 5) What is the scope of justice?; and 6) What are the relevant units of concern? (Robeyns, 2011).

This article has been taken from Maitreyee, the e-bulletin of HDCA, of September 2011.

17


18

Revista Enfoque 29

While a number of different theories arise on the back of these questions, the work of John Rawls remains most prominent. John Rawls’ contractarian approach continues to influence much of the most recent discussions of social and global justice – including the recent work of Martha Nussbaum and Amartya Sen (Nussbaum 2006, Sen 2009). Indeed, Nussbaum and Sen’s articulations of the capability approach in light of issues of justice, has generated quite a bit of discussion about what contribution (if any) the capability approach is able to make to this body of work. Nussbaum’s approach – a partial theory of justice and which departs in important ways from Rawls – has generated discussion on whether the CA is able to produce a viable alternative to social contract theories of justice (Freeman 2006, Mendus 2008). Amartya Sen’s recent work critiquing Rawls’ ‘transcendental approach’ to justice in favour of a ‘comparative approach’ has generated questions around the kind of theory of justice Sen’s CA really is, and (perhaps more significantly) whether it is a theory of justice at all (Broome 2009). More generally, interest in the CA to justice has led to the publication of a recent and important volume of essays comparing the CA with the primary goods approach as the metric of social justice, and to an overview of what the CA needs to be developed into a full theory of justice (Brighouse and Robeyns, 2010).

Revista Enfoque 29

Much more discussion about the CA as a theory of justice is required to truly appreciate what contribution the approach is able to make to this body of work. As such, this Maitreyee brings together short papers that aim to provide insights for clarifying important aspects of the CA and in highlighting how new challenges are able to move the approach forward. One of the strengths of the CA is that it does not and need not buy into any particular approach or starting point for justice. Indeed, the two most prominent approaches are proof of how very different capability theories are able to develop from very different foundations. This means that proponents of the CA are able to create new approaches to problems and to review old ones. It provides us with space to develop and to redevelop new ways forward on significant social and global challenges. References. Brighouse, H. and I. Robeyns (eds) (2010), Measuring Justice: Primary Goods and Capabilities, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Broome, John (2010), ‘Is this Truly and Idea of Justice?’, Journal of Human Development and Capabilities,11(4). Freeman, Samuel (2006), ‘Frontiers of Justice: The Capabilities Approach vs. Contractarianism: Book Review’, Texas Law Review, 85(2):385-430. Mendus, Susan (2008), ‘Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership: Book Review’, Modernism/Modernity, 15(1):214215.

How has the Capability Approach been put into 2 Practice? This article provides a brief and partial survey of relatively recent attempts to put the capability approach into practice3. What kind of questions can be and have been answered using this framework? Do we have any evidence that the capability approach is making a difference to empirical studies or policy evaluations, or is having an impact as the basis for a critique of social arrangements? This article has been taken from Maitreyee, the e-bulletin of HDCA, of October 2008.

Ingrid Robeyns Erasmus University Rotterdam

19


Revista Enfoque 29

20

Revista Enfoque 29

Three theoretical specifications Ingrid Robeyns Erasmus University Rotterdam This article has been taken from Maitreyee, the e-bulletin of HDCA, of October 2008.

T

he capability approach is a broad normative framework for the evaluation and assessment of individual wellbeing and social arrangements, the design of policies, and proposals about societal change. It can be used to empirically assess aspects of an individual’s or groups’ wellbeing, such as inequality or poverty. It can also be used as an alternative to mainstream costbenefit analysis, or as a framework to develop and evaluate policies, ranging from welfare state design in affluent societies, to development policies by governments and nongovernmental organisations in developing countries. It can also be used as a normative basis for social and political criticism. The capability approach is not a theory that can explain poverty, inequality or well-being; instead, it provides concepts and a framework that can help to conceptualize and evaluate these phenomena. The capability approach in practice comes in a variety of forms, in part because of the wide scope of the approach, but also because the approach is radically underspecified: there are a number of theoretical lacunae that can be filled in a variety of ways.

How one makes these specifications depends in part on the kind of theory (for example, a theory of justice, or a theory of welfare economics), or the kind of application (for example, a critique on existing social practices, or a measurement exercise), but it also depends in part on particular normative and epistemological assumptions. Three theoretical specifications have emerged from the literature as particularly important: the choice between functionings and capabilities, the selection of relevant capabilities, and the issue of weighting the different capabilities for an overall assessment (also known as the question of indexing or trade-offs).

The capability approach in practice How has the capability approach been put into practice? It is important to stress that not all applications of the capability approach require empirical research techniques. Some applications are based on analytical reasoning or critical analysis.

This is an extract of an article that appeared in the Journal of Political Philosophy, Volume 14, Number 3, 2006, pp. 351-76. It has been condensed by Séverine Deneulin. 3 In recent years the applied capability literature has been booming, and hence there have been a significant number of post-2006 applications that are not included in this survey. 2

But many applications of the capability approach do rest on new empirical analysis, and therefore require the use of empirical research techniques. Not surprisingly, given the wide scope of capability applications and the highly multiand interdisciplinary character of this literature, a wide variety of empirical research techniques have been used (Kuklys, 2005). The main measurement techniques that have been explored so far are descriptive statistics of single indicators, scaling, fuzzy sets theory, factor analysis, principle component analysis, and structural equation modelling. Before embarking on a review of the actual applications, let us ask how the quantitative applications deal with the above theoretical specifications. The first observation is that virtually all the quantitative applications are using existing datasets. None of these data have been collected with the aim of measuring functionings. While most of these surveys are very rich in the range of domains on which they include information, these data are not collected with the aim of capturing people’s functionings wellbeing, let alone their capabilities.

The second and third theoretical specifications discussed above have been dealt with in more detail in the measurement literature. If an empirical application employs descriptive analysis, scaling, or fuzzy sets theory, both the selection of relevant functionings and the choice of the relative weights can be theoretically underpinned. But unfortunately, most measurement studies do not spend any time explaining and scrutinizing the normative underpinnings of the statistical techniques they use, and are writing for a narrow readership of fellow econometricians and statisticians.Some studies have also used qualitative empirical techniques. Alkire (2002) has used participatory methods both for the selection of the functionings, and also for the assessment of well-being changes. Qualitative methods have also been used in a recent study on deprivation in affluent societies by Wolff and de-Shalit (2007). In order to find out which capabilities are important to assess the wellbeing of the disadvantaged in society, they conducted interviews with disadvantaged people, but also with the ‘experts’ who are dedicated to improving their quality of life.

How has the capability approach been applied? I now proceed to describing some of the questions that have been addressed using the capability approach, grouped under the different themes that the capability approach in practice has covered so far:

21


22

Revista Enfoque 29

-General assessments of the human development of countries: Sen (1985) pointed out that while the GNP per capita of Brazil and Mexico was more than seven times the GNP per capita of India, China and Sri Lanka, functionings performance in terms of life expectancy, infant mortality and child death rates was most favourable in Sri Lanka, better in China than in India, and better in Mexico than in Brazil. Since 1990, the UNDP has adopted such basic insights from the capability approach in its annual Human Development Reports. - Assessing small-scale development projects: Alkire (2002) developed a capability analysis as an alternative for standard cost-benefit analyses of three poverty reduction projects in Pakistan: goat rearing, female literacy classes, and rose garland production. She assessed these projects in terms of how capabilityenhancing they were, and compared her evaluations with standard monetary evaluations. - Identifying the poor in developing countries: Several quantitative empirical studies have investigated, both in micro and macro settings, how many functionings-poor people there are, and whether they are the same people identified by an income-poverty measure. The majority of these poverty studies use household surveys, and focus on one country only (Ruggeri Laderchi, 1999; Klasen, 2000; Qizilbash, 2002) - Poverty and wellbeing assessment in advanced economies: Several studies have investigated the number and demographic profile of the poor in advanced economies, or have assessed well-being trends. Alessandro Balestrino (1996) analyzed whether a sample of officially poor people are functioningspoor (that is, education, nutrition or health failure), income poor, or both. Shelley Phipps (2002) made a comparison of the wellbeing of children in Canada, Norway and the USA, using equivalent household incomes and ten functionings. - Deprivation of disabled people: Disabled people suffer from at least two types of material disadvantages: they earn less income than the non-disabled, and because of their special needs they need more income to achieve similar functionings, for example to buy a wheelchair. The first disadvantage would be captured by any standard monetary income comparison, but the second would not.

Revista Enfoque 29

Zaidi and Burchardt (2005) make use of standard techniques in welfare economics to account for the fact that the disabled are disadvantaged in converting income into material wellbeing. - Assessing gender inequalities: In his first set of empirical illustrations of how he envisioned the capability approach in practice, Sen (1985) examined gender discrimination in India. He found that females have worse achievements than males for a number of functionings, including age-specific mortality rates, malnutrition and morbidity. The capability approach has also been used to assess gender inequality in advanced economies (Chiappero-Martinetti, 2003; Robeyns, 2003). - Debating policies: The capability approach has also been used to discuss and empirically assess policies, such as educational policies or the principles for welfare state reform. For example, Schokkaert and Van Ootegem (1990) showed that compensating the Belgian unemployed for their income-loss does not help in alleviating all their functionings deprivations. - Critiquing and assessing social norms, practices and discourses: For example, a social norm may induce certain behaviour that restricts people’s capability sets or privileges some group’s capabilities at the expense of other groups. Or certain claims made in public discourse may be criticized if one broadens the informational basis, or if one shifts the focus from purely material resources to a broad range of capabilities - Functionings and capabilities as concepts in nonnormative research: The concepts of functionings and capabilities can also be used in a non-normative setting, for example in ethnographic research, or as concepts in explanatory analysis. In addition to these nine different types of capability applications, there are also a very large number of studies that look at one specific capability, such as education or health or nutrition. These studies often challenge a more narrow economic efficiencyrational by pointing at the (unintended) side effects of particular policies on people’s capabilities. 4See Anand and van Hees (2006) for an application of the capability approach in the UK context.

Concluding remarks What do we conclude from this survey? Putting the capability approach into practice is not a straightforward exercise, since the capability approach is radically underspecified. The capability applications surveyed in this article indicated that current applications of the capability approach arrive at different measurement results and evaluations than the standard approaches that focus on income-based metrics. In addition, the theoretical framework also offers different foundations for policy proposals, and can be a helpful component in the critique of social norms, practices and arrangements. However, caution is needed: the capability approach still struggles with some problems that other evaluative frameworks face, and should not be seen as a framework that is superior to other frameworks in each and every application. Instead, its relative usefulness often depends on the kind of question being addressed. Moreover, capability applications should in many cases not be seen as supplanting other approaches, but instead as providing complementary insights to the more established approaches. References Alkire, Sabina. 2002. Valuing Freedoms. New York: Oxford University Press. Anand, Paul and Martin van Hees. 2006. Capabilities and achievements: an empirical study. The Journal of Socio-Economics, 35, 268–84. Balestrino, Alessandro. 1996. A note on functionings-poverty in affluent societies. Notizie di Politeia, 12, 97–105. Chiappero-Martinetti, Enrica. 2003. Unpaid work and household well-being. In Antonella Picchio (ed.), Unpaid Work and the Economy: A Gender Analysis of the Standards of Living. London: Routledge. Klasen, Stephan. 2000. Measuring poverty and deprivation in South-Africa. Review of Income and Wealth, 46, 33–58. Kuklys, Wiebke. 2005. Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach: Theoretical Insights and Empirical Applications. Berlin: Springer Verlag. Phipps, Shelley. 2002. The well-being of young Canadian children in international perspective: a functionings approach. Review of Income and Wealth, 48, 493–515. Qizilbash, Mozaffar. 2002. A note on the measurement of poverty and vulnerability in the South African context. Journal of International Development, 14, 757–72. Robeyns, Ingrid. 2003. Sen’s capability approach and gender inequality: selecting relevant capabilities. Feminist Economics, 9, 61–92. Ruggeri Laderchi, Caterina. 1999. The many dimensions of deprivation in Peru. Queen Elizabeth House Working Paper Series, 29. Schokkaert, Erik and Luc Van Ootegem. 1990. Sen’s concept of the living standard applied to the Belgian unemployed. Recherches Economiques de Louvain, 56, 429–450. Sen, Amartya. 1985. Commodities and Capabilities. Amsterdam: North Holland. Wolff, Jonathan and Avner de-Shalit. 2007. Disadvantage. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Zaidi, Asghar and Tania Burchardt. 2005. Comparing incomes when needs differ: equivalization for the extra cost of disability in the U.K. Review of Income and Wealth, 51, 89–114.

