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SNAP Customer Data Analysis for Oasis Community Partners By Nikardi Jallah


Area of Focus – Woodridge ■ Woodridge is located in Ward 5 ■ Race: – White: 16.5% – Black or African American: 76.0% – Hispanic/Latino: 5.5% – American Indian and Alaska Native: 0.4% – Asian: 1.6 % ■ Unemployment rate: 8.1% ■ Mean travel time to work: 30.3 minutes ■ Persons with food stamp/SNAP benefits: 15.2% ■ GFM is located in neighborhood cluster 22 and also directly serves cluster 24


Retail Partner – Good Food Markets ■ Good Food Markets is a mission-driven grocer developing retail solutions that work in food desert communities, serving the Woodridge neighborhood in Washington, DC ■ GFM is located in neighborhood cluster 22 and also directly serves cluster 24 ■ Within Cluster 22 we find – >15%+ Unemployment – >15% Households living in Poverty ■ Before GFM opened there were no healthy food options (mRFEI: 0.0) ■ Diet related disease rates are some of the highest in the District – % of Obese people: >25% – Deaths due to Cancer: 16.2 – 18.6% (Highest in DC) – Deaths due to Diabetes: >20% – Deaths due to Heart Disease: 16 – 18.5%


Community Demographics Cluster 22

Cluster 24

■ Race – White: 14.0% – Black or African American:

■ Race: – White: 5.5% – Black or African American:

78.0%

– Hispanic/Latino: 6.1% – American Indian and Alaska Native: 0.4% – Asian: 1.5%

87.0%

– Hispanic/Latino: 5.8% – American Indian and Alaska Native: 0.5% – Asian: 1.2 %

■ Unemployment rate: 14%

■ Unemployment rate: 23%

■ Persons with food stamp/SNAP benefits: 29.5%

■ Persons with food stamp/SNAP benefits: 18.2%


Access to Grocery stores and convenience stores who accept SNAP using GIS (Ward Level)


Access to Grocery stores and convenience stores who accept SNAP using GIS (Ward Level)


Access to Grocery stores and convenience stores who accept SNAP using GIS (Cluster Level)


Access to Grocery stores and convenience stores who accept SNAP using GIS (Cluster Level)


SNAP Customer Purchase Analysis Summary Summary # Items Qty Sold

Total Sales ($)

Category

Notes

33

1869.13

1,814.59

Produce

Produce sold by volume

17

774.22

3,082.52

Prepared Foods

Mains, Sides, Salads and Desserts

16

912

1,775.90

Beverages

Water, Juices, Sodas

15

593.65

1,003.47

Baked Goods

Breads and pastries

13

598.64

1,652.77

Refrigerated Grocery and Dairy

Including dairy and meat

6

343

281.96

Candy and Snacks

Small organic lollipops account for 52.77% of these sales

9,611.21 31.60% of SNAP Sales, in dollars, came from the Top 100 selling products 6.26% of SNAP Sales, in # of unique SKUs (products), represented by the Top 100


What is the top selling Fresh Produce? Total Rank 1 2 7 12 15 17 18 22 24 26 29 32 33 37 41 44

Description BANANA OG AVOCADO CV APPLE OM TOMATO CV ROMA CUCUMBER CV LEMON CV POTATOES CV IDAHO RUSSET GRAPES CV RED SEEDLESS GRAPES CV GREEN SEEDLESS STRAWBERRIES CV H/C FRESH CUT Mango ORANGE CV NAVEL TOMATO CV SLICER ONION CV YELLOW POTATOES CV SWEET GARLIC CV

Qty 275.620 243.000 114.230 76.960 70.000 67.000 67.000 57.650 52.070 49.000 47.000 46.000 45.180 44.600 43.000 40.000

Sales 194.79 188.51 132.63 88.11 41.50 34.21 36.24 114.78 116.00 113.59 52.49 23.86 68.12 25.92 28.01 16.79

45 52 53 56 60 63 64 65 66 68 74 79 83 84 85 92 99

PEPPERS CV JALAPENO AVOCADO ORG CILANTRO CELERY CV PEPPERS CV GREEN ONION CV RED LEMON ORG BROCCOLI CV CROWNS GARLIC CV LIME CV GREEN BEANS GFM pack POTATOES CV RED ORANGE CV CARA CARA ORANGE CV TANGELO MINNEOLA SQUASH CV GREEN ZUCCHINI BLUEBERRIES CV PT BANANA CV

40.000 36.000 36.000 35.210 34.930 33.180 33.000 32.330 32.000 31.000 29.090 27.950 27.000 27.000 26.570 25.000 24.560

