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66th Annual Founders’ Days • February 14-17

FOUNDERS’ DAYS SOUVENIR EDITION

DELIVERED TO: HOMES & BUSINESSES IN • DEERFIELD BEACH • LIGHTHOUSE POINT • HILLSBORO BEACH • POMPANO BEACH • BOCA RATON

Souvenir Edition

Observer www.observernewspaperonline.com

Since 1962

Deerfield Publishing, Inc. © 2013

FOUNDERS’ DAYS ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS FRIDAY • Carnival • Famous Frank and the Nucklebusters Blues Band • Resolvers

SATURDAY • Parade • Andrew Morris • Uproot Hootenanny • Fireworks

SUNDAY • Stand Up Paddleboard Races • Skinny Jimmy • Pitbull of Blues


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By Rachel Galvin Deerfield’s tomatoes were considered Since Ponce De Leon’s supposed search among the best in Florida. for the “fountain of the youth” 500 years When World War I came, freight cars ago, people have been arriving at South were more often filled with needed machinFlorida shores seeking paradise. This “land ery than produce; plus, a severe freeze in of flowers” today is still a hot tourist 1917 destroyed most of the tomato crop and attraction, no matter what part of the penruined the idea of building a processing insula you visit, but especially near the plant. But something positive happened that sun-kissed beaches. year—the bridge was built over the IntracDeerfield’s beach still brings in everyoastal. Residents could go to the ocean one from those who prefer to soak in some without having to swim or take a boat. rays to die-hard surfers , water enthusiasts As the Roaring Twenties hit, a real estate and boaters. boom hit Florida. Promoted primarily by But the landscape here was not always entrepreneur Carl G. Fisher, this push for so accommodating. Back in the early 19th Florida real estate created more land grabs century, visitors would find much more and more traffic into the area. In the April rugged terrain, including swamps, vines, 22, 1975 edition of the “Sun-Sentinel,” pioneer J.B. Wiles told a story saw palmetto, cabbage palms, wild fig trees and pine groves that they about his recollection of those years. had to manuever around. It wasn’t very welcoming to travelers. But it He said, “I came down during the ’25 boom. That was equal to better was a prime piece of real estate, in between Palm Beach and Miami, than the California gold rush.” which both were starting to blossom by the late 1800s. Wiles described what were then called the “tin can tourists” who lived Florida would not be the populous place it has become without the in Deerfield Beach. Whether the people were tourists or trying to find vision of Henry Flagler, a partner at Standard Oil and creator of the work in the area, they did not have homes to go to. They slept in cityFlorida East Coast Railway. He came to Jacksonville with his wife, who sponsored camps. was ill, to try to find a better climate. Unfortunately, she still died two He explained, “They lived out of tin cans. They didn’t have any years later, but, thank goodness, Flagler stayed. restaurants. They didn’t have any motels. There weren’t all the places up He ended up marrying two more times and and down the road like there is now.” devoted much of his time to building up his But through many factors, the boom became a bust. To make matters new home. worse, the Great His first restoration was in St. Augustine, Miami Hurricane where he constructed the Ponce De Leon hit in 1926, costing Deerfield area, 1886. Hotel (now part of Flagler College). He went an estimated $157 on to create the Royal Poinciana Hotel in billion according to West Palm Beach, now the Breakers. These Carl G. Fisher helped promote Wikipedia. Those were just a few of his developments. As his the real estate boom in the 20s. who had not already vision expanded, so did his railroad. Soon, he moved it not only across the state, but southward where the warm left, did, but die-hards like Wiles stayed Henry Flagler’s Florida climates were more conducive to successful crops. He incorpo- behind. It was also at this time that the Cloister East Coast Railway rated Miami in 1896. The railroad going back and forth from north helped people discover to south allowed more people to be aware of Deerfield Beach, and, Inn in Boca, now called the Boca Raton early Deerfield. just two years later, Deerfield Beach got its first post office to Resort & Club, opened. It was the most serve the approximately 20 people who now resided in what was expensive 100-room hotel of its day. It was purchased by Clarence Geist and then still a wilderness. The business district was located where Dixie Road and Hillsboro Boulevard are located expanded to include the former Cabana today, except Dixie Road was a “9-foot wide dirt trail,” according to “Fiesta Magazine,” Club and a new golf course. After $8 Courtesy of State Photographic Archives. 1977. The key industry was agriculture, which was brought to the produce shed near the million in renovations, it re-opened as railway depot and then shipped north. Deerfield residents grew many types of fruits and the Boca Raton Club and was run as a private club until Geist’s death in 1938. The main vegetables, including pineapples (until the pineapple industry collapsed in the early 1900s employment for people in the area was maintenance work on the hotel or on Federal Highway. when Flagler’s train went to Key West and picked up cheaper Cuban pineapples.) See Journey, pg 4

Deerfield Beach:

Journey through Paradise!