23


24

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Operationalising Human Development: A Programmatic Approach 5 K. Seeta Prabhu

Being able to apply the human development approach in a systematic way to programmes can enhance their on the ground as they break the silos in which government departments and ministries work. The adoption of a more holistic approach can change in fundamental ways the development strategies of governments as well as other actors such as the private sector and civil society.

Examples of using HD This article has been taken from Maitreyee, the e-bulletin of HDCA, of October 2008.

H

uman development is a broad approach that is about enlarging the range of people’s choices. It focuses on enhancing capabilities and freedoms and furthers the agency aspect of individuals. The approach has had far reaching impact on development thinking. A ‘New York Consensus’ on operationalising the human development paradigm was proposed, building on four policy elements of:

• pro-poor economic growth,

This provides framework.

•accelerating social progress,

There are also several initiatives across the globe in evidence based policy making using the Human Development Reports. These may, however, need to be supplemented with a more specific articulation of how one integrates the human development approach in programmes at the operational level.

•expanding political freedoms and participation through political reforms, and accelerating economic and institutional reforms to improve the global environment for poor countries.

5 This article appeared as HD Insight, issue 13, available at http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/hdinsights_oct2007.pdf.

a

very

useful

We could take two areas - poverty reduction and democratic governance which are critical for human development attainments and also the areas in which several bilateral and multilateral agencies are actively supporting programmes across countries. In poverty reduction, for example, the question of equity could lead to advocating for pro-poor, employment led growth and ensuring particularly for women and marginalized sections of the population the access to land, and credit as a right.

25


26

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Operationalising Human Development: A Programmatic The simultaneous emphasis on efficiency Approach would imply that measures to enhance productivity in sectors that provide the poor with livelihoods, e.g. small scale agriculture and micro enterprises, as well as ensuring better coordination of efforts by national governments to address multi-dimensional poverty would be critical. The interventions also need to be efficient in enlarging the choices people have and therefore it is essential to identify choices, examine their pros and cons before embarking on programmes to support them. Attention to participation and empowerment would mean not only involving the poor in design and in implementation, but also ensuring broad- based ownership of poverty reduction initiatives by all the actors, viz., the government, local bodies, private sector and civil society. Sustainability considerations need to be addressed not only in terms of environmental sustainability, but also with respect to growth being rapid enough to reduce absolute poverty and equitable enough to reduce relative poverty and inequalities.

In the realm of democratic governance, the same principles can be applied, although the interventions would be different. Equity could be translated at the very least into creation of a participatory and enabling environment for the poor and adherence to the rule of law. Efficiency/productivity is reflected in the effective functioning of all the actors, particularly government, with respect to implementation and facilitation of pro-poor initiatives. The capability of the government to spend resources meaningfully and towards attainment of propoor goals, and the performance of civil service in implementing propoor policies could also be good indicators. Emphasis on participation would imply the involvement of all actors in development. Promoting policy dialogue, decentralization, and building effective public-privatecommunity partnerships can be tools to ensure participation. Ensuring sustainability could be achieved through capacity development, integrating governance concerns into all initiatives of development and promoting democratic values and systems.

Human UNDP

development

beyond

The human development is based on principles which are specifically aimed at providing support to programmatic interventions. Anyone who believes in the human development approach and its values could adapt these interventions to their purpose. However, the principles of human development are integral to the approach and they need to be adhered to simultaneously. Paying attention to equity at the expense of efficiency, participation and empowerment and sustainability will be self-defeating as will the effort to ensure efficiency without attention being paid to the other three aspects. Implementing human development principles does not go without constraints. The main constraints would be those of time and institutional capacity. Capacity development would need to be an important measure to ensure mainstreaming of human development. Financial resources may also be limited to implement a strategy which requires paying attention to all four principles simultaneously. But these issues are not insurmountable given the commitment to a people-centred development approach.

References Fukuda-Parr, Sakiko, 2003, ‘Operationalsing Amartya Sen’s Ideas on Capabilities, Development, Freedom and Human Rights’, Feminist Economics, 9 (2/3). Jahan, Selim, 2007, ‘Human development, Equality and Economic Growth: Issues and Policies’, paper presented at the Human Development and Capability Association Conference, New York Kaul Inge and Saraswathi Menon, 1993, ‘Human Development- From Concept to Action A 10-Point Agenda’, Occasional Paper No. 7, Human Development Report Office, UNDP UNDP, Colombo Regional Centre, 2006, Asia Pacific Human Development Report 2006, Trade on Human Terms, Macmillan, New Delhi Nussbaum, Martha (2006), Frontiers of Justice, Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press Robeyns, Ingrid (2011), ‘The Capability Approach’, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, http://plato.stanford. edu/archives/sum2011/entries/capability-approach/ Sen, Amartya (2009), The Idea of Justice, London: Penguin

27


28

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

HDCA 2013 Annual Conference:

Opportunity to reflect upon the kind of country and region we want to build in Nicaragua and in Latin America as a whole

T

he HDCA 2013 Annual Conference to be held in Managua, Nicaragua will be a landmark event in regional academic circles. The Conference will provide a venue where hundreds of people from a variety of cultures and age groups, as well as from a wide range of disciplines, can share their common interest in getting to know, learning and sharing human development experiences from other parts of the world. Few events as important as this conference seem to have taken place or are likely to take place in Nicaragua. The presence of intellectuals and thinkers of international calibre such as Amartya Sen, Marta Nussbaum, and Sabina Alkire, among many others, will provide an opportunity to reflect upon issues that are relevant to the well-being of Nicaraguans and other Latin American populations. Thus, we should seize the opportunity this event presents. The various activities involved in preparing and holding the HDCA 2013 Annual Conference also offer the chance to make known the status of development in Latin America and specifically in Nicaragua, as well as the challenges that lay ahead for the region. Getting acquainted with other people´s life experiences or the impact of public policies designed from a human development perspective may be of help in finding shorter routes to further advance human development – understood as more than mere growth of GDP in our countries. The HDCA 2013 Annual Conference will be held at the Universidad Centroamericana (UCA), a prestigious university in Nicaragua that has been the recipient of international awards in a number of fields. The Conference will provide a platform for practitioners and scholars, as well as representatives of governments and of civil society organisations to meet from 9 to 12 September in Managua, Nicaragua with the aim of reflecting upon the kind of country and region we want to build in Nicaragua and in Latin America as a whole.

29


30

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Holding the HDCA 2013 Annual Conference,

“Human Development: Vulnerability, Inclusion and Well-being�

Latin America is at a particular stage in its history. On the one hand, it is the most unequal region in the world, with high rates of violence resulting from the proliferation of organised crime and high exposure to drug trafficking (specifically in Central America); environmental vulnerability due to its geographical location and the effects of climate change have worsened the lack of opportunities for a wide segment of the population who live in conditions of exclusion.

Maria Rosa Renzi Human development office coordinator UNDP- Nicaragua

On the other hand, the region is undergoing a demographic transition. Youths are estimated to make up a fourth of the total population and a higher percentage in Central America (particularly in Nicaragua and Honduras). The implementation of sound macroeconomic policies has allowed the region to recover rapidly from the negative impact of the financial crisis of 2008-2009, and even to maintain a significant pace of economic growth. Progress has been made in education and access to food and to health care, thus increasing life expectancy and reducing such diseases as TB and malaria, as well as significantly improving control of HIV-AIDS, among other advances.

within a context that is both positive and negative, as described above, will offer a suitable platform for development scholars to meet and discuss the complex reality in which we live. Indeed, the previous HDCA conferences have provided opportunities for shared reflections and theories, as well as practices in such fields of development as education, health care, rural development, and access to productive assets, as well as inequalities due to gender, age, and ethnicity. Other related areas include sustainable human development, effectiveness of public programmes aimed at reducing poverty and inequality, measurement of poverty or deprivation, and thematic group studies (i.e. children, women, and indigenous peoples, to mention a few).

The human development and capability approach points out that GDP growth is not enough for people to enjoy the benefits it supposedly conveys. For people to be and do according to their perceived reality and their aspirations a great deal more is required, more specifically equal opportunities and equal outcomes to effectively achieve human development based on the effective exercise of human rights and their enjoyment. We expect the event in Managua, Nicaragua to help us find a way to design public policies that lead to sustainable human development in Nicaragua and in all other Latin American countries. The goal is to advance through proper policy implementation and follow-up the kind of human development that can be shared and felt by our respective populations, instead of development that is measured using indexes or national and sub-regional statistics. Maria Rosa Renzi

31


32

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Jakarta: A window to the global human development agenda

I

ndonesia is a country of captivating contrasts, which will grip you the moment you set foot in Jakarta, its capital city. These contrasts draw your attention as you head from the airport to the hotel in a Blue Bird latest model Mercedes Benz taxi cab (typically found in the city). At first sight Jakarta seems as crowded as a beehive, with imposing buildings and industrial areas, in contrast with the conditions of poverty in which thousands of Indonesians live. As has been occurring in other cities in the Malay Peninsula, Jakarta’s contemporary urban design has been changing into an investor-friendly city for big Western investors. Thus, all public signs in the city, including its public ornamentation, parks, roads, malls, and surrounding areas, are written in English. Menus are usually in English in Jakarta’s countless restaurants, while the local language is conspicuously absent. Store clerks, bar employees and people working in other city services, largely migrants from the country’s interior, have limited or no knowledge of English for the most part and usually resort to a distorted form of English used locally. They “tropicalize” English words as is done in other countries, to facilitate communication with foreign visitors.

Guillermo Bornemann Dean of the School of Economic Science Universidad Centroamericana

The crowd walking through the multicoloured streets of Jakarta cannot go unnoticed to tourists. People are used to act with their bodies (body-machine language) to make and edge their way forward through the crowd while causing the least possible offense, courteously respectful in the midst of chaos, something unthinkable in Nicaragua. We should be Christian at home and Buddhist in the street.1 1 Buddhism in Indonesia was predominant until the introduction of Islam. today it is estimated that 2.3% of the population practices Buddhism

Jakarta was the venue for the recent conference of the Human Development and Capability Association (HDCA) held last September. The need to evaluate pending matters in their model of development – where disproportionate urban growth coexists with impoverished and unattractive rural conditions – seems to be reflected in the slogan selected by the local organising committee, “Revisiting Development: Do we assess it correctly?” and portrays the challenge posed by that reality to the current and future configuration of the city and its services.

33


34

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

“green revolution” Thirty-nine countries from all over the world were represented at the three-day conference. The 171 presentations, including state-of-the-art development, new methodological ideas and approaches, as well as the results of innovative methods already tested in other fields of science, gave a window to the world. All conference participants had access to a menu from which to select an option. Presentations were organised into 33 themes related to human development and made of the event an impressive international showcase. During the short breaks between sessions, participants of different nationalities manifested their eagerness to make the most of this opportunity by being on time to as many activities as possible. A comment everyone shared at the end of each day was the need to carefully plan the events they attended, so as to avoid feeling guilt for choosing one topic over another – and paying the cost of opportunity for the trade-off. The conference took place with a significant number of participants (close to 300) and a tight programme of activities, including keynote lectures and breakout sessions, in order to facilitate interaction among attendees.

Therefore, panel discussions and analysis of keynote

lectures were organised. A very particular feature of the conference dynamics was that “keynote lecturers” did not limit themselves to their scheduled keynote address but could also be seen enlivening other panel discussions, promoting debate, and engaging in conversation with students and scholars who would eagerly look for an opportunity to hear their views from a more personal perspective or simply out of admiration or desire to shake their hand. After the morning keynote lecture, there would be presentations of academic research, especially devoted to analyse policies and programmes in Indonesia (the host country). This impressed a particular and very original mark upon the conference with regard to the country’s great concerns related to human development. Presentations by Martha Nussbaum, Tony Atkinson, Sabina Alkire, Kaushik Basu, and Frances Stewart, among others, held the audience spellbound during the event by positioning the themes on which they are experts of international calibre, fostering debate, and encouraging reflection among participants given the significance of the ideas expounded.

