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February 6, 2012

Psssst... Obiter Dicta <3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mock Trial

February 8 - 9, 2012 Proposed Bill C-10 Statement

A Word in Favour of Our Prime Minister

The Lost Art of Going on a Date

pg. 4

pg. 7

pg. 15


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OBITERdicta

“The definitive source for Osgoode news” Osgoode Hall Law School, 0014G York University 4700 Keele Street Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 Tel. 416.736.2100 x77527 Fax. 416.736.5736 E-mail. ObiterDicta@osgoode.yorku.ca Website. www.obiter-dicta.ca

“The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. “ - Martin Luther King, Jr.

Editors-in-Chief: Cassie Burt-Gerrans, Andrew Monkhouse, Jennifer O’Dell Sponsorship Manager: Rory Wasserman Business Manager: Kristina Bliakharsky Osgoode News Editor: Kyle Rees Opinions Editor: Nick Van Duyvenbode Arts & Culture Editor: Nancy Situ News Editor: Hassan Ahmad

Editorial: Last week the Obiter received a heinous and despicable anonymous email directed at Andrew Monkhouse in response to his “Letter From An Editor”. The tone and hostile nature of this letter is an unacceptable response to a student’s opinion expressed in our community paper. While the Obiter respects healthy debate and is open to diverse points of view, the Editorial Board can never condone such offensive rhetoric. Such response does little to further constructive engagement; students should feel safe to express their views on a variety of issues. In addition to aforementioned email, we received a number of emails responding to Andrew’s letter last week. As per the editorial policy of many newspaper publications we have reserved the right to print a select overview of the letters received. We elected to print 3, which sum up the various positions. Notwithstanding any further developments, we hope this issue is now closed. This year at the Obiter we have witnessed a lot of student involvement with important issues, e.g. Bill C-10, the Davies ad, the Occupy movement and the services (or lack thereof) currently available at Osgoode, to name a few. It has always been our policy to foster an environment in which people can respectfully challenge each other. We hope that this continues and the Editorial Board will do what it can to facilitate this kind of community discourse. As part of this discourse, we at Osgoode Hall are all beholden to higher standard of responsibility for our actions and opinions. Our professional education necessitates that we reflect on ourselves and the community in which we are situated at all times. We want to thank everyone who continues to contribute to the paper, and also wish to express our sincere gratitude to all those who make working at the Obiter an interesting, exciting and a unique learning experience for us.

Sports Editor: Joe Marcus Staff Writers: Dave Shellnutt, RJ Wallia, Travis Weagant, Michael Szubelak Contributors: Pam Hinman, Melayna Williams

Letters to the Editor

Layout Editors: Julia Vizzaccaro, Harjot Atwal, Nancy Situ

Re: Proposed Bill C-10 Statement

Photography: Harjot Atwal

As one of your student senators, my role is to represent students at York's Senate. As your social convenor, my primary role is to help the good times roll. However, I am an elected representative of the student body and feel that it is my responsibility to ensure that I do represent students to the best of my ability.

Website Editor: Nancy Situ, Cassie Burt-Gerrans

Articles are due at 2 p.m. on the Wednesday before date of publication. The appropriate maximum length for articles is 1200 words. Please submit articles in Microsoft Word format via e-mail attachment to obiterdicta@osgoode. yorku.ca. Please attach photographs separately; do not include them in your Word document.

The Obiter Dicta is the official student newspaper of Osgoode Hall Law School. The opinions expressed in the articles contained herein are not necessarily those of the Obiter staff. The Obiter reserves the right to refuse any submission that is judged to be libelous or defamatory, contains personal attacks, or is discriminatory on the basis of sex, race, religion, or sexual orientation. Submissions may be edited for length and/or content.

The Obiter Dicta is published weekly during the school year, and is printed by Weller Publishing Co. Ltd.

monday - february 6 - 2012

I have many opinions and concerns regarding Bill C-10. However, I am not currently in favour of the letter that is being published in the Obiter this week by my esteemed colleagues and friends on Legal & Lit and Student Caucus. As an elected member of the student body, my concern is the rapid timing in which this is happening, and with some of the wording. I can honestly say that I believe my colleagues are working with the absolute best of intentions, and though I may personally agree with what is written, as an elected student official I think that more time is required and I have voiced my objection to the publication of this letter at this time. As such, the letter that is being published in the Obiter today does not currently represent my views or opinions as a member of Legal and Lit and Student Caucus in my capacities as social convenor and student senator, respectively. Sincerely, Sandra David

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Habeus Corpus, Abuse of Process and Other Pleadings (a reply to “Letter From An Editor”/R. v. Jack LeCasse) Last week, I submitted a short work of creative fiction to the Obiter Dicta that drew the ire of Andrew Monkhouse, an editor-in-chief. It was my third such submission this school year. Before the issue went to print, he wrote a commentary on the story setting out his views that, generally, creative content such as mine has no place in the Obiter Dicta, and specifically, my stories suck. He then adds that he would support continued publication of my shitty stories if only I penned under my true name - so I could be held to account for my crime, I suppose. Eerie. His cracked commentary was published early in the issue. I have serious concerns about an editor who, knowing an article is going to print, rips the work apart in a self-penned rebuttal to be published simultaneously. An editor has the privilege of seeing a work before publication. That editorial privilege has uses, but it certainly cannot be for reviewing a piece of fiction by a fellow student, unaware, in order to trash it before anyone even reads it. While I’d like to say this is a question of

etiquette, it sure seems like a grievous lapse of editorial integrity (greater than the initial publishing of my silly stories, even). I doubt I am the only writer who cringed. But perhaps I should be thankful instead. It’s wonderful that Andrew fancies himself a literary critic, unable to resist including a review of my work alongside it. I should be satisfied he was touched so intimately by my piece. Apparently, Andrew also fancies himself the Sovereign, putting me on trial in R. v. Jack LeCasse. The judge, too. We should all be so lucky as to have someone of obvious regal authority offer voluntary critiques of our creative hobbies at surprise trials. Forgive me for picturing him lying on his belly near a wax log fire, body splayed under a shawl of lamb’s wool, capped with a buccaneer hat fashioned from a folded newspaper, as he sips cheap red wine, nibbles chocolate covered cherries, and, doting his monogrammed leather pencilcase of assorted seven sisters highlighters, notes each weak metaphor of mine with the staccato honk of an apneic goat. Oops, a

little sub-par fictional seepage there. Apologies. Shameful, really. My name is John Lucas. The stories I write make it into the Obiter Dicta over Andrew’s objections because the other two co-editors-inchief do not share his opinion on their anonymous authorship, quality or suitability for this community. In fact, the Obiter Dicta has not logged a single complaint about my stories from any reader or sponsor. Andrew is very concerned I am wasting your time with a monthly instalment of short creative fiction, yet it is not at all clear that anyone cares about this except Andrew. He has ineffectively tried to craft some actual problem out the fact that he simply doesn’t like my writing. But if Spartacus here wants to drag his newsie politics from the Obiter office to the pages of the paper, he’s welcome to it. In my view, that clear disconnect with his colleagues at Obiter is present in the Osgoode community as well. - John Lucas

Letter from a Senior Editor (Editorial Note: Grant requested the following be included with his Letter to Editor: It is not my intent to escalate the tensions between members of the editorial board, or between the board and the paper’s now marginalized audience. I simply wanted to convey, in a whimsical manner, my dissatisfaction with Mr. Monkhouse’s writing, and the basis for his argument. Please note that I do not wish to be associated with any aspect of the events surrounding Mr. Monkhouse’s article other than my rebuttal.) It is with sadness that I sit in front of the glow of my computer screen. I do so this evening, however, to respond to a recent article entitled "Letter From An Editor," in which the Obiter's co-Editor-in-Chief, Andrew Monkhouse, callously attacks a column that many of the Obiter’s readers have come to love. To begin, I will address that very point—a point that seems to have escaped Mr. Monkhouse. The Obiter’s readership enjoy the articles published under the nom de plume Jack LeCasse. They are fun, engaging stories. It may behove Mr. Monkhouse to learn that the reader is no more forced to read these stories than she is to read his writings. These stories the OBITERdicta

may not relate to the study or practice of law, but they are worth reading; and they are certainly no less worthy than the Obiter’s comic strips or crossword puzzles. The former, much like the latter, serves to uplift the spirit of the reader. So congratulations Jack LeCasse for doing this so well! Moreover, I am compelled to reject Mr. Monkhouse’s line of argument. I will do so colourfully. Mr. Monkhouse claims that Jack LeCasse’s articles “ought not be published” in the Obiter, but if they must, the author’s true identity should be revealed. With respect, I think Mr. Monkhouse was sick the day they taught law at law school. I am sure that I, like most, read “the definitive source for Osgoode news” as a slogan, not a mandate. After all, a quick glance at an issue would prove otherwise. The size of issue and frequency of publication, for example, preclude the Obiter from being such a source. Mr. Monkhouse continues in his flawed argument, noting that “osgoode news” [sic] is defined as either “law-school or law related… or alternatively would be interesting for law students…” To this point I ask: What is his source of phraseology? Note to Monkhouse: Skilled advocates ground their arguments in facts,

law, and/or policy. From a procedural perspective, it appears that Mr. Monkhouse is forum shopping. He has tried, to no avail, to persuade his colleagues to institute a publication ban on Jack LeCasse’s articles, so he is trying to appeal to larger, albeit less sympathetic, audience. I offer the following piece of advice to Mr. Monkhouse: do not air your dirty laundry in public. I also need to address the sanctimonious and poorly crafted words of Mr. Monkhouse. I, too, am an editor (with the Osgoode Hall Law Journal). In fact, most students are editors to some degree. Other than the title, which I am sure he earned meritoriously, it is difficult to discern from many of Mr. Monkouse’s writings whether he is an editor at all. This particular piece reads more like the work of one of the eighth-graders to which he so inconsiderately refers, rather than the work of a law student and editor. If one is going to hold oneself out to be an editor, one should edit appropriately, starting with one’s voice. Lastly, I think it needs to be said, Mr. Monkhouse, you are not a judge. - Grant LoPatriello monday - february 6 - 2012