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Deerfield Beach: The way we were

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Uproot Hootenanny

The band with the uncommon name has become a common fixture here in Deerfield, appearing at many local events. Playing a unique brand of Folk, Classic Rock, Celtic, Bluegrass and Country music, they aim to please all ages, from 3 to 103. Each band member not only sings, but plays an instrument as well. The band, which plays mostly originals and some covers, is composed of Brian Bolen (guitar, bass), Brian Trew (violin, viola), Rolando Willemann (bass, guitar), David Welch (banjo, guitar) and Billy Gilmore (mandolin, dobro, fiddle,banjo and guitar). This collective group of diverse musicians came together as friends just hoping to have fun and make some good music. Their influences individually run the gamut from Simon & Garfunkel to The Grateful Dead, from Herbie Hancock to Led Zeppelin, as well as Bill Monroe, the Cheiftains, Altan and The Clancy Brothers. For more info, visit www.uproothootenanny.com. Uproot Hootenanny will be performing Saturday, Feb. 16 from 8 to 9 p.m, followed by the fireworks, and again 9:25 to 10 p.m.

The Resolvers

FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Journey continued from pg 2 But many sought out more questionable lines of work. With Prohibition, came new opportunities. Rum runners became prevalent, bringing rum from Bimini up to speakeasies in Florida, like Cap’s Place in Lighthouse Point (See story, page 10). Even Al Capone tried to expand his business here, but was run out of town. Deerfield Island Park, which he once intended to make his home, is still called Capone Island by some. According to www.flpd.org, “During the depression, one of the duties of the Police Department and Sheriff’s Office, was handling the socalled “hobo express.” In an attempt to get undesirables out of the area, including those looking for work, vagrants were herded to the county line of each county. Fort Lauderdale transported

its undesirables to the northern boundary of Deerfield Beach. It was either the “hobo express” or a 30-day jail sentence.” In World War 2, many moved in during war time to train here. According to the Boca Raton Historical Society website, in 1942, the Army Air Corps established its only war-time radar training school at the site of what is today F.A.U. and the Boca Raton Airport. The facility brought thousands of servicemen, as well as families and civilian employees to the tiny community of Boca Raton, with a population of 723 in 1940. Betty Tondel came to town at that time to train. Tondel said, “I was taking a course to learn to be a Red Cross volunteer nurse’s aid. I

This alternative reggae group has its own unique sound. They call it “Big Band Reggae” and they draw their influence from classic Jamaican roots reggae, rock steady, and ska, along with New Orleans Jazz, funk, and soul. Their explosive sound often includes up to 10 musicians on stage, with three lead vocalists and a full horn section. For more info, visit www.bigbandreggae.com. Listen to the Resolvers’ beats on Friday, Feb. 15 from 8:30 to 10 p.m.

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completed the course and learned a lot that I have used over and over.” A submarine watchtower was built on Deerfield’s beach and manned around the clock by volunteers. Jack Nelson was in charge of antisubmarine operations, and residents were able to witness the sinking of several German U-boats. At the same time, people coming here discovered Deerfield’s beautiful oceanfront and, as more tourists came in, more hotels and motels opened along the shoreline. In 1960, the movie Where the Boys Are was filmed in Ft. Lauderdale. This comingof-age film shed a new light on fun in the sun on the South Florida beaches. It began a tradition of coming to the area for Spring Break, not only in Ft. Lauderdale, but all along the beach. Today, people come to Deerfield for many reasons. What brought you to Deerfield? Do you have a story to tell, historical items or pictures of your family? Contact the Deerfield Beach Historical Society at 954-4290378. For those interested in helping to preserve our history, they are also seeking volunteers! In the meantime, celebrate our history and the pioneers who began our town at Founders’ Days!