Basu and other speakers at the conference gave emphasis to behavioural issues by skilfully approaching human productivity in terms of punctuality, rationality, and the local culture of human groups. It was impressive the skill with which these authors articulated such issues as industrial organisation, ethics and measurements in an aggregate manner to explain productive behaviour. Ethics was one of the core themes that generated special interest at the conference, though not in a predetermined way; rather, there was a certain natural complicity to approach the theme from the specialty areas of speakers concerning issues related to empowerment, democracy and human development. David Crocker showed perfect theoretical-instrumental command of philosophical categories in the field of ethics and their application to the real world. He also shared and coordinated participation in parallel thematic presentations linked to empowerment and gender in development. The interdisciplinary nature of presentations was evident; teams of PhD students and professors/ researchers from several research centres showed the results of C02 measurements compared between cities in South Asia and the response of communities to the transfer of environmentally-friendly technology. They used experimental models to determine the impact it has on emission reduction and its correlation with improved environmental and living conditions in the communities. This kind of approaches required a complicated econometric analysis associated with interventions in development projects. Along the same line of environmental analysis, members of several think tanks, largely European, kept constantly active and interested in issues related to climate change and food security. The themes addressed reflected concern for building scenarios that would decrease the uncertainty of local authorities and actors as regards the population under threat from natural disasters and their impact on food provision. Thus, the main topics to be addressed in subsequent conferences have been put forth. For the main, these are proposals aimed at creating systems at local level that contribute to improving physical planning and strengthening the food supply chain.

The conference provided conditions to offer a natural policy space and received very convincing support from the US Agency for International Development (AID) as both sponsor of the event and in positioning themes as presenters in that region of the world. AID’s approaches to agriculture development and value added agriculture products by means of agribusiness chains were similar to its anchor company model strategy in Nicaragua. During its interventions I thought at times that AID was making an apology of the need for another “ g r e e n r e v o l u t i o n ” to feed a growing and hungry population, as well as to provide new opportunities in rural areas. However, these words have a negative connotation for Latin Americans, as we watched how this model of high inputs and dependence on technological packages did not bring any benefit to farmers. In Indonesia, as in other unequal regions of the world, rural areas are neglected, as is agricultural production. AID laid emphasis on the lack of vitality of the rural social and economic fabric, and on the need to link collective investment in productive undertakings such as stockpiling and commercialisation centres, agri-business processing, local transportation and infrastructure, among others, in order to revitalise rural areas. Regional UNDP representatives and officials from its New York office also attended the event. The keynote lecture by José Pineda is worth pointing out given his superb methodological skills and good management of conceptual and quantitative tools to analyse poverty. He prompted us to reflect on the fact that our concerns are more common than we think by showing us the progress made in new measurement tools promoted by UNDP. As regards the foregoing, the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) held a workshop to build local capacity of scholars and practitioners on the innovative method of multidimensional measurement. The various themes were linked through workshops, presentations and keynote sessions, making evident the impact of the multidimensional approach on the world academic community by adopting this approach towards empowerment, governance and democracy, as well as to conducting a critical review of efforts made in the struggle against poverty.

35


36

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

It drew my attention that no mention was made of economic issues addressing in depth the way world economy is being conducted, the current crisis and the consumption model, though reference was made to the global crisis, at least in those presentations I was able to attend. Maybe this is an unresolved matter to be discussed in subsequent conferences. A fascinating feature of the conference was that it allowed for engaging in dialogue and informal exchange between plenary meetings. The long hallways of the old Indonesian Palace where the event took place were abuzz with conversation, giving the impression of a bee hive in spring. Lunch or coffee breaks in mid-morning or afternoon provided a brief space for students, cooperation agents, government officials, scholars and researchers to engage in a lively exchange over the topics presented. These gatherings offered opportunities to exchange business cards and shake hands. In sum, the conference provided a natural enabling environment for new cooperation networks and served as a vehicle to forge alliances between development organisations, universities and governments. All sorts of opinions were expressed in a context of academic courtesy, and at the end of each day there was a feeling of shared concern for human development issues and being able to determine how endowed we are with methodological tools to face its complexities in each of our respective realities. As Central Americans, we have grown accustomed to a certain degree of resigned pragmatism vis-à-vis the struggle against poverty. Thus, learning the reality of other cities such as Jakarta, Mexico City, Bombay or Cairo – where population growth and migration have caused disproportionate urban growth and erosion of local governance – lead us to reflect upon the dimension of our commitment and resolve to reduce inequalities and increase opportunities, so as to improve the standard of living of our local populations. Jakarta has brought forward the world’s concern for the status of human development, the environment, the economy and social rights in general. The conference has encouraged us to effectively forge alliances among all national actors and international cooperation agencies, and to draw up appropriate public policies in order to make it possible to effectively walk the path of development as proposed in the various countries and regions. Jakarta has closed a chapter in the global human development agenda and another one will open up in 2013, when the next HCDA Conference is hosted in a new venue. A proposal has taken shape to hold it in Managua in September 2013 under the logo “Human development: Vulnerability + inclusion = quality of life,” which reflects the challenges that lie ahead of us.

Guillermo Bornemann Dean of the School of Economic Science Universidad Centroamericana

37


38

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

HDCA 2013 Conferencia Anual principales Oradores:

Amartya Sen Universidad de Harvard

Luis Felipe López Calva Banco Mundial

George Gray Molina PNUD- Oficina para América Latina y el Caribe

Martha Nussbaum Universidad de Chicago

José Pineda PNUD – Oficina de Informes sobre Desarrollo Humano

Kaushik Basu Primer Vice Presidente del Banco Mundial

Susan Pick Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Joshua Cohen University of Stanford

José Antonio Ocampo Columbia University, New York (pendiente de confirmar)

Estimados lectores de Enfoque,

L

a Asociación por el Desarrollo Humano y las Capacidades (HDCA) está muy complacida con los preparativos para su conferencia internacional de 2013, que tendrá lugar en Managua del 9 al 12 de septiembre.

La HDCA es una asociación académica fundada en septiembre de 2004 con el objetivo de promover la investigación en temas de justicia social, en un contexto de varias disciplinas como economía, filosofía, sociología, política, antropología, derecho y desarrollo. Sus investigaciones tienen como marco normativo el enfoque de las capacidades humanas cuyo pionero fue el premio Nobel Amartya Sen, quien lo propuso a fines de los años setenta para evaluar la desigualdad desde la perspectiva de las capacidades de una personas más que por su utilidad o ingresos, las mediciones estándar empleadas por los economistas. “El valor del nivel de vida se encuentra en el vivir y no en la posesión de bienes” escribió Sen en 1985, en su libro Commodities and Capabilities. Las capacidades son las oportunidades que tienen las personas para ser o hacer lo que tienen motivo para valorar en la vida, como participar en la vida de la comunidad, ser saludable, tener educación, una alimentación adecuada y una vivienda digna, caminar sin peligro en la calle, gozar de relaciones satisfactorias, llevar a cabo un trabajo significativo, etc. No obstante, muchas personas en el mundo carecen aún hoy de estas oportunidades a pesar de los grandes progresos económicos alcanzados. En la India, por ejemplo, el promedio anual de crecimiento económico ha sido de 5% en los últimos 20 años, pero la mitad de su población infantil carece de oportunidades para ser saludable y sufre de desnutrición, con todas las consecuencias que ya sabemos para su futuro. Lo más probable es que un niño desnutrido no pueda concentrarse en la escuela y obtenga pocos logros educativos, lo cual limitará su capacidad de encontrar empleo seguro más tarde en la vida. La desnutrición infantil también podría causar mayor incidencia de mala salud en la vida adulta. América Latina no queda fuera de esta narrativa política. A pesar de las altas tasas de crecimiento económico en algunos países latinoamericanos, como Nicaragua, muchas personas carecen de oportunidades para vivir bien por razones de género, color de la piel, la familia a la que pertenecen o el lugar donde nacieron. Es probable incluso que algunos grupos experimenten una disminución de oportunidades de vivir mejor, es decir, pérdidas de capacidad. La HDCA espera con ansia la realización de una conferencia estimulante en la Universidad Centroamericana en Managua. La conferencia promete debates de alto nivel sobre vulnerabilidad, inclusión y bienestar, y cómo diseñar mejores políticas para aumentar las oportunidades de que las personas puedan llevar vidas valiosas. Como parte de los preparativos para la conferencia, ofrecemos una breve biografía de los principales oradores, al igual que cuatro colaboraciones de miembros de la HDCA sobre los usos del enfoque de las capacidades para construir un mundo más justo: El enfoque de las capacidades como teoría de la justicia de Krushil Watene de Nueva Zelanda; Utilización del enfoque de las capacidades de Sabina Alkire del Reino Unido; ¿Cómo se ha puesto en práctica el enfoque de las capacidades? de Ingrid Robeyns de Los Países Bajos; Puesta en práctica del desarrollo humano: un enfoque programático de Seeta Prahbu de la India. ¡Les esperamos en Managua, en el mes de septiembre! Consejo Ejecutivo de la HDCA

E ditorial

Tony Atkinson Nuffield College, Universidad de Oxford

39


40

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

2013 CONFERENCIA INTERNACIONAL SOBRE DESARROLLO HUMANO Y ENFOQUE DE CAPACIDADES Desarrollo Humano: Vulnerabilidad, Inclusión y Calidad de Vida

C

on la realización de la IX Conferencia sobre Desarrollo Humano y Enfoque de Capacidades (HDCA) en nuestro país, teniendo a la Universidad Centroamericana (UCA) como sede, damos un paso adelante dentro una trayectoria educativa que desde el espíritu clásico nos proponía el bien como un rasgo fundamental en la formación de la conciencia. Un impulso educador que ha propuesto lo humano en su totalidad, definiendo la academia como un lugar de palabras y acciones. Éstas, en el contexto actual y a la luz de los valores éticos del humanismo que hemos heredado con un legado ignaciano de 500 años, se manifiestan en la salvación de rasgos fundamentales de la utopía social moderna que conduce a la paz y al desarrollo a través del conocimiento, la justicia y la solidaridad como experiencias de vida. La Conferencia Internacional sobre Desarrollo Humano y Enfoque de Capacidades representa una oportunidad extraordinaria para profundizar en nuestro quehacer y acercarnos de manera realista a esta utopía social con sello ético a través de la formación, el análisis, la investigación y la discusión sobre grandes temas pendientes en el marco de la organización de la sociedad. Todo ello para perfilar un modelo de desarrollo humano sustentado por nuevas relaciones interpersonales y sociales, dentro de una complementariedad estructural que trasciende las fronteras geográficas, económicas, políticas, raciales y culturales.

Visión compartida por Xabier Gorostiaga, quien promoviera, siendo Rector de nuestra Universidad, el concepto de educación como una trayectoria hacia el desarrollo humano que un día habrá de concretarse y dar frutos en la realidad social centroamericana. La educación continúa siendo la primera condición para ese desarrollo. Y lo es porque constituye el mejor instrumento para revertir la hegemonía de un sistema que si bien aporta innovaciones beneficiosas para la vida, también contradice el equilibrio que habría de conllevar el avance científico y tecnológico, necesario para profundizar positivamente en las grandes asimetrías entre los países, las regiones y los grupos sociales. Con esta convicción compartida, la UCA se enorgullece de abrir sus puertas al mundo como sede de la IX Conferencia Internacional sobre Desarrollo Humano y Enfoque de Capacidades, consciente de que a través de este espacio aportará con la inteligencia y el corazón de sus participantes en la creación de nuevos conocimientos y enfoques que incidan, de alguna manera, en las políticas públicas para situarnos como ciudadanos del Sur en un nuevo contexto social sostenido por el derecho a la justicia y a la libertad.

