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Your Guide To Area Healthcare Providers & Services

AN ADVERTISING PRODUCT OF THE


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YOUR GUIDE TO AREA HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS & SERVICES

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352-333-7847

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TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S GYNECOLOGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY. . . . . . . . . 10

MIDWIFERY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

RADIOLOGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

NUMBERS TO KNOW

A R E A H O S P I TA L S

Emergency 911 Florida Highway Patrol 352-498-1371 Alachua County Fire Rescue 352-658-3852 Alachua County Sheriff 352-367-4000 Gainesville Fire Rescue 352-334-5078 Gainesville Police Department 352-334-2400

North Florida Regional Medical Center 6500 W Newberry Road 352-333-4000 www.nfrmc.com

Abuse / Assault Registry

800-962-2873

Alzheimer’s & Dementia

800-272-3900

AIDS / HIV Hotline

800-352-2437

American Cancer Society

800-227-2345

American Cancer Society

352-376-6866

American Heart Association

877-242-4277

American Red Cross

800-733-2767

Arthritis Foundation

352-373-8550

Blind Services

800-342-1828

Elder Hotline

800-963-5337

Elder Care of Alachua County

352-265-9040

Lifesouth Community Blood Center 352-224-1660 Meals on Wheels

352-265-9040

Poison Control Center

800-222-1222

Public Health - Alachua County

386-462-2542

Rape Crisis / Victim Services

352-264-6760

Social Security Hotline

877-219-8323

Suicide Hotline

352-264-6789

Veterans Affairs - Regional

800-827-1000

VA Medical Center

352-376-1611

info@azuregnv.com

UF Health Shands Hospital 1515 SW Archer Road 352-265-0111 www.ufhealth.org UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital 1600 SW Archer Road 352-265-7337 www.ufhealth.org/kids Malcom Randall VA Medical Center 1601 SW Archer Road 352-376-1611 www.northflorida.va.gov/ locations/gainesville.asp Florida Recovery Center 4001 SW 13th Street 352-265-5500 www.floridarecoverycenters.com

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YOUR GUIDE TO AREA HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS & SERVICES

The convenience of 12 primary care locations. The expertise of UF Health.

We’ve grown to meet the needs of our community, which means easy access to the highest-quality primary care for you and every member of your family. From checkups and annual physicals to management of complex and multiple health concerns, we’re here for you every step of the way. And we offer evening and weekend appointments to fit your busy schedule.

FIND THE LOCATION CLOSEST TO YOU UFHealth.org/primarycare Children: 352.265.2222 • Adults: 352.265.1234

Pediatric Primary Care • Family Medicine • Internal Medicine

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Healthy Ways

STRESS

to handle

S

tress affects people of all ages. The symptoms of stress can be extremely unpleasant, as participants in a study released earlier this year by the Statistic Brain Research Institute and the American Institute of Stress reported experiencing physical symptoms of stress admitted to feeling fatigue, headache, upset stomach, and even muscle tension.

Among those who reported feeling physical symptoms of stress, 77 percent admitted to feeling those symptoms regularly, citing job pressure and money as the primary causes of their stress. How men and women handle stress can impact both their immediate and longterm health, as stress has been linked to a host of problems and ailments. Many people cope with stress in unhealthy ways, which may only exacerbate the

effects of stress on the body. Certain methods of handling stress may work for some people but not others, but the following are a few healthy ways to combat stress. alcohol and caffeine consumption. • Limit The Anxiety and Depression Association of

• • •

America notes that alcohol and caffeine can aggravate anxiety and trigger panic attacks. Rely on a support network. Many people simply need to talk to someone after a stressful day, which can feel like a weight has been lifted off their shoulders. Let your support network (coworkers, family and friends) know you’re there for them when they experience stress as well. Get daily exercise. When the body is physically active, the brain secretes endorphins, which are neurotransmitters that make you feel good. Eat a healthy diet. Diet also can affect how your body handles stress. Certain foods can tame stress, such as oatmeal - which boosts levels of a calming chemical known as serotonin in your brain.