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Re: R. v. Jack LeCasse Surprised would have been putting it lightly when I opened up the Obiter last week to see a letter from one of the Co-Editors-in-Chief concerning a regular columnist`s submissions. I won`t delve into directly responding to the comments made in his article, other than saying that I completely disagree with them. Instead, I`d rather focus on why having well written, creative, and imaginative pieces, such as Jack LeCasse`s, has an important place in the Obiter. While I enjoy law school, frequently reading 100+ pages at a time (okay, fine 25-50 pages), leaves my mind mostly numb and confused. When taking a break nothing is better than flipping open the Obiter to read a short, entertaining story. When reading a LeCasse article, I always find my mind is taken on adventure for a brief few moments, one that I could never have conceived, and I am always left thoroughly

entertained and laughing out loud by the end. Regularly, these article submissions contribute within the confines of a mere 600 words, a developed, character driven story, that again, very few could replicate. It without a doubt punches above its weight in quality. Beyond its creative merits, I also value its place in a predominately conservative law school environment and broader legal occupation. Law school to a large degree, beyond enriching us in legal knowledge, re-structures our identity to embody the characteristics of a serious, task oriented, and assertive individual. Finding humour, creativity and dare I say, playfulness, is not part of the curriculum. When I read the LeCasse article I am reminded of these undercurrents, even though they are forced to the margins in each of us. I am

reminded of a personality that values humour and human intrigue; one that desires to rise to the surface. As we embark on our legal careers, I want to ardently believe that there is space for lawyers to have some fun and have creative, and yes, non-sanitized, and perhaps even risque contributions that make us a little less boring and a little more like the average human being. To this end, I hope that we continue to fight against conservative voices that try to push creative contributions such as Jack LaCasse`s underground, because if we allow this, we will be worse for wear and without a doubt, shallow representations of our former lawyer selves. - Nicholas Van Duyvenbode Opinions Editor

Legal and Literary Society Proposed Bill C-10 Statement We are writing to express our views on the Safe Streets and Communities Act, Bill C-10 (“Bill C-10”). As law students, we have a unique perspective on the law. We engage with it on an academic level, work within it through various employment capacities, and live with it as Canadians. While we are not lawyers yet, it will be our duty to serve those dealing with the justice system long after those who currently practice law have moved on. For all of these reasons, our interest in the development of the law, and in this case the criminal law, is substantial and long-term. Many of us amongst the Osgoode Hall Law School student body have carefully analysed the proposed amendments within Bill C-10. We have assessed its probable impact on the current criminal justice system and Canadian society more broadly. Based on these assessments, a decision has been made by the Osgoode Hall’s Student Government, composed of the Legal and Literary Society and Student Caucus, to publicly oppose Bill C-10 in its current form. We take this stance as elected representatives in student government, with the support of the undersigned students and student groups. This bill should not pass, particularly but not limited to the following reasons: Bill C-10 Ignores the Reality of Crime In Canada: There are elements of Bill C-10 with which we do not take issue. Unfortunately, any positive contributions to the law that may arise from monday - february 6 - 2012

Bill C-10 are far outweighed by the many negative impacts that will result from its passing. As a whole, this Bill ignores the realities of crime in Canada. The police reported crime rate for 2010 dropped 5% from 2009, reaching its lowest level since 1973.1 The same results show that the Crime Severity Index, which measures seriousness of crime also decreased by 6%.2 This is the lowest since the measure was first introduced in 1998. The 2010 homicide rate dropped to 1.62/100 000, the lowest level since 1996 with 56 less homicides than in 2009 for a total of 554.3 The rate and severity of youth crime similarly saw respective decreases of 7% and 6%, with a corresponding decrease of 4% in the severity of violent youth crime.4 Bill C-10 Ignores Accepted Theories of Crime Causation and Control: This Bill proposes policy changes based on ideology that disregards criminological theories of what leads to criminal behaviour, and how best to combat crime as a social problem. A review of social science literature on deterrence reveals that sentence severity does not affect levels of crime.5 At best, there are marginal crime preventive effects that do not significantly differ from those achieved through less serious sentences.6 “Incarceration must be finely tuned or its counterproductive effects may well outweigh its benefits.”7 While it may not mean that a “tough on crime” approach is completely ineffective, there is an absence of evidence to support developing policies according to such ideology.

Bill C-10 Will Be Too Punitive: In its current form, we are concerned that Bill C-10 will result in an overreliance on incarceration at the expense of an offender’s circumstances and rehabilitative prospects through the use of mandatory minimums, limiting the availability of conditional sentences, and expanding the gateway to custody in youth sentencing. We are concerned that restrictions on the availability of “record suspensions”, and even the amended name itself, will subject offenders to a disproportionate level of stigma. We are concerned with the limits many of the proposed amendments will place on judicial discretion, and how this may impact the effectiveness of the justice system. In its current form, we believe that Bill C-10 will be counterproductive to its purported aims. It will be ineffective in preventing or reducing harm to the public, overwhelm an already backlogged justice system, and ultimately bring the administration of justice into disrepute. Bill C-10 was Drafted Without Proper Consultation and Thorough Vetting: We further take issue with the means by which Bill C-10 has been expedited through the democratic process. Bill C-10 encompasses many complex legal issues that are deserving of a full and thorough discussion. The components of the Bill itself reflect a lack of consultation with the academic and legal community, which has only continued throughout the Committee process. What discussion has taken place Continued to next page. the OBITERdicta


page 5 Continued from previous page. has been rushed and superficial, curtailed by arbitrary time restrictions and the impracticality of addressing every issue in a Bill so dense. The law cannot be developed in a political vacuum – attention must be paid to the impact such decisions will have on all Canadians. As one example, Thomas Gabor concluded in his review of mandatory minimum sentences that they “should not be introduced merely to placate a political constituency or without regard to a thorough understanding of the infractions or offenders for whom they are intended.”8 Such complex matters as contained in this Bill should be considered individually, where all issues can be addressed meaningfully and the law shaped to be the most effective and beneficial possible. The tactics employed are representative of irresponsible governance, and are not in line with democratic principles. The Legal and Literary Society and Student Caucus of Osgoode Hall, along with the undersigned students and student groups, stand with our colleagues at the University of Dalhousie Law School and Windsor Law School in firm opposition to Bill C-10. We strongly urge you to reconsider the impacts of this bill, to revise it in accordance with evidence about crime prevention and the impacts of crime and sentencing on Canadian communities, and to do so in a manner that is transparent and accountable to voting Canadians. The future efficacy of the criminal justice system, and the security of all Canadians, demands it.

Crossword Solution: First Attempt (featured Monday, January 30, 2012) by Michael Szubelak

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Endnotes: Shannon Brennan and Mia Dauvergne, “Policereported crime statistics in Canada, 2010” Juristat (July 21, 2011), online: <http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85002-x/2011001/article/11523-eng.pdf> at 2. 1

Supra at 3.

2

GO OFF-LEASH

Tina Hotton Mahony, “Homicide in Canada, 2010”, Juristat (October 26, 2011), online: <http://www.statcan. gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2011001/article/11561-eng.pdf> at 2. 3

Supra note 1 at 19.

4

See: Anthony N. Doob and Cheryl Marie Webster, “Sentence Severity and Crime: Accepting the Null Hypothesis” (2003) 30 Crime and Justice 143. 5

Supra. See also: Thomas Gabor and Nicole Crutcher, “Mandatory Minimum Penalties: Their Effects on Crime, Sentencing Disparities, and Justice System Expenditures” Department of Justice Canada (January 2002), online: <http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/rs/reprap/2002/rr02_1/rr02_1.pdf>. 6

Gabor, supra at 33.

7

Ibid.

8

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monday - february 6 - 2012

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Please PRINT a hard copy1:37:30 of thePM 1/5/2012 file and either FAX it or SCAN and EMAIL it back to me, thanks!


page 6

Osgoode News Osgoode Gets Social! SANDRA DAVID Legal & Lit Social Convenor Hello Ozzies! Well our social calendar has gotten off to a great start this year, with the opening of the JCR, Thursday pub nights downtown, a Karaoke night, and not to mention a wildly successful ski trip to Blue Mountain. And that was just January! As your social convenor, I want to provide social events to help you relieve the stress of law school while highlighting the finer and funner (yes, that is a word) aspects of our time together. To that end, there is the Mock Trial Pub next week on Thursday, February 9th in the JCR. Tickets are sold out for line bypass, but you can still get in! The JCR is open weekly on Thursdays, with the potential for other days in the works. We’ve already had karaoke (we may bring it again), and you can happily anticipate a live band, a drag show fundraiser featuring some of your favourite Osgoode personalities, an open mic night/ talent showcase, and a comedy show. We’re also

open to requests if you have any. Of course, there will be the usual libations and opportunities for socialization. The JCR is your space and the only way to have it open more often is for you to create the demand. We built it so you would come, so now you gotta make your way over if you want to get served! We are also arranging for a trip to Niagara Falls on Saturday March 4th. There will be cross-border shopping, and for those not interested in shopping, an opportunity to tour the Canadian side of the Falls including checking out the Clifton Hill strip and some of the local attractions such as the giant Ferris wheel, the wax museums, photo ops with giant chairs and giant Hershey’s kisses and a chance to check out the Niagara casino. Then there are three potential ways to end the trip a) have dinner and head home at around 11 pm, b) stay and party at Rumours, the Niagara Night club and then head home at 2am, or c) to stay overnight in a local hotel and come home on Sunday afternoon. The trip can only end with one of these options. The cost of the trip will vary based on what

DUTY TO WARN

the majority would like to do, since admittedly adding an overnight stay will increase the cost of the trip. So, in the interest of accommodating what the majority of people want to do, there is a poll set up at http://www.surveymonkey. com/s/S7DQRB6. It will be open until February 15th at 5pm. The decision for how the trip will end, and what the cost will be, will be sent out by email shortly thereafter (gotta use the legal vernacular somewhere). Then, later in March, you will have the opportunity to enjoy yourself at either the Dean’s Formal for grads and upper years or the Dean’s Informal, the 1L event to cap the end of an awesome first year at Oz. So dust off your dancing shoes, go shopping for that new dress, or tie, or suit; get yer nails done and yer hair did, take care of the manscaping and be ready to shake your groove thang. Details about these events will be announced soon, so keep an eye out! In April, there will be a celebration capping the end of exams, the end of the year, and for some of you the end of your three year stint at Osgoode. It will be an incredible end of the year event!