Mayra Luz Pérez Díaz Rectora Universidad Centroamericana

BREVES BIOGRAFÍAS DE LOS PRINCIPALES ORADORES

41


42

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Amartya Sen

A

martya Sen nació en Santiniketan, India, estudió en Presidency College en Calcuta, India y en Trinity College, Cambridge. Es ciudadano de la India. Imparte la cátedra Lamont y es profesor de economía y filosofía en Harvard University; fue rector de Trinity College, Cambridge hasta fecha reciente. Ha sido presidente de Econometric Society, Indian Economic Association, American Economic Association e International Economic Association. Fue presidente honorario de OXFAM y actualmente es su asesor honorífico. Ya antes había sido profesor de la cátedra Lamont de Harvard University (1987 – 1998), y anteriormente también impartió la cátedra Drummond de Economía Política en Oxford University, fue miembro y profesor de All Souls College (del cual es ahora profesor emérito) y profesor de economía de Delhi University y del London School of Economics.

Sus libros han sido traducidos a más de treinta idiomas, entre los cuales se encuentran Collective Choice and Social Welfare (1970, título en español Elección colectiva y bienestar social), On Economic Inequality (1973, 1997, título en español Sobre la desigualdad económica), Poverty and Famines (1981, título en español Pobreza y hambre), Choice, Welfare and Measurement (1982), Resources, Values and Development (1984), On Ethics and Economics (1987, título en español Sobre ética y economía), The Standard of Living (1987, título en español El nivel de vida), Inequality Reexamined (1992, título en español Nuevo examen de la desigualdad), Development as Freedom (1999, título en español Desarrollo y libertad), Rationality and Freedom (2002), The Argumentative Indian (2005, título en español La argumentación india) e Identity and Violence: The Illusion of Destiny (2006, título en español Identidad y violencia: la ilusión del destino), entre otros. Sus investigaciones han abarcado una serie de ámbitos de economía, filosofía, teoría de la decisión, incluyendo la teoría de la decisión social, la economía del bienestar, la teoría de la medición, la economía del desarrollo, la salud pública, estudios de género, filosofía moral y política, y economía de guerra y paz Las principales universidades de Norteamérica, Europa, Asia y África le han otorgado doctorados honoris causa. Es Miembro de la British Academy, Miembro Honorario Extranjero de la American Academy of Arts and Sciences, y miembro de la American Philosophical Society. Entre los premios y distinciones que Amartya Sen ha recibido están “Bharat Ratna” (el más alto honor otorgado por el presidente de la India); Premio Internazionale Senatore Giovanni Agnelli (Italia); Alan Shawn Feinstein World Hunger Award (Estados Unidos); Edinburgh Medal (Reino Unido); la Ordem do Merito Cientifico (Grã-Cruz) de Brasil; Medaglia del Presidente della Repubblica Italiana; Eisenhower Medal (Estados Unidos); Honorary Companion of Honour (Reino Unido.); George C. Marshall Foundation Award (Estados Unidos) y el premio Nobel de Economía. (Biography taken from http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~phildept/sen.html)

43


44

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Ha presidido el Committee on International Cooperation, el Committee on the Status of Women y el Committee for Public Philosophy de la American Philosophical Association. En el período 1999-2000 presidió su Central Division – una de sus tres divisiones – en cuya reunión anual pronunció el discurso presidencial. La Dra. Nussbaum ha sido miembro del Consejo de la American Academy of Arts and Sciences, y miembro de la Junta Directiva del American Council of Learned Societies. Fue galardonada con el Brandeis Creative Arts Award in Non-Fiction en 1990 y el Premio PEN SpielvogelDiamondstein para la mejor colección de ensayos en 1991; recibió el Ness Book Award of the Association of American Colleges and Universities en 1998 por su obra Cultivating Humanity, y el Grawemeyer Award in Education en 2002. Con Sex and Social Justice obtuvo el premio al mejor libro de 2000 de la North American Society for Social Philosophy. Su obra Hiding From Humanity ganó el Association of American University Publishers Professional and Scholarly Book Award for Law en 2004.

Martha Nussbaum

M

artha Nussbaum obtuvo su licenciatura en New York University (NYU) y su maestría y doctorado en Harvard. Estudió en las universidades de Harvard, Brown y Oxford. Entre 1986 y 1993, la Dra. Nussbaum fue asesora de investigación del World Institute for Development Economics Research, Helsinki, que forma parte de la Universidad de Naciones Unidas.

Ha recibido títulos honoris causa de más de cuarenta universidades de EEUU, Canadá, Asia, África y Europa, entre las cuales se encuentran Grinnell College, Williams College, la Universidad de Atenas (Grecia), University of St. Andrews (Escocia), University of Edinburgh (Escocia), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Bélgica), University of Toronto, la Ecole Normale Supérieure (París), the New School University, la Universidad de Haifa, Emory University, la Universidad de Bielefeld (Alemania), Ohio State University, Georgetown University, y University of the Free State (Sudáfrica). Recibió el Grawemeyer Award in Education en 2002, la Barnard College Medal of Distinction en 2003, el Radcliffe Alumnae Recognition Award en 2007 y la Centennial Medal of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences de Harvard University en 2010. Es miembro de la Academia de Finlandia. En 2009, obtuvo el premio A.SK del Centro Científico para la Investigación Social de Berlín (WZB) por sus contribuciones a la “reforma del sistema social” y el American Philosophical Society’s Henry M. Phillips Prize in Jurisprudence. En 2012 recibió el Premio Príncipe de Asturias de Ciencias Sociales. biografía tomada de http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/nussbaum

La Dra. Nussbaum es profesora emérita de la cátedra Ernst Freund de Derecho y Ética en la Facultad de Derecho y el Departamento de Filosofía, también es profesora asociada del Departamento de Filología, la Facultad de Teología y el Departamento de Ciencias Políticas de Chicago University. Es, asimismo, miembro del Comité de Estudios del Sur de Asia y Miembro del Consejo Directivo del Programa de Derechos Humanos de esta misma universidad. Algunas de sus publicaciones son Aristotle’s De Motu Animalium (1978), The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy (1986, edición actualizada 2000, título en español La fragilidad del bien: fortuna y ética en la tragedia y la filosofía griega), Love’s Knowledge (1990, título en español El conocimiento del amor: ensayos sobre filosofía y literatura), The Therapy of Desire (1994, título en español La terapia del deseo: teoría y práctica en la ética helenística), Poetic Justice (1996, título en español Justicia poética: la imaginación literaria y la vida pública), For Love of Country (1996, título en español Los límites del patriotismo: identidad, pertenencia y “ciudadanía mundial”), Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education (1997, título en español El cultivo de la humanidad: una defensa clásica de la reforma en la educación liberal), Sex and Social Justice (1998), Women and Human Development (2000, título en español Las mujeres y el desarrollo humano: el enfoque de las capacidades), Upheavals of Thought: The Intelligence of Emotions (2001, título en español Paisajes del pensamiento: la inteligencia de las emociones), Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law (2004, título en español El ocultamiento de lo humano: repugnacia, vergüenza y ley), Frontiers of Justice:Disability, Nationality, Species Membership (2006, título en español Las fronteras de la justicia: consideraciones sobre la exclusión), The Clash Within: Democracy, Religious Violence, and India’s Future (2007, título en español India: democracia y violencia religiosa), Liberty of Conscience: In Defense of America’s Tradition of Religious Equality (2008, título en español Libertad de conciencia), From Disgust to Humanity: Sexual Orientation and Constitutional Law (2010), Not For Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities (2010, título en español Sin fines de lucro. Por qué la democracia necesita de las humanidades), Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach (2011, título en español Crear capacidades: propuesta para el desarrollo humano), The New Religious Intolerance: Overcoming the Politics of Fear in an Anxious Age (2012), and Philosophical Interventions: Book Reviews 1985-2011 (2012). Asimismo, ha editado quince libros y en la actualidad se encuentra trabajando en su libro Political Emotions: Why Love Matters for Justice, que será publicado por Harvard en 2013. Educación: En 1969, obtuvo su licenciatura de New York University; en 1971, su maestría y en 1975 un doctorado de Harvard University.

45


46

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

J

osé Antonio Ocampo es profesor de Prácticas Profesionales en Asuntos Internacionales y Públicos, director del Programa de Desarrollo Económico y Político de la Escuela de Asuntos Internacionales y Públicos, y miembro del Comité de Pensamiento Global de Columbia University. En la actualidad preside una comisión para revisar las actividades de la Oficina de Evaluación Independiente del Fondo Monetario Internacional. En 2008-2010 fungió como codirector del Proyecto del PNUD/OEA “Agenda para una democracia de ciudadanía en América Latina” y en 2009 fue miembro de la Comisión de Expertos del Secretario General de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas sobre Reformas al Sistema Monetario y Financiero Internacional.

Sir Tony Atkinson

S

ir Tony Atkinson es miembro de Nuffield College, del cual fue rector entre 1994 y 2005. En la actualidad es profesor centenario del London School of Economics. Ha sido presidente de Royal Economic Society, Econometric Society, European Economic Association, e International Economic Association. En el Reino Unido ha sido miembro de Royal Commission on the Distribution of Income and Wealth, Pension Law Review Committee y Commission on Social Justice. Dirigió la Atkinson Review of Measurement of Government Output (medición de los resultados gubernamentales). Ha sido miembro del Conseil d’Analyse Economique, que asesora al primer ministro de Francia y del Comité Consultivo para la Gobernanza Estadística, nombrado por el Consejo de Ministros de la UE. En 2001 fue investido caballero por sus servicios a la economía y es caballero de la Legión de Honor. Sus libros más recientes son The Changing Distribution of Earnings in OECD Countries, Top incomes: A global perspective (editado con T. Piketty) e Income and living conditions in Europe (editado con E. Marlier). biografía tomada de http://www.nuff.ox.ac.uk/economics/people/atkinson.htm

Joshua Cohen

J

oshua Cohen es profesor de Ética en la Sociedad Marta Sutton Weeks y profesor de ciencias políticas, filosofía y derecho. Cohen también es director del Programa de Justicia Global en el Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies de Stanford University, donde es investigador principal del Programa de Tecnología de Liberación. Como politólogo y filósofo, Cohen ha escrito sobre temas relacionados con la teoría democrática, en especial la democracia deliberativa, y las implicaciones para la libertad personal, la libertad de expresión y el financiamiento de campañas. Asimismo, ha escrito sobre justicia global, incluyendo los fundamentos de derechos humanos, justicia distributiva y gobernabilidad democrática supranacional. Entre sus publicaciones más recientes se encuentran Philosophy, Politics, Democracy (Harvard University Press, 2009); Rousseau: A Free Community of Equals (Oxford University Press); The Arc of the Moral Universe and Other Essays (Harvard University Press, 2011); y Establishment, Exclusion, and Democracy’s Public Reason. Además, es editor de Boston Review, una revista bimensual de ideas políticas, culturales y literarias, y es miembro del profesorado de Apple University. biografía tomada de https://politicalscience.stanford.edu/faculty/joshua-cohen

José Antonio Ocampo (Pendiente de confirmar) Publicaciones: Desarrollo económico de América Latina desde la independencia, con Luis Bértola (2012). Oxford Handbook of Latin American Economics, editado con Jaime Ros (2011). Cooperación para el desarrollo en tiempos de crisis, editado con José Antonio Alonso (2012) Time for a Visible Hand: Lessons from the 2008 World Financial Crisis, editado con Stephany Griffith-Jones y Joseph E. Stiglitz (2010). Growth and Policy in Developing Countries: A Structuralist Approach, con Lance Taylor y Codrina Rada (2009).

