Issuu on Google+

official magazine of oakland zoo

• www.oaklandzoo.org

online edition • SUMMER/FALL 2012

ALL CREATURES GREAT & SMALL Oakland Zoo’s New Veterinary Hospital Can Take Care of Them All FEEDING THE ANIMALS MEET THE NEW HYENA ANIMAL BIRTHDAYS

NEW THIS ISSUE FOR KIDS:

Meet Zena the Zookeeper!


HAPPY IKI! AY T BIRTHD ame

Photo: Nancy Filippi, Oakland Zoo Archive

d e grand Tiki, th raffe herd, i d of our g her 23r d e t a r b . cele in April y a d h t r bi

A Cake Fit for a Giraffe

W Tiki the giraffe is presented with her birthday cake by Sara Mellard (left) and Amy Phelps (right).

2

hat kind of cake do you make for a special giraffe on her 23rd birthday? A very special one, according to Keeper Amy Phelps. “Tiki’s cake was made with fresh-baked cinnamon rolls (baked by me), and fresh roses grown by volunteer Lisa Clifton Bumpass. “She is our oldest giraffe and a senior citizen, turning 23 years old – that’s akin to a person being around 80 years old! Tiki is a mother, grandmother, and great grandmother to many of the giraffe at Oakland Zoo and other giraffe in zoos around the country, so we had to celebrate her big day in a big way!”


EAST BAY ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY BOARD OF TRUSTEES Steven E. Kane President Thomas P. Britanik Vice President William L. Marchant Secretary Jonathan M. Harris Treasurer Joel J. Parrott, DVM President & CEO Thomas J. Bjornson Daniel Boggan, Jr. Meredith L. Burke, CPA Lewis E. Byrd Lawrence S. Cahn Sebastian DiGrande Cassady M. Hudson Justin J. Hurd Marianne Laouri, PhD Mark A. McClure Alison McDonald Rodrigo Prudencio Steven Schwimmer Charles H. Seaman B. Reid Settlemier Patrick J. Sherwood Lora R. Tabor Kirsten M. Vital Jim Wunderman FOUNDATION BOARD Skip Rhodes President JoAnn Harley Vice President Stacey Barsema Peter Bernhard Kenneth R. Betts Warren A. “Chip” Brown Ginny L. Hair Jason M. Knight Greg Lassonde, CFRE Cornell C. Maier Jack McAboy Robert L. Montgomery Eleanor Moore Gerald D. Overaa Jon Q. Reynolds A. Horton Shapiro Phillip H. Tagami James A. Vohs Fong Wan John M. Woolard George A. Zimmer

www.oaklandzoo.org

MESSAGE Joel J. Parrott, DVM President and CEO, Oakland Zoo

I

am proud to announce that over the last few months the Oakland Zoo has experienced a tremendous outpouring of community support. More than 6,700 residents, community leaders, and elected officials from throughout Alameda County – including many of you – have joined a coalition of supporters who value and support the Zoo’s commitment to humane animal care and education programs for children and youth. It’s Your Zoo, and you have shown us how much it matters to you! Animals living at the Zoo deserve quality care. We are working to ensure that the Zoo maintains the ability to care for and meet the basic needs of the animals, including food; heating and cooling; maintaining aging animal shelters; and repairing deteriorating sewage and drainage systems. Providing essential care for sick and aging animals is one of the critical ways the Zoo addresses animal care needs, and we are in the process of building our new Veterinary Medical Hospital, slated to open in October. Most animals live significantly longer in a zoo than they might in the wild, which creates unique veterinary care needs. The Zoo must retain quality veterinarians and animal specialists to adequately address animals’ medical needs. Additionally, the Zoo is striving to protect and maintain our affordable and accessible education programs, including providing school field trips for children who otherwise would not be able to visit Oakland Zoo. The Zoo’s quality education programs are more important than ever for local school children who are already underserved by budget cuts in our public schools. Nearly 250,000 children visited the Zoo last year, and our education programs teach them about wildlife and nature in a way that just isn’t possible through books. The Zoo is working to ensure we do not have to eliminate these important educational opportunities or reduce the quality of care for the animals. As such, we have been researching ways to be more financially self-sufficient and are working with Alameda County to develop a fiscallyresponsible plan. A potential Alameda Countywide Zoo Measure to support humane animal care and science and nature education programs may be considered at the end of this process. We thank you for your continued support of the Zoo; we will continue to keep you updated.

“Oakland Zoo is striving to protect and maintain our affordable and accessible education programs.”

Dr. Joel J. Parrott, DVM President and CEO, Oakland Zoo

Follow the Oakland Zoo Online facebook.com/oakzoo

twitter.com/oakzoo

oaklandzoo.org/blog

3


IN THIS ISSUE DEPARTMENTS Birthday Girl ................................................................................................. 2 Tiki the giraffe celebrated her 23rd birthday President’s Message..................................................................................... 3 Upcoming Events........................................................................................... 5 Zoo Newcomers ............................................................................................ 6 In “otter” news, tiger play, Osh turns 18 Animal Spotlight .......................................................................................... 7 Hyena Helping at Home............................................................................................ 8 Celebrating Elephants Adventures in the Wild . ................................................................................ 9 Kenya Adventures Employee Spotlight . ....................................................................................10 Oakland Zoo’s Veterinary Staff Board Member Spotlight . ............................................................................ 11 Larry Cahn Walk in the Wild Recap.................................................................................12 Conservation Efforts.................................................................................... 14 Budongo Snare Removal Project Behind-the-Scenes.......................................................................................15 Feeding the Animals: Oakland Zoo’s Commissary Picture This.................................................................................................. 22 Earth Day 2012 Giving Back.................................................................................................. 23 Ways to Support Your Zoo

FEATURE All Creatures Great & Small .......................................................... 16-17 Oakland Zoo’s new Veterinary Medical Hospital takes them all

OUR MISSION The Oakland Zoo’s mission is to inspire respect for and stewardship of the natural world, while providing a quality visitor experience.