FORUM

• Monday, February 6th, 12:30 - 2:30 pm, Room 1003, BLSA Town Hall: Let’s Have a Conversation...

on the

• Monday, February 6th, 7 pm, Room 1001, “A Right to Health Protection under the Charter: First Nation People in Sarnia’s Chemical Valley” with Ron Plain, activist and litigant, Aamjiwnaang First Nation and Justin Duncan and Kaitlyn Mitchell, Counsel, Ecojustice.

FUTURE OF ARTICLING

• Monday, February 6th, 11:59 pm, Diversity Contest Essays Due! Send to Jeannine Woodall at the Career Development Office (JWoodall@osgoode.yorku.ca). • Tuesday, February 7th, 12:30 - 2:30 pm, Room, 2006, OWN Fashion Show open casting call. • Wednesday, February 8, 12:30 pm - 2 pm, Room 2001, Pierre Genest Memorial Lecture by Professor David B. Wilkins, Harvard Law School: “Globalization, Lawyers and Emerging Economies”. • Wednesday, February 8, 12:30 - 1:30 pm, Room 2003, Alternatives to Traditional Legal Practice Panel. • Thursday, February 9, 1:30 pm - 2;30 pm, Room 2001, Osgoode Student Seminar by Professor David B. Wilkins, Harvard Law School, on his paper: “The New Social Engineers in the Age of Obama: Black Corporate Lawyers and the Marking of the First Black President” . • Friday, February 10th, 1:30 - 3:00 pm, Room 2003, Forum on the Future of Articling.

Panelists will include: Laurie Pawlitza, LSUC Treasurer and Member, Articling Task Force Tom Conway, Chair, Articling Task Force Janet Leiper, LSUC Bencher Lorne Sossin, Dean, Osgoode Hall Law School Professor Trevor Farrow, Osgoode Hall Law School

YOUR PARTICIPATION WILL HELP SHAPE THE FUTURE OF ARTICLING!!

Friday, February 10, 2012 1:30pm-3:00pm Room 2003

Refreshments will be available

monday - february 6 - 2012

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Sports

Pumped Up Kicks MICHAEL SZUBELAK Staff Writer

having never ranked higher than 40th -and that was back in '96.

When it comes to Canadian soccer on the international stage, our female athletes are standing at the forefront of the pack with their male counterparts straggling two steps behind. Just over a week ago, the Canadian women's national soccer team qualified for the London Olympics this summer after handily defeating the likes of Costa Rica, Haiti, Cuba and Mexico (with a goal differential of 16-2!). The achievement was only somewhat dampened by a 4-0 loss to the United States in the final qualifying game. Although both teams clinched a spot at the Olympics, it was clear that the Canadian women along with their new coach, John Herdman, must improve to overcome a superior U.S. squad that they will undoubtedly face in future tournaments.

Although the statistics are seemingly favourable, they leave out an important part of the story. The fact is the women's game has improved over the years. From what was largely a counterattacking game - long hail-mary-esque passes to swift and aggressive strikers - has transformed into a fluid exercise in team formation, individual skill display and adept passing. This is largely due to an increase in talented women playing competitively at a higher level and on a more consistent basis. Aside from the hard work being done in the United States college circuit, the real boost has come from the establishment of professional soccer leagues for women, namely Women's Professional Soccer (WPS).

Despite their disappointing performance at last summer's FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany, the women's team seemingly bounced back by capturing the gold medal at the Pan Am Games a few months later. Canada has also regained some ground in international rankings moving up to 7th in the world from 9th place a few months ago. Compare that to the Canadian men's team who currently sit 74th in the world

The WPS has it's roots in the Women's United Soccer Association, which was founded in 2003 and was the first league to compensate it's female athletes as professionals. Moving from an amateur paradigm to a professional one has paved way for increased player development. This translates into higher quality play on the field, and the U.S. women's team is a prime example with a style that is reminiscent of better-known European men’s clubs.

As for Canada, we have Christine Sinclair. She is Canada's all-time leading scorer, five-time FIFA World Player of the Year nominee and Canada Soccer Player of the Year seven years running. A tremendous athlete, Sinclair has moved from her natural striking role to a central midfield position - tinkering, which is part of coach Herdman's new strategy to evolve the team's on-field presence. By creating stability in the centre of the pitch, Sinclair can use her creative touch to allow her teammates, like Melissa Tancredi and Christina Julien, to show off their talents. If Sinclair is one of the keys to Canada's continued soccer success, then maintaining a professional women's league is the other. Last week, the WPS announced that the 2012 season was suspended citing the need to sort out legal issues between the league and the owner of the Florida MagicJack franchise, Dan Borislow. With relatively low and inconsistent attendance figures and a lack of investor interest, the league has been struggling to expand and, in fact, contracted last year from six teams to five. That said, the Summer Olympics are around the corner and London might very well be the ideal venue to attract investors by showing them the potential of organized professional women’s soccer in North America and elsewhere.

News

A Word in Favour of our Prime Minister HASSAN AHMAD News Editor

After five years and two consecutive terms of leading a minority Conservative government, Stephen Harper became the head of a majority government in the 2011 federal election in which his party secured 166 seats, impressively making in roads in previously held Liberal strongholds. With a majority government, it was obviously apparent that Harper and the Conservatives would be able to begin initiatives and enact laws that were previously not possible in a minority government. With a majority government, it was only a matter of time before we would see Harper take a stronger stance on his vision for Canada and the methods his government would use to achieve such a vision. In the recent World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Harper began to outline how his majority government would approach both the economic and social issues facing Canada in the years to come. Salient aspects of the Harper plan include expediting review processes for resource trade projects, increasing the old age security (OAS) eligibility age from the OBITERdicta

65 to 67, and revamping Canada’s immigration policies to put emphasis on skilled technical professionals rather than family class applicants. Undoubtedly, Harper’s Davos speech has received criticisms both within and outside of Canada claiming that he is sacrificing the rights and concerns of the most vulnerable citizens in Canadian society for the prospect of sustainable economic growth. Similar arguments were made when Harper and US President Barack Obama agreed to reform trade policies between the US and Canada with respect to goods traveling between the two countries, in exchange for American intelligence having greater access to personal information of Canadians traveling to the US. In the case of the USCanada trade agreement, many were appalled that the Prime Minister would sacrifice the privacy and potential human rights of Canadians to increase trade with the world’s largest economy—a moniker which the US will not possess much longer given its rather average 2-3% growth rate.

would actively endeavour to defend the policies of the Conservatives or the leadership of Mr. Harper. However, in this case, if cooler minds are to prevail, our Prime Minister has to be accorded with some credit with attempting to make difficult decisions in the face of his critics in order to promote the sustainability of the Canadian economy long after his tenure as Prime Minister has ended. Given the aging Canadian population and the fact that OAS costs will increase nationally from their current level of $36 billion to approximately $108 billion in 2030, a retirement age increase seems necessary to sustain the higher costs of supporting retirees. As well, in addition to the economic arguments, improvements in medical science and health care have rendered longer life expectancies in which many adults in their 60s and 70s have the continued capacity to work—and therefore contribute taxes. Germany and Norway have 67 as their retirement age already and the US is slowly increasing its retirement age from 65 to 67.

Admittedly, it is a rare occasion in which I

In a similar vein, with the Canadian populaContinued to next page. monday - february 6 - 2012


page 8 Continued from previous page.

tion unable to reproduce itself shortly by birth rates alone, immigration is a necessity to supplement the workforce. Shifting the focus from unskilled family applicants who are sponsored by those already in Canada to skilled foreign workers who can bring their education and skills to the Canadian economy is not only a wise step but a necessary one. With both America and Canada desperately lagging behind in its supply of workers with technical scientific knowledge, the jobs of the 21st century and therefore the economies of the 21st century are

moving to parts of Europe and Asia. Importing skilled workers from the world beyond will fill the supply vacuum for technical jobs and give a boost to the manufacturing, health care, and research sectors. As many will note, Stephen Harper and the Conservatives have committed many blunders in the past thereby tarnishing Canada’s reputation at home and abroad. A fruitless war in Afghanistan, distorted and biased foreign policy decisions, discriminatory policies towards religious and cultural minorities, ignorance of the continued suffering of the First Nations

peoples, and cuts to various social programs have all troubled many Canadians. However, the recently revealed Harper agenda is a bold step to recognize the difficult economic times in which we live and possibly avert a Canadian version of the looming economic crises in America and much of Europe. Leadership, and good leadership at that, reveals itself in the most difficult of circumstances and Canadians should appreciate that we are in such circumstances currently. Therefore, it may not be the most popular decisions that are the right ones, but those decisions that account for the shortterm and long-term prosperity of our nation.