Antes de su nombramiento, Ocampo ocupó varios cargos en las Naciones Unidas y el Gobierno de Colombia, principalmente el de subsecretario general de las Naciones Unidas para Asuntos Económicos y Sociales; secretario ejecutivo de la Comisión Económica de Latinoamérica y el Caribe (CEPAL); ministro de Finanzas y Crédito Público, y presidente del Banco Central de Colombia; ministro de Planificación, ministro de Agricultura y Desarrollo Rural, y director ejecutivo de FEDESARROLLO. Ocampo ha publicado extensamente sobre teoría y política macroeconómica, temas de finanzas internacionales, desarrollo económico y social, comercio internacional, gobernabilidad económica global, e historia económica de Colombia y América Latina. Ocampo obtuvo su licenciatura en economía y sociología de la University of Notre Dame en 1972 y su doctorado en economía de Yale University en 1976. Fue profesor de economía en la Universidad de los Andes, de Historia Económica en la Universidad Nacional de Colombia y profesor visitante en las universidades de Cambridge, Oxford y Yale. Ha sido galardonado con honores y distinciones personales, incluyendo el Premio Jaume Vivens Vives 2012 por el mejor libro sobre historia económica de España y América Latina del bienio 20102011, el Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought 2008 de Tufts University y el Premio Nacional en Ciencias Alejandro Ángel Escobar 1998 de Colombia. biografía tomada de http://sipa.columbia.edu/academics/directory/jao2128-fac.html

47


48

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

George Gray Molina

G

eorge Gray Molina es el economista jefe del PNUD para América Latina y el Caribe, con sede en Nueva York. Como miembro del Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Programme, su investigación se centró en nichos de crecimiento económico en economías de bajo crecimiento. Antes de llegar a Oxford, George coordinó el Informe de Desarrollo Humano del PNUD en Bolivia, fue director de la Unidad de Análisis de Política Económica (UDAPE) en el Ministerio de la Presidencia de Bolivia y director del Programa de Maestría en Políticas Públicas de la Universidad Católica. Asimismo, fue cofundador de un grupo de expertos sobre desarrollo verde en Bolivia (Instituto Alternativo), investigador asociado del Centre for Research on Inequality, Ethnicity and Human Security (CRISE) de Oxford, y miembro del Diálogo Interamericano en Washington DC. George es coeditor de Tensiones irresueltas, Bolivia, pasado y presente con Laurence Whitehead y John Crabtree (Plural 2010), La otra frontera (PNUD 2009), El estado del Estado (PNUD 2007), La economía más allá del gas (PNUD 2005) y autor de varios artículos sobre política, economía y desarrollo. George obtuvo un doctorado (Política) de University of Oxford, una maestría en políticas públicas del Kennedy School of Government de Harvard University y una licenciatura de Cornell University (Economía y Antropología). biografía tomada de http://www.globaleconomicgovernance.org/dr-george-graymolina-oxford-princeton-global-leaders-fellow)

Utilización del enfoque de las capacidades 1 a pregunta central de la Conferencia que dio Sabina Alkire OPHI, Oxford

L

origen a este volumen fue cómo podía ponerse en práctica el enfoque de las capacidades de Amartya Sen – que parece haber captado el interés de muchas personas – para enfrentar la pobreza y las injusticias de manera sistemática, y hasta un grado significativo. Un tema de debate frecuente que, por lo general, subyace a la pregunta es si la investigación provocada por el enfoque de las capacidades da lugar a metodologías prácticas más eficaces para tratar problemas sociales que son apremiantes. Por supuesto que las aplicaciones subsiguientes no constituyen la única base para estudiar una propuesta; por ejemplo. Artículo extraído de Maitreyee, boletín electrónico de HDCA de octubre de 2008.

49


50

Revista Enfoque 29

También se podría examinar provechosamente sus implicaciones teóricas y su mensurabilidad o coherencia conceptual. Hasta qué grado las aplicaciones y técnicas específicas plasman el enfoque conceptual (su precisión y limitaciones) también podría ser de interés, pero en un contexto de pobreza y justicia quizá sea directamente pertinente a la evaluación de aplicaciones y consecuencias concretas, o cualquier otra cosa que también examinemos. Un enfoque tan claro podría crear ansiedad, pues incluso si los enfoques de reducción de la pobreza basados en ingresos arrojaran una pálida luz sobre el tema, después de un examen riguroso quizá debamos admitir que en la práctica el enfoque de las capacidades no tiene mejores resultados, o que todavía no sabemos. No obstante, la pregunta parece necesaria. Muchas personas se han sentido atraídas por la “promesa” que ofrece el enfoque de las capacidades y el desarrollo como libertad. Algunos escritos afirman sus beneficios (a veces con más entusiasmo que pruebas) o proponen que el enfoque se extienda en una dirección específica o que responda a ciertas preguntas apremiantes. Los estudios en este volumen demuestran con frecuencia una tendencia más constructiva y proactiva. Conciben el enfoque de las capacidades como algo en desarrollo, exponen varias aplicaciones de este enfoque, examinan con espíritu crítico qué conocimientos están expresados en diversas técnicas y/o debaten si se puede demostrar y cómo que estos análisis difieren de otros enfoques alternativos. Si se adopta esta metodología realista, no tiene la menor importancia que los autores de esta investigación sean ostensiblemente “críticos” o alberguen cierto afecto por el enfoque de las capacidades de Sen. El valor agregado del enfoque de las capacidades, en comparación con otros enfoques alternativos, se evidenciaría (o no) en los análisis empíricos, aplicaciones y políticas a las que dé origen – incluso en las capacidades que hubieran aumentado (o no). No se sabe si algo es bueno hasta que se prueba.Aunque la necesidad de probar sea inagotable, también hay una permanente demanda de un enfoque más sólido de reducción de la pobreza. Las fuerzas políticas e intelectuales parecen confluir para impulsar actividades de desarrollo de maneras que no son incompatibles con el enfoque de las capacidades; por ejemplo, 1Ésta es la primera sección del capítulo de introducción “Using the Capability Approach: Prospective and Evaluative Analyses” publicado en Sabina Alkire y Mozaffar Qizilbash (eds.), The Capability Approach: Concepts, Measures and Applications (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008). Agradecemos a Cambridge University Press por su amabilidad al habernos permitido reproducir este extracto de Maitreyee.

Revista Enfoque 29

algunas organizaciones de desarrollo, ONG y gobiernos mantienen su apoyo a la Declaración del Milenio y a los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio (ODM) – en los que se define la pobreza como algo multidimensional, que abarca no sólo los ingresos sino también una gama de funcionamientos. Algunas estrategias nacionales de reducción de la pobreza aprovechan el debate público y democrático sobre prioridades y procesos, e incluyen a los pobres en el debate. Algunas actividades directas de reducción de la pobreza persiguen empoderar a las personas pobres para que sean agentes activos en las estructuras sociales y políticas, al igual que en el hogar. Aunque las iniciativas que impulsan los ODM, las prácticas democráticas o el empoderamiento (por ejemplo) sean imperfectas, también son señales de que podría haber una demanda de aplicaciones adecuadas del enfoque de las capacidades. Es más, indican el valor de usar bien el enfoque, salvo que las aplicaciones prácticas sean menos exigentes. Sin embargo, la pregunta central es en realidad muy difícil de evaluar: ¿Puede la investigación provocada por el enfoque de las capacidades dar lugar a metodologías prácticas más eficaces para abordar problemas sociales de importancia? Más concretamente, la pregunta podría malinterpretarse. La dificultad se relaciona en parte con las distintas opiniones de qué es en efecto el enfoque de las capacidades – ya que se puede interpretar con mayor o menor amplitud – y qué aspectos de sus diversas aplicaciones o técnicas lo ejemplifican. Asimismo, ignora algunas lagunas en el enfoque, cuando necesita tomar prestado de otras áreas de investigación o cuando aún no se ha producido ningún intercambio de ideas con la nueva literatura paralela. A pesar de todo, la pregunta, tal como la he formulado normalmente, no es en realidad una pregunta apropiada para evaluar el enfoque de las capacidades, al menos no cuando éste se entiende como un marco evaluativo. La pregunta en sí misma es más bien una aplicación fundamental del enfoque de las capacidades. La función de evaluación primaria del enfoque de las capacidades es precisamente determinar cuál de las dos situaciones ha contribuido en mayor grado a la ampliación de las libertades humanas o qué tipos de libertades han ampliado (o contraído), respectivamente. ¿El enfoque de las capacidades es sabor o textura, creación o evaluación del producto?

El enfoque de las capacidades como teoría de la justicia: aclaraciones y desafíos Krushil Watene University of Auckland

L Artículo extraído de Maitreyee, boletín electrónico de la HDCA, septiembre de 2011.

as teorías de justicia social y global constituyen un importante e influyente corpus de investigación en filosofía política contemporánea. Estas teorías de justicia, concebidas para explicar cómo distribuir los beneficios y cargas en y entre sociedades, e interesadas en indagar qué esquemas sociales pueden justificarse, difieren en algunos aspectos importantes: 1) ¿Sobre qué bases se justifican los principios? 2) ¿Cuáles son estos principios? 3) ¿Cuáles deben ser los parámetros de justicia? 4) ¿Quién está obligado a perseguir y hacer realidad esquemas sociales justos? 5) ¿Cuál es el alcance de la justicia? y 6) ¿Cuáles son las unidades de interés pertinentes? (Robeyns, 2011).

51


52

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Aunque hay varias teorías que se derivan de estas preguntas, el trabajo de John Rawls sigue ocupando un lugar prominente y su enfoque contractualista continúa dominando gran parte de los debates más recientes sobre justicia social y global, entre los que se incluye el trabajo reciente de Martha Nussbaum y Amartya Sen (Nussbaum 2006, Sen 2009).

Es necesario discutir más a fondo el EC como teoría de justicia para entender realmente las contribuciones que puede hacer a este corpus de investigación. En este sentido, esta edición de Maitreyee es una recopilación de ensayos cortos cuyo objeto es proporcionar perspectivas que aclaren importantes aspectos del EC y destaquen cómo pueden impulsarlo los nuevos desafíos.

Es más, el enfoque de las capacidades expresado por Nussbaum y Sen a la luz de cuestiones relacionadas con la justicia ha generado mucho debate sobre si podría contribuir de alguna manera a este corpus de investigaciones. El enfoque de Nussbaum – una teoría parcial de justicia que difiere en aspectos importantes de Rawls – ha generado discusión sobre la posibilidad de que el EC produzca una alternativa viable a las teorías de justicia basadas en un contrato social (Freeman 2006, Mendus 2008). El trabajo reciente de Amartya Sen, en el que critica el “enfoque transcendental” que tiene Rawls de la justicia en favor de un “enfoque comparativo”, ha generado interrogantes en torno al tipo de teoría de la justicia que es en realidad el EC de Sen y (quizá de mayor importancia aún) si verdaderamente es una teoría de justicia (Broome 2009). En términos generales, el interés en la justicia desde el EC ha llevado a la publicación reciente de un importante volumen de ensayos que comparan el EC con el enfoque de bienes primarios, como los parámetros de justicia social, y a una visión general de lo que necesita el EC para convertirse en una teoría completa de justicia (Brighouse y Robeyns 2010).

Una de las fortalezas del EC es que no acepta ni necesita aceptar ningún enfoque o punto de partida específico de la justicia. Es más, los dos enfoques más prominentes demuestran cómo las distintas teorías de la capacidad pueden desarrollarse a partir de fundamentos muy distintos. Es decir que los proponentes del EC son capaces de crear nuevos enfoques de los problemas y revisar los anteriores. El EC nos ofrece espacio para desarrollar y reformular nuevas formas de avanzar ante considerables desafíos sociales y globales.

¿Cómo se ha puesto en práctica el enfoque de las capacidades?2 Este artículo ofrece un breve estudio parcial de algunos intentos relativamente recientes para poner en práctica el enfoque de las capacidades . ¿Qué tipo de preguntas se puede o se ha respondido utilizando este marco? ¿Tenemos alguna prueba de que el enfoque de las capacidades incide en estudios empíricos o evaluaciones de políticas, o tiene algún impacto como fundamento para una crítica de esquemas sociales? Artículo extraído de Maitreyee, boletín electrónico de HDCA de octubre de 2008.

Referencias. Brighouse, H. e I. Robeyns (eds.) (2010), Measuring Justice: Primary Goods and Capabilities, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Broome, John (2010), ‘Is this Truly and Idea of Justice?’ Journal of Human Development and Capabilities,11(4). Freeman, Samuel (2006), ‘Frontiers of Justice: The Capabilities Approach vs. Contractarianism: Book Review’, Texas Law Review, 85(2):385-430. Mendus, Susan (2008), ‘Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership: Book Review’, Modernism/Modernity, 15(1):214215.

