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OFFICE OF PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.

Introduction

2.

Complaints

3.

Use of Force

4.

Vehicle Pursuits

5.

Biased-Based Profiling

6.

Accreditation

7.

Signature Approval Page


Section 1- Introduction The Ocala Police Department Office of Professional Standards is charged with the responsibility of compiling and producing the annual report for the Ocala Police Department. The Office of Professional Standards is responsible for conducting various audits, inventories and inspections throughout the year and investigates complaints originating both internally and externally. The annual report presents statistical information outlining complaints, use of forces within the agency, vehicle pursuits and information addressing bias based profiling. The Ocala Police Department is committed to the vision of the agency: “We proudly pledge to serve all citizens with respect and are committed to protecting life and property.� The officers of the Ocala Police Department are committed to the core values of Integrity, Courage, and Character.


Section 2- Complaints The Office of Professional Standards conducts Internal Affairs investigations and is the repository of all Internal Affairs Investigation, Supervisory Inquiry, and Citizen Complaint files. Depending on the seriousness of the complaint, the Chief of Police and/or the Deputy Chief of Police will assign a complaint to a supervisor for investigation or assign it to the Office of Professional Standards so an Internal Affairs Investigation can be conducted. During the 2017 calendar year, the Office of Professional Standards received 18 Citizen Complaint forms. Four of these complaints were assigned for formal investigation as Supervisor Inquiries. The 14 remaining complaints were either determined to be unfounded, or resolved to the complainant’s satisfaction by an agency supervisor. Fourteen of the complaints were against employees assigned to Patrol, and four were against employees assigned to Special Operations. The Office of Professional Standards oversaw seven Supervisory Inquiries. Six of the inquiries were assigned to a Patrol, Special Operations, or Investigations supervisor for investigation and one was assigned to a supervisor in Professional Standards. Out of the seven Supervisory Inquiries, four were sustained, two were not sustained, and one investigation expired without findings. Three of the complaints originated from outside the department and four were internal complaints. Six of the complaints were against officers assigned to Patrol and/or Special Operations and one was against a civilian employee assigned to the Communications Center. The Office of Professional Standards conducted twenty Internal Affairs investigations for the 2017 calendar year. Of the twenty investigations, fifteen investigations resulted in sustained violations, two investigations resulted in the accusations being not sustained against the officer(s), two investigations exonerated the officer(s), and in one case the accused officer resigned before the investigation was completed. Eighteen of the complaints originated from within the department and two from citizens. Nineteen investigations involved officers assigned to Patrol / Special Operations, while one involved an officer assigned to the Drug Unit.


Section 3- Use of Force The Office of Professional Standards received a total of 219 Use of Force reports during the 2017 calendar year. The table below shows the yearly totals since 2007. (See Chart 3.01)

Number of Use of Force Reports by Year 250 219 190

200

150

173 142

155 141

145

120 100 69

82 45

50

0 Chart 3.01

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Review of the 2017 use of force reports showed there were 13 incidents during which the subject sustained an injury. Of those reported injuries, all 13 were minor in nature. Subjects sustained one injury from a K-9 bite and three from the use of a Taser Conducted Energy Weapon. There were 11 officers injured during a use of force. The reports indicated subject(s) had been arrested during 152 of the incidents, with a total of 163 subjects arrested.


Section 3- Use of Force Force was used 80 times against white males, 104 times against black males, and 21 times against Hispanic males. Force was used 34 times against white females, 19 times against black females, and 1 time against Hispanic females, for a total of 259 subjects. This total is higher than the number of total reports, as several of the Use of Force reports documented force being used against multiple offenders. (See Chart 3.02)

Use of Force by Race and Gender 120

104

100 80 80 60 34

40 21

19

20

1 0

White Males

Chart 3.02

Black Males

Hispanic Males

White Females

Black Females Hispanic Females

During the 219 reported uses of force, a total of 412 separate uses of officer force occurred. (For example, an officer pointing a firearm at two subjects during a felony traffic stop would constitute two uses of officer force – one use for each subject.) Of these, 107 were simply shows of force where the officer pointed either a firearm or Taser at the subject. There were 305 actual applications of physical force, including arm bars (2), knee strikes (4), lateral vascular neck restraints (1), pressure point techniques (2), punches (1), restraints (127), takedowns (85), and other uncategorized uses of force (55). There were 21 applications of the Taser, and 2 uses of OC (pepper) spray. On two occasions, subjects were apprehended by a K-9 bite. The disparity between the total uses of force (412) and the total number of reports (219) arises because multiple officers and/or multiple levels of force were involved in some of the use of force encounters. (See Chart 3.03)