ISSUE 44

SUMMER 2012

STAFF Executive Editor Managing Editor Art Director

Nancy Filippi Nicky Mora Everard G. Strong

CONTRIBUTORS Elizabeth Abram

Rick Mannshardt

Victor Alm

Beth Needel

Mary Burns

Dr. Joel Parrott, DVM

Erica Calcagno

Moe Perez

Sarah Cramer

Sean Pivenger

Amber Frisbie

Melinda Sievert

Andrea Goodnight, DVM

Emma Lee Twitchell, CFRE

Amy Gotliffe Colleen Kinzley ROAR is the official publication of the Oakland Zoo. Published three times per year, it is exclusively made available to the Zoo’s members. For more information about this magazine or on becoming a member, contact the Zoo at (510) 632-9525 or visit us online at www.oaklandzoo.org. All content property of the Oakland Zoo. No part of this publication may be reproduced without express permission of the Oakland Zoo.

official magazine of oakland zoo

• www.oaklandzoo.org

ISSUE 44 • SUMMER/FALL 2012

ZENA THE ZOOKEEPER’S KIDZONE New Babies...................................................................... 18 Summer Plans for 2013.................................................... 19 ZooCamp .........................................................................20 Activity Zone: Word search and crossword puzzle .......... 21 4

ALL CREATURES GREAT & SMALL Oakland Zoo’s New Veterinary Hospital Can Take Care of Them All FEEDING THE ANIMALS MEET THE NEW HYENA ANIMAL BIRTHDAYS

NEW THIS ISSUE FOR KIDS:

Meet Zena the Zookeeper!

Cover Photo: Looking eye-toeye with Donna. She was born in Zimbabwe around 1980. She came to us from New Orlean’s Audubon Zoo in 1990. She is over nine feet tall and weighs 9,300 pounds (almost five tons!). Photo: Nancy Filippi


EVENTS Summer / Fall 2012 JULY The United Seniors of Oakland and Alameda County’s Ninth Annual Healthy Living Festival (www.usoac.org) Thursday, July 19 8:00am – 2:00pm Arroyo Viejo Creek Crew Clean-Up Saturday, July 21 10:00am – 1:00pm

Oakland Senior Summer Free Day Monday, August 20 10:00am – 4:00pm

Oakland Senior Summer Free Day Monday, September 17 10:00am – 4:00pm

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

Member “Wake up Zoo” Last Day Monday, September 3 9:30am – 10:00am

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Walkathon (www.jdrf.org) Sunday, October 14

Family Sundown Safari Saturday, August 4 5:00pm – 10:00am Family Sundown Safari Saturday, August 11 5:00pm – 10:00am Arroyo Viejo Creek Crew Clean-Up Saturday, August 18 10:00am – 1:00pm

www.oaklandzoo.org

ZOOLIGHTS BEGINS

DECEMBER

Saturday – Monday, Dec. 1-31 5:30pm – 9:00pm

Includes FREE Teddy Bear Check-Up Saturday, July 28 9:00am – 3:00pm

AUGUST

Thanksgiving (Zoo closed) Thursday, November 22

ZOOLIGHTS

FEAST FOR THE BEASTS

Oakland Senior Summer Free Day Monday, July 30 10:00am – 4:00pm

Thanksgiving ZooCamp Monday-Wednesday, Nov. 19-21

Friday, November 30 5:30pm – 9:00pm

Family Sundown Safari Saturday, July 21 5:00pm – 10:00am

Family Sundown Safari Saturday, July 28 5:00pm – 10:00am

Saturday, November 17 10:00am – 1:00pm

CA Revels - Yule at the Zoo Saturday, December 1 1:00pm

BOO AT THE ZOO Summer Hours End Monday, September 3 Grandparents Day: Free Train Rides for Grandparents Sunday, September 9 10:00am – 3:00pm Arroyo Viejo Creek Crew Clean-Up Saturday, September 15 10:00am – 1:00pm

9:00am – 2:00pm Arroyo Viejo Creek Crew Clean-Up Saturday, October 20 10:00am – 1:00pm

Arroyo Viejo Creek Crew Clean-Up Saturday, December 15 10:00am – 1:00pm

BOO AT THE ZOO

Zoolights Monday-Tuesday, Dec. 24 & 25 5:30pm – 9:00pm

Saturday – Sunday, October 27 and 28 10:00am – 3:00pm

Zoo closed (Christmas) December 25

NOVEMBER Arroyo Viejo Creek Crew Clean-Up

Winter ZooCamp Wednesday-Friday, Dec. 26 - 28

Oakland Zoo Summer Hours

In effect through Sep. 3, 2012 Sat, Sun & Holidays: Mon – Fri: 10:00am – 4:00pm 10:00am – 5:30pm For more information, go to www.oaklandzoo.org 5


RECAP

A Hole in One! We would like to thank Lake Chabot Golf Course for hosting our first-ever “Feed the Animals” tournament, and to committee chair Justin Hurd for organizing the event. The event raised more than $10,000! Golf Tournament Hole Sponsors • Alten Construction • Interface Engineering • DRYCO Construction, Inc. • Yerina, Pascual, & Dizon, Inc. • The Hurd Jorgensen Group – Merrill Lynch • Walsh Family in support of Autism Awareness • McGuire & Hester • Noll & Tam Architects Hole in One Contest – Sponsored by: • One Toyota of Oakland

6

• Pacific Bay Electric • Alyssa and Jonathan Harris • La Farine Boulangerie • One Toyota of Oakland • The Sarens Group • Lewis Rents, Inc. • Meridian Point Partners • Brightpath Capital Partners, LP • Bigge Crane and Rigging Co. • McKenna Long & Aldridge, LLP