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Arts & Culture

A Room with a View - A Look at the Gladstone’s Most Recent Show KAROLINA WISNIEWSKI Staff Writer

I like to think I’m fairly in touch with local galleries, but for years, my unfamiliarity with the Gladstone had left a gaping hole in my mental rolodex (yes, rolodex) of relevant culture spots. It had taken on an almost mythological quality in my mind, representing a cultural and social mecca that was emblematic of top-tier independent Toronto art. Never having visited such a relevant institution, I consequently felt disconnected from a portion of the city’s arts scene. When I heard it was hosting the opening reception for it’s 9th annual alternative design event, Come Up To My Room on Saturday, January 28th, I jumped on the chance to see it. The premise of the show was to transform 11 rooms on Gladstone’s second floor into whatever the artists and designers wanted. I had looked over the curatorial statement and even had a pleasant exchange with the artistic director about securing a few photos to include in my review. He was helpful and professional, which was decidedly refreshing, considering the last time I emailed a curator explaining I was an Osgoode student writing for the on-campus paper and asking for some pictures, I received the flippant and slightly frustrating answer: “hahaha. what a weird place for a review. sure, we can get you some pics”. Long story short, all signs pointed to a fantastic opening reception, and I was eager to see what I had been missing for so long. I came expecting a quirky but sophisticated show that straddled the distinction between boring King West elitism and back-door DIY student run affairs; what exactly that might look like I wasn’t sure, but I knew it wouldn’t disappoint. And disappoint it didn’t. I arrived to find an absolutely packed reception area, completely disorienting save for the queue snaking its way up the stairs (fitting, given the event’s name), pointing the way to the show. The hordes of people waiting to get in were only a taste of what was waiting inside. I entered, squeezing and jostling my way through a crowd of sweaty plaid-shirts and patterned tights (the temperature was akin to that of a sauna), feeling more like I was at a club than a gallery. Music blared through insufficient looking speakers, barely the OBITERdicta

sustaining the ear splitting decibels of M83’s Midnight City pumping through them. Above me hung Interstice Studio, a sprawling blanket of paperclips suspended from the ceiling of the lobby, cradling the makeshift bar underneath it. Impressive as the installation was, it wasn’t what I had come here to see. Itching to discover what the artists and designers had done with the rooms, I set off in whichever direction looked least crammed and most easily navigable (an extremely relative valuation). The first room I stumbled upon contained Tinsel & Sawdust by Janna Watson and Katrina Tompkins. An abstract painting hung on a wall, evocative of a less gestural Francis Bacon, or else, a more visceral Jackson Pollock. On the ground before it, there lay its mirror image in the form of a carpet, complete with scattered bottles and thread, evoking a still-in-progress feeling. Was this a commentary on art imitating life (or vice versa)? Or an existential musing on the individual’s constant pursuit of some unattainable ideal? The rich blue tones of the artwork contrasted brilliantly with yellow walls, creating a visually gratifying, if slightly inaccessible final product. Next, I found an apparently untitled installation by Fugitive Glue, a design collective, which consisted of rusted propane tanks stacked atop one another, forming a square. They described the piece by the term “UPHOARDING”: gathering waste objects for up-cycling, which I assumed was some superior form of recycling. There’s a fine line between provocative, challenging art that nonetheless manages to hit a topical note and hipster rhetoric, jumping on whatever bandwagon is most convenient (ecofriendliness today, gay rights tomorrow) to lend itself legitimacy as a guardian of social welfare. This effort encroached on the territory of the latter. After this, I made my way back to the lobby, looking to brave the crowds and get a drink from the bar. A few moments later, I heard a loud pop immediately followed by lapping flames emerging from one of the worn speakers. A panicked bartender yelled for the DJ to turn the music off and tore the mounted speaker out of the wall. I was equal parts worried and amused. I casually imagined the old and predominantly wooden

building set ablaze, but remained rooted where I was – I had to see how the stupefied bartender would find his way out of this conundrum. He was apparently wondering the same thing as he held the burning speaker under his arm until the flames came a little too close for comfort, at which point he threw it on the ground, cutting off the oxygen and extinguishing the flames. Not surprisingly, on a subsequent trip to the bathroom, I saw the slain speaker lying defunct in the bathtub under a pile of ice. I guess that’s as good a place as any. Next I found myself in the room styled by merk!, a group of “design provocateurs” who had suspended bed sheets from the ceiling, creating a maze lit by glaring red lights. Flashlights were handed out to guests who shone the UV lights along the linens, discovering designs invisible to the naked eye. Adjacent to it was Darklab, a sound and sculpture installation. A brightly lit pseudo-tentacle occupied the centre of the room, which was otherwise completely unlit, as ambient and eerie sound effects drifted in from speakers. I didn’t know quite what to make of it, but the sacrosanct silence of the room struck a chord with all who entered, offering solace from the frenetic crowds outside. Wendy W Fox’s room transformation was undoubtedly my favorite. On the wall, there were mounted foam sculptures, thin and flat, twisting in various directions. The uneven edges cast shadows, and the incredibly friendly artist was glad to point out to guests that the shadows were actually mini cityscapes of New York, London, Hong Kong and Vienna. Realization of this was only attainable through patience and investigation, thereby forcing the audience to earn their enjoyment of the piece, something contemporary art rarely does. In a world where a blank canvas constitutes “art” (not that that’s a bad thing), where we’re always looking for quick and easy stimulation, where gallery-goers have (for the most part) long forgotten the lost art of meditative appreciation of a piece, Fox’s work was refreshing and rewarding, not to mention visually stunning. Gareth Bate’s Jewel Net of Indra was another favorite of mine. One thousand small circular mirrors patterned the wall, on three hundred of Continued to next page. monday - february 6 - 2012


page 10 Continued from previous page.

which were painted the busts of iconic individuals, both current and historic. It was the sort of piece that draws the viewer in, encouraging them to engage in their own guessing game, spotting everyone from Albert Einstein to Princess Diana. If accessibility and the establishment of a dialogue with viewers was what they were going for, the artists couldn’t have done better. Though not one of the room installations, Matthew Blunderfield and Skanda Lin’s installation was another highlight. A myriad of electronic objects (artifacts?) seemingly floated in mid-air, suspended from above, creating a dome into which guests were invited to step. Standing beneath a net of fragmented computers and cell phones produced a striking effect. Divorced from their everyday context, dismantled until scarcely recognizable, these bits of technology, many of which are now obsolete, painted a picture of the digitalization of our culture, moving forward at break-neck speed, too self-absorbed to be interested in the relics it leaves behind. The irony of a girl standing next to me, texting on her iPhone4S, was almost too much to bear. Another delightful public space installation was Building Ties by Sonia Tyagi. A sea of bow ties were fastened together, creating a quirky and off-kilter take on a traditional Persian wall rug. The colors and textures of each bow tie drew you in for a closer look, but it was just as stunning seeing it all come together from a distance. As crowds started to trickle out of Come Up To My Room, my friends and I began to do the same. As we were leaving, one of us noticed we had missed the installation in Mirrored Room with Shiny Spinning Things, which we quickly realized was locked. I joined the other confusedlooking guests as we stood outside, wondering if it were appropriate to knock. Just then, a flustered woman brushed by us, moving towards the door, which opened just as she approached. I couldn’t see very well, but from behind the now considerably sized group of people I managed to peer a fidgety man opening the door, looking gleeful. The door quickly closed again, and I asked the gallery-goers around me if they knew what was happening. “The artist’s having a moment”, one woman said to me, nodding knowingly, injecting the air with a palpable sense of mysticism and enigma. I’m still not entirely sure what that meant, but it was a very fitting end to a fantastic art show that featured some peculiar antics, as they all should. monday - february 6 - 2012

Room 202 - Jewel of Indra - Gareth Bate. Photo by: Agata and Lucas Piskunowicz.

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PAM HINMAN Contributor

seats, the pit is entirely visible so you can watch the musicians in action!

Whether you are a first time opera goer or a seasoned opera buff, here are ten reasons why you should check out Tosca at the COC.

8. You are allowed to boo if you don’t like it! Actually, you are encouraged to boo at the villain if you think he gave a great performance. This is the fun thing about opera audiences. They are really vocal! Don’t be surprised if the person next to you bursts out “brava/bravo” after an aria, or if people start to clap in the middle of an Act. It is all part of the opera tradition.

1. Puccini’s Tosca is one of the best loved operas of all time. Set in 19th century Rome, this is a tale of a passionate woman caught in a web of corruption, lust, and betrayal. 2. If you are a first time opera goer, this is probably one of the best operas for you to see. The music is very tuneful, and incredibly expressive. You might even be surprised to recognize some famous tunes (like the music from the scene in James Bond: Quantum of Solace that takes place backstage at a Tosca performance). The story and drama move quickly, and there is a lot to see. This particular production is quite visually stunning. 3. Tickets can be purchased for relatively little. Under 30 ticket buyers can get tickets for $22 each, and you can purchase them online at www.coc.ca. If you are over 30 there are rush tickets for $22 and standing room tickets for $12 available. Rush and standing room tickets go on sale at 11 a.m. on the day of a performance and have to be bought in person at the box office. 4. The singers are outstanding! The male and female lead roles are shared between two casts. All four of these singers are phenomenal, but world renowned Canadian soprano Adrienne Pieczonka is particularly captivating as Floria Tosca. Her voice is powerful yet warm, and she performs with conviction and a deep emotional connection to the music. 5. It doesn’t matter if you don’t speak Italian, there are subtitles projected above the stage. 6. The chapels, palaces, and fortresses of Rome are beautifully brought to life in this lavish production. The set and costumes are characterized by intricate and ornate detail, and are artfully varied over three acts. 7. The orchestra sounds fantastic. The Globe and Mail review reported that the orchestra “performed with exceptional clarity and a narrative focus, registering at every moment the flickering emotional densities of the drama.” 80 very talented musicians are in the pit, working away accompanying singers, skilfully following the conductor, and giving life to the beautifully rich score that Puccini created. From most the OBITERdicta

9. If you haven’t been to the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, it is worth it to go just for the building. This award-winning opera house is now considered one of the best for opera acoustics in the world. It was designed by the award-winning Toronto-based firm Diamond and Schmitt Architects Inc. The auditorium, orchestra pit, and stage, are designed to be an entirely separate and isolated structure within the building, resting on nearly 500 rubber acoustic isolation pads. The European horshoe-shaped auditorium seats 2070, and was designed to hold the same acoustics, regardless of the number of people in the hall on any given performance. There are no bad seats in this opera house. The view is easy and accessible no matter where you are, and even the sound in the very back row is exquisite. Keep in mind that opera singers are not miked, and they have to project over 80-100 musicians. The design of the hall allows them to do this with ease.