Ingrid Robeyns Erasmus University Rotterdam

53


54

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Tres especificaciones teóricas Ingrid Robeyns Erasmus University Rotterdam This article has been taken from Maitreyee, the e-bulletin of HDCA, of October 2008.

E

l enfoque de las capacidades es un marco normativo amplio para evaluar y determinar el bienestar individual y los esquemas sociales, el diseño de políticas y las propuestas de cambio social. Se puede utilizar empíricamente para determinar aspectos del bienestar de una persona o grupos de personas¸ como la desigualdad o la pobreza. Puede utilizarse también como una alternativa al análisis convencional de costo-beneficio, o como marco para desarrollar y evaluar políticas, que abarcan desde el diseño de un Estado de bienestar en sociedades opulentas hasta políticas de desarrollo formuladas por gobiernos y organizaciones no gubernamentales en países en vías de desarrollo. Puede, asimismo, emplearse como base normativa para la crítica social y política. El enfoque de las capacidades no es una teoría que pueda explicar la pobreza, desigualdad o bienestar, sino más bien ofrece un marco y conceptos que pueden ayudar a conceptualizar y evaluar estos fenómenos.En la práctica, el enfoque de las capacidades adopta una amplia variedad de formas, en parte por el amplio alcance que tiene, pero también porque está radicalmente subespecificado: hay una serie de lagunas teóricas que pueden llenarse de diversas maneras.

Cómo se hagan estas especificaciones depende en parte del tipo de teoría (por ejemplo, una teoría de justicia o de economía del bienestar), o de aplicación (por ejemplo, una crítica de las prácticas sociales vigentes o un ejercicio de medición), aunque también depende en parte de suposiciones normativas y epistemológicas particulares. Tres especificaciones teóricas de particular importancia han surgido de la literatura: la elección entre funcionamientos y capacidades, la selección de capacidades pertinentes y el tema de sopesar las distintas capacidades para una evaluación general (conocida también como la cuestión de indexación o compensación).

El enfoque de las capacidades en la práctica ¿Cómo se ha puesto en práctica el enfoque de las capacidades? Es importante destacar que no todas las aplicaciones del enfoque de las capacidades requieren técnicas de investigación empírica. Algunas aplicaciones se basan en un razonamiento analítico o análisis crítico, pero muchas aplicaciones del enfoque de las capacidades descansan en un nuevo análisis empírico y, por consiguiente, requieren el uso de técnicas de investigación empírica.

2 Éste es un extracto de un artículo publicado en el volumen 14, número 3 de Journal of Political Philosophy, 2006, pp. 351-76, resumido por Séverine Deneulin. 3 En los últimos años la literatura de las capacidades ha florecido y, por lo tanto, las aplicaciones posteriores a 2006 han sido considerables y no están incluidas en este estudio.

No sorprende que se haya utilizado una amplia variedad de técnicas de investigación empírica, en vista del amplio alcance de las aplicaciones de capacidades y el carácter multidisciplinario e interdisciplinario de esta literatura, (Kuklys 2005). Las principales técnicas de medición investigadas hasta ahora son estadísticas descriptivas de indicadores únicos, escalamiento, teoría de conjuntos difusos, análisis de factores, análisis de componentes principales y modelo de ecuaciones estructurales. Antes de emprender una revisión de las aplicaciones reales, debemos preguntarnos cómo se relacionan las aplicaciones cuantitativas con las especificaciones teóricas mencionadas más arriba. La primera observación es que prácticamente todas las aplicaciones cuantitativas utilizan conjuntos de datos existentes. No se ha recopilado ninguno de estos datos con el objeto de medir funcionamientos. Si bien la mayoría de estos estudios ofrece una rica gama de dominios sobre los que tiene información, la recopilación de estos datos no tiene por objeto captar el bienestar de los funcionamientos de las personas y mucho menos sus capacidades. En la literatura sobre mediciones se examina en detalle la segunda y tercera especificación teórica analizada más arriba.

Si una aplicación empírica emplea el análisis descriptivo, escalamiento o la teoría de conjuntos difusos, la selección de funcionamientos pertinentes y de los pesos relativos puede sustentarse en teoría. Lamentablemente, la mayoría de los estudios de medición no dedican tiempo a explicar y examinar las bases normativas de las técnicas estadísticas que utilizan y se escriben para un número reducido de lectores entre colegas econometristas y estadísticos. Algunos estudios también han utilizado técnicas empíricas cualitativas. Alkire (2002) ha empleado métodos participativos tanto para la selección de los funcionamientos como para la evaluación de cambios en el bienestar. Wolff and de-Shalit (2007) también utilizaron métodos cualitativos en un estudio reciente sobre privaciones en sociedades opulentas. Estos autores no sólo entrevistaron a personas desfavorecidas sino también a los “expertos” que se dedican a mejorar su calidad de vida con el fin de establecer las capacidades que son importantes para evaluar el bienestar de las personas necesitadas de la sociedad.

¿Cómo se ha aplicado el enfoque de las capacidades? A continuación describo algunos de los aspectos que se han abordado mediante el enfoque de las capacidades, agrupados en los distintos temas que hasta la fecha ha abarcado este enfoque en la práctica:

55


56

Revista Enfoque 29

-Evaluaciones generales del desarrollo humano de los países: Sen (1985) señaló que si bien el PIB per cápita de Brasil y México era siete veces el PIB per cápita de la India, China y Sri Lanka, el rendimiento de los funcionamientos en lo que respecta a la esperanza de vida, la mortalidad infantil y las tasas de mortalidad preescolar, era más favorable en Sri Lanka, mejor en China que en la India, y mejor en México que en Brasil. A partir de 1990, el PNUD adoptó algunos elementos básicos del enfoque de las capacidades en sus Informes Anuales de Desarrollo Humano. -Evaluación de proyectos de desarrollo de pequeña escala: Alkire (2002) desarrolló un análisis de capacidades como alternativa a los análisis estándar de costo-beneficio de tres proyectos de reducción de pobreza en Pakistán: crianza de cabras, clases de alfabetización para mujeres y producción de guirnaldas de rosas. La autora evaluó la manera como estos proyectos mejoraban las capacidades y comparó sus evaluaciones con evaluaciones monetarias estándar. -Identificación de los pobres en los países en vías de desarrollo: Varios estudios empíricos cuantitativos han investigado, tanto en entornos micro como macro, cuántos funcionamientos-personas pobres hay y si son las mismas personas identificadas en una medición de ingresos y pobreza. La mayoría de estos estudios de pobreza usan encuestas de hogares y se centran sólo en un país (Ruggeri Laderchi 1999; Klasen 2000; Qizilbash 2002) -Evaluación de la pobreza y el bienestar en las economías avanzadas: Varios estudios han investigado el número y perfil demográfico de los pobres en las economías avanzadas o han evaluado tendencias de bienestar. Alessandro Balestrino (1996) analizó si una muestra de personas oficialmente pobres son funcionamientos-pobres (es decir, carecen de educación, nutrición o salud), ingresos-pobres o ambos . Shelley Phipps (2002) hizo una comparación del bienestar de los niños en Canadá, Noruega y EEUU utilizando el equivalente de ingresos de los hogares y diez funcionamientos. -Privaciones de las personas discapacitadas: Las personas discapacitadas sufren por lo menos dos tipos de desventajas materiales: ganan ingresos inferiores a los de aquellas personas sin discapacidades y por sus necesidades especiales necesitan más ingresos para alcanzar funcionamientos similares, por ejemplo, para comprar una silla de ruedas.

Revista Enfoque 29

Cualquier comparación de ingresos monetarios estándar captaría la primera desventaja, pero no la segunda. Zaidi y Burchardt (2005) hacen uso de técnicas estándar en economías de bienestar para dar cuenta de que las personas discapacitadas están en desventaja al convertir los ingresos en bienestar material. -Evaluación de las desigualdades de género: En su primera serie de ilustraciones empíricas de cómo concebía el enfoque de las capacidades en la práctica, Sen (1985) analizó la discriminación de género en la India y llegó a la conclusión que los logros de las mujeres eran inferiores a los logros de los hombres en varios funcionamientos, por ejemplo, tasas de mortalidad en edades específicas, desnutrición y morbilidad. El enfoque de las capacidades también se ha utilizado para evaluar la desigualdad de género en economías avanzadas (Chiappero-Martinetti 2003; Robeyns 2003). -Debate de políticas: El enfoque de las capacidades también se ha utilizado para analizar y evaluar políticas empíricamente, como por ejemplo políticas educativas o principios para las reformas del Estado de bienestar. Por ejemplo, Schokkaert y Van Ootegem (1990) demostraron que el compensar a los desempleados belgas por su pérdida de ingresos no ayudaba a aliviar sus privaciones de funcionamientos. -Crítica y evaluación de normas, prácticas y discursos sociales:Por ejemplo, una norma social puede inducir cierto comportamiento que restringe conjuntos de capacidades de las personas o privilegia las capacidades de algunos grupos a expensas de otros. O se puede criticar ciertas afirmaciones hechas en el discurso público si se amplía la base informativa o se cambia el enfoque de recursos puramente materiales a una amplia gama de capacidades -Funcionamientos y capacidades como conceptos en una investigación no normativa:Los conceptos de funcionamientos y capacidades también pueden emplearse en un contexto no normativo, por ejemplo en la investigación etnográfica o como conceptos en un análisis explicativo. Además de estos nueve tipos de aplicaciones de capacidades, también hay un gran número de estudios que examinan una capacidad específica, como educación, salud o nutrición. Muchas veces, estos estudios cuestionan una justificación más estrecha de eficiencia económica al señalar los efectos colaterales (involuntarios) de políticas específicas en las capacidades de las personas. 4 Véase Anand y van Hees (2006) para una aplicación del enfoque de las capacidades en el contexto del Reino Unido.

Conclusiones ¿Qué podemos concluir de este estudio? La puesta en práctica del enfoque de las capacidades no es un ejercicio directo, ya que el enfoque es radicalmente impreciso. Las aplicaciones de capacidades estudiadas en este artículo indicaron que las aplicaciones actuales del enfoque de las capacidades obtienen resultados de mediciones y evaluaciones distintas de los enfoques estándar que se centran en criterios basados en ingresos. Además, el marco teórico también ofrece distintos fundamentos para propuestas de políticas y puede ser un componente útil en la crítica de normas, prácticas y esquemas sociales. Sin embargo, es necesario tener precaución: El enfoque de las capacidades aún enfrenta algunos de los problemas que aquejan a otros marcos evaluativos y no debe ser visto como un marco superior a otros en todas y cada una de sus aplicaciones. A menudo su utilidad relativa depende más bien del tipo de pregunta que se plantea. Es más, en muchos casos las aplicaciones de capacidades no deben verse como si sustituyeran a otros enfoques sino más bien como que ofrecen perspectivas complementarias a los enfoques más establecidos. References

Alkire, Sabina. 2002. Valuing Freedoms. Nueva York: Oxford University Press. Anand, Paul and Martin van Hees. 2006. Capabilities and achievements: an empirical study. The Journal of Socio-Economics, 35, 268–84. Balestrino, Alessandro. 1996. A note on functionings-poverty in affluent societies. Notizie di Politeia, 12, 97–105. Chiappero-Martinetti, Enrica. 2003. Unpaid work and household well-being. En Antonella Picchio (ed.), Unpaid Work and the Economy: A Gender Analysis of the Standards of Living. Londres: Routledge. Klasen, Stephan. 2000. Measuring poverty and deprivation in South-Africa. Review of Income and Wealth, 46, 33–58. Kuklys, Wiebke. 2005. Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach: Theoretical Insights and Empirical Applications. Berlín: Springer Verlag. Phipps, Shelley. 2002. The well-being of young Canadian children in international perspective: a functionings approach. Review of Income and Wealth, 48, 493–515. Qizilbash, Mozaffar. 2002. A note on the measurement of poverty and vulnerability in the South African context. Journal of International Development, 14, 757–72. Robeyns, Ingrid. 2003. Sen’s capability approach and gender inequality: selecting relevant capabilities. Feminist Economics, 9, 61–92. Ruggeri Laderchi, Caterina. 1999. The many dimensions of deprivation in Peru. Queen Elizabeth House Working Paper Series, 29. Schokkaert, Erik and Luc Van Ootegem. 1990. Sen’s concept of the living standard applied to the Belgian unemployed. Recherches Economiques de Louvain, 56, 429–450. Sen, Amartya. 1985. Commodities and Capabilities. Amsterdam: Holanda del Norte. Wolff, Jonathan and Avner de-Shalit. 2007. Disadvantage. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Zaidi, Asghar and Tania Burchardt. 2005. Comparing incomes when needs differ: equivalization for the extra cost of disability in the U.K. Review of Income and Wealth, 51, 89–114.