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Grand Marshal of the 66th Founders’ Days Parade: Don King Boxing promoter Don King has been selected as this year’s Grand Marshal. Working with legends like Muhammad Ali and Mike Tyson through the years, Don King has made a name for himself with big hair and an even bigger personality. For years with his headquarters right here in Deerfield Beach, King has promoted big fights like “The Rumble in the Jungle” and the “Thrilla in Manila,” and brought in celebrities and dignitaries to watch the action. Since the 1970s, he has worked with a long list of boxers, including George Foreman, Larry Holmes, Evander Holyfield, Julio César Chávez and many more. But his skill for promotions goes farther than boxing, including the music industry. In 1984, he helped promote the Jacksons’ Victory Tour. He even got into the publishing business:

In 1998, he purchased Call and Post, a weekly newspaper in Cleveland that serves primarily the African American community. He was inducted into the Gaming Hall of Fame in 2009, which has inductees like Donald Trump. Not only have there been movies and TV shows made about King’s career, but he also has been in a few films and shows himself, including in movies The Last Fight, The Devil’s Advocate and Head Office. Even video games have created characters based on him! King has made a tradition of giving away turkeys each Christmas. Over the last several years, he has held an annual turkey giveaway, distributing approximately 2,000 free turkeys to needy South Floridians.

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Why is our city named City of Deerfield Beach? By Rachel Galvin Ever wonder how our city’s name came to be? It actually began as Hillborough. You will notice that the spelling of the name has changed, but many places still have this moniker – Hillsboro Beach, Hillsboro Inlet, Hillsboro River and Hillsboro Boulevard. This land was originally granted to the English Earl of Hillsborough by King George III of England in the late eighteenth century. It is disputed if he ever actually visited the land here or not. It was filled with dangerous terrain and critters – panthers, alligators

and swamps. Yet, people built a home here (see more on pg. 2). On June 22, 1898, the first post office was established. Along with 20 people who had settled in these parts, many deer frequented the area near Hillsboro River, which then marked the northern boundary of the settlement, hence the name … Deerfield. The population grew. By June 11, 1925, it had reached a whopping 1300 residents and the name changed to The Town of Deerfield. This also helped to stave off Boca Raton, who was threatening

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to take over the area. At this same time, Deerfield got its first mayor, George Emory Butler, Jr. As the ’30s rolled into the ’40s, 500 more residents moved in, as well as an influx of outsiders who came to work on various projects in the area or just visit our beaches. On August 22, 1939, the name was changed to Deerfield Beach. It wasn’t until 1951, that Deerfield Beach was incorporated as a city and became known, as it is today, as the City of Deerfield Beach.


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Parade Participants 1930s antique car

City Manager Float

1984 Highway Patrol Car—CHIPS

City of Deerfield Beach CERT Team—Dragon Float

Deerfield Beach Island Community Association

Observer Newspaper

Deerfield Beach Little League

Police Athletic League (PAL)

City of Deerfield Beach Recycling Division

Emerald Towing Service Games on the Go

Parks and Recreation Department

Commissioner Ben Preston

GFWC Women’s Club

Randall and The Band

Commissioner Bill Ganz

Gimler Plumbing

Re-Elect Peggy Noland

BSO Helicopter

Commissioner Joe Miller

Gimme A Burger

Robb Campaign for Mayor

BSO Mounted Police

D & J Transportation

Grand Marshal Don King

Star-Lite Express

BSO SWAT

Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce

Key Club Mayor Peggy Noland

State Representative Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed

NE Focal Point Senior Center & Preschool

Wishing Well International Foundation

ATA Black Belt Academy of Deerfield Avante Automotive Bibleway Temple Ministries Broward Sheriff Fire Department Engine 102

Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate Candidate for Commissioner District 3 Chick Fil-A

Deerfield Beach Dolphins Deerfield Beach High School band

Original Save our Beach (OSOB)

**Partial list of entries**

Road Closures Friday, February 15 • From 6 a.m., Ocean Way from Hillsboro Blvd. to SE 4 S. will close, reopening 6 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 18.

Saturday, February 16 (during parade) – 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Parade Route

• US1 will be closed at SE 10 St and NE 2 St. • Hillsboro Blvd. E. will be closed at NE 2 Ave. • A1A will be closed at NE 7 St. and SE 3 St.