PLEASERS Fresh and Ready The Savanna Café in the African Village (by the meerkats) is now serving delicious soft tacos – chicken and beef topped with fresh-cut salsa, chopped onions, and cilantro. Each taco is made to order. In the Children’s Rides area, at the Safari Cafe, you can find grilled chicken and sausage sandwiches (Louisiana hot and chicken apple). Both come with coleslaw, homemade potato chips, and a small soda. Photos: Moe Perez

Adopt-an-Animal Appreciation Ice Cream Social We’d like to celebrate all of our Adopt-an-Animal participants! Saturday, August 4, 1:00-3:00pm Wayne and Gladys Valley Children’s Zoo RSVP: Mary Burns, mburns@oaklandzoo.org, or (510) 632-9525 x159. This event is open only to those who participated in Oakland Zoo’s Adopt an Animal program.

www.oaklandzoo.org

7


NEWS Playing Nice: An Update

T

orako (“Tora” is Japanese for tiger, “ko” is the suffix for a female), Oakland Zoo’s oldest tiger, has accepted the presence of younger tigers Ginger and her sister, Grace. These three tigers are usually on exhibit weekday mornings. Torako comes off exhibit midday, when sisters Molly and Milou join Grace and Ginger; Torako also gets the weekends and holidays off, and usually sleeps them away in our outdoor holding area. Each step of these introductions involves many observations and interpretation of all the tigers’ behaviors. Involvement will continue at a steady but slow rate due to the dangers involved with territorial carnivores. Torako has benefited from the presence of other tigers in her world; it’s a privilege to watch her communicate with the other tigers.

Ginger, Grace, and Torako sharing the tiger exhibit / Photo: Erica Calcagno

Oh Gosh, Osh is 18!

O

sh, the Oakland Zoo’s only male elephant, celebrated his 18th birthday in May. His zookeepers prepared a special cake with fresh strawberries and other snacks for the birthday boy, which he thoroughly enjoyed (as seen in this “after” photo).

Osh enjoying his birthday cake / Photo: Gina Kinzley

8

Three baby river otters


In “Otter” News

R

ose, Takota, and Etu, our new otter triplets, can be seen on exhibit along with their older siblings, Ahanu and Tallulah, and with mom, Ginger, and dad, Heath. They have emerged from the den and, since their birth on February 18, they have grown exponentially – really, really fast! It’s tough to keep up with these speedy mustelids (that’s the scientific name for otters) as they zip around their exhibit in the Wayne and Gladys Valley Children’s Zoo. The best time to see them is at 10:00am. (Members can take advantage of the Zoo’s members-only “Wake up Zoo” hours during the summer, and enter the Zoo at 9:30am, before the crowds). The otters usually eat lunch at 1:15pm, which is another good time to view them. They are still growing, but you need to get here soon, because before long, it will be hard to tell them apart from the adults.

Baby Otters / Photo: Chelsea Williams

www.oaklandzoo.org

9


SPOTLIGHT Not Just for Laughs Oakland Zoo adopts a new hyena Erica Calcagno : Animal Keeper III

I

n early March, Oakland Zoo welcomed Zoe, a new 20-yearold female spotted hyena, to our collection. Zoe comes from the University of California’s Berkeley Hyena Center. Having passed the normal quarantine period, she has been sideby-side next to Dos Equis, our 24-year-old male hyena (Zoe is slightly larger than Dos Equis and has more spots). She is now sharing both the exhibit and night-house with him. Based on their behaviors, and with some input from the Hyena Center consultant, it took less than a day to introduce them. For the future, renovations continue on the hyena exhibit to accommodate the arrival of a second group of three hyenas. Look for them sometime this summer. Often bad-mouthed, maligned, and generally misrepresented as cowardly scavengers, hyena’s sloping bodies, thick necks, and powerful jaws are perfectly adapted to be the efficient hunters they are. While they do eat carrion, nearly ninety percent of hyenas’ food is hunted and killed. If the lion is king, then the African spotted hyena is the queen. Born into a matriarchal society where females are larger and socially dominant, African spotted hyenas are unique in many ways. Though often described as “dog-like,” taxonomically they are more closely related to the cat clan – the mongoose and civet are their closest modern relatives. The African spotted hyenas are the largest of the four hyena species (the others being, brown, striped, and aardwolf). Hyenas can move in groups as small as four or five individuals, though these groups may come together to form clans with as many as ninety hyenas. They are gregarious and noisy creatures, exhibiting several forms of vocalized communication that can include whoops, groans, and giggles. The giggle is probably the most misunderstood of these, as it actually expresses frustration, not glee. Hyenas also scentmark their territories and have elaborate greeting ceremonies between individuals. Mothers nurse their cubs (they have one to two) for nearly a year, ensuring a food supply for the growing youngsters. Hyenas are widely persecuted – they are shot, poisoned, and snared throughout Africa, and are protected only in areas such as national parks. Their populations continue to decline; for a species that is highly intelligent and adaptable, this decline should be seen as a clear warning of a severely degrading ecosystem.

Zoe, Oakland Zoo’s newest hyena / Photos: Adam Zuby

10


AYS:

ZENA S

’ ‘giggle s ’ a n e y n “A h pressio x e n a t is ion, no t a r t s u r of f ess.” happin

www.oaklandzoo.org

11


AT HOME Celebrating Elephants: A Look Back

O

akland Zoo recently held two Celebrating Elephants events. The first event featured Cynthia Moss, one of the world’s leading experts on African Elephants and founder of the renowned Amboseli Elephant Research Project at Amboseli National Park, in Kenya. Moss hosted a fascinating presentation, and guests enjoyed a reception and silent auction. The second, Celebrating Elephants Day at Oakland Zoo, featured guests visiting elephant information stations, making treats for the elephants, and enjoying the antics of San Francisco’s Circus Finelli, an animal-free, all-women

circus troupe. Many families took advantage of a special behind-the-scenes tour of the elephant barn, and had the opportunity to get face-to-face (safely) with one of the Zoo’s elephants. Together, our extended Zoo family of members, volunteers, and community supporters helped raise over $21,000 to protect elephants in the wild. (All of the funds raised are donated to the Amboseli Trust for Elephants.) For more information on the Oakland Zoo’s elephants and our involvement with the Amboseli Elephant Research Project, go to www.oaklandzoo.org.