8.05 38.46 44.71 55.08 49.20 35.06 16.74 38.91 15.12 9.37 65.09 21.96 19.97 14.85 23.93 68.69 13.85


What are the top selling Prepared Foods? Total Rank 6 9 21 23 30 35 46 54 59 62 69 70 76 78 82 90 94

Description DCCK LG KALE SALAD DCCK SM KALE SALAD DCCK CHICKEN SALAD DCCK SM BLACK BEAN CHILI ML TIRAMISU DCCK LG MAC & CHEESE DCCK CHICKEN BREAST DCCK SM SPIN SALAD ML SALMON W/DILL TG WRAP BH COLESLAW EE CHUNK MED CHEDDAR DCCK SM BEEF CHILI EE SLICED MILD CHEDDAR - 8 DCCK LG GRN SALAD ML CAESAR SALAD DCCK SALMON CAKES (2)

Qty 123.000 104.000 63.610 53.000 47.000 45.000 39.000 36.000 35.000 34.000 30.610 30.000 28.000 28.000 27.000 26.000 25.000

Sales 502.60 234.43 420.96 92.87 227.33 202.80 174.21 80.90 258.85 216.90 70.72 96.00 100.72 76.40 109.54 116.29 101.00


What are the top selling Beverages? Total Rank 4 5 10 14 20 28 36 38 48 55 72 75 80 89 93 98

Description REAL WATER 32 REAL WATER 16.9 F/D GRPFRT SPARKLING WATER 12 ZEVIA GINGERALE 16 OZ CANADA DRY GINGERALE 20 oz GTS KOMBUCHA, TRILOGY DEER PARK GALLON DEER PARK SPRING WATER O/S CRAN GRAPE 6-10OZ KNUDSEN SPKL APPLE CIDER MARTINELLIS APPLE JUICE A&W ROOTBEER 20 OZ A&E APPLE JCE ORG 48 MISFIT SCREAM BOLTH COFFEE PROTEIN PLUS SPRITE 16.9OZ

Qty 173.000 144.000 88.000 71.000 64.000 47.000 45.000 44.000 38.000 36.000 30.000 29.000 27.000 26.000 25.000 25.000

Sales 358.11 162.03 37.62 94.47 85.93 172.93 72.54 38.14 204.82 96.84 51.30 45.61 114.21 128.76 78.55 34.04


What are they top selling Baked Goods? Total Rank 13 19 27 31 34 39 42 50 57 58 81 86 88 100 101

Description LYON JALA/CHED ROLL BR GINGERBREAD BR MUFFIN LMN RICOTTA DCCK BLONDIE DCCK 2 Cookies BR BROWNIE BF PLAIN BAGEL LYON DEMI BAGUETTE BR MUFFIN MRNNG GLRY BR S/C COFFEE CAKE DCCK LEMON BAR BF EVERYTHING BAGEL LYON SOURDOUGH BOULE BF SESAME BAGEL KINGS HAWAIIAN ORIG

Qty 71.000 65.000 47.000 46.000 45.000 43.650 42.000 37.000 35.000 35.000 27.000 26.000 26.000 24.000 24.000

Sales 99.38 82.45 76.89 123.47 80.65 77.21 55.42 48.03 57.80 46.85 72.63 31.04 45.92 30.37 75.36


What are the top selling Refrigerated Foods? Total Rank 8 11 16 43 47 49 51 71 73 96 97 40 61

Description GRADE A DZN EGGS YOPLAIT FR VANILLA BH HONEY SMOKED TURKEY FRESH GROUND BEEF 80/20 NAT YOLK CAGE FREE EGGS IDV CREAM CHEESE YOPLAIT STRAWB/BAN HEBREW NATIONAL JUMBO BEEF FRA 8 OZ CHICKEN BREASTS LAMAGNA MOZZARELLA BALL PILLS BUTTERMILK BISCUIT CL VITAMIN D 1/2 GAL CL 2% .5G

Qty 110.000 79.000 69.000 41.990 38.000 37.000 37.000 30.000 29.650 25.000 25.000 43.000 34.000

Sales 189.37 65.38 369.75 233.07 135.69 16.74 29.60 161.61 124.17 112.25 42.50 96.48 76.16


What are the top selling Snacks? Total Rank 3 25 67 87 95

Description YUMEARTH LOLLIPOP ASSTD OG HONEY STICKS F/D VAN CREAM COOKIE KETTLE CHIPS SS & BLK 1.5 OZ KETTLE CHIPS HONEY DIJON