57


58

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Puesta en práctica del desarrollo humano: un enfoque programático 5 K. Seeta Prabhu No obstante, quizá sea necesario complementarlas con una articulación más específica de cómo integrar operativamente el enfoque de desarrollo humano en los programas. La capacidad de aplicación sistemática del enfoque de desarrollo humano a los programas puede mejorarlos en el terreno al romper el aislamiento en que trabajan los ministerios y departamentos. La adopción de un enfoque más holístico puede cambiar de una manera fundamental las estrategias de desarrollo de los gobiernos y otros actores, como el sector privado y la sociedad civil.

Ejemplos de utilización del DH Artículo extraído de Maitreyee, boletín electrónico de HDCA de octubre de 2008.

E

l desarrollo humano es un enfoque amplio que persigue extender la gama de opciones de las personas. Está centrado en aumentar las capacidades y libertades, y en impulsar el aspecto de agencialidad de las personas. El enfoque ha tenido un impacto de largo alcance en el pensamiento sobre desarrollo

La propuesta del “Consenso de Nueva York” sobre la puesta en práctica del paradigma de desarrollo humano se basa en cuatro elementos de política: •crecimiento económico en pro de los pobres; •aceleración del progreso social; •expansión de las libertades políticas y la participación a través de reformas políticas; y •aceleración de reformas

económicas e institucionales para mejorar el entorno global de los países pobres. Esta propuesta ofrece un marco muy útil. Hay, asimismo, varias iniciativas en todo el mundo para formular políticas basadas en evidencias que utilicen los Informes de Desarrollo Humano.

Podríamos tomar dos áreas como la reducción de la pobreza y la gobernabilidad democrática, que son esenciales para la consecución del desarrollo humano, y también las áreas en las que varias organizaciones bilaterales y multilaterales apoyan activamente programas en varios países. En la reducción de la pobreza, por ejemplo, la cuestión de la equidad podría llevar a abogar por los pobres, el crecimiento impulsado por el empleo y el acceso a la tierra y al crédito como un derecho, en especial para las mujeres y sectores marginados de la población.

59


60

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Puesta en práctica del desarrollo humano: un enfoque El énfasis simultáneo en la eficiencia programático es fundamental pues supondría tomar medidas para mejorar la productividad de los sectores que proporcionan medios de vida a los pobres, p. ej. agricultura a pequeña escala y microempresas, y la coordinación de esfuerzos de los gobiernos nacionales para enfrentar una pobreza multidimensional. Las intervenciones también deben ser eficientes para ampliar las opciones de las personas y, por consiguiente, es esencial identificar estas opciones además de examinar los pros y los contras antes de emprender programas de apoyo. El prestar atención a la participación y el empoderamiento supondría no sólo que los pobres tomen parte en el diseño y la ejecución sino también asegurarse de que la apropiación de las iniciativas para reducir la pobreza sea de amplia base y abarque a todos los actores, a saber, el gobierno, organismos locales, sector privado y sociedad civil.

Es necesario abordar las consideraciones de sostenibilidad no sólo en términos de sostenibilidad ambiental sino también en lo que respecta a un crecimiento que ocurra con suficiente rapidez para reducir la pobreza absoluta y sea tan equitativo como para reducir la pobreza relativa y las desigualdades.Se pueden aplicar los mismos principios en el ámbito de la gobernabilidad democrática, aunque las intervenciones sean distintas. La equidad podría traducirse cuando menos en la creación de un entorno participativo y habilitante para los pobres, y en adhesión al estado de derecho. La eficiencia/productividad se refleja en el funcionamiento eficaz de todos los actores, en especial del gobierno, en lo que respecta a la ejecución y facilitación de las iniciativas en pro de los pobres. La capacidad del gobierno de realizar inversiones relevantes para alcanzar los objetivos a favor de los pobres y el desempeño de la administración pública en la ejecución de políticas en beneficio de los pobres también podrían ser buenos indicadores. El énfasis en la participación implicaría la participación de todos los actores en el desarrollo. La promoción del diálogo de políticas, la descentralización y la construcción de alianzas eficaces entre el sector público,

sector privado y la comunidad pueden ser herramientas para garantizar la participación. La consecución de la sostenibilidad podría asegurarse a través del desarrollo de capacidades, la integración de aspectos de gobernabilidad en todas las iniciativas de desarrollo y el fomento de valores y sistemas democráticos. El desarrollo humano más allá del PNUD El desarrollo humano se basa en principios específicamente dirigidos a proporcionar apoyo a las intervenciones programáticas. Cualquiera que crea en el enfoque de desarrollo humano y sus valores podría adaptar estas intervenciones a sus objetivos. No obstante, los principios de desarrollo humano son parte integral del enfoque y es necesario acatarlos simultáneamente. Sería contraproducente prestar atención a la equidad a expensas de la eficiencia, la participación, el empoderamiento y la sostenibilidad si no se presta atención también a los otros tres aspectos. La aplicación de los principios de desarrollo humano no está exenta de restricciones, entre las cuales el tiempo y la capacidad institucional son las principales.

El desarrollo de capacidades debe ser una importante medida para garantizar la transversalidad del desarrollo humano. Los recursos financieros también pueden limitarse a la aplicación de una estrategia que requiere prestar atención a los cuatro principios al mismo tiempo. No obstante, estos aspectos no son insuperables en vista del compromiso con un enfoque de desarrollo centrado en las personas. Referencias Fukuda-Parr, Sakiko, 2003, ‘Operationalsing Amartya Sen’s Ideas on Capabilities, Development, Freedom and Human Rights’, Feminist Economics, 9 (2/3). Jahan, Selim, 2007, ‘Human development, Equality and Economic Growth: Issues and Policies’, ponencia presentada en la Conferencia sobre el Desarrollo Humano y las Capacidades, Nueva York Kaul Inge and Saraswathi Menon, 1993, ‘Human Development- From Concept to Action A 10-Point Agenda’, Occasional Paper No. 7, Human Development Report Office, UNDP UNDP, Colombo Regional Centre, 2006, Asia Pacific Human Development Report 2006, Trade on Human Terms, Macmillan, Nueva Delhi Nussbaum, Martha (2006), Frontiers of Justice, Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press Robeyns, Ingrid (2011), ‘The Capability Approach’, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, http://plato.stanford. edu/archives/sum2011/entries/capability-approach/ Sen, Amartya (2009), The Idea of Justice, Londres: Penguin

61


62

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

La conferencia HDCA 2013:

Una oportunidad para pensar sobre Nicaragua y la región Latinoamericana que queremos

L

a próxima conferencia mundial de la HDCA 2013 que tendrá lugar en Managua, Nicaragua, marcará un hito en el ámbito académico en la región. Será un espacio en el que confluirán cientos de personas de diferentes culturas, edades, profesiones, todas ellas interesadas en conocer, aprender y compartir experiencias de otras latitudes sobre el desarrollo humano. Posiblemente pocos eventos de este tipo se hayan realizado o se realizaran en Nicaragua. La presencia de personalidades y pensadores del calibre de Amartya Sen, Martha Nussbaum, Sabina Alkire y muchos otros mas, darán la oportunidad de reflexionar sobre las cuestiones que son de relevancia para el buen vivir de la población de Nicaragua y de los países de la región latinoamericana y por tanto es una oportunidad que debemos saber aprovechar. Las diferentes actividades que involucra la preparación y realización de la Conferencia HDCA 2013 ofrece también una oportunidad para dar a conocer donde esta Nicaragua y la región Latinoamericana en materia del desarrollo y cuáles son los desafíos que enfrenta la región. Conocer las vivencias de otros pueblos o el impacto que han tenido las políticas públicas diseñadas desde la óptica del desarrollo humano puede ayudar a encontrar las rutas más cortas para seguir impulsando el desarrollo humano que es más que el crecimiento del PIB de nuestros países. La Conferencia HDCA 2013 a celebrarse en el recinto de la Universidad Centroamericana (UCA), prestigiosa universidad de Nicaragua que detenta reconocimientos a nivel internacional por su excelencia académica en varios tópicos, ofrece una plataforma para que profesionales, investigadores, representantes de los gobiernos y de las diversas organizaciones de la sociedad civil nos demos cita entre los días 9 al 12 de septiembre del 2013 en Managua, Nicaragua para reflexionar sobre la Nicaragua y Latinoamérica que queremos.

63


64

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

En el marco de dicho contexto, con sus elementos positivos y negativos, la realización de la HDCA 2013:

“Desarrollo Humano: vulnerabilidad, inclusión y calidad de vida”

Latinoamérica está pasando por una fase particular de su historia. Por un lado, es la región más desigual en el mundo; con elevados índices de violencia por la proliferación de delitos del crimen organizado y alta exposición al tráfico de drogas (particularmente la región centroamericana); la vulnerabilidad ambiental por su posición geográfica y los efectos del cambio climático que profundiza la falta de oportunidades para un amplio sector de la población que vive en condiciones de exclusión.

Maria Rosa Renzi Coordinadora de la oficina de desarrollo humano PNUD-Nicaragua

Por otra parte, la región se encuentra en una fase de transición demográfica en la que la población joven representa aproximadamente una cuarta parte de la población total, siendo esa proporción mayor en países de Centroamérica (Nicaragua, Honduras principalmente); con una base solida en su macroeconomía lo que le ha permitido recuperarse rápidamente de los impactos negativos de la crisis financiera de los años 2008-2009 y que mantiene aun ritmos de crecimiento económico importantes; donde el avance en los niveles de la educación y el acceso a la alimentación y la salud, han permitido aumentar la esperanza de vida y eliminar la presencia de algunas enfermedades como la tuberculosis, el paludismo, con avances importantes en el control de la epidemia del VIH SIDA, entre otros.

Ofrece una plataforma idónea para convocar a personas estudiosas del desarrollo para desentramar la compleja realidad en la que vivimos. En efecto, las conferencias anteriores de la HDCA han sido un espacio donde se compartieron reflexiones, teorías y prácticas en diferentes campos del desarrollo: la educación, la salud, el desarrollo rural, el acceso a activos productivos, las causas de las desigualdades por razones de género, edad, etnia, el desarrollo humano sostenible, la eficacia de algunos programas públicos orientados a la reducción de la pobreza y la desigualdad, las mediciones de la pobreza o privaciones, estudios por grupos temáticos como niñez, mujeres, pueblos indígenas, por mencionar algunos.

El paradigma del Desarrollo Humano y capacidades señala que no basta el crecimiento del PIB para que las personas gocen de los beneficios que supuestamente conlleva el crecimiento económico. Se requiere algo más que eso para que las personas puedan ser y hacer desde sus propias percepciones y aspiraciones, y sobre todo tener iguales oportunidades con los iguales resultados para que efectivamente se alcance el desarrollo humano que tiene en su base el ejercicio y goce de los derechos humanos. Ojala que la cita en Managua, Nicaragua, nos permita encontrar un camino que le ayude a Nicaragua y a los países de la región latinoamericana en el diseño de políticas públicas, que a través de una adecuada implementación y seguimiento, logremos encaminar de manera sostenible el desarrollo humano, un desarrollo humano que no solo palpemos a través de los índices o las estadísticas nacionales o subregionales sino que sea una realidad compartida y sentida por toda la población de nuestros países. Maria Rosa Renzi

65


66

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Jakarta: Una ventana a la agenda global de desarrollo humano.

