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annual highlights

2015


HELLO FROM THE OMA! As president of the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA), I am proud to report that 2015 has been a successful and productive year, which included repositioning our organization with a new name and identity. Here are some highlights of what we were able to accomplish: nn We created innovative educational opportunities for obesity medicine professionals. nn We provided useful resources for you, our members, the medical community, and patients. nn We increased advocacy efforts to recognize obesity as a disease and increase access to obesity treatment services for every American. nn We engaged hundreds of obesity medicine professionals who attended conferences, networked with colleagues, and worked through OMA committees to achieve the many accomplishments highlighted in this annual report. Our efforts were guided by our strategic plan and our three primary goals: FIRST, we empowered our members to be leaders within obesity medicine. We did this by changing our name to the Obesity Medicine Association and developing a new brand and logo. The response from professionals in the field of obesity to our new name has been overwhelmingly positive and reinforcing. In addition, we built alliances with sister organizations within the obesity medicine community, and we further developed our charitable arm, the Obesity Treatment Foundation. SECOND, we educated physicians in the treatment of obesity as a disease. We worked to engage our members by providing unique, accredited educational opportunities. We improved the quality of our speakers and presentations at our biannual conferences. We also updated our professional resources, including the Obesity Algorithm®. THIRD, we expanded our organization’s reach. We grew our membership base and added many new members. We also developed our Corporate Advisory Council and strengthened our relationships with corporate supporters. We plan to build on our momentum in the upcoming year and continue to increase our membership in an effort to grow the field of obesity medicine. Our goal in 2016 is to reach 2,000 OMA members, and you play a critical role in reaching that goal. Your commitment to excellence in your practice will inspire your colleagues to make a difference in the lives of people affected by obesity. JANUARY IS A GREAT TIME TO LOOK AHEAD… We’re already planning some big changes for next year. We will offer our top-rated review course— to prepare physicians for the obesity medicine certification exam— twice in 2016. We will implement a new learning management system, which will allow physicians and health care professionals to purchase and stream our educational content online. We will release a new Pediatric Obesity Algorithm to help professionals who focus on the treatment of obesity in children. And we will partner with other obesity organizations to develop a medical school curriculum to train early-career medical professionals about the comprehensive treatment of obesity. With these programs and initiatives, OMA leaders will continue to work to create a valuable experience for you, our members. BUT, we can’t do it without you. Please consider 2016 your year to get involved. Join a committee or volunteer to work on a project. Everything we accomplished in 2015 was made possible by of the passion, commitment, and resourcefulness of our members. We are the Obesity Medicine Association. YOU are the Obesity Medicine Association. We are here for you and because of you. I hope you will join us with your continued support and enthusiastic participation. In good health, Deborah Bade Horn, DO, MPH, FOMA PRESIDENT, OBESITY MEDICINE ASSOCIATION Medical Director, Center for Obesity Medicine and Metabolic Performance at UTHealth

2 | ANNUAL HIGHLIGHTS 2015


WELCOME TO THE SCIENCE OF HOPE We are the clinical leaders in obesity medicine who work to advance the prevention, treatment, and reversal of the disease of obesity.

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INTRODUCTION We Became the Obesity Medicine Association After more than six decades as the American Society of Bariatric Physicians, it was time for a change. We needed a new name that would accurately describe who we are and what we do. We needed a name that would align us with the widespread recognition among health care professionals of obesity as a chronic disease. We needed a name that would position us to lead the health care industry in the advancement of clinical obesity treatment. So, on Oct. 2, 2015, we became the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA).

Before we changed our name and introduced our new brand, we had some work to do.

STEP 1: WE NEEDED APPROVAL FROM OUR MEMBERS In order to officially change our name, we needed members to vote to approve the change. Through a series of branding articles in the newsletter, social media posts, and a live “name-change Q&A” conference call, we made a strong case for why our organization needed a new name.

The vote opened on July 15, and members voted overwhelmingly in favor of changing the name to Obesity Medicine Association.

The important tipping point was the advent of the collaboration between the two potential board exams and the new board, which was named the American Board of Obesity Medicine. As the clinical leader, we really wanted the name of our society to be very closely aligned with [ABOM]. We’re really trying to create a congruent message among all the entities that are focusing on this evolving field.

– Dr. Deborah Bade Horn, OMA president

STEP 2: WE NEEDED A NEW LOOK Changing the name was just part of the rebranding process. With the new name secured, we began defining what we stand for. We identified our core brand attributes and used them to develop our key messages.

