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MARION COUNTY CAREER RESOURCE GUIDE Sunday, May 13, 2018

IT’S WORKING Marion County continues to enjoy low unemployment

INSIDE:

Time to clean up that resume. Page 2 | What are the hot jobs? Page 3


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Sunday, May 13, 2018

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Career Resource Guide

SPRING CAREER RESOURCE GUIDE Published by the Ocala Star-Banner / www. ocala.com Publisher: Jim Doughton Editor and General Manager: Doug Ray Section editor: Jim Ross Advertising director: Amy Griffith Designer: GateHouse Center for News and Design The Ocala Star-Banner is located at 2121 SW 19th Avenue Road, Ocala, FL 34471. For information about this guide, contact Jim Ross at jim.ross@ starbanner.com or 671-6412. The stories in this guide, along with additional related content, can be found at ocala.com/topics/ Career Guide 2018 starting May 13. Many of the online stories have links to additional resources. On the cover: Keifer Calkins of the City of Ocala Recreation and Parks Department, left, talks with job seeker Von Moore, right, during a City of Ocala hiring event that was organized by CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion and held Feb. 22 at the Ocala Police Department. Twentyone city job openings in nine city departments were featured during the event. [Bruce Ackerman/ Ocala Star-Banner]

Spring-clean your resume This is no time to be modest By ZipRecruiter.com

Now is a good time to spring-clean your resume and make sure it showcases the skills and experience you need to land your dream job. Most people don’t think about updating their resumes until it’s absolutely necessary. But there are very good reasons not to wait until you’ve lost your job or are desperate for a new one. For one, it ensures that you’ve remembered all your recent accomplishments, promotions and skills. Second, an updated resume helps you feel prepared and ready to hit the ground running if you suddenly find yourself out of a job.But most importantly, revisiting your resume on a regular basis keeps you focused on your career goals and sends a subconscious message to yourself that you’re not stuck in your current job if you don’t want to be. Of course, the best resumes are customized to address the specific skills of the position for which you are applying. But there are steps you can take to ensure that all the important details are in place when it’s time to look for a new job. Clear the clutter Is your first real job as a cashier at Taco Bob’s still applicable to your current career goals? If the answer is no, it’s time to delete it. Does your experience as a summer camp counselor translate to your required job skills? If so, how? Sometimes these extra details only serve to distract from your strongest and most pertinent experience. Edit

Is your resume ready for prime time? Make sure it is before you head out into the job market. Here, Mindy Stewart, the director of support services for the Ocala Police Department, left, talks with Laquisha Hill, a job seeker, during the City of Ocala Career Fair organized by CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion at the Ocala Police Department back in February. [BRUCE ACKERMAN/OCALA STAR-BANNER]

what’s relevant and get rid of the rest. Showcase recent skills, accomplishmentsPut your best face forward by elaborating on any recent achievements, awards or job promotions. Did you lead your team in the completion of a successful project? Did you come up with a winning concept that resulted in quantifiable sales? Did you gain valuable new skills or insights from workshops or other professional development? Rather than feeling like a static record of your job skills, a resume should seem as if it’s an evolving document of your career growth.

Update your look Just as your physical appearance in an interview can say a lot about you, the look of your resume can speak volumes. Is the format clean, modern and easy to follow? Does the font need updating? Is the language friendly, professional and concise? Giving your resume plenty of white space makes it easier for prospective employers to read. Use bold and italics sparingly. Stick to one font. Avoid verbosity and emphasize skills with bullet points when possible

Proofread — and then proofread again Your resume is complete with all your shiny new skills, achievements and promotions. You have a super-cool font and a clean, streamlined format. But, oops, you misspelled a word, failed to add an apostrophe in the correct spot, or have an extra space between words here or there. These may seem like small mistakes to you, but to employers they stand out and give pause. One of the things that sets a good job candidate apart from an excellent one is attention to detail. It also helps to ask somebody else to review it.


Career Resource Guide

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Sunday, May 13, 2018

Some employment statistics Staff report

Unemployment rate March 2018: 4.4 percent March 2017: 5.0 percent Workforce in March 2018: 135,056 Workforce in March 2017: 133,573

Where people work The top employment sectors in Marion County, ranked by number of workers 1. Health Care and Social Assistance: 915 establishments, 17,325 workers 2. Retail Trade: 1,221 establishments, 16,332 workers 3. Accommodation and Food Services: 574 establishments, 10,599 workers 4. Manufacturing: 260 establishments, 8,031 workers 5. Construction: 1,083 establishments, 7,044 workers 6. Public Administration: 63 establishments, 6,476 workers 7. Admin., Support, Waste Mgmt, Remediation: 553 establishments, 4,743 workers 8. Transportation and Warehousing: 242 establishments, 3,724 workers 9. Professional, ScientiďŹ c & Technical Services: 812 establishments, 3,511 workers 10. Education Services: (data not available)