Some tips if you are a first time opera goer: • Read the synopsis beforehand, it will help give you a context for understanding each act and you won’t feel so stuck to reading the subtitles. • Arrive early so you have time to read the program, and be sure to pre-order your drinks for intermission if you plan on having them. If you don’t, by the time you get your beer or glass of wine you will only have two minutes to chug it before going back into the hall. • Dress up or don’t, it really doesn’t matter. You see all kinds at the opera, from men in tuxes and women in ball gowns, to others in jeans and sweaters. I once met a huge opera fan at a show who was dressed like a biker, in leather pants and an opera t-shirt from the Met (the big opera house in New York). How you dress really depends on your comfort level (though you might want to avoid the biker look...). I always enjoy an opportunity to dress up, it can be fun for a night out. • I know we can’t live without them, but don’t forget to turn off your cell phone. • If you are sitting up in the nosebleed section, don’t worry, your view and sound will still be excellent. Just don’t lean forward over the railings during the show. You will obstruct the view of the people behind you.

10. Finally, this show is a great way for you to take a night off of studying, and give the musical and artistic side of your brain a treat. What makes opera so great is its combination of music, drama, acting, literature, and visual art. Its palette of artistic offerings keeps you engaged and entertained. So go check it out! You might just get hooked... Upcoming shows are Feb 7, 9, 11, 13, 16, 21, 23, and 25 at 7.30 pm. Running time for the show is approximately 2 hours and 35 minutes including two intermissions. Visit coc.ca for more information. Feel free to contact me with any questions or comments at pamelahinman@osgoode.yorku.ca. If you go, let me know how you liked it! I would love to hear your thoughts. monday - february 6 - 2012


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An Interview with Law Professor and Singer-Songwriter Lynda Collins NANCY SITU Arts & Culture Editor

Lynda Collins is an Osgoode alumnus who is now an Associate Professor at University of Ottawa Faculty of Law as well as a singersongwriter with over 17 years of experience. She has performed across North America as a musician and is also eligible to practice both in Canada and the United States. We asked her a little about what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to balance work and life. Tell us a little about your background, both in law and music. I graduated from Osgoode in 2000 and articled with the Sierra Legal Defense Fund (now Ecojustice Canada). I spent the next two years with the Toronto office doing public interest environmental law and then relocated to San Francisco to try my hand at toxic tort litigation. Although I loved practice, I developed a desire to shape environmental policy proactively and so decided to enter academia. Since becoming a prof in 2006 I've had the opportunity to advise governments in Canada, the EU and Asia regarding such issues as the reduction of toxic substances, environmental rights for future generations, and constitutional environmental rights. I have been very fortunate and very happy in my legal career. Musically, I've been singing forever and began playing guitar and writing music in my early twenties. I've recorded 3 albums before this one (the first two on analog!) but this is the first professionally produced full-length album.

Edith Brown Weiss, David Boyd, Natasha Affolder, Allen Linden...

among them. We occasionally have faculty music jams and they are always a ton of fun.

What was your dream job as a child? Any role models that stand out?

How do you find time to accommodate all of your interests and responsibilities? Was there ever a time or fork in the road that you felt like you had to choose between being a legal professional/academic and a musician?

I wanted to be a singer :) As a teenager I decided that I wanted to be a lawyer but I was concerned about the long hours and abandoned the idea for a couple of years. Then I read a course catalogue from Osgoode and found myself totally fascinated by the curriculum. I wanted to be a full time paid activist and I decided that lawyering was the best way to do that. You play many roles, for instance, as a professor, a practicing lawyer, and a musician. Where do you feel most at home? Would you say you're a musician who happens to practice and teach law? Or perhaps a professor who also practices and composes/ performs music? Probably the latter. I think we are beyond the era of rigid categorizations. Identity is so fluid and I think people are realizing that more and more in the 21st century. People have a variety of interests and talents and in general I think we are happier when we allow time for a variety of passions... What do your students think of your music? Are they aware of your musical background? You'd have to ask them! My students are fantastic people, with many talented musicians

I think I was clear in my early career that I wanted to prioritize law but of course I never stopped singing and writing, so that was going on all along as a parallel path. Eventually I just decided that it was worth taking the time to put together a decent recording of my recent musical work. What advice do you have for law students who are also pursuing a career in music or other creative fields? Find what you love - it's out there. The legal field is incredibly diverse and it is well worth searching until you find a job that lights you up, and leaves you time to have a full life outside of working hours. Thanks a lot for taking time out of your busy schedule to speak with us, Lynda! Professor Lynda Collinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; music can be streamed here: http://radio3.cbc.ca/#/artists/ Lynda-Collins As well, her album, Love, is available for purchase on iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/ album/love/id474887656

What made you decide to pursue environmental law? My mentor, Stewart Elgie, showed me a book called Wild By Law which is a photography book full of pictures of wild places that have been saved by public interest environmental lawyers. I got half-way through that book and decided that I would spend my professional life as an environmental lawyer. Who would you say your influences are? Musical or otherwise. Musically - Joni Mitchell, Tracy Chapman, Ray Lamontagne, Jen Grant, Ani DiFranco... Legally - Stewart Elgie (former prof at Osgoode, currently at uOttawa), Rachel Carson, monday - february 6 - 2012

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Features

Fake It Or Make It: A Symphonic Evening KYLE REES News Editor RABJEET WALLIA Staff Writer

Kyle: This is an article about how to enjoy a symphony, or, alternatively, how to use a symphony as a means to impress a date, and thus maybe increase the odds of making some music yourself (allegro and con bravura, if you please!). RJ will cover the latter, but first, here’s a quick primer on how to appreciate and acclimatize to classical music. If you are anything like me, your knowledge of classical music comes from Bugs Bunny (Elmer Fudd singing ‘Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbbbiiittt’ being my only exposure to Wagner). This was not a barrier to enjoying a night at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. To overcome my cluelessness, I called up TSO Publicist Nicole Morrison who agreed to show us around and help us act the part of an orchestragoer. We were well received by the Nicole, who kindly gave us a tour backstage where the performers get ready for the show. We met with the Manager of Customer Service Kevin Devaux who gave us insight into what all the TSO offers to everyone. I definitely know I’ll be attending again and I recommend that you go too. And here’s why.

You don’t need to know anything about the music to feel comfortable here: the entire experience is designed to be accommodating to the orchestral nouveau and the classical connoisseur alike. First, there are no clothing restrictions: I came wearing jeans and a polo shirt, and I wasn’t the only one. This is important, considering that you can’t get into half of the bars in Toronto without a monocle and top hat. Second, there are a number of TSO programs designed to help generate new enthusiasm for the arts. I would highly recommend checking out the ‘Soundcheck’ program, which lets anyone under 35 buy tickets for as little as $14. It’s cheaper than a movie, and significantly less likely to feature Tom Cruise, which is a plus. Finally, this is something anyone can appreciate regardless of musical taste. Even if you can’t follow the twists and turns, peaks and valleys of the music, you can at the very least watch what the percussionist does in the back, behind the strings section. It might make me sound like an uncultured pleb, but I really looked forward to seeing the percussionist smash those cymbals together, or go to town on the triangle (hands down, the most interesting instrument in the assembly). As amazing as the music may be, there are plenty of other reasons to attend a performance, like impressing a date with your musical knowl-

edge. RJ has more: RJ: As Kyle and I arrived to the TSO awaiting the arrival of our dates, Russian supermodels who were flying in from Monaco after a fashion shoot, we began to look around Roy Thomson Hall. I must say, it is rather impressive. Large, vaulted ceilings await you as you circle past the gift shop and onto the main reception area. We made our way over to one of the many bars happy to serve you and asked the bartender what their most popular drink was, anticipating that he would regale us with tales of the largesse of Toronto symphony-goers. Without batting an eyelash, he said: “Coffee”. With that unexpected and hilarious response, armed with our tickets and programs, we suddenly received a text from our ‘friends’ Natasha and Svetlana. Apparently, their private jet was delayed and had to stop in New York for a while, so they would miss the show. They advised us to go on without them and they would meet us later after they had landed. Kyle and I were forced to be each other’s date. As we glanced at each other, clearly disappointed with how this evening was turning out, we begrudgingly took our seats in the balcony and awaited the performance. As we sat there, I was thinking about the pros and cons about Continued to next page.

“The whole reason why I want to be a lawyer is I because I think some of the laws are screwed up.” Wendy Babcock was a true inspiration to all those who knew her. Her tragic passing last August weighs heavily on all of us; both for the loss of a friend and colleague and for the loss of a passionate advocate who could have made the world a better place. Anyone fortunate enough to have met Wendy walked away a better person for it. Because of Wendy, a generation of lawyers will leave law school as more sympathetic, and simply put, better lawyers, with a greater awareness and concern for those in need. It is in that spirit that the Obiter Dicta is proud to announce a contest in Wendy’s honour. In this way, it is our hope that we can continue Wendy’s work.

CONTEST RULES:

PRIZES:

• To enter submit a short article (under 600 words) about a social justice issue to the Obiter Dicta

• Dinner for two at O.NOIR (www.onoir.com) valued at $120. “But O.NOIR does more than just fire the imagination and stimulate the senses. After an hour or two in complete darkness (that’s right, no flashlights, matches, cell phones, cigarette lighters or luminous watches), customers gain a better understanding of what it’s like to be blind - just like the restaurant’s entire wait staff.”