BRAND ATTRIBUTES: When people think of the OMA, they recognize the following in us:

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WE PRACTICE CLINICAL OBESITY MEDICINE

WE KNOW OBESITY IS A DISEASE

WE USE A COMPREHENSIVE TREATMENT APPROACH

WE BELIEVE IN COLLABORATION AMONG THE LEADING EXPERTS

WE PRACTICE SCIENCE-BASED DISEASE REVERSAL AND PREVENTION

WE ARE PROGRESSIVE


WE ALSO GOT A NEW LOGO. The logo is designed to be modern and energetic. The four interconnected hexagon shapes reflect our scientific focus and our belief in a continuous, comprehensive approach. The four colors at the center of the hexagons represent our four obesity treatment pillars—nutrition, physical activity, behavior, and medication—which, when combined and personalized, help patients reach their health goals.

STEP 3: WE PLANNED AN UNVEILING PARTY We wanted to introduce our new look with a big splash. We planned the big unveiling party to occur at the same time as our official transition to the new name. Both took place at our fall conference, Overcoming Obesity 2015, in Washington, D.C. The party was themed, “It’s a Beautiful Day.” We decked out the room in our new colors, revealed the logo at the end of an exciting unveiling video, and entertained the crowd with live music performed by some of our board members: Dr. Eric C. Westman, Dr. Richard Lindquist, and Dr. David Bryman. They performed a rewritten rendition of U2’s “Beautiful Day,” with the new lyrics reflecting the new OMA. We also staged four activity stations throughout the room, based on the four treatment pillars.

The night was a resounding success— the new OMA was on its way!

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INTRODUCTION

2015 OMA BOARD OF TRUSTEES

PRESIDENT Deborah Bade Horn, DO, MPH, FOMA

PRESIDENT-ELECT Wendy Scinta, MD, MS

VICE PRESIDENT Craig Primack, MD, FACP, FAAP

SECRETARY/TREASURER Ethan Lazarus, MD

CHAIRMAN Eric C. Westman, MD, MHS, FOMA

TRUSTEE Spencer Berry, MD

TRUSTEE Crystal Broussard, MD

TRUSTEE Angela Fitch, MD, FACP

TRUSTEE Carl Knopke, MD

TRUSTEE Richard Lindquist, MD, FAASP

TRUSTEE Nicholas Pennings, DO

EX OFFICIO David Bryman, DO, FOMA

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A COMMUNITY OF CLINICIANS DEDICATED TO ENDING OBESITY OMA is the largest organization of clinicians working to

advance the practice of obesity medicine and the treatment of patients affected by obesity. A wide spectrum of health care professionals make up our community, including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, allied health care professionals, residents, and students. Through unique, accredited educational resources, collaboration, and thought leadership, our members continue to advance the practice of obesity medicine and deliver evidence-based treatments. We believe that sustained results—brought about by comprehensive, individualized treatment plans— improve overall health and provide hope for those affected by obesity.


MEMBERSHIP Our Members Count on Popular Benefits We strive to provide the best resources for our members to help them advance the field of obesity medicine, deliver evidence-based treatments, and improve the lives of patients affected by obesity. We offer a variety of valuable, exclusive benefits to our members. One of our most popular member benefits is exclusive access to our online discussion forum, where members can interact, ask questions, offer advice, and share ideas. Another highly valued benefit is our mentorship program. At each live conference, members have the opportunity to participate in the program as a mentor or a mentee. A mentor is an experienced obesity medicine clinician willing to help those new to the field; a mentee is an emerging obesity medicine clinician looking for advice. Participants of the program gain valuable insights and form lasting relationships with other members of the OMA community.

OTHER POPULAR MEMBER BENEFITS nn Make it easier for patients to find you with a practice listing on FindObesityTreatment.org. nn Enhance your knowledge using practical obesity medicine resources. nn Save money with discounts on conference registration and educational materials. nn Effect real change by joining a committee that interests you. nn Receive free resources to give to your patients through your complimentary Obesity Action Coalition membership.

Physicians (82.5%) Nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other allied health care professionals (11%) Students and residents (2%)

OMA Members

International (2%)

NEW BENEFITS ADDED IN 2015

Other (2.5%)

nn Access even more resources about the global impact and treatment of obesity through your new complimentary World Obesity Federation membership. nn Take advantage of new networking opportunities offered at every conference.

A Comprehensive Approach to Treating Obesity

Nutrition

Each of our members is dedicated to treating obesity using a comprehensive, scientific, individualized approach that may encompass the four treatment pillars of obesity medicine.