Guests enjoy circus snacks / Photo: Colleen Kinzley

Animal-free Circus Finelli, on the way to the show / Photo: Colleen Kinzley

Elephant manager Jeff Kinzley explains Osh the elephant’s daily foot inspection routine / Photo: Colleen Kinzley

Guests learn about the daily routine at the elephant barn from elephant manager Jeff Kinzley / Photo: Colleen Kinzley

12


A Thank You to Celebrating Elephants Sponsors 5 little Monkeys À Côté A Great Good Place For Books Acme House of Music Africa Matters Aiken, Alex Alm, Victor Aneurythm Aquarium By the Bay Art Murmur Artful Hummingbird Atomic Garden Aurora Theatre B Hive (etsy) Babs & Jay Wardwell Baldwin, Debbie Baja Nights Jewelry Bealer, Kaethe Bella Ceramica Belomy, Nathan Berkeley Hyena Center Blake Edgar/UC Press Body, Mind, Spirit, Massage Therapy Bonzon, Jeff and Carolyn Bottle of Clouds Boulevard Burgers Bridges Restaurant Calcagno, Erica Calcagno, Sharon Carrot Fever Cato’s Ale House Center for Holistic Health, Chiropractic Office C’era Una Volta Restaurant Clark, Seena Club One Comcast Cramer, Sarah Crepevine Crooks, Cori Dancing Color Ceramics Dasche Cellars Dickerson, Chris Ann Diffleson, Anne DogBone Alley Draw Gabby Draw Eight Arms Cellars Elephant Sanctuary Elephant Voices Elizabeth Lydon Studios (Etsy) Endangered Species Print Project Extreme Pizza Ferro, Edwina Filippos Flora Art Studio Folk Manis Puppets Fulcher-Nutt, Sigi Geffen, Elaine Ghirardelli Gillman, Leah Global Exchange Golden State Warriors Gorgeous and Green Events Great Harvest Bread Co. (Rockridge) Gwendoline, Zoe (Etsy) Hall, Coco Harley, JoAnn Hazelhofer, Galen Healthy Life Vitamins Jane Hong Hey Day Books Highwire Coffee Roasters Hing Made Hand Made Hudson, Cassidy Hula Woman’s Store J Sahadi Jewelers Jelincic, Jen Johnson, Ann Kahn, Sue

www.oaklandzoo.org

Kane, Steve Kate’s Caring Gifts KBLX Kerbel, Carol KOFY Kollias, Elaine La Mediternaee Laurel Book Store Laouri, Marianne Loddra Lowe, Eva Leschke, Ursala Lim, Serena Luka’s Taproom & Lounge Malloy, Sandy Marine Mammal Center Mariposa Baking Company Matthews, Cheryl Mealiffe, Kristin Men’s Warehouse Mensah, Christina Montclair Skin Care Montclair Sports Montgomery, Tana Monterey Bay Aquarium Moore, Dave Mountain Yoga Nancy Overton Designs Nathan and Co. Gift Shop Nathanson, Laurel Noe Osada Design North, Kathy Oakland A’s Oakland East Bay Symphony Oakland Grown Oakland YMCA Oliveto’s Restaurant Paganucci Designs Pave Fine Jewelry Design Performing Animal Welfare Society Paws and Claws Piedmont Yarn Pigeon Roof Studios Pope, Tessa Porterfield, Jessica Poulin, Mark Powell’s Sweet Shop Powers, Karen J Preble, Martha Rock Wall Wine Company Rockridge Home Sacred Wheel Cheese Safari West Sherwood, Patrick San Francisco Zoo Smith, Marti Shrunken Cat Heads Smart Energy Shots Someone’s in the Kitchen Sonam Tibetan Gift Store Spinster, Giddy Sumbody Store and Spa Talarico, Amy Jo Teacake Bake Shop Tessier Winery The Sugar Pine Tilley, Ruby Tortoise Loves Donkey Tree House Green Gifts Walden Pond Books Wente Winery White Rose Skin Care Wilson, DJ Wing, Jereld and Carol Your Basic Bird Yvonne Crochet Zacahary’s Pizza Zuniga, Pilar

All Aboard…

Want to celebrate a loved one, special occasion, promote your business, or show your own affection for the Zoo in a unique way? Our new Outback Express Adventure Train Plaques may be the answer. Placed on the front or back seat of the train, these plaques offer unique and lasting recognition. Your gift will benefit the Zoo by providing ongoing financial support that ensures the health and well-being of all the animals at the Zoo, and provides for education and outreach, conservation, and animal welfare programs. Contact Mary Burns at mburns@oaklandzoo.org or (510) 632-9525, ext 159 for more information.