• Articles will be judged based on style and content • Articles are due by 4pm on Monday, February 17 (deadline has been extended) • The winner will be announced on Monday February 27th • Top articles will be published in the Obiter Dicta the OBITERdicta

• a $250 donation to the Wendy Babcock Fund in the winner’s name.

monday - february 6 - 2012


page 14 Continued from previous page. taking someone here for a date. Here’s what I could come up with. Pro: Really easy to put your arm around someone and get in close The seating is designed to fit as many as possible. As such, you have the perfect opportunity to place your arm around someone’s shoulder and use it as an excuse to try to get comfortable. Just be careful that you pick the right time to do this. And the right person, as Kyle was, rather unfortunately, a little uncomfortable when I tried to make my move. Oh well, better luck next time. Con: How low to the ground are these seats? I’m not a tall person by any stretch of the imagination (get it, stretch?) but even I was having difficulty navigating my legs in order to be able to enjoy the show. I don’t mind my knees being bent, but when they are a few inches away from my ear, I tend to have an issue. Thankfully, I was on the edge and could extend my leg into the stairwell so as to get some comfort. Moreover, I noticed that there are seats which seem to have more leg room, so I would recommend the floor level or some other balconies. This can also save you from accidentally kneeing your date in the head as you get out of your seat. That doesn’t go over well.

Pro: Pre-ordering your drink for the intermission Okay, this is absolutely awesome. When I mentioned before there were many bars, I really meant it. Kyle and I did a tour of the place and we saw bars strategically located on each level. They allow you to pre-order your drinks so that you don’t have to wait in line as everyone is going to get something (you only have 15 minutes during the intermission). You get to impress your date by having their favourite drink ready for them so you can maximize your time in order to regale them with your knowledge of the symphony and show how them exactly how sophisticated you are. The bars are well stocked with beers, wines and spirits of premium quality and value, so you can typically get exactly or close to what you are looking for. Con: Well, I did say they were premium priced? It wasn’t the most I’ve ever paid for a premium drink, but my god, they sure know how to make a buck. Granted, if you have expensive tastes than you know what you are getting, but if you’re going to get a drink, then make sure it counts. You literally have enough time for 1 or maybe 2, so perhaps it’s worth it. Judging by the wafts of scotch I encountered as I passed many of the guests, I can only imagine that Roy Thomson Hall did well.

Pro: The performance is amazing! There’s not much more that you can say about the TSO except for the fact that they are world class performers. I’m not as well versed in classical music as others but from what I could hear, there was nary a flaw throughout. There is something unique about going to see the symphony. Rather than just hearing the music, which a good set of headphones can accomplish, you actually get to see the fluidic and organic nature of an entire symphony working together. What is even more amazing is the seamlessness of it all. Individuals working harmoniously and with such precision adds an entirely new dynamic to the experience that cannot be replicated without actually being there. This was my first symphony and it absolutely convinced me to go again. Con: You should do your research about what you are seeing The story behind The Miraculous Mandarin? Yeah, it involves a girl having sex with a dying man. After he’s been smothered, stabbed and hanged. This was proceeded with him continuously staring at her. Yeah. Not exactly setting the mood. Whether or not this is an ideal place for a date or for the musically inclined will be entirely up to you.

Kyle masters the art of ordering an expensive drink at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra

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The Unreasonable Man Perpetuates Scottish Stereotypes TRAVIS WEAGANT Staff Writer I was not born in Scotland. My parents were not born in Scotland. My grandparents were not born in Scotland. You have to go three generations back to find stories of my ancestors emerging from the Highlands and embarking for the New World in search of more intelligible accents. But I must say that the Scottish blood runs awfully thick, for I find myself inexplicably drawn to certain things in life, a few of which I’m going to share with you today. The sports, for example. Those who know me know that I’m not much of an athlete, but I do indulge in two decidedly Scottish pastimes: curling and golf. My brief pitch for the Toronto Curling Association two weeks ago didn’t do the sport justice. Founded on what was undoubtedly a late and hazy winter’s night in the 16th century, some revelers went down to the local pond and started sliding rocks around. At least I assume that’s what happened – no one actually knows. I am going to put to rest, once and for all, the heinous rumour that curling is not actually a sport. Anyone who saw the size of the British team at the Vancouver Olympics knows otherwise, and I can say categorically that anyone who maintains their denial has never played the game. I can assure you that it is a thoroughly physical endeavour, having taken part since the age of 6. Golf, on the other hand, is a sport in which one can choose their level of exertion. The proliferation of wee vehicles to drive you, your clubs, and your beer around has made it very easy to turn four hours of good exercise into four hours of carbs and lost balls. It is, nonetheless, Scottish. Most important of the stereotypes that I have adopted, however, is the food and drink. On my most recent voyage to Scotland, I learned that very few, if any, of my Scottish ancestors served in either of the World Wars. It turns out they were more valuable to the war effort if they stayed home. You see, they were sheep farmers. You may pause now and take a moment to make the sheep joke of your choice. Laugh it up. Anyway,

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wool from Scottish sheep clothed a large portion of the British Army, including the kilted Highlanders. But what does this have to do with food and drink? Well, what do you do with a sheep when it’s done making wool? You are perhaps familiar with the prairie First Nations’ custom of using “the whole buffalo”. This custom was born of necessity, as was the Scottish custom of using the whole sheep. And so was born the haggis. I’m certain there’s no use trying to trick you into eating one without telling you how it’s made, so here goes. 1. Cut open the sheep. 2. Extract the “pluck” (heart, liver, and lungs) and stomach. 3. Mince the pluck with onion, oatmeal, suet, salt, and spices (pepper, coriander, mace, and nutmeg). 4. Fill the stomach with the slop you’ve produced. 5. Tie off the stomach and cook it Newfoundland-style (bring it to a salty boil for about three hours). It may sound positively repellent to those of you unaccustomed to organ meats, but the taste is surprisingly savoury and the texture is very similar to that of thick oatmeal. Haggis is traditionally served with neeps and tatties (turnip and potatoes, both mashed), but you can get creative: I enjoyed a haggis burger the last time I visited Glasgow. If you visit Scotland and order a full Scottish breakfast, you’ll often get haggis. Beside it you’ll find a reddish-black pudding. This is blood pudding (sometimes called black pudding, which is diabolical trickery of the worst sort). Do not eat this. It is literally made of livestock blood and, unlike the haggis, tastes like it too. Of all things

Scottish, it’s one I can’t stomach. Finding haggis in Canada is somewhat more difficult than it is in its native land. You can try Scottish butchers (preliminary research indicates Allen’s, located at 2151 Weston Rd.), but your most convenient bet comes only once a year. On January 25, pubs all over the world celebrate Robbie Burns Day. Named for a Scottish poet, the day is a celebration for Scottish expats and those of Scottish heritage. When evening time arrives, a man in a kilt, accompanied by a piper, will parade through the dining room with a haggis and recite a Burns poem about said haggis, appropriately titled “Address to a Haggis”. Before the poem’s end, you’ll have noticed the shimmering golden liquid that your server has placed on your table. Scotch whisky is not for everyone. It lacks the traditional smoothness of Canadian whisky and won’t knock your socks off like bourbon. Irish whiskies can be comparable, but are produced differently. Scotch whisky is uniquely flavourful. There are two kinds of scotch: blended and single malt. Blended whiskies contain whisky from more than one batch and age, while a bottle of single malt comes entirely from the same cask. While both can certainly be excellent, the cheapest whiskies to produce are blended, so caveat emptor. The free one that just appeared next to your haggis while the kilted man recited is most definitely the bar’s cheapest blended. Do not under any circumstances smell it, and when it’s time, get it down the hatch before you have a chance to taste it. Once the man finishes the poem, he’ll raise his glass and toast the haggis. The appropriate response is an energetic “slàinte mhath!” Your homework this week is to be suitably flabbergasted when you Google how to pronounce that.

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The Lost Art of Going on a Date RABJEET WALLIA Staff Writer It seems to me that the one of the bigger concerns for single people at Osgoode is not necessarily finding someone, although that does take up a lot of time. No, it turns out that while people are really good at networking at parties or events, when they finally meet someone and decide to meet again, one on one, they somehow choke and can’t get things going. Yes, I’m talking about the first date. There is something so shockingly frightening about the first date. There appears to be a stigma attached to it along with a heightened sense of expectation. Where are we going? What should I wear? What do I want to project? What happens after? What am I going to do? What am I NOT going to do?...It’s uncanny. What is it about the first date that makes us so nervous? Of course, this wouldn’t be one of my articles if I didn’t answer my own questions. The problem with first dates is that we expect far too much to come from them. Logically speaking, all long lasting relationships began with a first date. The stories that come from couples (and romantic comedies) teach us to believe that the first date is crucial for making the best connection. We’ve always learned that you only get one chance to make a first impression. After all, why waste time on a second date if you can can’t even stand the first? And fail they do. This doesn’t mean that every first date is bad. The people I’ve spoken with over the years have had all kinds of first dates: from the truly terrible to the absolutely nice. Yet, invariably, they did not yield a second date. As one person I was talking to always would equivocate. “Oh sure, it was nice and all but I didn’t feel that spark/connection/je ne sais quoi, so I don’t think I’ll see them again.” This leads one to wonder if this is not a case of a self-fulfilling prophecy. Perhaps if we go in with our usual mindset, we’re destined to fail, regardless of how awesome things may be.

good conversation. You’ve had a bad day at work, you’re tired, you have a big exam, etc. These things happen and sometimes you just can’t avoid it. That doesn’t, however, necessarily mean that the date has to fail. The art of good conversation is to have a great back and forth going between the parties involved. So, you should get the nervousness out of your mind of having to always be “on”. You don’t have to have everything you say be the wittiest thing they have ever heard. Sometimes, it’s nice when the other person gets a chance to talk and you merely listen and politely engage. Additionally, perhaps being less talkative puts the other person at ease, as they may realize they don’t have to be on the ball the entire time either. 2. I hate just going for coffee/dinner. It seems so boring! Sometimes, sitting down with some food and drink can be incredibly uncomfortable for people. They prefer to go out and do something active, as it takes the pressure off of the date. There is a solution to this simple problem: all you need to do is decide on what you want to do, and propose it. There is nothing wrong with talking about doing something active instead of just sitting somewhere. It simply shows that you are open to doing a lot of things that aren’t mainstream or that you simply want to do something else. Trust me, this usually comes off as a good thing and should be encouraged if that is exactly what it will take to make you feel at ease.