Take Care of You. Your Lake City OB/GYN Since 2004 AllAboutWomenMD. com

386-754-1744 Helping You Live A Healthy Lifestyle!


YOUR GUIDE TO AREA HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS & SERVICES

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GYNECOLOGY JEAN C. COOK, M.D., FACOG Gynecology Medical School: University of Florida Board Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Fellow: American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Most Insurances Accepted

All About Women Obstetrics and Gynecology 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 111 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 386-754-1744 AllAboutWomenMD.com

MIDWIFERY JULIE GAONA, CNM Midwifery Medical School: M.S. in Nursing, University of Florida Certified Nurse-Midwife, Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner

Most Insurances Accepted

North Florida Women’s Women’s Physicians 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 508 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 352-332-7222 mynfwp.com

AMANDA HUSBAND, CNM Midwifery Medical School: M.S. in Nursing, University of Florida Certified Nurse-Midwife, Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner

Most Insurances Accepted

North Florida Women’s Women’s Physicians 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 508 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 352-332-7222 mynfwp.com

How to Lower Blood-Sugar Levels

Without Mediciation D

iabetes is a disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use the energy found in food. To be more specific, diabetes compromises the body’s ability to use glucose. Diabetes treatment can include a combination of strategies, including the following nondrug remedies.

Diabetics can work with •theirDiet:doctors and nutritionists to come up with a diet that will be most effective.

Work with a professional to create a healthy diet and follow it as closely as possible. Eat meals at the same time each day so you can better regulate blood-sugar spikes and lulls. Many people with •typeExercise: 2 diabetes are carrying

around extra weight. Exercise can help them shed pounds and maintain healthier weights. But exercise does more than just help you lose weight. By maintaining lean muscle mass, you can get rid of a larger amount of glucose in the bloodstream, thus helping manage diabetes in the process. Get at least 20 to 30 minutes of moderate activity several days per week.

Supplementation: Some •people find that certain

natural ingredients can help regulate blood-sugar levels. For example, pure, organic apple cider vinegar taken over time can help people with diabetes manage their blood-sugar levels more effectively. A small amount of cinnamon per day may be able to reduce fasting glucose levels by anywhere from 18 to 29 percent, according to a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Always speak with a doctor before trying any home remedies to treat diabetes or exploring any alternatives to traditional diabetes treatments.


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AUDIOLOGY Healthy Relationships Building Tracey Botha, MD

Karen Harris, MD

Dr. Botha specializes in high and low risk obstetrics, minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery, well-woman care and adolescent gynecology.

Dr. Harris’s specialties include evaluation and treatment of pelvic pain, adolescent gynecology, treatment of abnormal Pap smears and minimally invasive surgery using the da Vinci robot.

Richard Brazzel, MD

Ann Hatfield, MD

Dr. Brazzel specializes in high and low risk obstetrics. He also has a special interest in caring for women with abnormal Pap smears, pre-conception counseling and contraceptive care. He performs minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery.

Dr. Hatfield specializes in adolescent gynecology, contraceptive management and caring for expectant mothers.

Sheyna Carroccio, MD

Eduardo Marichal, MD

Dr. Carroccio’s specialties are in minimally invasive gynecological surgery, surgery using the da Vinci robot as well as high and low risk obstetrics.

Dr. Marichal’s specialties are delivering babies, minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery as well as surgery using the da Vinci robot. He has a special interest in helping women through menopause.

Kelly Chamberlain, MD

Amy Million, MD

Dr. Chamberlain specializes in minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery, obstetrics and especially enjoys supporting women in labor. She also has a special interest in contraceptive care.

Dr. Million specializes in high and low-risk obstetrics, adolescent and general gynecology and helping women through menopause.

Jill Delker, MD

Erin Werner, MD

Dr. Delker’s specialties are delivering babies, minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery, gynecology services from adolescence to menopause, and treatment of abnormal Pap smears.

Dr. Werner specializes in obstetrics and delivering babies. She performs minimally invasive laparoscopy; managing abnormal Pap smears and provides gynecology services from adolescence to menopause.