13


IN THE WILD TreeTops Hotel, Aberdare National Park / Photo: Public Domain

Dream an African Dream This November, Travel with the Oakland Zoo to Beautiful Kenya Elizabeth Abram : Senior Animal Keeper

Y

our adventure begins at the Amboseli Game Reserve, where you get up-close to free-ranging elephants, and witness breathtaking views of Mount Kilimanjaro. From there you travel to the Samburu National Reserve, where rare species like the Beisia oryx and Grevy’s zebra can be seen along with lions, leopards, and cheetahs. A visit to the local Samburu village completes your experience. From Samburu, you take a trek to Aberdare National Park and the renowned Treetops Hotel. The hotel, built on fortyfoot high stilts, oversees a watering hole and salt lick, allowing panoramic views of elephants, buffalos, rhinoceros, and more animals gathering around the watering hole. The last leg of your trip will be spent viewing wild game at Masai Mara. Here you’ll witness the Great Migration – one of the most impressive natural events in the world. At the Mara river, you can spot hippopotamus and Nile crocodiles, and watch as the game cross the infamous waterway. Your trip will also include a special visit to the Sheldrick Elephant Orphanage and Rothschild Giraffe Centre. Dates for this trip are November 5 – 16, 2012. Come join us on this twelve-day, breathtaking journey through Kenya’s most legendary parks while staying at affordable deluxe accommodations! For more information or to reserve your spot on this amazing journey, contact Elizabeth at elizabeth@oaklandzoo.org or Adam at adam@oaklandzoo.org, or leave a message by calling (510) 632-9525 ext. 274.

14


A Lasting Gift for Someone Special … and the Earth! If you’re searching for a special gift or tribute for a loved one, consider dedicating the planting of an Oak tree, a unique and personal gift that will be remembered for generations to come. For more information, contact Mary Burns at mburns@oaklandzoo.org or (510) 632-9525, ext 159.

BACK » IN HONOR OF

Adopt An Elephant Celebrate summer by adopting one of our Zoo animals, and help provide funds for quality animal care, conservation programs, education, and ongoing research. For just $40, you’ll receive a personalized adoption certificate, photo of the animal, fun fact sheet, and an elephant plush animal. For a complete list of other Zoo animals to adopt, visit www.oaklandzoo.org. Visit our website to adopt an animal, or scan in the QR code with your smartphone. You can also take advantage of this offer by calling Matt Rasmussen at (510) 6329525, ext 154. Please note: all adopted animals remain at the Oakland Zoo.

www.oaklandzoo.org

Jesse Antin In Honor of Anonymous Melissa Bacina In Honor of Chris & Marla Bacina Tania Selden In Honor of Gary Bogue Yuching Ni In Honor of Suz Burwell Mimi Abegglen In Honor of Alison Chapot Leah Grass In Honor of Anne-Marie Despain Suzanne Block In Honor of Dan Fishlow Michelle Jowitt In Honor of Michelle Jowitt Judith Wilhite In Honor of Elfie Larkin Nan Ho In Honor of Amy Phelps Melanie Kelsey In Honor of Hana Sahakian Robert Wood In Honor of Stacey Wong

» IN MEMORY OF

Carol Kerbel In Memory of William Kerbel Kirstin Litz In Memory of Karen Litz Jesse Antin In Memory of Margaret Pauline Marx In Memory of Sandra Salerno Patricia Silberman In Memory of Sandra Salerno

15


OAKLAND ZOO VETERINARY SERVICES STAFF

Dr. Karen Emanuelson, Dr. Andrea Goodnight, Senior Veterinary Technician Maria Trenary, Veterinary Technician Rachel Wells

Rick Mannshardt : Education Department

(L to R) Dr. Goodnight, Rachel Wells, Dr. Emanuelson, Maria Trenary / Photo: Nancy Filippi

T

here’s been a lot of attention paid to the exciting new Veterinary Hospital under construction at the Zoo. But you probably don’t know much about the professional staff that will soon be working there. Dr. Karen Emanuelson, Oakland Zoo’s Director of Veterinary Services, graduated from San Diego State and UC Davis, and then worked in private practice in Walnut Creek before starting at the Zoo in 1989. Residing near majestic Mount Diablo with her husband and two sons, Dr. Emanuelson spends her leisure time hiking, swimming, horseback riding, dancing, and reading. “What I love best about working at Oakland Zoo,” says Dr. Emanuelson, “is the combination of the amazing animals and people I work with.”

16

Sharing the demanding workload of animal care responsibilities for the past six years is Associate Veterinarian Dr. Andrea Goodnight. Educated at College of William and Mary and North Carolina State, Dr. Goodnight has completed internships at a variety of locales, including the Birmingham, Indianapolis, and Columbus Zoos. In her free time, she enjoys running, hiking, and travel. As a licensed pilot, she loves flying the plane that she owns with her husband. “I have the privilege of providing for the medical needs for a tremendous group of creatures,” says Dr. Goodnight. “As the Zoo grows to impact conservation on a more global scale, I am excited to be an integral part of these efforts.” With the Oakland Zoo since 2003, Senior Veterinary


SPOTLIGHT

Technician Maria Trenary has worked as a veterinary assistant at both the Montclair Veterinary Hospital and the Bay Area Veterinary Specialists. In her free time, Maria enjoys doing volunteer wildlife rescue and rehabilitation work at the Marine Mammal Center in Marin. She also enjoys spending time with her husband and her cats. “Every day at the Zoo brings something new,” says Maria. “This makes the job very challenging but also enriching.” Veterinary Technician Rachel Wells has been with the Oakland Zoo for five years and has worked as a veterinary assistant at a variety of places. She’s also volunteered at the Marine Mammal Center and the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia. In her spare time, she loves dancing as well as outdoor adventuring with her husband and dog. www.oaklandzoo.org

“I love the daily challenge and excitement of working with such a rich diversity of animals at the Zoo. I am very proud to work for an organization that prioritizes wildlife conservation and education.” Oakland Zoo’s veterinary staff is eagerly looking forward to the opening of the new Veterinary Hospital this October. » For more on the new veterinary hospital, turn to page 16.