3. I’m really just looking for the perfect person for me, and he isn’t it! I’ve saved the best for last. By best I mean the most illogical. This is typically said by those about whom they have never met. There is this belief that almost no one will match what they are looking for so they just don’t bother trying unless they are absolutely sure. Or they have one person in mind already and since the person who asked them out is not it, they simply will ignore them and wait for the Perfect One. Well, I hate to break it to you (I really don’t) but I think you’ll soon realize that not only is the Perfect One not who you think he is entirely, you missed out on someone pretty awesome too. Perhaps the person who just asked you out has more in common with your desirable Perfect One than you think. Moreover, suppose you do land the Perfect One and they turn out to be completely different once you get to know them. This is more likely to happen, since you’ve probably built them up a bit in your head already. My point with all of this is simple: we need to be more courageous with our dating life in order to make it more exciting and fulfilling. It’s always going to be easy to find reasons not to do something. However, if we get these ideas out of our head and these preconceptions of what is out there, we may find that there is more to dating than waiting for the inevitable, whatever that may be. So, the next time someone asks you out and you feel the slightest bit of an impulse to say yes, trust your instincts.

Maybe the problem we have then is not necessarily expectations, but preconceptions that we need to get over in order to succeed on that first date. Here are a few that have come up a lot in my conversations: 1. There’s too much pressure to communicate! I can be the first one to admit that, on occasion, there are times when it is difficult to make monday - february 6 - 2012

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An Ozzie at Ryerson ANDREW MONKHOUSE Co-Editor-in-Chief This semester I singed up for the RyersonOsgoode exchange. The course I am enrolled in is Diversity and Equality in the Public Sector (PA 8210). As someone who will be articling in human resources law, as well as having a background in the subject given my work experience as a policy analyst within the employment equity division of the federal government, I figured that this would fit well into my past history and my future plans. Moreover, since I live downtown the proximity was appealing. And so I became an Ozzie at Ryerson. This might be a one-time column, or a reoccurring one. I guess it depends on what happens in the class. So I missed the first class unfortunately, however, the class was watching a movie so not too much was lost. Prior to attending the second class I received the syllabus. There are a couple of things which differentiated it from the law school seminars I am used to. What first struck me was that under 'assignments and expectations' it says: “a) All students are expected to read at least one of the three articles/chapters assigned for each week and come prepared to participate in class discussion.” (Bolding is IN THE ORIGINAL TEXT). So as you can tell there are three articles assigned each week and the professor is asking us to read *one * of them. The midterm is a 6 page paper and you have three options. One of the options is a case comment (on Farrel v. Ontario). Guess which one I'm doing? Oh comfort zone, I missed you. The

final paper is 18 pages long. There is a presentation also, like many Osgoode seminars. Past that there is no attendance mark or really any attempt to get people to show up, but people do still attend. The grades also stop at a B-, after which there is only a failing grade. As a law student this is a relief. I did have some issues getting to class after the first one because it seems that Ryerson had randomly changed the day the course was on, making it so that it conflicted with another course of mine. Luckily the Osgoode Administration was very accommodating and now I have worked it out so that I get to stay in the course (but not Commercial law . Too bad, Johnston seemed awesome). When I finally got to the class, I was instantly outed as an outsider as I raised my hand for the question “who cannot access blackboard?” (which I assume is some internal file sharing system) and having my answer as to why not be “because I am not a Ryerson student.” While most of the others in this class are all in the same graduate program they are quite friendly and were quick to include me as someone from a northern campus. Most of those in the course are current or aspiring civil servants. Throughout the lecture, however, I kept asking myself “what is the practical use of this?” and “where does this fit within the totality of the course?” But of course there was very little discussion of either laws or cases. Instead the discussion consisted of almost philosophical concepts and other graduate analysis. It was an interesting shift from law school. However, whenever anything legal related does come up there is a tendency to ask me for

'the legal opinion', or to find out if I know a case on the topic, etc. As a self-appointed ambassador from Osgoode I attempt to do my best when called upon. But it is certainly interesting to discuss the history, purpose of laws and cases on subjects and see how they are viewed from a non-law student perspective. Unfortunately as a non-Ryerson student I did not have access to the internet in class. This means that I cannot look up cases in order to be more helpful...looking up legal cases being the only thing anyone ever uses the internet for. I am sad there is no internet in the class. The second week I was there I was given the coursepack which was over 500 pages and yet cost $25, which seemed to be the actual cost to print the book. I've never had a coursepack cost anywhere near that at Osgoode... We also had someone from the CFS come in and do a class talk for 'November 1st' drop fees day. Wow. I haven't had that happen in a long, long time. Even though there were only 15 of us in the room for our grad class, they came and spoke to us. By contrast they would never do a talk at Osgoode even in much larger classes. Although I have made fun of my Ryerson course a bit in the article, overall after having taken so many classes at Osgoode I am finding the class a refreshing relief and really much less stressful than an Osgoode class. The topic is great and the people are fun. Even if the idea of being singled out as 'the lawyer' in the group is worrying to you (maybe that’s just me...) I would, at this point at least, highly recommend people consider taking a Ryerson course in the program. At the very least it is warmer downtown and there is a Timmies right across the road to go to on break.

OWN Charity Fashion Show: Own Your Style On March 7th a select group of your law school colleagues will stop talking and start walking--down the runway! The Osgoode Women's Network charity fashion show Own Your Style will be a night to remember. All proceeds are going to Nellie’s, a local women’s shelter - so don't forget to save the date! If you’re interested in modeling for the show come to our open casting call in Room 2006 on Tuesday, February 7th from 12:30-2:30! Or contact Harri Codrington at harriettecodrington@osgoode.yorku.ca for more information about modelling.

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Opinions Just a Thought: Beyond “Slavies” MELAYNA WILLIAMS Contributor

dichotomy, but this time, I will frame it that way for simplicity.

In the wake of a very interesting and engaging moment within Osgoode and subsequently beyond, I want to highlight the importance of this moment.

White people who cannot see what the hell the big deal is:

I’m speaking of the now infamous advertisement in which a major Bay Street law firm poked fun at a long-standing law student derogatory joke referring to the firm as ‘Slavies’. The firm thought the joke was so good, that it published an ad, making light of it. Firstly, appropriating “slavies” as a marketing strategy was ill advised - to say the least. Chances are, if something is considered a long running “joke” in the legal community, it’s not funny. Chances are, in fact, it is a sarcastic, backhanded perspective about an issue. So even if the term “Slavies” wasn’t problematic… it would have been unfunny. Secondly, the ad did make light of a joke regarding slavery, something many people, especially African Canadian people, do not find funny-for good reason. Actually, for a multitude of reasons, including images like this:

White people’s reactions to this have ranged from concern to flippantness. The people who don’t care actually resent the fact that backlash has occurred. Why? Because not only do they truly not understand the nature and triggering that can take place in a discrimination framework, but they don’t want to care. They prescribe to the “minorities are always complaining, and things aren’t even that bad right now” school of thought. Their privilege (and most likely some subconscious racist thought, belief in stereotypes) dictates their opinion and their loud voice of dissent towards the fallout of this situation speaks volumes. The silencing of an anti-racist discourse essentially comes from a racist place. Those people need a little bit more than some education. Oftentimes people of colour encounter White people like this, and in turn assume they are all like that. They are not. Saying that, there are many White people like this, but painting them with a broad brush in that manner may not be effective. Because the ones who may actually care, and in this instance, see the ad as problematic, may be afraid to come forward if they feel they have already been assessed and judged as racist. What if a White person didn’t really see racism in the ad but has additional questions for Black people who were offended? There has to be a space for them, in my opinion. Allies need more information, but they also need to feel that they are welcomed as an ally. Sometimes that means educating.

and current realities like this: http://www.ilo. org/global/topics/forced-labour/lang--en/index. htm. As a Black law student, looking at the ad was not a great experience. It was uncomfortable and should not have been published in the first place. The ad was published, a complaint issued, the ad was pulled, followed by an apology from the firm. I want to speak to the amazing conversation this has started. FINALLY. So, that’s the thing. This ad, the discourse that surrounds it, as well as the actions that took place following the discovery of the ad are all necessary components to a genuine conversation about this. I don’t really enjoy the way race is often employed in a Black against White monday - february 6 - 2012

I completely understand and relate to Black people feeling like it is not their job to teach White people how to treat us at this point. Perhaps it should not be, but it very well may be our responsibility. Teachable moments aren’t always because people have earned them - some happen because people need them. Educating and Engaging- Informing Allies I think White law students who understand their privilege and are legitimately interested in understanding the ways in which people without that privilege operate in society, deserve a chance to weigh in here. Why? Because no one begins by knowing everything. Everyone has something to learn. For example, I wanted to write this last week, but I hadn’t spoken to enough people about it. And I still don’t know everything - I never will. But I want to learn continually.