Behavior

5

During the last

Medication

30 1,800

years, our membership has increased more than

8 | ANNUAL HIGHLIGHTS 2015

Physical Activity

percent. We now have more than

members.


WHERE DO OMA MEMBERS PRACTICE?

12%

We have members in all 50 U.S. states and in 14 other countries.

4% 9%

6%

12%

16%

21% 11%

6%

(3% International)

40%

of members are Diplomates of the

American Board of Obesity Medicine

MEMBER AWARDS

Each year, we honor our members for their contributions to the advancement of obesity medicine. We recognized seven award recipients in 2015. OBESITY MEDICINE CLINICIAN OF THE YEAR

DR. VERNON B. ASTLER AWARD

This award is among our highest honors and recognizes a member who has done the most to advance the field of obesity medicine and OMA.

Recognizes the efforts of a member to advance the organization’s place and purpose through the media, government, and/or medical community.

ETHAN LAZARUS, MD

FELLOW OF THE OBESITY MEDICINE ASSOCIATION

ERIC C. WESTMAN, MD, MHS, FOMA

Recognizes a long-term member who has worked tirelessly on behalf of OMA and made continuing contributions to the organization.

COMMITTEE LEADERSHIP AWARD

JENNIFER SEGER, MD

Recognizes outstanding contributions by one or more individuals who worked on a committee-driven project and furthered an initiative on behalf of OMA.

DR. PETER G. LINDNER AWARD

BRENT GEAR, DO, FACEP, FACOEP

STEELMAN-SEIM EDUCATOR AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN ACADEMICS

RICHARD LINDQUIST, MD, FAASP

This honor is bestowed upon a member exhibiting excellence in advancing the cause of health care through education and teaching.

DR. RAYMOND E. DIETZ MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARD

CRAIG PRIMACK, MD, FACP, FAAP

Recognizes an individual who has made continuing contributions to OMA.

FRANK GREENWAY, MD

Presented in honor of Dr. Lindner, a gifted teacher, who worked with the scientific community to elevate OMA as a credible organization consisting of reputable and responsible clinicians.

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MEMBERSHIP Committee Accomplishments Every member has the option to join a committee, and we are proud of the many accomplishments made this year by our committees. Each volunteer, through the dedication of his or her time and talents, contributes to the success of OMA. The countless hours of support they provide is critical to our ability to be a leading voice in the treatment of those affected by obesity. The corporate outreach committee recruited five inaugural Corporate Advisory Council members, who partner with leaders from OMA and the Obesity Treatment Foundation to exchange information, strategic initiatives, and resources related to obesity medicine. The marketing-communication committee produced a series of videos to answer three questions: What is obesity? What is an obesity medicine clinician? What does an obesity medicine clinician do? Watch this video series on our website, or click on the photos below, and share them on your own social media channels. WHAT IS AN OBESITY MEDICINE CLINICIAN?

WHAT IS OBESITY?

WHAT DOES AN OBESITY MEDICINE CLINICIAN DO?

nn The membership committee implemented a referral campaign, which brought in 77 new members.

nn The professional society outreach committee helped OMA become an approved American Osteopathic Association Category 1 CME sponsor.

nn The medical school curriculum committee drafted curricula about obesity medicine for medical students.

nn Members of the advocacy committee visited Capitol Hill to meet with legislators, and garner support for the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act.

ADVOCACY COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Eric C. Westman, MD, MHS, FOMA

Spencer Berry, MD

Carolynn Francavilla, MD

Susan Isensee, MD

Krishna Doniparthi, MD (left)

(second from right)

Being a member of OMA has had a huge impact on the way I practice. I have actually changed the way that I treat patients. I spend more time on behavior modification [and] dietary changes instead of constantly adding more medications to my patients to treat their diabetes and their hypertension and their heart disease. I’ve been able to actually help people get off their medications, lose weight, stop adding on obesogenic medications, and [I’ve] made people a lot happier and healthier because of it.

— Dr. Stacy Braff, member since 2012 10 | ANNUAL HIGHLIGHTS 2015


CREATING CHANGE THROUGH ADVOCACY AND ACTION OMA is dedicated to the recognition of obesity as a

chronic disease. We advocate for public policies giving individuals access to obesity treatment and health care plans covering obesity treatment. Our members participate in monthly advocacy days, where representatives from OMA and our partner organizations go to Washington, D.C., to meet with federal legislators to raise awareness about the impact of obesity on public health and encourage support for obesity initiatives.