17


Larry Cahn

East Bay Zoological Society Board of Trustees Mary Burns : Development Department

L

aurence Cahn, Principal of Feasible Properties, has been an active supporter of Oakland Zoo for more than fifteen years and has served on the East Bay Zoological Society’s Board of Trustees since 2007. He has provided leadership and support for fundraising projects throughout the Zoo. Oakland Zoo: What prompted you to join the East Bay Zoological Society Board? Larry Chan: Nearly five years ago, I could see the progress being made by Oakland Zoo. Being a resident of Oakland, I wanted to participate in a venture that brought pride to the community. Another aspect I liked is that once you get out of your car and walk through the Zoo entrance, there is no differentiation between people; you are there because of your interest and love of animals. The Zoo is an open-air equalizer of people.

square feet.) Longer term is the California trail, an upcoming expansion of the Zoo that will give visitors – via a gondola ride – a unique opportunity to see once-native animals that no longer exist in California or are seriously endangered. This project will offer a zoological setting that will be breathtaking, both in terms of being able to witness native California animals in their natural habitats, and in seeing them in a visually unimpaired venue that is hundreds of feet above the Bay. It’s designed to create an intimacy between nature and an urban setting. OZ: Why do you think volunteering is so important? LC: Volunteering is important to any organization, since it permits you to donate your time in order to serve. You develop friendships and get a deeper understanding and appreciation of what the casual observer is unable to witness.

OZ: What do you gain from being a part of the Zoo family? LC: You gain an awareness of the responsibility you have in relation to the environment. These animals are dependent on us for their food and well-being, as the people who care for these animals depend on the Zoo for their ongoing employment and care. Where else can you be so connected to the symbiosis of life? You don’t “do things” because of organizational pressure to “do the thing right.” You do it because of your desire to “do the right thing.”

OZ: What opportunities do you see for the Zoo? LC: The Zoo is more than a place to see animals. By providing a forum with a theme, the Zoo is a gathering place for the community. By the Zoo’s surroundings being a part of nature, a peaceful surrounding is developed wherein amiable discussions can occur. The Zoo’s opportunities range from being a place for all generations – from the very young to the elderly – who can meet, observe, and experience life. It’s a forum for lovers as well as a meeting spot for professionals.

OZ: How does your service, and the Board’s oversight of the organization, benefit the community? LC: I ask questions in order to get clarity of both long- and short-term impacts that the Zoo will have on the community. On the outside, it looks simple: all you do is feed and clean up after the animals. It’s far more complex than that. On the Board, we monitor the cash flow for the Zoo in order to make it an organization that will meet its financial goals. At the same time, we are planning for new exhibits and the restoration and improvement of existing exhibits; all this will have an impact that will last beyond twenty-five years. The nearly complete Veterinary Hospital is one example – a multi-million dollar project that has created one of the most advanced veterinary facilities in the United States within its 17,000 square foot structure. (The existing facility is 1,200

OZ: What is your favorite Zoo animal? LC: Giraffe. They get to see the bigger picture.

18


SPOTLIGHT

“By providing a forum with a theme, the Zoo is a gathering place for the community.”

Larry Cahn / Photo: Rick Camargo

www.oaklandzoo.org

19


The Oakland Zoo’s 20th Annual

WALK IN THE WILD: AN EPICUREAN ESCAPADE! Saturday, June 23, 2012 Thank you to all sponsors, patrons, guests, and the 100 restaurants, bakeries, wineries, and breweries whose participation in Walk in the Wild raised over $200,000 to support the Zoo’s education, conservation, and animal care programs. Special thanks to our volunteer leaders: Carla Betts, Walk in the Wild Committtee Event Chair; Laura de Petra, Vendor Chair; Dalton Fine, Patron Party Designer; and Liam Mayclem, Honorary Host. The Board and Staff members of the East Bay Zoological Society would like to extend our gratitude to the corporate sponsors who provide the necessary support for Walk in the Wild to be the premiere event our patrons look forward to each year. All photos Rick Camargo.

2012 Walk in the Wild

Oakland Zoo Board of Directors and guests

Chris & Kristin Smith, Reid Settlemier, Annie & Mark Perrin, & Amy Settlemier

Ann & Jon Reynolds

Dancing the night away to live music Jeanie Christopaulos & Carla Betts

Philip & Carol Chesnutt, Dr. Joel Parrott, President & CEO of the Oakland Zoo, and Dr. Laura Becker

20

Martin Lion & Angie Chen

Kim McGuire-Reed, Nik Dehejia, & Concilman Larry Reid

Linda Hart Huber & Eric Maul

Live entertainment from Masterpiece


THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS Veterinarians ($5,000)

SheppardMullin

Curator ($2,500)

Pantone 286C

Media

THANK YOU TO OUR VENDORS BAKERIES, CATERERS, AND RESTAURANTS AIDELLS SAUSAGE COMPANY San Leandro ANN’S CATERING AND RICK AND ANN’S RESTAURANT Berkeley ASQEW GRILL CATERING San Francisco BARBACOA Orinda CATERED TO YOU Oakland DICKSON NAPA RANCH Napa EL AGAVERO RESTAURANT Oakland EL TORITO RESTAURANT San Leandro ENGLANDER SPORTS PUB & RESTAURANT San Leandro FAZ RESTAURANTS Pleasanton FENTONS CREAMERY Oakland FISCALINI CHEESE COMPANY Modesto GRACE STREET CATERING, FLORAL & EVENT DESIGN Oakland GREAT HARVEST BREAD CO. Oakland GUADALAJARA RESTAURANT Oakland HOME OF CHICKEN AND WAFFLES Oakland HORATIO’S San Leandro ITALIAN COLORS RISTORANTE Oakland JUST DESSERTS Oakland KINCAID’S Oakland LA BOCCA FINA CATERING Hayward LADYFINGERS Oakland LAKE CHABOT GOLF COURSE Oakland LAVA PIT HAWAIIAN GRILL Orinda MARKET SMART INC. Pleasanton MIMI MCCURRY’S CHIMICHURRI SAUCE San Rafael MISS PEARL’S RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE AT THE WATERFRONT HOTEL Oakland MONTIBELLA SAUSAGE COMPANY Orinda MR. DEWIE’S FROZEN DESSERTS Oakland NOTHING BUNDT CAKES Walnut Creek OAKLAND ZOO ISLAND CAFÉ Oakland OLD TOWNE DANVILLE BAKERY Danville OLIVETO CAFÉ & RESTAURANT Oakland OZUMO RESTAURANT Oakland PIETISSERIE Oakland PIZZA ANTICA Lafayette SCOTT’S SEAFOOD GRILL & BAR Jack London Square, Oakland SKATES ON THE BAY Berkeley SORELLA DI ZZA’S Oakland SYSCO San Francisco TABLE 24 Orinda TACOS EL NOVILLO Oakland TACOS GUADALAJARA TACO TRUCK Oakland THE TERRACE ROOM AT LAKE MERRITT HOTEL Oakland TRADER JOE’S Rockridge, Oakland WOOD TAVERN Oakland BREWERIES ALE INDUSTRIES Concord ANDERSON VALLEY BREWING COMPANY Boonville