If we as Black law students can learn to take the opportunity (and I am not saying I’m an expert at this/it is easy) to engage with people who may have not understood the triggering implications of the ad, amazing conversations could be had. It all depends on the way we as a community choose to frame this. With an us vs. them mentality, people who don’t identify with “them” will be silenced because they feel boxed in. This is not a conversation for exclusively Black law students. We can facilitate the conversation, but the true beauty with this issue is there is potential for an inclusive dialogue. We can actually express our levels of comfort towards the law school environment. We can talk about what diversity in the profession actually means. What cultural sensitivity, accountability and the difference between tolerance and an anti-racist framework mean. We have a platform. We should not merely talk amongst ourselves, as it can be dangerous. As Black law students, we also have to take into account those of us who did not find the ad racist. They exist and it doesn’t make them less Black, less critical or worthy of alienation. As the small community that we are, we must stand together on this, but we also must understand that this did not mean the same thing for everyone. I hated the ad. I listened to the ‘Slavies’ nickname for three years and I am not ashamed to say that I didn’t bat an eyelash. Seeing it published conjured up something different. That does not make me Blacker now than I was before I thought the term was offensive. We need to appreciate the beauty and diversity in our community, without fearing what White people will think if we don’t appear to agree on absolutely everything. I acknowledge that saying these things as a Black woman could be offensive to other Black people because we have a tendency to keep our issues under wraps, within our community. I don’t prescribe to secretly addressing issues that should inform a public discourse. A grillion years ago, before I was a law student, I was at a Black Law Students’ Association of Canada conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia. A friend and I were in an elevator with other Black students, along with a few White women. One of the White women asked if we were attending a basketball conference. In an awkward “ugh.. sigh..really” way, one of us explained why we were there. This was a teachable moment, not necessarily for the women in the elevator, but by telling that story (and ones like it - we all have many) to other White people may allow them to check themselves. They could just not know. Some don’t want to and never will. But we should try with the ones who may. the OBITERdicta


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What Grinds My Gears: Tipping ANONYMOUS Contributor

An article in the Toronto Star noted that the 'new' 'common' appropriate tip is 20%. In the alternative, I would like to suggest that tipping is generally illogical. The article (found at http:// www.toronto.com/article/710035--standardtip-in-toronto-restaurants-now-20-per-cent) suggests that 15% is the 'norm' in Toronto, but that 20% is becoming the new standard, which is being encouraged by restaurants when they set the default tip on their machines for interact/credit cards to 20%. So, what grinds my gears is tipping (leaving aside the perverse action of increasing 'suggested' tips). Notwithstanding the fact that this sounds an awful lot like a bribe, tips are generally accepted in many service industries within Canada and the United States. Interestingly enough, the convention is not even universal to Western nations as it is contrary to the norm in Europe, the United Kingdom and Australia. In these nations you pay the bill and if you leave extra money, the kind bartender runs down the street after you to give it back (true story). The first issue with tipping is that it is very hard to know who to tip (we will come back to this later). You are expected to tip at a buffet where the waiters do not serve you food but instead just fill up your water. But at Subway, where people put together your entire meal for you specifically as you ordered, you are now allowed to tip. Am I expected to tip the hairdresser for 15 minutes of super awkward conversation about the weather? Another issue is that you have no idea how your tip is being distributed or 'tipped out'. At many places the tip is split up afterwards. A portion goes to the host or hostess, to the cooking staff, to the manager, split up between the wait staff on duty, etc. However, you do not know what the division of your tip will be when you tip, so you have no real ability to decide what the appropriate level of tip would be for the service based on the constituent parts of the tip. Furthermore, in a previous article (April 13, 2010) the Toronto Star stated that many service staff are now required to give their tips to the business they work for. You don't know where your money is going, why are you giving the OBITERdicta

it? I have held many jobs. I have worked very hard for both my employer as well as outside clients. I was NEVER handed money for the job I did. It was merely part of the job. I would have felt that it was very inappropriate if I had been handed money for doing a job that I was supposed to do anyway. Heck, even from a contractual point of view where on earth is the consideration for this extra money? Maybe someone should start up a class action to get all of our money back. From a public good standpoint the argument for tipping is that the types of jobs that get tips are paid poorly and these people need the extra money in order to survive. But WHY are they paid less? Well, because the law says they can be paid less, less than minimum wage. Perhaps these people should simply be paid better. The expectation of tipping allows employers to justify paying these positions lower than minimum wage while coercively forcing the employees in these situations to 'work for their money' past what they already have to do as part of their job. Tipping also can act as a form of discrimination, effectively providing higher wages to certain people who get more tips than others, often due to their age and attractiveness, effectively avoiding both equal wage and antidiscrimination legislation. The simple answer is that without tipping employers and employees would be able to more accurately negotiate their own wages. On the flip side, there is a public harm to tips which at first glance does not seem obvious. The trick is that tips are generally all cashbased, which means that reporting them on your taxes is basically voluntary. For example: Quebec taxes tips at a flat 8%, clearly lower, but this is the solution they have come up with. Ontario by contrast just works on the basis of self-reporting. This allows people to get more money from the government through rebates or paying fewer taxes by underreporting their tips. This takes money from the government, which would otherwise be used for social services. It also encourages people to not respect the law as much by encouraging systematic tax evasion. For Ontario resident students it is even worse as there is a perverse incentive

to also under report your income to OSAP, meaning that some students get more assistance from the government than they would get if they reported what they truly made. Students working at jobs that pay well in tips but poorly in over the counter pay can end up with more money in the end than students working at jobs which do more to further their career goals, thus potentially creating an incentive for students to hold themselves back in jobs where they learn less skills but make more under the table money. By contrast of course, some people who are honest get less than they would have, which seems unfair. Again it encourages a system of abusing the OSAP system. From a practical standpoint I, of course, tip. But this is due to because of social convention. The threat of having a wait staff scream at you demanding 'their money' as if you walked out on a bill is enough to generally keep people in line. And I gave up trying to rebel against strong socially constructed 'normal' behaviour after high school. Make It or Fake It Part About Tipping

So, given that you will be hated, potentially chased after and screamed at if you do not tip, what are you to do? Well, this author believes that the important thing to do is to check out the advice as given to people not from here. So, it seems that tripadvisor has a section on Canadian Tipping and Etiquette! Amazing. (found at: http:// www.tripadvisor.ca/Travel-g153339-s606/ Canada:Tipping.And.Etiquette.html) Anyway it recommends that 15% is normal, with 20% for exceptional service. While 10% is allowable on personal choice it notes that 15% is *expected *. As for whom to tip they suggest bribing, I mean tipping, basically every person who helps you. They note that 'other services' are often tipped a minimum of 10% including â&#x20AC;&#x153;hairdressers, manicurists, aestheticians and taxi driversâ&#x20AC;?, however from my perspective, I am very much not sure how to draw a principled test as to whom to tip.

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Crossword Twice Shy Crossword /// /// Twice Shy by Michael Szubelak by Michael Szubelak 1

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ACROSS: ACROSS: 1. Code 1. Code 7. Bush party 7. Bush party 10. Civil unrest 10. Civil unrest 14. Mexican cerveza 14. Mexican cerveza 15. Holiday preceder 15. Holiday preceder 16. Facts 16. Facts 17. Camera stabilizer 17. Camera stabilizer 18. Stalwart wood 18. Stalwart wood 19. Another for 16-across 19. Another termterm for 16-across 20. Shapely diagram? 20. Shapely diagram? 21. Belief 21. Belief 23. Contends 23. Contends 25. Wall Street 25. Wall Street clubclub 29. Errors 29. Errors 31. “Make double” 31. “Make ______ double” 32. Not 32. Not youryour 33. Sinister 33. Sinister 34. Intrude 34. Intrude 35. Joyous shout in Mexico 35. Joyous shout in Mexico City City 36. “____ 36. “____ too!”too!” 37. “30 Rock” 37. “30 Rock” star star TinaTina 38. Canadian songstress who’s 38. Canadian songstress who’s goodgood numbers? withwith numbers? 41. Devices for truckers to keep 41. Devices for truckers to keep in in touch touch 42. Antique 42. Antique 43. in SeaCannes in Cannes 43. Sea 45. Toronto environs 45. Toronto and and environs 46. Toy maker 46. Toy maker 48. Lacking in colour 48. Lacking in colour 49. Sister 49. Sister 50. Chart 50. Chart 51. Financial 51. Financial guruguru SuzeSuze 53. Sink 53. Sink 56. 555 56. 555 57. Saharan endpoint 57. Saharan rallyrally racerace endpoint 61. Historical phase 61. Historical phase 62. Spicy vampire slaying device? 62. Spicy vampire slaying device? 65. Inlet 65. Inlet 66. Skype? 66. Skype? 67. DiFranco Lorak 67. DiFranco and and Lorak 68. Seize 68. Seize 69. Composure 69. Composure 70. Borrowed 70. Borrowed

DOWN: DOWN: 1. Security channel? 1. Security channel? 2. Time 2. Time pastpast 3. Gutenberg invention 3. Gutenberg invention 4. Beer ingredient (sing.) 4. Beer ingredient (sing.) 5.album U2 album producer 5. U2 producer 6. The “R”RFE in RFE 6. The “R” in 7. Math branch 7. Math branch 8. Eggs 8. Eggs 9. Black orange 9. Black and and orange tea?tea? 10. Mock 10. Mock 11. Moron’s in power? 11. Moron’s stintstint in power? 12. Commonly 12. Commonly 13. Tribute 13. Tribute 22. Shot 22. Shot fromfrom afar afar 24. Reviews 24. Reviews 26. With 48-down, the masses 26. With 48-down, the masses 27. Opposite of WNW 27. Opposite of WNW 28. 28. ShellShell out out 29. Lecture 29. Lecture 30. ____ 30. ____ matemate 37. Tank 37. Tank 39. “Simpsons” regular Disco 39. “Simpsons” regular Disco ______ 40. Bronze 40. Bronze 42. Tallahassee export 42. Tallahassee export 43. Hamlisch 43. Hamlisch and and GayeGaye 44. Nightmarish street? 44. Nightmarish street? 45. Prudish 45. Prudish 47. percentage Fat percentage 47. Fat 48. 26-down See 26-down 48. See 52. Birth related 52. Birth related 53. Swiss capital 53. Swiss capital 54. Vocal 54. Vocal solosolo 55. Hasn’t produced a vehicle 55. Hasn’t produced a vehicle sincesince AprilApril 20112011 56. Inventor of product causing 56. Inventor of product causing muscle spasms? muscle spasms? 58. Citizen____ 58. Citizen____ 59. Like 59. Like 60. Take 60. Take five five 63. iPhone purchase 63. iPhone purchase 64. Singer Lo Green 64. Singer ______ Lo Green

At Davies we measure our achievements by one simple standard: your success. If you have a record of outstanding achievement and are interested in joining our team, visit us at dwpv.com or contact Frances Mahil at fmahil@dwpv.com.

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monday - february 6 - 2012

the OBITERdicta

Issue 15 - Feb 6 2012  

Issue 15 of the Obiter Dicta (2012). Covers the week of February 6.