North Florida Women’s Physicians provides comprehensive healthcare that compassionately supports women through every stage of their lives. Utilizing the most advanced technologies, we specialize in delivering the highest level of obstetric care, including low-risk, high-risk, and patientcentered midwifery. We are dedicated to guiding you through every step of your pregnancy. Including the baby steps. Start building a healthy relationship for you and your baby today. Located at the Women’s Center at North Florida Regional Medical Center. 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite #508, Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 332-7222 www.mynfwp.com

Building healthy relationships.

OBSTETRICS | GYNECOLOGY | MIDWIFERY | GYNECOLOGIC SURGERY | INFERTILITY | WELL-WOMAN CARE


YOUR GUIDE TO AREA HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS & SERVICES

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MIDWIFERY MONIQUE MCAFEE, CNM Midwifery Medical School: M.S. in Nursing, University of Cincinnati Certified Nurse-Midwife, Advanced Registered Nurse North Florida Women’s Women’s Physicians Practitioner 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 508

Gainesville, FL 32605 | 352-332-7222 mynfwp.com

Most Insurances Accepted

JULIE RISCHAR, CNM, ARNP Midwifery M.S. in Nursing, University of Florida Certified Nurse-Midwife, Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner

All About Women Obstetrics and Gynecology 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 111 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 386-754-1744 AllAboutWomenMD.com

Most Insurances Accepted

SHELLEY RUSSELL, CNM, ARNP Midwifery M.S. in Nursing, University of Florida Certified Nurse-Midwife, Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner

All About Women Obstetrics and Gynecology 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 111 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 386-754-1744 AllAboutWomenMD.com

Most Insurances Accepted

ERIN SMITH, CNM Midwifery Medical School: M.S. in Nursing, University of California, San Francisco Certified Nurse-Midwife, Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner

Most Insurances Accepted

North Florida Women’s Women’s Physicians 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 508 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 352-332-7222 mynfwp.com

Did You Know? A

ccording to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 1,658,370 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2015. The NCI also estimates that more than 589,000 people will die from cancer in the United States in 2015. However, in the “Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer,” issued jointly by the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Cancer Institute and published in March 2015, showed that the overall cancer death rate in the United States has declined since the early 1990s. Between 2002 and 2011, cancer death rates

decreased by 1.8 percent per year among men and by 1.4 percent per year among women. Children fared even better, with cancer death rates declining by 2.1 percent per year among children ages 0 to 14 and 2.3 percent per year among children ages 0 to 19. While cancer research continues to discover new treatments and ways people can reduce their risk of developing cancer, the World Health Organization predicts the number of new cases of cancer will rise to 22 million in the next two decades. Many of those cases figure to be in Africa, Asia and Central and South America, where 60 percent of the world’s total new annual cases occur. These regions also account for 70 percent of the world’s cancer deaths, according to the WHO.


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OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY ANTHONY B. AGRIOS, M.D., FACOG Obstetrics and Gynecology Founder and Senior Provider Medical School: University of Southern California Board Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Fellow: American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Most Insurances Accepted

All About Women Obstetrics and Gynecology 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 111 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 386-754-1744 AllAboutWomenMD.com

MAURINE BATSON, M.D. Obstetrics and Gynecology Medical School: University of South Alabama College of Medicine Residency: University of Florida Fellow: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Most Insurances Accepted

All About Women Obstetrics and Gynecology 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 111 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 386-754-1744 AllAboutWomenMD.com

JOSEPH S. IOBST, M.D., FACOG Obstetrics and Gynecology Medical School: Temple University Board Certified: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Fellow: American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Most Insurances Accepted

All About Women Obstetrics and Gynecology 6440 W. Newberry Road, Suite 111 Gainesville, FL 32605 | 386-754-1744 AllAboutWomenMD.com