Qty 181.000 52.000 31.000 26.000 25.000

Sales 19.90 23.35 94.55 27.42 26.30


What is being purchased? SNAP Customer Purchase Analysis Conclusion ■ Bestselling items are listed if they rank in the top 100 items sold – 33 produce items are on the top 100 list – Only 6 candy and snack items are listed in the top 100 items. Small organic lollipops account for 52.8% of the best selling candy and snack products – Prepared foods account for 32.1 % of the total money spent on top 100 items

■ Top 20 bestselling items – 7 Produce items – 2 Prepared food products – 5 Beverages (3 of them a form of water) – 2 Baked goods products – 3 Refrigerated food items – 1 Candy item


GFM Sales Data Characteristics ■ Time Period for Analysis: January – June 2016 ■ Customer Groups (% of Total Sales): – SNAP (9.54%) ■

Customers who self report by answering Yes to the question, “Has anyone in your household been eligible for SNAP/EBT in the last six months

– NONE (9.53%) ■

Customers who did not want or have time to sign up

– SENIOR (7.48%) ■

Customers over the age of 60

– EE (5.24%) ■

Employees, other RIA NE Businesses, Friends and Family

– GN (68.21%) ■

Basic “Good Neighbor” Customer Group (non-Senior, non-SNAP)


Good Neighbor Rewards Program ■ Every customer who agrees to join the Good Neighbor Rewards Program is either placed in: – The “Good Neighbor” reward program which provides customers with 5% off all grocery and produce products – The “Senior Good Neighbor” reward program which provides customers over the age of 60 years 5% off all grocery products and 10% off all produce – The “SNAP Good Neighbor” reward program which provides customers who have SNAP benefits 10% off all grocery products and 20% off all produce ■ All other customers who do not sign up for the rewards program do not get a ”Good Neighbor” discount


COMPARISON OF MONTHLY SALES: SNAP CUSTOMER GROUP & EBT TRANSACTIONS EBT Transactions are subtracted from SNAP Group Sales to show a closer correlation


In This Analysis… ■ Two variables are used in this comparison: EBT TRANS and SNAP GROUP – EBT TRANS: Represents the total daily transaction of those customers using their EBT benefit card to make purchases. These customers can be a part of any customer group, but the sales come from only EBT transactions – SNAP GROUP: Represents the total daily transactions for those in the “SNAP Good Neighbor” rewards program regardless of the payment method they used


Monthly SNAP VS EBT Sales EBT Transactions and SNAP Group Sales in January

■ In January the peak sales of EBT Transactions were on the weekend of January 8th and 9th

■ The second peak for SNAP customers fell on Thursday January 21st to Friday the 22nd

160 140 120 100 80

EBT TRANS SNAP GROUP

60 40 20 0

2-Jan 3-Jan 4-Jan 5-Jan 6-Jan 7-Jan 8-Jan 9-Jan 10-Jan 11-Jan 12-Jan 13-Jan 14-Jan 15-Jan 16-Jan 17-Jan 18-Jan 19-Jan 20-Jan 21-Jan 22-Jan 24-Jan 25-Jan 26-Jan 27-Jan 28-Jan 29-Jan 30-Jan 31-Jan

■ The month started on a Friday the previous week

180

AMOUNT OF SALE ($)

■ In January the peak sales of SNAP Group purchases were on Monday, January 4thth and Tuesday, January 5th

200

Jan

MONTH OF SALE


Monthly SNAP VS EBT Sales Cont. ■ In February the peak sales for EBT transactions and the SNAP customer group fell on the weekend of February 6th and 7th

180 160 140 120 100 80

EBT TRANS SNAP GROUP

60 40 20 0

1-Feb 2-Feb 3-Feb 4-Feb 5-Feb 6-Feb 7-Feb 8-Feb 9-Feb 10-Feb 11-Feb 12-Feb 13-Feb 14-Feb 15-Feb 16-Feb 17-Feb 18-Feb 19-Feb 20-Feb 21-Feb 22-Feb 23-Feb 24-Feb 25-Feb 26-Feb 27-Feb 28-Feb 29-Feb

■ The second peak for SNAP group purchases fell on Friday February 19th and Saturday February 20th

200

AMOUNT OF SALE ($)

■ The month started on that Monday

EBT Transactions and SNAP Group Sales in February

Feb

MONTH OF SALE


Monthly SNAP VS EBT Sales Cont. ■ In March the peak sales for EBT transactions were on Thursday of March 11th and Friday 12th

■ The second peak in March for SNAP Group sales fell on the weekend of March 25th and 26th