I

ndonesia es un país donde los contrastes mantienen fascinado al visitante desde su llegada, luego al salir de la terminal aérea, pendientes de los detalles detrás del vidrio del taxi “Mercedes Benz” de la línea Blue Bird, último modelo (son comunes de encontrar), que te conduce de la terminal internacional al hotel que has reservado, los contrates de Jakarta (capital), en un primer plano se asemeja a un enjambre de imponentes edificios y de perímetros industriales que se contrasta con la convivencia de la miseria de miles de Indonesios, la Jakarta actual al igual que otras ciudades de la península malaya, ha venido sufriendo cambios en su diseño para hacer de esta un entorno “amigable” al gran inversionista occidental; así, la rotulación de la ciudad, sus ornatos, parques, carreteras, centros comerciales, y áreas anexas están explicadas en ingles. Es común encontrar en sus innumerables restaurantes cartas configuradas en Ingles y curiosamente se nota la ausencia del idioma local; así mismo, los dependientes de tiendas, bares y demás servicios de la capital, en buena medida inmigrantes del interior en busca de oportunidades de empleo, no hablan inglés, por lo que deben hacer uso de las deformaciones propias que cada país hace del inglés “tropicalizan su interlocución” para facilitar la comunicación con los visitantes.

Guillermo Bornemann Decano de Facultad Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales Universidad Centroamericana

Otro aspecto que no pasa desapercibido para cualquier visitante son las multitudes que transitan por las abigarradas arterias de la capital, una muchedumbre acostumbrada al amago (lenguaje maquina/corporal) para escalar posiciones y abrirse paso, sin calificativos al vecino manteniendo un respeto y cortesía en medio del caos, esto sería impensable en Nicaragua deberíamos ser cristianos en la casa y budistas en las calles . 1 1El budismo en Indonesia fue predominante hasta la traducción del islamismo en la actualidad se calcula que 2.3% de la población practica el budismo

Jakarta fue la sede de la reciente conferencia de desarrollo humano y capacidades (HDCA) en septiembre pasado; el slogan seleccionado por su comité organizador local en ocasión de la conferencia reza lo siguiente; Revisiting Development: “Do We Asses it Correctly” el mismo parece encarnarse en la necesidad de evaluar los pendientes de su propio modelo de desarrollo el cual coexiste con un campo muy empobrecido y poco atractivo (lo rural) en contraposición a un desmedido crecimiento urbano que reta la configuración presente y futura de la ciudad y sus servicios. El título de la conferencia se mimetiza en esa realidad.

67


68

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

“revolución verde” Durante los tres días que duró la conferencia, esta se constituyó en una ventana al mundo presentando el estado del arte del desarrollo, al cual concurrieron 39 países de todas las latitudes; el esgrima de ideas, la presentación de nuevas propuestas metodológicas, resultados de innovadoras aplicaciones de métodos ya probados en otros campos de la ciencia, todo ello a lo largo de 171 presentaciones. Todos los participantes teníamos a nuestro alcance un menú de opciones a seleccionar, presentaciones organizadas en 33 tópicos relacionados al desarrollo humano, esto hizo del evento, un escaparate internacional impresionante; en el transcurso del evento (durante los breves recesos intermedios) se podía notar la prisa de los asistentes de distintas nacionalidades en sacar el mayor provecho al evento, tratando de llegar a buena hora al mayor número de eventos como fuera posible; fue un comentario compartido por todos, al terminar cada jornada, llevarnos sentimientos de culpa por haber discriminado un tema por otro, en fin un costo de oportunidad que se había de pagar y por ello el calcular cuidadosamente la agenda de las presentaciones. La conferencia se desarrolló con un buen número de asistentes (cerca 300 asistentes) y un nutrido programa de actividades que incluía conferencias magistrales y acopladas a estas, para facilitar el intercambio entre los participantes, se organizaron paneles de discusión y análisis de las sesiones magistrales; un aspecto muy singular de la dinámica de la conferencia fue la participación de los “grandes expositores” que no se limitaron solamente a su presentación en la agenda, sino que se les podía observar animando otros paneles de discusión, promoviendo el debate y departiendo con estudiantes y académicos que les buscaban ávidos por conocer su opinión desde una perspectiva más personal o simplemente por admiración y tener la oportunidad de estrechar su mano. Una vez concluida la sesión magistral de la mañana, la jornada daba continuación con las presentaciones de investigaciones académicas, ocupando un especial lugar las presentaciones dedicadas al análisis de políticas y programas en Indonesia (país anfitrión), esto imprimió un sello particular y muy orinal en el marco del formato de la conferencia respecto a las grandes preocupaciones del país en torno al desarrollo humano. Las presentaciones de Martha Nussbaum, Tony Atkinson, Sabina Alkire, Kaushik Basu, Frances Stewart entre otros, mantuvieron permanente la atención de los asistentes durante el evento, posicionando los temas en los que son referentes internacionales animando el debate y provocando en los participantes sus propias

reflexiones dada la trascendencia de las ideas expuestas. Basu y otros ponentes enfatizaron en temas conductuales trabajando con gran habilidad aproximaciones en la productividad humana respecto a la puntualidad, racionalidad y cultura local con que se conducen grupos humanos, resulta impresionante la habilidad de estos autores como temas de organización industrial, ética y mediciones eran articulados de manera agregada para explicar el comportamiento productivo., La ética fue uno de ejes en el que la conferencia mostró un espacial interés, no de forma predeterminada, pero había una cierta complicidad natural por apuntar desde las aéreas de especialidad en muchos de los ponentes respecto a tópicos relacionados con el empoderamiento, democracia y el desarrollo humano. David Crocker, entre lo ya comentados anteriormente, mostraba un perfecto dominio teórico instrumental de las categorías filosóficas del campo de la ética y su aplicación al mundo real, además compartió y coordinó espacios en presentaciones paralelas temáticas vinculadas al empoderamiento, y el género en el desarrollo. El carácter interdisciplinario de las ponencias fue visible, equipos de estudiantes de cursos doctorales y docentes/ investigadores provenientes de distintos centros de investigación mostraban sus resultados comparados de ciudades del sur de Asia respecto a mediciones de CO2 y la respuesta de las comunidades a la transferencia de tecnología ambientalmente amigables, para ello se apoyaban en modelos experimentales con capacidad de determinar su impacto en la reducción de emisiones y su correlación en el mejoramiento de condiciones ambientales y de vida de las comunidades; este tipo de enfoques requería un complicado análisis econométrico acoplado a intervenciones en proyectos de desarrollo. Sobre la misma línea medioambiental, integrantes de distintos centros de pensamiento principalmente europeos mantuvieron una constante actividad e interés en temas relacionados con el cambio climático y la seguridad alimentaria, las temáticas presentadas apuntaban a la preocupación de construcción de escenarios que permitiesen disminuir la incertidumbre de autoridades y actores locales respecto a las poblaciones asentada bajo la amenaza de fenómenos naturales y su consecuente afectación a la oferta de alimentos; la invitación para las siguientes conferencias esta puesta, las principales preocupaciones se definieron en la línea de propuestas que apunte a la creación de sistemas de escenarios locales que ayuden la planificación territorial y oferta local de alimentos.

La conferencia también prestaba las condiciones para ser un espacio político natural, fue muy convincente el apoyo que la Agencia Norteamericana para el Desarrollo (AID) a la conferencia, tanto como patrocinadores del evento como posicionado temas como expositores en esa región del mundo; sus enfoques en el desarrollo del agro y la agregación de valor a los productos agropecuarios mediante encadenamientos agroindustriales se asemejaban a la estrategia de la AID en Nicaragua respecto a las empresas ancla, por algunos momentos a lo largo de sus intervenciones pensé que hacían apología a la necesidad de otra “ r e v o l u c i ó n v e r d e ” para alimentar a una población creciente y hambrienta y dotar de nuevas oportunidades al campo; mala palabra para los latinoamericanos que observamos cómo este modelo de altos Input y dependencia de paquetes tecnológicos no significó ningún beneficio para nuestros agricultores; Indonesia al igual que otras regiones desiguales del mundo presenta un abandono del campo; abandono de la producción agropecuaria, poca vitalidad en el tejido socioeconómico rural y necesidad de acoplar iniciativas de inversiones asociativas productivas como centros de acopio y comercialización, procesamiento agroindustrial, transporte e infraestructura local entre otros para devolverle el atractivo a las zonas rurales, este fue el énfasis de la AID. Al evento, también asistieron representantes del PNUD de la región y también se dieron cita oficiales desde sus oficinas en Nueva York, destacó la presentación magistral de José Pineda mostrando una excelente habilidad metodológica y un buen manejo de herramientas conceptuales y cuantitativas para el análisis de la pobreza, José Pinedo nos provocó la reflexión compartida de que nuestras preocupaciones son más comunes de lo que pensamos mostrando los avances y novedades respecto a las herramientas de medición que el PNUD promueve. Sobre las ideas anteriores, el equipo de OPHI de la universidad de Oxford realizó el taller de transferencias a grupos locales del enfoque multidimensional, dotando de capacidades locales a estudiosos y practicantes sobre la innovadora propuesta del análisis multidimensional; Talleres, presentaciones y sesiones magistrales, conectaron las temáticas pudiendo observar la fuerza del enfoque multidimensional en la comunidad académica mundial mediante la adopción del enfoque desde el empoderamiento de actores, la gobernanza, la democracia, y la propia revisión crítica al esfuerzo del combate a la pobreza,.

69


70

Revista Enfoque 29

Revista Enfoque 29

Me llamó la atención, que en la mayoría de las presentaciones aunque hacían referencia a la crisis global, no se presentaron ( al menos a las que pude asistir) temas de economía que abordaran en profundidad la forma en que se llevando la economía global, la crisis y el modelo de consumo.. Quizás sea una asignatura pendiente para otras conferencias.. Un aspecto fascinante de la conferencia, es que permitía realizar intercambios informales entre plenarios, el local destinado al evento se agitaba tanto que los corredores del viejo palacio indonesio que asemejaba el comportamiento de una colmena de abejas en plena primavera; durante los breves espacios que permitía los almuerzos o cafés de media mañana o tarde; estudiantes, agentes del mundo de la cooperación, funcionarios de gobierno, académicos e investigadores departían ansiosos de continuar conversando de los temas presentados en animadas tertulias en las que los intercambios de tarjetas y los apretones de mano eran el mejor regalo, en resumen, la plataforma de la conferencia es ambiente natural de creación de nuevas redes de colaboración y una correa de trasmisión que potencia las alianzas entre agencias de desarrollo, universidades y gobiernos. La cortesía académica dio cobijo a todo tipo de opiniones, teniendo la sensación una vez que finalizaba cada jornada en que tan acompañados estamos en los temas del desarrollo humano y que tanto estamos dotados de herramientas metodológicas para enfrentar la complejidad del mismo, desde cada una de nuestras realidades. Para los centroamericanos, que cargamos con un cierto pragmatismo resignado en ganarle la batalla a la pobreza, conocer otras realidades de ciudades como Jakarta, México DF, Bombay o El Cairo, entre otras, donde el crecimiento de sus poblaciones locales y la migración han provocado crecimientos desproporcionados urbanos devorando la gobernabilidad local; percatarnos de otra realidades, nos lleva a reflexionar sobre la dimensión de nuestro compromiso y empeño en disminuir las desigualdades e incrementar las oportunidades con el propósito de mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestras poblaciones. Jakarta, nos ha mostrado la preocupación del mundo respecto al estado del desarrollo humano, el medio ambiente, la economía y los derechos sociales en general, y nos exhorta a que las posibles rutas de desarrollo que se propongan en todos los países y las regiones, solo va a ser posible, con una efectiva promoción de la inclusión de todos y todas mediante una efectiva alianza entre los actores nacionales, la cooperación y colaboración internacional y una adecuada política pública. Jakarta ha cerrado un capitulo en la agenda del desarrollo humano global y ha dejado abierta la agenda para los próximos años; en la ruta de este relevo universal, toma forma la propuesta de Managua en septiembre 2013 con el desafío expuesto en su nombre “Desarrollo humano: vulnerabilidad + inclusión = calidad de vida”.

Guillermo Bornemann Decano de Facultad Ciencias Económicas y EmpresarialesUniversidad Centroamericana

71


72

Revista Enfoque 29


Revista Enfoque - Edición 29