Seasonal Allergy Triggers A

llergic reactions occur when the body’s immune system attacks an often harmless substance like animal dander, food or pollen. Medication can help reduce the severity of such reactions, but some allergy sufferers find allergic reactions inconvenient nuisances even with medication. Understanding what triggers allergic reactions may help some people avoid them or make them easier to handle. The following are some of the more common allergy triggers and how men and women suffering from allergies can avoid them. Pollen: Pollen is perhaps the bestknown allergy trigger. A fine, often yellow substance that’s essential to the fertilization of flowers, pollen can be spread by wind, insects or other animals. Allergy sufferers can combat high pollen counts by staying indoors on windy days and closing their windows and running their air conditioners. Pet Dander: Dander are flakes of skin in an animal’s fur or hair. Because of their microscopic size, these flakes of skin can easily attach and remain attached to

bedding, fabrics and furniture. Many people keep their pets even if they develop allergies to dander. Should such a situation arise, do not allow your pet into your bedroom, bathe the animal regularly and remove carpeting in favor of bare floors or washable rugs. Mold: Mold is a furry growth of minute fungal hyphae that is often found in damp parts of a home, such as basements and bathrooms. Mold also can be found in grass and mulch, triggering allergic reactions when men and women spend time in their yards. To avoid an allergic reaction triggered by mold, make sure moist areas of your home get fresh air regularly and routinely clean ceilings or other areas where mold may grow. Dust Mites: Tiny bugs that live in bedding, carpets, curtains, upholstery, and mattresses, dust mites feed on dead skin cells from people and pets. Dust mites also may feed on bacteria, fungi and pollen. Dust mites thrive in humid conditions, but these pests can be combatted with hypoallergenic pillows and mattress covers. Removing materials that collect dust, such as carpet, also can reduce the number of dust mites. Seasonal allergies affect millions of people. But such sufferers can combat their seasonal allergies by taking several proactive approaches to eliminate allergens before reactions occur.


YOUR GUIDE TO AREA HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS & SERVICES

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Include Good Fats & Carbs in a

Healthy Eating Plan

C

ome the end of the holiday season, many people resolve to rest, recharge and get back to healthy eating habits. Time magazine reports that losing weight and getting fit are the most popular New Year’s resolutions, but also the ones that people are most likely to abandon after a short time. That may be because New Year’s dieters are too often choosing diets that are impractical and not conducive to long-term success. Some may stop eating certain foods or ingredients entirely, while others look to diets that require a level of commitment beyond busy adults’ capabilities. Many fad diets target fat and carbohydrates, but dieters may not know that fat and carbs are necessary for a healthy metabolism. According to Dr. Walter Willett of the Harvard School of Public Health, low-fat diets don’t work for many people. In fact, dozens of studies have found that low-fat diets are no more healthy than moderate- or high-fat diets and may, in fact, be worse. Foods that are low in fat may be full of ingredients that can be detrimental when eaten in high amounts. Processed low-fat foods can be made to taste better with copious amounts of salt or sugar. Some low-fat foods are actually high in simple carbohydrates, which can cause spikes in blood sugar and increase bad fats called triglycerides in the blood. Simple carbohydrates are generally those that

break down fast and do not provide much value beyond the initial energy burst. Although some simple carbs, such as fructose and lactose, can be beneficial and are generally found in healthy foods, it’s best to avoid simple carbs. Eating healthy doesn’t mean avoiding carbohydrates and fats altogether. The key is to find good fats and carbs that provide a host of benefits. Good fats, such as monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats, and omega-3 fatty acids, help to manage mood, maintain mental acuity, fight fatigue, and control weight. Good fats are largely found in olives, nuts, legumes, soy, and fatty fish. Keep total fat intake to 20 to 30 percent of your calories. Good carbs are complex carbohydrates. They’re starches that take a longer time to metabolize in your digestive system. Good carbs will raise blood sugar, but they will keep it at a stable level for an extended period of time. Complex carbs usually contain a lot of fiber, which can help keep a person feeling full for long periods of time. Plus, they help keep digestion moving smoothly to help you avoid constipation. Fibrous vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beans are high in fiber and are good carbohydrate choices. Some foods contain both good carbs and good fats. Eating healthy means finding a balance that includes the right fats and carbohydrates.


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Eyes on Health:

What Your Eyes Can Tell Doctors P eople who have been putting off eye examinations may want to call their opthalmologists to schedule an appointment. That’s because vision checkups can do more than protect your eyes. By examining the eyes, doctors may have a window into health problems affecting other areas of the body.