Type of Force 140

127

120 100

85

80 55

60 40 20

24 2

2

4

1

2

2

1

0

Chart 3.03

In 2017, a Taser was deployed against white males 9 times, 11 times against black males, 1 time against a Hispanic male and 3 times against a white female. (See Chart 3.04)

Taser Deployments by Race and Gender 12 10

11 9

8 6 4

3

2

1

0 Chart 3.04

White Males

Black Males

Hispanic Males

White Females

Each incident requiring a Use of Force was reviewed through the involved officer’s chain of command. Each of these review processes required several supervisors to review an incident for conformity to established practices and directives. In 2017, 218 of the 219 Use of Force incidents were deemed within the guidelines of the Use of Force Policy. The remaining incident was forwarded to the Office of Professional Standards for investigation in reference to the amount of force used by the officer. At the conclusion of Internal Affairs case 17-18, the allegation of excessive force was sustained against the officer, who received 40 hours of suspension and was removed from a specialty unit. The IA Trak program currently used by the Office of Professional Standards to track Use of Force reports will notify the user when an employee reaches or exceeds five Use of Force reports within a 182-day period. In 2017, there were 8 alerts on a total of seven different officers. The notifications were sent to the Bureau Majors for dissemination. After a review of the Uses of Force for each alert, it was determined the involved officers were justified in the amount of force used.


Section 4- Vehicle Pursuits In 2017, The Office of Professional Standards received 56 Pursuit Reports. Nine of the pursuits ended when the drivers stopped their vehicles, 18 ended when the driver abandoned the vehicle and fled on foot, two ended when the pursued vehicle became disabled, eight ended after the pursued vehicle crashed, and nineteen of the pursuits were discontinued or canceled. All the pursuits were reviewed for adherence to policy. After the pursuits were reviewed through the chain of command it was determined officers violated the pursuit policy in three of the pursuits. The following chart provides a 10-year overview of pursuits initiated by the agency:

Number of Pursuits by Year 60

56 48

50 40

41

41

2014

2015

32

30 20

18 14 10

10

10 3

4

2010

2011

0

2007

2008

2009

2012

2013

2016

2017


Section 5- Bias-Based Profiling Ocala Police Department Directive 7.25 states in part: It is the policy of the Ocala Police Department to protect the Constitutional rights of all people, regardless of race, color, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, physical handicap, religion or other belief system or physical characteristic; and to treat each person with respect and dignity. While contacting persons in a variety of situations is not only routine, but also relevant to law enforcement activities, the Department will not accept or tolerate bias-based profiling. Members of the Ocala Police Department are prohibited from taking bias-based law enforcement action, such as contact, detention, asset seizure, or interdiction toward any person(s). Persons who believe they have been stopped and/or searched as a result of bias-based profiling may file a complaint with the Department. There were no complaints received by the department in reference to bias-based profiling during the 2017 calendar year. To conduct an analysis of possible bias-based Profiling by Ocala Police Department officers for the 2017 calendar year, two sets of data were reviewed. Most bias-based Profiling occurs through self-initiated activity, so the first set of data reviewed came from Field Interview Reports (FIR’s). The second set of data used was traffic enforcement information, which included reviewed data from Citations1, Written Warnings and Verbal Warnings. Both FIR and Traffic Enforcement data are broken down into subsets showing raw totals and percentages by race and gender After a review of the Field Interview Reports and Traffic Stops information gathered for this report, it does not appear the Ocala Police Department performs any type of bias-based profiling.

1

With the present computer program there is no way to separate as to whether a citation was issued during an accident or a traffic stop.