The detour route will be as follows: • • • • •

SR 810 (Hillsboro Blvd) traffic west of SE 5 St. will be rerouted to Dixie Hwy. Northbound Federal Hwy. traffic will be rerouted to Dixie Hwy. Southbound Federal Hwy. traffic will be rerouted to Dixie Hwy. Northbound A1A traffic will be rerouted to Camino Real in Boca Raton Southbound A1A traffic will be rerouted to SW 14 St. in Pompano Beach

Trolley Service Free parking and trolley pick-ups available at: • The Cove Shopping Center (1500 E. Hillsboro Blvd.) • St. Ambrose Catholic Church (363 SE 12 Ave., on east side)

Admission to festival and parade is FREE! For more information, visit www.deerfield-beach.com

Founders’ Days Scrapbook

Observer float 2012 - Winner of Best Overall

Police Pipe & Drum Corp

Walker Elementary School Band


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Mayor’s Message Mayor’s Message

Dear Friends: The 66th Annual Founders’ Days are here! Most of you know I have lived in our great city, Deerfield Beach, for more than 30 years and this is one my favorite events. For more than three decades, this event has drawn thousands of people to our city and, as your Mayor, I am proud to host this event along with our City Commissioners and staff. In recent months, I’ve talked a lot about coming together as one community in order to continue to improve our city and make changes that will benefit everyone who live and work here. I believe Founders’ Days is a great way to remember that we are all one family, the Deerfield Beach family. This cel-

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Karen Rice...In Tribute It’s been almost one year since we at the Observer, as well as her family and many, many friends, lost our much loved Karen Rice. As Senior Sales Advisor, Karen was instrumental in putting our Founders’ Days issue together, and she is sorely missed. We lost a very dedicated co-worker, and a great friend. Karen, not a day goes by that we don’t think of you, or need you here at The Observer. And of course, your many customers miss you too. – Observer Staff

ebration is an opportunity for us to observe our rich history, celebrate the great strides that we have made and rejoice in what the future will bring! As a mother, my family is the most important thing in the world, and the events at Founders’ Days have always been a time for me to bring my family together. I hope that you will do the same with yours. Bring out your family, friends and neighbors to enjoy the carnival, parade, entertainment and fireworks at the beach February 14-17. I wish our Parks & Recreation Department and everyone else involved in this year’s events great success! Warm wishes, Mayor Peggy Noland

Happy Founders’ Days 2013!

“Journey through Paradise” GFWC Woman’s Club of Deerfield Beach. 94 years of Service, Self Improvement, & Social Opportunities Come & Join Us at the Evening Division Meeting Thursday, February 21, 2013 – 7:30 p.m. 910 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach, Fl 33441 Light refreshments served. More information/ to reserve a spot contact: Marti 954-421-4700

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ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE THURSDAY, FEB. 14 6-10 p.m. – Carnival

FRIDAY, FEB. 15 6-10 p.m. – Carnival ($20 wristbands) 6-7:30 p.m. – Famous Frank & the Nucklebusters Blues Band 8:30-10 p.m. – Resolvers

SATURDAY, FEB. 16 10:05 a.m. – Parade 12 p.m.— 10 p.m. – Carnival 12:30 p.m. – Opening Ceremonies, including National Anthem 1 p.m. – Parade Awards 1:30-3 p.m. – Magowens Chair 3:30-5 p.m. – Orange Sunshine 6-10 p.m. – Carnival 6-7:30 p.m. – Andrew Morris 8-9 p.m. – Uproot Hootenanny 9 p.m. – Fireworks off the pier 9:25-10 p.m. – Uproot Hootenanny

SUNDAY, FEB. 17 7 a.m. registration – Stand Up Paddleboard Races 12 p.m.—5 p.m. – Carnival ($20 wristbands) 1-2:30 p.m. – Skinny Jimmy 3:30-5 p.m. – Pitbull of Blues

Free parking and trolley pick-ups available at: · The Cove Shopping Center 1500 E. Hillsboro Blvd. · St. Ambrose Catholic Church 363 SE 12 Ave., on east side

Admission to festival and parade is FREE! For more information, visit www.deerfield-beach.com. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY – PATRONIZE OBSERVER ADVERTISERS. LET THEM KNOW YOU SAW THEIR ADS IN THE OBSERVER.

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Cap’s Place By Rachel Galvin Take a lazy boat ride from the mainland of Lighthouse Point to the Peninsula where Cap’s Place resides. There, you will find a historical treasure. Built in 1928, this landmark was originally called Club Unique and was frequented by rum runners, but also became a hot spot for dignitaries through the years. The Vanderbilts came to dine. Stars like Joe DiMaggio, Susan Hayward, Kate Smith, Myrna Loy and George Harrison have stopped by through the years. FDR and Winston Churchill came here. President Clinton, said staff members, “was here not too long ago … and has been coming to Cap’s since he was governor.” This gem features unique and local cuisine, including fresh hearts of palm salad from Okeechobee and fresh seafood. The island also is inhabited by some lucky cats who get to eat the leftovers. Everything here is fresh. The original owner, Eugene Theodore “Cap” Knight,