300

250

200

150

EBT TRANS SNAP GROUP

100

50

0

1-Mar 2-Mar 3-Mar 4-Mar 5-Mar 6-Mar 7-Mar 8-Mar 9-Mar 10-Mar 11-Mar 12-Mar 13-Mar 14-Mar 15-Mar 16-Mar 17-Mar 18-Mar 19-Mar 20-Mar 21-Mar 22-Mar 23-Mar 24-Mar 25-Mar 26-Mar 27-Mar 28-Mar 29-Mar 30-Mar 31-Mar

■ In March the peak sales for SNAP group purchases fell on Friday of March 4th and Saturday the 5th

350

AMOUNT OF SALE ($)

■ The month started on a Tuesday

EBT Transactions and SNAP Group Sales in March

Mar

MONTH OF SALE


Monthly SNAP VS EBT Sales Cont. EBT Transactions and SNAP Group Sales in April

■ In April the peak sales of EBT transactions were on the weekend of April 8th and 9th

■ In April the second peak sales for SNAP group purchases fell on the weekend of Friday April 22nd and Saturday 23rd

250

200

150

EBT TRANS SNAP GROUP

100

50

0

1-Apr 2-Apr 3-Apr 4-Apr 5-Apr 6-Apr 7-Apr 8-Apr 9-Apr 10-Apr 11-Apr 12-Apr 13-Apr 14-Apr 15-Apr 16-Apr 17-Apr 18-Apr 19-Apr 20-Apr 21-Apr 22-Apr 23-Apr 24-Apr 25-Apr 26-Apr 27-Apr 28-Apr 29-Apr 30-Apr

■ In April the peak sales for SNAP group purchases fell on the weekend of April 17th and 18th

300

AMOUNT OF SALE ($)

■ The month started on a Friday

350

Apr

MONTH OF SALE


Monthly SNAP VS EBT Sales Cont.

■ The second peak in May for SNAP group customers fell on the weekend of May 20th to the 22nd

350

300

250

200

150

EBT TRANS SNAP GROUP

100

50

0

1-May 2-May 3-May 4-May 5-May 6-May 7-May 8-May 9-May 10-May 11-May 12-May 13-May 14-May 15-May 16-May 17-May 18-May 19-May 20-May 21-May 22-May 23-May 24-May 25-May 26-May 27-May 28-May 29-May 30-May 31-May

■ The month started on a Sunday

EBT Transactions and SNAP Group Sales in May

AMOUNT OF SALE ($)

■ In May the peak sales for both EBT Transactions and the SNAP Group fell on Wednesday, May 11th and Thursday, May 12th

May

MONTH OF SALE


Monthly SNAP VS EBT Conclusions ■ In this sales data set multiple trends are seen – There is a peak of EBT Transactions representing the distribution of benefits – There are two peaks identifiable in the SNAP Group: ■

The first peak usually falls on the first full weekend of the month and corresponds with the peak in EBT Transactions following distribution of benefits

The second peak is seen between the 18-21st of each month, and does not correlate with a peak in EBT Transactions. This represents a time when EBT benefits have run low, and GFM’s substantial SNAP discount is even more meaningful to this price sensitive and at-risk group

■ Identifying these trends allows OCP, as well as public sector and non-profit partners, to target additional food benefits and health services geared towards SNAP households to these at risk populations ■ GFM can also provide certain sales and discounts that encourage healthier food choices


SHOPPING HOURS AT GFM WITH THE MOST TRAFFIC IN SALES BY TICKET Comparing customer traffic between the hours of 10 AM to 8 PM across the different customer groups by month. The number of transactions over time is plotted by month


Hourly Sale Data Hourly Sales in January

Number of Tickets

35 30

EE

25

GN

20

NONE

15

SENIOR

10

SNAP

5 0

10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 Jan

Month of Sale on an Hourly Scale

â– In this graph we can approximate peak times of customer transactions in the month of January as falling between the times of 12 to 2 PM and 3 to 5 PM


Hourly Sale Data Cont. Hourly Sales in February 35

30

Number of Tickets

EE 25 GN 20

NONE

15

SENIOR

10

SNAP

5

0

10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 Feb

Month of Sale on an Hourly Scale

â– In February the peak times that GFM had the most transactions fell between the hours of 11 AM to 12 PM and 3 to 5 PM


Hourly Sale Data Cont. ■ In March the peak transaction times fell between the hours of 12 to 2 PM and 5 to 7 PM

Hourly Sales in March 35

30

Number of Tickets

EE 25 GN 20 NONE 15 SENIOR

10

SNAP

5

0

10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 Mar

Month of Sale on an Hourly Scale

■ In march the evening peak falls later than the other months analyzed ■ This difference could be due to the days getting longer seasonally