Researchers recently discovered a link between detected retinal amyloid plaques and the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. While evidence was found in lab mice, autopsies of at least eight Alzheimer’s disease patients have also shown amyloid plaques, which are known to interfere with memory and other mental functions, present in the retinas. Doctors at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, Calif., are gearing up for larger studies of humans to determine if an Alzheimer’s imaging technique can be perfected. Dementia is not the only thing that doctors may be able to detect through an eye exam. Jaundice in the whites of the eyes may indicate liver disease, and early warning signs of diabetes may be detectable in the eyes. The American Academy of Opthalmology says the eye is the only place where doctors can see veins, arteries and a nerve without surgery, and eye examinations are increasingly being relied on to gauge overall health.

may result. This symptom in conjunction with persistent nasal congestion could be a sure sign of allergies. High cholesterol: The presence of bumpy, •yellowish patches on the eyelid, known as

xanthelasma palpebra, is a warning sign of high cholesterol, which is often initially diagnosed during a routine eye exam. Cancer: Some cancer metastases can be •detected during an eye exam. The presence of a bump or brown spot on the eyelid also may be indicative of skin cancer. Many malignant eyelid tumors are basal-cell carcinoma. If the spot is brown, it’s more likely to be malignant melanoma.

issues: When the outer one-third •of Thyroid the brow (the part closest to the ear) begins to disappear on its own, this is a common sign of thyroid disease. The thyroid helps regulate metabolism, and thyroid hormones are essential to hair production. Hair loss may occur elsewhere, but is much more visible in the brows. Clogged arteries: Blockages in the smaller •veins in the retina may indicate clogs caused

The following are a few additional conditions that may be detected through the eyes.

by arterial plaque. This will show up as a retinal occlusion in a visual exam. If blood vessels in the eyes are blocked, clogged arteries may be present elsewhere in the body, so a cardiology workup may be ordered.

eye circles. While this can be a sign of aging, dark circles, sometimes referred to as “allergic shiners,” also may indicate certain allergies. When clogged sinuses cause a blockage of blood flow in the nasal passages around the eye, darkness

a sign of Bell’s palsy. This is a condition of the nervous system that controls facial muscles, causing temporary paralysis in one side of the face. Sometimes Bell’s palsy follows a viral or bacterial infection.

Allergies: Patients may be referred to an •allergy specialist if they exhibit dark under-

palsy: The inability to close one eye or •to Bell’s control tear production in that eye may be


YOUR GUIDE TO AREA HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS & SERVICES

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Did You Know?

Reduce Exposure with Sun-Protective Clothing

A

ccording to the National Institutes of Health, sun-protective clothing can protect adults and children from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation, exposure to which can cause skin cancer. Sun-protective clothing is typically made with fabrics designed to absorb or reflect ultraviolet, or UV, radiation. Much like sunscreen is rated for its sun-protection factor, or SPF, sun-protective clothing is given an ultraviolet protection factor, or UPF. UPF even provides a broader spectrum of protection than

SPF, protecting from both ultraviolet A and B radiation, whereas SPF protects largely against ultraviolet B. Clothing with a UPF rating of 40 or greater provides excellent protection, blocking nearly 98 percent of UV radiation. Doctors recommend that people who are at greater risk of skin cancer, such as those with blue eyes, fair skin, a large number of moles, and red hair, wear sun-protective clothing when exposed to sunlight for extended periods of time.

HELPING YOU LIVE A HEALTHY LIFE.

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RADIOLOGY ANDRES’ R. ACOSTA, MD Radiology Medical School: University of Puerto Rico Board Certified: American Board of Radiology Fellowship: University of Florida; Musculoskeletal Radiology

Most Insurances Accepted

Doctors Imaging Group 6716 NW 11th Place Gainesville, FL 32605 | 352-331-9729 DoctorsImagingGroup.com 3 Color Spot Coated

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JILL L. DALBA, DO Radiology Medical School: Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine Board Certified: American Board of Radiology Fellowship: University of Florida; Mammography & Body Imaging