BEAR REPUBLIC BREWING CO. Healdsburg BISON BREWING COMPANY Berkeley BUFFALO BILL’S BREWERY Hayward CRISPIN CIDER Minneapolis DRAKE’S BREWING COMPANY San Leandro E.J. PHAIR BREWERY & ALEHOUSE Concord FIRESTONE WALKER BREWING COMPANY Paso Robles FOX BARREL CIDER Colfax LAGUNITAS BREWING COMPANY Petaluma LINDEN STREET BREWERY Oakland NEW BELGIUM BREWING COMPANY Ft. Collins, CO PACIFIC COAST BREWING Oakland PYRAMID BREWERIES Berkeley SIERRA NEVADA BREWING COMPANY Roseville SPEAKEASY ALES & LAGERS San Francisco TRIPLE ROCK BREWING CO. Berkeley TRUMER BRAUEREI Berkeley VERMONT HARD CIDER COMPANY STRONGBOW CIDER Hereford, England WOODCHUCK DRAFT CIDER Middlebury, VT WYDER’S PEAR CIDER Middlebury, VT WINERIES BAREFOOT WINE & BUBBLY Modesto CONCANNON VINEYARD Livermore DASHE CELLARS Oakland ELLISTON VINEYARDS Sunol FENESTRA WINERY Livermore HOPPER CREEK WINERY Yountville IRISH MONKEY CELLARS Oakland JC CELLARS Oakland J. LOHR VINEYARDS & WINES San Jose LA ROCHELLE WINERY Livermore LITTLE VALLEY WINERY Sunol MERCY VINEYARDS Pebble Beach MILL CREEK VINEYARDS & WINERY Healdsburg MURRIETA’S WELL WINERY Livermore RETZLAFF VINEYARDS Livermore ROCK WALL WINE COMPANY Alameda ROLAND ROSARIO CELLARS Oakland ROSENBLUM CELLARS Alameda ST. FRANCIS WINERY & VINEYARDS Santa Rosa STEIN FAMILY WINES/JUST JOSHIN WINES San Francisco THE STEVEN KENT WINERY Livermore TAMAS ESTATES Livermore URBAN LEGEND CELLARS Oakland WEIBEL FAMILY VINEYARDS AND WINERY Lodi WENTE VINEYARDS Livermore WESTOVER WINERY Castro Valley NON-ALCOHOLIC HONEST TEA Bethesda, MD NUMI ORGANIC TEA Oakland S. MARTINELLI & COMPANY Watsonville WORLD GROUND CAFÉ Oakland

THANK YOU TO OUR PATRONS VETERINARIAN Alten Construction Bigge Crane and Rigging Co. Brown and Brown Insurance Services of California Chevron Corporation The Grubb Company Merrill Lynch Pacific Gas and Electric Company Ann and Jon Reynolds Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP CURATOR Alaska National Insurance Company Carrie and Kelly Barlow Bay Alarm Company Carla and Kenneth Betts BrightSource Energy, Inc. California Capital & Investment Group

www.oaklandzoo.org

Claremont Behavioral Services The Clorox Company Kathy and Ed Deenihan Linda Hart Huber McGuire and Hester Foundation Meyers Nave, a professional law corporation Dave Moore Reed Smith LLP Robin and Jake Reynolds Safeway, Inc. Hort and Betty Shapiro Barbara Snow Clark Townsend Public Affairs ValueAct Capital Mary Wade ZOOLOGIST Heather Bryant and Doug Jameson Chain Link Fence & Supply, Inc. Dick and Vicki Davis

Nik P. Dehejia Great American Insurance Group Steve and Jackie Kane Marianne Laouri Jon and Megan Leuteneker The Lew Edwards Group Harold and Jean Mackenzie Bob and Joan Montgomery Gregory Murphy Noll & Tam Architects Peterson Sheet Metal, Inc. Maria Pracher Frankie and Skip Rhodes Barbara and Tom Skelly Sitzmann Morris & Lavis Insurance Agency Wells Fargo Wendel, Rosen, Black & Dean, LLP William’s Brewing

ENVIRONMENTALIST Aliquot & Associates, Inc., Planners, Civil Engineers, Surveyors Linda Barrett and Jim Faulkner Jeffrey W. Baus Meredith Burke and Kevin Walsh Philip and Carol Chesnutt Jeanie and Dan Christopoulos Patricia Condran The Crowley Family Beth and Richard DeAtley Dr. Bo De Long-Cotty and Phil Cotty Lisa and John Demarest Jennifer Fish Howard and Mary Rossi Fuchs Neil and Diane Goodhue Alyssa and Jonathan Harris Mr. and Mrs. Cullen and Michelle Jowitt Susan and Ted Kirsch