found his original location on the Hillsboro Inlet to be a perfect place for his rum running. He and his wife, Lola, went on trips down to Bimini to pick up whiskey. Some residents have said that his escape from prying eyes of the law came in the form not only of some skilled sailing manuevers, but also from the light from the lighthouse, which was operated by his brother, Thomas. Customers who wanted a bit of the drink, could get the contraband “hams” (burlap bags which contained the whiskey), after they were pulled out of Lake Placid. Cap had let them hide there, tied with a long rope surreptitiously to buoys. When the 1926 hurricane hit and the subsequent one two years later, Cap decided to move about a half a mile to the peninsula where Cap’s now sits. He built the restaurant out of an old barge which reportedly was used by Henry Flagler during the construction of the Overseas Railroad to Key West. With the help of his new friend Albert Hasis,

FEBRUARY 14, 2013 who was just 16, he beached the barge. It was a real fixer upper, but Cap went to work and by 1929, he got his place running. He sold memberships to the club for 25 cents and the main form of entertainment was gambling, which was illegal. Today, the slot machines that lined the walls and “wheel of fortune” that hung in the bar are gone, confiscated in the 1950s. That put an end to the frequent visits of mobsters like Meyer Lansky. But people continued to come in for the food and ambience, as they still do today. Al Hasis, and his wife Pat, took over Cap’s and today his children run the venture. The bar that Al built is still in use with its hard bamboo from the Everglades and wood he found that had come in from the sea. The feel of ocean adventure is part of the ambiance here, along with its history. Cap’s Place is located at 2765 N.E. 28th Court in Lighthouse Point. For information or reservations, call 954-941-0418 or visit www.capsplace.com.

Al Hasis created this bar out of bamboo from the Everglades and wood found from ships.

Step back in time: Cap’s Place still welcomes visitors after 80 years.

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Skinny Jimmy & the Stingrays Surf’s Up! Skinny Jimmy & the Stingrays have been pumping out their surfin’ sounds since 2009. They have stayed true to tradition with their ‘60s surf and Hot Rod music, which is all instrumenFind Skinny Jimmy & the Stingrays on Facebook! tal. Their revved up guitar gets

The Pitbull Of Blues With a strong rhythm section and guitar, this Florida-based trio has kept the music coming for 15 years. Josh“ThePitbullof Blues” Rowand is the Lead Vocalist, as well as an accomplished guitarist, harmonica player and songwriter. Deny Rowand is the bass player and backup vocalist. Richie Corricelli plays drums and does back-up vocals. They have won many awards, includ-

ing being The 2011 Blues Alliance of the Treasure Coast Blues Challenge Winner & The 2012 Blues Alliance of the Treasure Coast International Blues Challenge Representatives, as well as the 2012 International Blues Challenge Semi Finalist.In 2010, they were honored as the 2010 Central Florida Blues Challenge Winner & Fan Favorite Award

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people doing the twist. The elements of Sci-Fi, Secret Agent, Spaghetti Western, Exotica and Rockabilly are blended to create an authentic vintage sound. The band consists of Skinny Jimmy on guitar, Chris “Savvy” Savarino on drums, the “G-Man” Garrett Wood on bass and Dan Eng,

A.K.A. Doctor Dano, on guitar. In 2013, Skinny Jimmy & the Stingrays will release their debut 10 song CD. You may have seen this group when they opened for the legendary Dick Dale during his 2012 tour in West Palm Beach and Miami. Perhaps you heard their groovy rhythms at The International

Winner. In 2011, they were chosen as the Orange Blossom Blues SocietyInternationalBluesChallengeRepresentativesandassemi finalistsinthe InternationalBlues Challenge. For more info., visit www.thepitbulloftheblues.com You can hear The Pitbull of Blues’ bluesy beats on Sunday, Feb. 17 from 3:30 to 5 p.m.

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Tattoo Expo/Coral Springs or the “Atomic Grogs” Mixer at the Mai Kai in Ft. Lauderdale. The quartet also is the feature act at Dada’s in Delray Beach every second Saturday of the month. Skinny Jimmy & the Stingrays will be performing on Sunday, Feb. 17 from 1 to 2:30 p.m.