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JACK J. RYAN, M.D. Radiology Medical School: University of Massachusetts Board Certified: American Board of Radiology Fellowship: Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute/ Baptist Hospital; Vascular and Interventional Radiology

Most Insurances Accepted

Process Vascular4Grayscale &Color Interventional Physicians 6685 NW 9th Boulevard Gainesville, FL 32605 | 352-333-7847 DoctorsImagingGroup.com/VIP

White

WILL F. WILLIAMS, MD Radiology Medical School: University of Florida Board Certified: American Board of Radiology Fellowship: University of Florida; Vascular & Interventional Radiology

Most Insurances Accepted

Doctors Imaging Group 6716 NW 11th Place Gainesville, FL 32605 | 352-331-9729 DoctorsImagingGroup.com 3 Color Spot Coated Grayscale

3 Color Spot Uncoated

JUDY M. YANCEY, MD Diagnostic Radiology Medical School: University of Florida College of Medicine Board Certified: Diagnostic Radiology, American Board of Radiology Residency: University of Florida College of Medicine

Most Insurances Accepted

Did You Know? A

ccording to the Celiac Disease Foundation, gluten is the general name for proteins found in wheat, rye, barley and triticale. That’s an important thing for party hosts to know, as many people now follow gluten-free diets. When planning party menus, hosts should ask guests if they adhere to gluten-free diets, as consuming gluten can trigger an abnormal immune system response in people who have Celiac disease,

4 Color Process M•U•S•I•C 7550 W. University Ave, Suite A Gainesville, FL 32607 | 352-727-4911 www.musicpllc.com

White

potentially causing damage to the small intestine. Wheat is commonly foundGrayscale in bread, baked goods, pasta, and cereals, among other foods. Barley is present in food coloring, soups, malt vinegar, and beer. Rye is found in rye bread, certain beers and cereals, while triticale may be present in certain breads, pastas and cereals. If guests have gluten allergies or are suffering from Celiac disease, look for foods that are designated as gluten-free. Many grocers now offer numerous gluten-free products to cater to the growing number of individuals


YOUR GUIDE TO AREA HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS & SERVICES

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ADVERTISING INDEX

Able Pharmacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 All About Women. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Azure Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Doctors Imaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Haven Hospice.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 North Florida Women’s Physicians. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Orthopaedic Institute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Shands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 LISTING INDEX

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McAfee, Monique. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Rischar, Julie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Russell, Shelley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ryan, Jack.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Smith, Erin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Williams, Will. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Yancey, Judy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Health Boosters You Have At Home

M

any people desire to be healthier, and sales of nutritional supplements reflect such desires. A report by Packaged Facts titled “Nutritional Supplements in the U.S,” says supplement sales reached $11.5 billion in 2012 and have been climbing ever since. In addition, gym memberships also have increased. Individuals also can turn to many health boosters in their own homes to help them achieve their goals of living healthier lifestyles.

• Lemon water: Lemon water can help reduce

acidity in the body, including removing uric acid, a main cause of inflammation. Lemons contain pectin fiber, which can aid in weight loss by helping to fight hunger pangs. Lemons also contain vitamin C.

• Yogurt: Probiotic pills can help return healthy bacteria to the digestive system, but so can eating yogurt regularly. Look for yogurts that contain live and active cultures for optimal

health benefits.

• Bicycle: Dust off that bicycle that has been

hiding in your garage. Cycling is an excellent form of cardiovascular exercise, and riders can tailor their intensity levels to correlate to their ages and abilities.

• Fruits and vegetables: Produce offers many

of the vitamins and minerals people look to supplements to provide. Including diverse fruit and vegetable choices in one’s diet can improve health in various ways, including providing a boost to the immune system.

• Honey: Honey is a valuable superfood that can boost overall health. In addition to soothing sore throats, it can serve as an antibiotic and wound healer, provide allergy protection, increase calcium absorption, and provide a source of energy without the insulin spike associated with other forms of sugar. Being healthier is a goal for many people, and certain foods, beverages and products already in your home can help you get on a healthy track.


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2016 Medical Directory GNV  
2016 Medical Directory GNV  

Your Guide to Area Healthcare Providers & Services