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Since the ‘90s, the Florida Legislature has cranked out new exception programs with a good array of acronyms. From MMTDs, to TCMA, to TCEAs, to DULAS and backlog authorities, the criteria have been to make it easier to develop, even if the roadways can’t handle the extra traffic. The funding ideas have created more problems than they solved. Proportionate fair share doesn’t seem to have taken off because it’s too hard to understand. The last project in still gets stuck paying for improvements after all the capacity has been sucked up. The difficulty with transportation concurrency is that someone has to pay for the roadways that support vehicle movement. In Florida, impact fees that were attached to new homes have been repealed. A proportionate fair share ordinance seems to have created confusion on who pays and when. In 2009, a statewide study supported by FDOT and DEO, and conducted by CUTR, looked at mobility fees as a way to fund infrastructure. Concurrency fees only consider transportation. Mobility fees can be implemented to consider land use and transportation. The mobility fee study from 2009 focused more on how land use and transportation interact to make it easier to determine how much a mobility fee should be. “The proposed working concept suggests the development of a regional mobility plan. However, localized mobility needs clearly also need to be addressed. Such needs may require another funding alternative, such as a transportation utility fee. Alternatively, a local impact fee may also be needed to fund localized improvements not reflected in the mobility plan. This raises additional concerns relative to cost of infill and the need to avoid double‐charging development for its impacts.”—Florida Mobility Fee Study, p. 7, 2009. Twenty three local governments in Florida have rescinded transportation concurrency. In several instances, these local governments replaced transportation concurrency with alternative transportation mitigation strategies such as mobility fees. So far only St. Johns, Pasco, Jacksonville and Alachua County are using mobility fees. Gainesville has implemented a multimodal district plan that

Concurrency030614  

Analysis of changes in FL transportation concurrency policy since 1993.

Concurrency030614  

Analysis of changes in FL transportation concurrency policy since 1993.

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