Field Interview Reports The Community Policing philosophy encourages direct citizen contact by officers. In addition to gathering information to facilitate the performance of their duties, officers may approach any person who is on a public street or in a public area to engage in voluntary conversation. When an officer observes suspicious activity, the officer should make contact with the suspicious individual(s) and make every effort to resolve the reason for suspicion. If there is no reasonable suspicion that a crime has occurred or is occurring, the individual will not be detained. The individual cannot be forced to answer questions; however, the officer will attempt to gather the individual's personal information. Information concerning the contact will be appropriately documented on a Field Interview Report. During the 2017 calendar year, officers documented a total of 632 Field Interview Reports. A total of 317 (50%)2 were documented on white males, 108 (17%) were documented on white females, 126 (20%) were documented on black males, 26 (4%) were documented on black females, 33 (5%) were documented on Hispanic males, 11 (2%) were documented on Hispanic females, 6 (1%) were documented on a males of another race, and 5 (1%) were documented on females of another race. (See Chart 5.1) Total FIR's by Race & Gender W/F, 108, 17% B/M, 126, 20%

B/F, 26, 4% H/M, 33, 5%

W/M, 317, 50%

Chart 5.1

2

H/F, 11, 2%

O/F, 5, 1%

All percentages are rounded off to the closest whole number.

O/M, 6, 1%


Of the Field Interview Reports documented, a total of 425 (67%) were documented on Caucasians, 152 (24%) were documented on African Americans, 44 (7%) were documented on Hispanics, and 11 (2%) were documented on a person of another race. (See Chart 5.2)

Total FIR's by Race

Black, 152, 24%

Hispanic, 44, 7%

White, 425, 67%

Other, 11, 2%

Chart 5.2

Of the Field Interview Reports documented, a total of 482 (76%) were documented on males and 150 (24%) were documented on females. (See Chart 5.3) Total FIR's by Gender

Male, 482, 76%

Female, 150, 24%

Chart 5.3


Traffic Enforcement During the 2017 calendar year, officers initiated a total of 22,929 traffic contacts. Of this total, 8,490 (37%) were with white males, 6,736 (29%) were with white females, 3,315 (14%) were with black males, 2,920 (13%) were with black females, 437 (2%) were with Hispanic males, 244 (1%) were with Hispanic females, 450 (2%) were with males of other races, and 337 (2%) were with females of other races. (See Chart 5.4) Officers' Total Traffic Contacts by Race & Gender W/F, 6736, 29% B/M, 3315, 14%

B/F, 2920, 13%

H/M, 437, 2% H/F, 244, 1% O/M, 450, 2%

W/M, 8490, 37% O/F, 337, 2% Chart 5.4

Of the total traffic contacts, 15,226 (66%) were with Caucasians, 6,235 (27%) were with African Americans, 681 (3%) were with Hispanics, and 787 (4%) were with persons of other races. (See Chart 5.5) Officers' Total Traffic by Race White, 15226, 66% Black, 6235, 27%

Hispanic, 681, 3% Other, 787, 4% Chart 5.5


Of the total traffic contacts, 12,692 (55%) were with males and 10,237 (45%) were with females. (See Chart 5.6) Officers' Total Traffic by Gender Female, 10237, 45%

Male, 12692, 55% Chart 5.6


Section 6- Accreditation Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation The Ocala Police Department is accredited by The Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation. Accreditation is the certification by an independent reviewing authority that an entity has met specific requirements and prescribed standards. The accreditation process is an ongoing evaluation developed to ensure the agency is meeting the highest standards of professionalism and excellence. Files are developed covering 203 standards. The Ocala Police Department was initially accredited in 2008. It was reaccredited in 2011 and 2014. Every three years the Ocala Police Department participates in the reaccreditation process with The Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation. An Accreditation Assessment took place in November 2016. The Ocala Police Department received full reaccreditation in February 2017. Participation in the accreditation process is approved by Chief Greg Graham and overseen by the Captain of the Office of Professional Standards. Mrs. Corie Byrd is assigned as the Accreditation Manager, having been appointed to this position in August 2017.


Signature and Approval

APPROVED

DATE

DISAPPROVED

9/10/18 Greg Graham Chief of Police

Greg Graham Chief of Police

Ocala Police Department- 2017 Annual Report  
Ocala Police Department- 2017 Annual Report  
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