Best paying jobs The occupations with the highest paying 2017 estimated annual wages in Marion County 1. Anesthesiologists, $308,453 2. Internists, General, $259,428 3. Physicians and Surgeons, All Other, $232,216 4. Psychiatrists, $227,363 5. Dentists, General, $209,674 6. Family and General Practitioners, $190,344 7. Chief executives, $188,495 8. Physician assistants, $136,151 9. Engineering managers, $135,026 10. Lawyers, $126,090

Best pay in Florida? 2017 average weekly earnings for Florida metro areas, listed highest to lowest. The Ocala metro area is all of Marion County. The Gainesville metro area is Alachua and

Health care / social assistance is the biggest job sector in this area. Here Leona Yawn, an LPN, works with a veteran in a room in primary care at The Villages VA Outpatient Clinic on Mulberry Lane in The Villages. Yawn was awarded the Secretary’s Award for Nursing Excellence, a once-in-a-lifetime achievement for nurses in Veterans Administration clinics and hospitals in the north Florida and south Georgia regions. [BRUCE ACKERMAN/OCALA STAR-BANNER] Gilchrist counties Jacksonville: $930.90 Naples-Immokalee-Marco Island:$875.13 Tampa-St Petersburg-Clearwater: $873.42 North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton:$839.39 Miami--Ft. Lauderdale-West Palm Bch: $825.90 Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville: $820.93 Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford:805.73 Lakeland-Winter Haven: $787.32 Cape Coral-Fort Myers: $765.56 The Villages: $760.38 Crestview-Ft Walton Beach-Destin: $742.03 Gainesville: $725.78 Ocala: $714.71 Port St Lucie: $714.49 Tallahassee: $708.50 Panama City: $704.55

Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent: $704.14 Deltona-Daytona Bch-Ormond Bch:$655.37 Sebastian-Vero Beach: $649.78 Homosassa Springs: $648.73 Punta Gorda: 646.35 Sebring: $607.85

Marion County jobs with the lowest average hourly wage: $9.20: Counter attendant $9.58: Cook, fast food $9.59: Dining room attendant $9.61: Cashier $9.70: Food prep/service $9.75: Diswasher $9.76: Person care/service worker $9.78: Motor vehicle operator/other

$9.79: Taxi driver $9.87: Hotel desk clerk

Marion County jobs with the highest average hourly wage $148.30: Anesthesiologists $124.72: Internists, general $111.64: Physicians and Surgeons, All Other $109.31: Psychiatrists $100.80: Dentists $91.51: Family and General Practitioners $90.62: Chief Executives $70.29: Personal Financial Advisors $65.46: Physician Assistants $64.91: Architectural and Engineering Managers

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2018 Career Resource Guide

2018 Career Resource Guide

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Sunday, May 13, 2018

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2018 Career Resource Guide

2018 Career Resource Guide

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Career Resource Guide

CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion is here to help Staff report

If you are a job seeker — or you are a business looking for employees — then CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion is the place to go for help. This agency “is one of nearly 600 business-led workforce investment boards created by the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998,” according to its website, https://careersourceclm.com/ CareerSource, which helps an average of 1,600 businesses per year, offers: • Online job posting, reaching wide audiences • Exclusive hiring events, including marketing, logistics and support staff • Job fairs • Training award programs • Research (labor market information, wages, talent pool) • Human resource management assistance • Outplacement assistance As for job seekers: On average, more than 36,000 job seekers receive free employment and training services each year.

Assistance includes: • One-on-one career consultation • Placement services • Job leads/referrals, resume writing assistance, training opportunities, veterans and youth programs and information on community resources. • Online job bank at www. careersourceclm.com via the Employ Florida Marketplace (EFM). • Employability workshops to sharpen skills • Recruiting events and job fairs • Skills assessments • Resource Rooms and Mobile Resources •Scholarships for training How to reach the agency: • For office hours and locations, call 1-800-434-5627 • Businesses call 873-7955 or 1-800-746-9950 or email ContactBusinessSrvcs@ careersourceclm.com • Job candidates call 7321700 or 1-800-434-5627 or email CareerSuccessPlan@ careersourceclm.com

Quick facts On the web https://careersourceclm.com/ Coming up: • Youth Job Fair for Class of 2018: 2-3:30 p.m. May 16 at the College of Central Florida Klein Conference Center, 3001 SW College Road, Ocala. Call 1-800-746-9950, ext. 1118 for additional information or go to https://careersourceclm.com/files/public/Youth%20Job%20 Fair%20flier%20seniors%20FINAL(1).pdf • Youth Job Fair for All Youths ages 16-24: 3:30-6 p.m. May 16 at the College of Central Florida Klein Conference Center, 3001 SW College Road, Ocala. Call 1-800-746-9950, ext. 1118 for additional information or check https://careersourceclm.com/files/public/Youth%20 Job%20Fair%20flier%20seniors%20FINAL(1).pdf