Hourly Sale Data Cont. ■ In April the peak transaction times at GFM fell between the hours of 11 AM to 1 PM and 3 to 5 PM

Hourly Sales in April 35

30

Number of Tickets

EE 25 GN 20

NONE

15

SENIOR

10

SNAP

5

0

10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 Apr

Month of Sale on an Hourly Scale

■ This April the district faced record rainfall. This could have pushed this afternoon peak back to 3 to 5 PM


Hourly Sale Data Cont. â– In May the peak transaction times at GFM fell between the hours of 12 to 2 PM and 4 to 6 PM

Hourly Sales in May 35

30

Number of Tickets

EE 25 GN 20

NONE

15

SENIOR

10

SNAP

5

0

10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 May

Month of Sale on an Hourly Scale

â– It is important to note that as the weather improves and the days get longer the peak sale hours may move closer to evening hours from 4 to 6 PM


Conclusions from Hourly Sales Report ■ Each month there are two peak transaction times that are seen at GFM – Early afternoon: 12 PM to 2 PM approximately – Late afternoon/evening: either 3 to 5 PM or 5 to 7 PM ■ This data allows us to determine what time of day GFM has the most traffic so that services and products are advertised during those peak transaction times ■ This can be catered to SNAP customers who might be better referred to other services and products during those hours


Proportion of Sales Represented by SNAP Customers (Jan.-Jun. 2016) ■ The SNAP customer group represents 12.2% of all transactions at GFM ■ The SNAP customer group represents 9.5% of total gross sales before discounts at GFM ■ The SNAP customer group received 16.9% of the total discounts provided through the Good Neighbor Program – This ratio is the highest proportion of sales to discounts for any customer group ■ EBT transactions account for 3.1% of total gross sales before discounts


Data Analysis Conclusions ■

This linear correlation procedure shows a comparison between the variables EBT_SALES, SNAP_SALES AND SNAPTOT_SALES

The variable EBT_SALES signifies the daily EBT transactions at GFM for the analysis period

The variable SNAP_SALES signifies the daily SNAP customer group transactions minus the EBT transactions

The variable SNAPTOT_SALES signifies the total SNAP customer group transactions

The results for the Proc Corr procedure on SAS shows that the SNAP group customers are using their EBT benefits 58.8% of the time when shopping at GFM


Goals of Oasis Community Partners ■ Using the data from this project in conjunction with other Oasis research projects, Oasis Community Partners will work to: – Reach at risk populations with information, services, and products that can potentially improve their health outcomes – Increase access to fresh produce and healthy foods in food desert areas – Market heathy food options to SNAP recipients – Partner with other organizations who cater to SNAP recipients to better serve this population – Find a way to better the health, social, and economic risk factors associated with communities in food desert areas


Resources for SNAP Recipients ■ Mary’s Center: – Non-profit organization in Washington, DC and Maryland that provides medical, social, and educational services for lower- income families – Programs: Works with DOH SNAP ED to help families with SNAP signups – http://www.maryscenter.org ■ Share Our Strength: A beta-testing web-based application for use by SNAP recipients to help families with price comparisons for groceries, unit price calculations, and lessons on how to read ingredients in food and what the ingredients mean – https://www.nokidhungry.org/about-us ■ Capital Area Food banks: Provides an online database for good food choices and help families enroll in free and reduced lunch programs for their students – https://www.capitalareafoodbank.org ■ Produce Plus: Run by DC Greens and the DC Department of Health. This program gives families receiving SNAP benefits a 10 dollar voucher to the farmers market to be spent on fresh produce – http://dcgreens.org/food-access-resources


References: ■ http://www.dc.gov ■ http://www.neighborhoodinfodc.org/nclusters/nclusters.html ■ http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap-retailer-data ■ http://www.maryscenter.org ■ https://www.nokidhungry.org/about-us ■ https://www.capitalareafoodbank.org ■ http://dcgreens.org/food-access-resources


Acknowledgments: Thank you to Philip Sambol, VP of Operations at GFM and Executive Director at OCP, for assisting me with this data project Thank you to Lillie Rosen, Food Access Director at DC Greens, for partnering with OCP to make this data project possible

Profile for Oasis Community Partners

SNAP Customer Analysis  

This is a detailed analysis of Good Food Markets' SNAP customer group covering the period from January through June 2016. Research was condu...

SNAP Customer Analysis  

This is a detailed analysis of Good Food Markets' SNAP customer group covering the period from January through June 2016. Research was condu...

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