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Andrew Morris Band

By Rachel Galvin Andrew Morris is the perfect “local boy makes good” story. With a down home feel, he sings his country with soul. You may have heard him perform recently at the Festival of the Arts, at the Country Music Festival, Pig Out in the Park or other activities here in Deerfield. His proud momma, Carolyn, is often nearby with camera in hand. Sometimes, his entire extended family travels long distances just to hear him sing. But he also travels, not only around the state, but in other areas of the country, including Nashville. He has opened up for national acts. He treats guests with cover songs like “Sweet Home Alabama,” “Dixie’s Land” and “God

Bless the U.S.A.” He is gearing up to record his debut single. Morris began his love of Country music when he was 4. Growing up, he loved entertaining his family and friends with performances. When he was 13, his grandfather gave him an old Martin guitar, on which he set out to teach himself how to play. After being solo, he formed a band in 2010 called Southbound Train. At the age of 20, he took on lead vocals and acoustic guitar. Later, the band was changed to the Andrew Morris Band. His lead guitarist is Harry Carson, who studied at the Hartford Conservatory of Music. Michael R. Cheney plays bass and also does vocals. Considered a “session and live perfor-

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mance musician,” he has worked with Grammy awardwinning musicians and appeared with many live. He has also worked in national television music production and collaborated with writers and others in the industry. Drummer Chuck Ficker keeps the audience guessing by adding some harmonica and mandolin to his performance. He also lends his voice to the mix. Together, these country boys have charmed the fans everywhere they roam. To find out more about the Andrew Morris Band, visit http:/ andrewmorrisband.com.

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Flashback: Deerfield Beach PTA officers meet

Taken in the 1950s, this picture at the Glati home includes officers of the Deerfield Beach Elementary School PTA. It is unknown if this was a social event or a business meeting. On the left is Thelma Glati, whose husband, John, owned several businesses and warehouses in Deerfield. Both Thelma and John passed away recently (see Observer, Feb. 7 issue for story). To the right of Thelma might be the school principal. Next is Mrs. Vrchota, wife of Roy Vrchota, who owned a gas station and towing company in Deerfield. At the end is Lorena Eller, mother of Observer publisher David Eller.

Listen to the bands’ Country tunes on Saturday, Feb. 16 from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

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Early Deerfield residents play dress up Dressing like some of the “cliques” in Deerfield, residents attended a Dale Carnegie event in 1953 at Deerfield Elementary.

Do you recognize these residents?

CITY SLICKERS:Top row includes on left: Homer Bourne, Dick Erickson, and, on right, Merele Johnson: bottom row: Mary Jones, Rossie Tanner, Lola Bourne, Alvin Jones, Hubert Hinson and Barney Chalker.

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Orange Sunshine

By Rachel Galvin Get your groove on with this psychedelic band that takes you back in time to the 1960s. This is not your ordinary tribute band. Instead of emulating one group, they emulate them all, or at least some of the bands they are most keen on from the era. In a set, you may hear everything from “California Dreamin’” and “I’m A Believer” to “Nights in White Satin” or “Sound of Silence.” They may throw in some James Brown, Beatles and a wide variety of other musicians. Founder and musical director Stephen B. takes the lead on vocals, but also is a bassist, keyboardist and occasionally guitarist. New York born, he started as a drummer at age 9 and went onto master

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other instruments by the time he was 18. Recording by age 16, he has had singles released on the Capitol and United Artists labels. He has been back-up for bands like The Shirelles, Little Anthony and Martha & the Vandellas. Lead guitarist Rob Alter has worked with heavy hitters like Roger Daltrey of The Who and Phil Collen of Def Leppard and has composed music for television shows, and more. He also provides vocals. Tony Viscard got his inspiration from everyone from The Beatles to Eric Clapton. He handles the acoustic guitar and bass as well as alternating lead vocals. Rob Burruano masters piano and synthesizers. He is the one who provides the sound of harpsichords, clari-

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net, sax/trumpet sections, French horns, rich string arpeggios and more. He began his love for music at the age of 5. Drummer Daryl Leoce began playing drums after seeing The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show. In numerous “garage bands,” he started playing some of the popular clubs in the New York area, working with Mark Rivera, from Billy Joel’s band, and others. He even had a single released that received a lot of college airplay. He lists Dino Danelli, Mitch Mitchell, Steve Gadd, Stewart Copeland and Jeff Porcaro as influences. For more information on Orange Sunshine, visit www.orangesunshine.biz. Orange Sunshine performs Saturday, Feb. 16 from 3:30 to 5 p.m.


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Founders' days  

The Observer's Founders' Days Special Section