Brandon Howe, a job candidate, left, talks with Lora Howard of Miller’s Boating Center and Jeff Barnes of K-Country and WIND FM about a job that was available at Miller’s Boating Center. This job fair was held March 1 at the Klein Conference Center at the College of Central Florida and was co-sponsored by CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion, K-Country and WIND FM. It’s an example of the services that CareerSource provides the community. [BRUCE ACKERMAN/OCALA STAR-BANNER] Sharon Moore, center, and Michele Mack, right, of Sitel, talk to job candidates during a March 1 job fair at the Klein Conference Center at the College of Central Florida in Ocala. This fair was co-sponsored by CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion, K-Country and WIND FM. It’s an example of the services that CareerSource provides the community. [BRUCE ACKERMAN/ OCALA STARBANNER]


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In what county do people work? Almost half of Marion workers go elsewhere Staff report

How many people live in Marion County but work elsewhere? How many live elsewhere but work in Marion County? The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity recently studied these questions, and others, and issued a report. CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion reviewed the report and extracted the following data points: • “Nearly half of the workers living in Marion County leave the county for employment, with most commuting to Orange, Lake and Alachua counties.” But … • “The daily outflow of workers under age 55 is slowing, with slight declines both as a percentage and in total numbers, while there was little change in the number of workers 55 and older commuting for employment.” The report relies on 2015 Census data. As County Commission Chairwoman Kathy Bryant notes, the stats likely have changed in the intervening years, since Marion has welcomed FedEx, Auto Zone, Chewy and other big employers. “I would believe that with the opportunities that we’ve had and the growth that we’ve had, there’s going to be some significant changes to that data,” Bryant said last month “I would be expecting that, as well,” said Rusty Skinner, CEO of CareerSource CLM, who was briefing commissioners on the report. He noted that the number of workers leaving

Of the workers who come into Marion for jobs, 14.3 percent are employed in “goods producing” industries like construction. [DOUG ENGLE/OCALA STAR-BANNER]

Where do they go? Top destinations for Marion County workers employed outside the county: 1. Orange County: 5,665 workers 2. Lake County: 5,536 workers 3. Alachua County: 4,979 workers Where are they coming from? Top origin counties for workers who live elsewhere and come to Marion for work: 1. Citrus County: 3,687 workers 2. Lake County: 2,644 workers 3. Orange County: 2,193 workers Why are they leaving Marion? • 12.9 percent (6,330) are employed in “goods producing” industries such as mining, construction and manufacturing • 28.9 percent (14,112) are employed in “trades, transportation and utilities” • 58.2 percent (28,446) are employed in “other services,” which covers everything from dry cleaning and laundry, administering religious activities, personal and pet care, equipment and machinery repair to dating services Why are they coming to Marion? • 14.3 percent (4,780) come for jobs in “goods producing” industries • 35 percent (11,698) come for work in “trade, transportation and utilities” • 50.7 percent (16,922) come for work in “other services” jobs. Source: Florida Department of Economic Opportunity

the county dropped between 2014 and 2015, a trend that is expected to continue. According to the report, “there were 107,076

workers living in Marion County and 91,588 workers employed in Marion County. Of those workers who lived in the county, 48,888 or 45.7

percent, were employed outside Marion County,” CareerSource found. “Of the 91,588 people employed in Marion County,

58,188 (63.5 percent) live and work here, while 33,400 (36.5 percent) commute into the county for work,” the agency said. That net job flow loss of 15,488 workers means Marion County had the 47th highest outflow rate among Florida’s 67 counties during the study period. This picture “reinforces the need to be competitive, in terms of compensation, with similar businesses within a one-hour commute,” Skinner said in prepared remarks. He continued: “One of our goals should focus on working with high school graduates and first time job seekers to retain their skills within our communities. This includes working with our school districts and the College of Central Florida to develop short term, certificate and degree programs (both Associate and Bachelor) that focus on the skills sets that business needs.” Of those who leave Marion to work in another county, 24 percent (11,750) are 29 or younger, 51.1 percent (24,980) are ages 30-54, and 24.9 percent (12,158) are 55 or older. Of those workers commuting into Marion County, 25.1 percent are 29 or younger, 51.3 percent (17,119) are 30 to 54, and 23.7 percent (7,903) are 55 or older. Skinner, during comments last month to the County Commission, said that younger cohort is a point of emphasis. Those are people working their first and second jobs. The goal is to keep those workers in Marion. “We are hoping to see that number decrease,” Skinner told the commission.


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Sunday, May 13, 2018

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Career Resource Guide

Career Resource Guide May 13, 2018  

career resource guide

Career Resource Guide May 13, 2018  

career resource guide