ADVOCACY Advocacy Highlights In 2015, we held our first-ever advocacy training program. Several members attended the training, taught by OMA’s Washington representative, Chris Gallagher. After the training, members went to Capitol Hill and met with 18 legislative staff members to discuss the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act. The Treat and Reduce Obesity Act has two major goals; improve access to obesity treatment by expanding existing Medicare coverage, allowing qualified professionals other than primary care providers to treat obesity; and allow Medicare Part D coverage of FDA-approved weight-loss medications to patients who qualify for them.

Our job that morning was to convince the Senate staffers to sign a letter, which would allow a budget analysis of the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act of 2015. Many senators are interested in knowing the cost-benefit analysis before pledging their support of a potential new law, and thus our advocacy was an important part of the process.

...

Obesity Care Continuum One of OMA’s key initiatives is our involvement in the Obesity Care Continuum (OCC), a coalition of obesity groups that advocates for those affected by obesity, and works to pursue policy change to provide better health care options for obesity treatment and prevention. Our OCC partners are the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the Obesity Action Coalition (OAC), and The Obesity Society (TOS).

OMA president Dr. Deborah Bade Horn, (second from right) and other OCC partners with the Surgeon General

OCC’S PROGRESS IN 2015 nn Focused heavily on gaining sponsors in the U.S. House and Senate for the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act. Currently, 101 members of the House and 10 members of the Senate support the legislation. nn Met with U.S. Surgeon General Vice Admiral Vivek Murthy, MD, to call for the recognition of obesity as a disease, and advocate for new and ongoing obesity research. They also discussed best practices for obesity treatment programs. nn Together with the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the Endocrine Society, and Novo Nordisk, Inc., launched the Obesity Care Advocacy Network to promote public policies that will address the obesity epidemic.

12 | ANNUAL HIGHLIGHTS 2015

nn Advised states to include coverage for obesity treatment services in their essential health care programs. As a result of this campaign, spearheaded by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, Colorado became the first state to switch from being a no-coverage state to a state that covers obesity treatment services. nn Signed a letter urging the U.S. Speaker of the House to support the repeal of Medicare’s sustainable growth rate formula. The formula was later repealed. nn Supported Obesity Care Week, a week dedicated to reversing public misconceptions about obesity and raising awareness about the comprehensive medical approach needed to treat obesity.


...

While I was apprehensive to get involved initially, I was very pleased with our advocacy day meetings. As a matter of fact, I enjoyed the experience so much, I applied to become a member of the advocacy committee.

American Medical Association (AMA)

— Dr. Pamela Lyon, member since 2007

To further our advocacy goals, we have an active and ongoing relationship with the American Medical Association (AMA)—including holding one of two obesity-focused medical specialty society seats in the AMA House of Delegates. For the first time in 2015, OMA also had a representative in AMA’s resident and fellow section. Representatives from OMA attended two AMA meetings in 2015. Dr. Ethan Lazarus served as the delegate, and Drs. Carolynn Francavilla and Carl Knopke both served as alternate delegates.

PROGRESS IN 2015 nn AMA accepted a proposed resolution, which called upon the organization to address medical education about obesity. By accepting, AMA agreed to work with accrediting organizations to analyze the state of obesity education in medical schools, identify organizations that provide good educational toolkits and resources, and finally, make recommendations to address any gaps in students’ obesity education.

nn OMA hosted two obesity caucuses, where representatives from 11 organizations joined the conversation about what else the AMA can do to better address obesity.

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EDUCATION SHARES NEW APPROACHES FOR HOPE Throughout the United States and increasingly abroad, health care professionals look to OMA for education on obesity treatment approaches, medications, and the best clinical practices. We host two conferences a year, one in the spring and one in the fall, as well as several introductory-level courses about obesity medicine. We offer unique, accredited educational opportunities and promote sharing of information among our members to enrich the learning experience.


EDUCATION HIGHLIGHTS

WE WELCOMED

OBESITY MEDICINE BASICS

1,350

We traveled to eight cities in the U.S., offering our introductorylevel Obesity Medicine Basics course to local physicians and health care professionals. We also partnered with the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and Seattle’s Swedish Medical Center to put on two additional courses and reach different audiences.

unique attendees to our conferences in 2015!

404 attendees

I found this day to be very informative . . . It was formatted perfectly for me as an OB/GYN who performs a fair share of primary care.

of those attendees,

78

came to a conference

This conference was well worth the time. It offered much information useful in current practice. Attending the conference will result in several changes to our clinical practice.

513 attendees

47

exhibitors OBESITY MEDICINE 2015 (DENVER) In the spring, we brought our attendees to Denver for an engaging conference covering topics from clinic management to nutrition and medication.

NETWORKING outside the classroom:

Sharing advice and building lasting relationships as a participant of the mentorship program

Gaining insight into a specific obesity-related topic during breakfast with the experts

Meeting with colleagues in the member lounge

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EDUCATION HIGHLIGHTS OVERCOMING OBESITY 2015 (WASHINGTON, D.C.) Attendees from across the country joined us in Washington, D.C., for our biggest conference yet. Here, we offered the review course to prepare physicians for the obesity medicine certification exam, as well as education about advocacy, clinical research, and the latest treatment approaches.

[I am] really impressed by the many clinical-focused conversations and invigorated by the passion of providers across the country. [It was] a great opportunity to network and develop collaborations in the future.

634

54

attendees

exhibitors

even more NETWORKING opportunities:

Messaging with other attendees on the mobile conference app

HIGHLIGHT:

Dining with experts and colleagues during dine-arounds

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Unveiling our new brand to members and attendees!


CULTIVATING THE SCIENCE OF HOPE The Obesity Treatment Foundation—the

education and research arm of OMA—was created in 2013. The foundation works to advance obesity treatment through clinical research and education.

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OBESITY TREATMENT FOUNDATION Obesity Treatment Foundation Highlights The Obesity Treatment Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization developed to raise funds for clinical research about the treatment of obesity, and increase awareness and understanding about the complexities of this chronic disease state.

GOALS nn Amplify the quantity and quality of clinician-driven, practice-based obesity treatment research. nn Elevate awareness among health care professionals that obesity is a chronic disease warranting comprehensive medical management by qualified professionals.

The foundation’s new logo is designed to align with OMA’s logo. The two interconnected hexagon shapes represent the two focuses of the foundation: optimizing treatment and increasing awareness.

OBESITY TREATMENT FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT Ed J. Hendricks, MD, FOMA

VICE PRESIDENT Frank Greenway, MD

SECRETARY/ TREASURER Amy Articolo, DO, FACOOG

DIRECTOR Louis J. Aronne, MD, FACP, FTOS

DIRECTOR Spencer Berry, MD

DIRECTOR Richard Lindquist, MD, FAASP

DIRECTOR Warren Peters, MD, MPH

MEMBER AT LARGE Paula Diamond

MEMBER AT LARGE Marni Lun, PharmD

MEMBER AT LARGE Mansi Mehta, RD, LDN

MEMBER AT LARGE Donna Watson, RN, MSN, CNOR, FNP-BC

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RESEARCH In 2015 the foundation sponsored the first-ever research basics workshop, which trained clinicians about collecting, analyzing, and publishing data specifically for obesity medicine.

GRANTS The foundation awarded two $7,500 grants in 2015. The grant recipients were Eduardo Grunvald, MD, for his proposal, titled “Predictors of patients with suboptimal weight loss after bariatric surgery,” and Cherie Vaz, MD, for her proposal, titled “Non-exercise activity thermogenesis and heart rate variability in subjects with obesity.”

POSTER CONTEST Suzanne Cuda, MD, won the poster contest at Overcoming Obesity 2015 for her poster, titled “Do decreases in visceral adipose tissue correlate with physiologic or metabolic improvements in children with severe obesity?”

SCHOLARSHIP The foundation created the Dr. Hal Seim scholarship program to further the obesity medicine education of physicians-in-training. Scholarships will cover registration and travel funds to help recipients attend OMA conferences.

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SUPPORTING THE SCIENCE OF HOPE The Corporate Advisory Council links the corporate community to OMA and the Obesity Treatment Foundation, creating an ongoing dialogue between industry and association, and allowing for information exchanges and resource sharing.

20 | ANNUAL HIGHLIGHTS 2015


SPONSORSHIP

FIVE INAUGURAL CORPORATE ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBERS

SM

CONFERENCE SPONSORS We were proud to partner with a variety of additional corporate sponsors in 2015.

DIAMOND SPONSORS:

BRONZE SPONSORS: SM

INDEPENDENT EDUCATION SUPPORTERS: Ethicon Novo Nordisk, Inc. Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc.

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Obesity Medicine Association 101 University Blvd., Suite 330 Denver, CO 80206 P | 303.770.2526 F | 303.779.4834 obesitymedicine.org

2015 Annual Highlights  

In addition to changing our name, we made waves in the field of obesity medicine. We grew our membership and educated health care profession...

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