Albert and Yvette Koehler Cynthia LaRose Barbara and Lew Lippard Holly and Tom Love Deanna and Richard Lyon John and Maggie Maiers Jack and Carole McAboy Judy Mears and Bart Lee Zina Mirsky Barbara and John Moore Gregory and Tracy Murphy Margo Murray Janet Y. Nakao Leon and Molly Natsues Norman and Janet Pease Honorable Don Perata Ann and Marc Perrin PETCO Animal Supplies Reliable Tree Experts Barbara Roach Ross Stores Margherita and Nicholas Sorci

Sandy Spring, East Bay Sotheby’s International Realty Janet and Bruce Stephenson Top Grade Construction Douglas Tucker Walter R. Turner Emma Lee and Gary Twitchell Eileen and Jim Vohs Holly Ward Linda Lea Weber Gene Zahas and Wendy Howard

21


EFFORTS Embracing Conservation Oakland Zoo remains committed to the plight of Budongo’s chimpanzees Amy Gotliffe : Director, Conservation

W

ildlife conservation is central to Oakland Zoo’s mission, and we fully embrace the projects we are closest to with funds, materials, awareness raising, staff expertise, ecotravel, and any other way we can help. The Budongo Snare Removal Project in Uganda is a good example. This project protects endangered chimpanzees by providing a snare patrol and removal team, an educational outreach program, and a means for the poachers to replace the protein they would have received from the chimpanzees with goats. The Oakland Zoo Conservation Fund has been the sole financial supporter of the Budongo Snare Removal Project since 2001. For the Love of Primates, a Zoo-hosted event and silent auction, brings awareness to the project, as well as much-needed funds. Discovering Primates Day also happens

22

in February, where guests participate in fun, hands-on stations and learn about all primates and what each of us can do to help them. To further help the cause, the Oakland Zoo’s ZooCamp selected the Budongo Snare Removal Project as their beneficiary in 2011, designating one dollar of every camper registration as a donation to the project. During the week, over one thousand children wearing yellow T-shirts with the Budongo logo connected with chimps and the project in a variety of ways. They visited the Zoo’s dynamic group of chimpanzees, created enrichment for them, and participated in a theatrical, live presentation called Budongo Hour. Their ZooCamp gift was a Kibale Bead bracelet made from re-used, colorful paper by an artisan group in Uganda. This beautiful jewelry is also available in the Zoo’s gift shop.


Meanwhile, an intrepid group of adults and an enthusiastic group of teens collected cameras, laptops, books, school supplies, medical supplies, and notes of appreciation from staff and ZooCampers, and set sail for Uganda to visit the project. After a very warm welcome, each group delivered their goods, walked the forest with the snare patrol team, attended ex-poacher meetings, got schooled in their outreach programs, and experienced first-hand the joys and challenges of maintaining a successful conservation program. I think a memorable part of that trip for many of us was the day spent de-worming the many goats in the program. www.oaklandzoo.org

Back at the Zoo, a new concept was launched: Quarters for Conservation. This program donates a quarter from each Zoo admission to one of three featured conservation programs, including the Budongo Snare Removal Project. Visitors receive a token at the gate and vote for their favorite project at the conservation voting station. We have reached a critical time in the history of conserving wildlife; now is the time for all of us to care and take action. We look forward to creating more ways the Oakland Zoo can fully embrace our partner conservation projects and all of our planet’s precious wildlife.

23


THE SCENES Feeding Time at the Zoo

A behind-the-scenes peak inside the Oakland Zoo’s kitchen

Sean Piverger : Operations

E

very day, and sometimes several times a day, Oakland Zoo’s hundreds of animal residents enjoy meals prepared especially for their individual dietary needs. Tigers eat fresh meat while the sun bears chow on fresh fruits and vegetables. The result is a Zoo full of content, well-fed animals. But, where does all the food come from? Oakland Zoo’s Animal Commissary serves as the main culinary hub for meal preparation. “The purpose of the commissary is to order and prepare food for the animals,” said Victor Alm, who is responsible for several areas of Oakland Zoo, including the commissary and the animal education room. Currently, the commissary employs two full- and two part-time staff workers (along with volunteers and interns) who work hard to ensure all of the animals eat nutritionally balanced meals. “They prepare the specific diets and required items, and then deliver them to the animal areas that need them,” said Alm. Primary Commissary Keeper Chris Angel has implemented an animal-specific custom diet plan to make sure each of the animals get its proper nutritional needs met. Their goal is to offer only the healthiest, freshest ingredients and produce. “We do it the same as we do it for human consumption. If it’s not healthy enough for a human, it’s not good enough for an animal,” said Angel. The keepers make sure to change up ingredients to keep the diet fresh and the animals interested in their meals. “Keeping the menu new keeps them interested,” said Angel. One thing is certain, Oakland Zoo animals never go hungry!

24


Over 660 animals reside in Oakland Zoo (one hundred and sixty species), each requiring a different meal: • Large cats such as lions and tigers, along with vultures, eat different types of meat – pork neck bones, ground meat, chicken, and more. • Fruit bats eat fruits like cantaloupes, apples, and pears. • Chimpanzees and sun bears eat different types of fruits and vegetables. Sun bears will also eat small amounts of insects and meat. • Giraffes eat edible tree parts (browse), different types of grass hays, and small amounts of chopped vegetables. • Warthogs eat different types of vegetables, small amounts of fruit, and small types of grass hays. • Carnivores (meat eaters) consume dead rabbits, guinea pigs, deer, pig feet and skulls, and horse meat. • Herbivores (plant eaters) have a sweet tooth. This allows the keepers to insert medications in their meals such as hiding pills in Fig Newtons. • Food is donated or purchased, from different vendors such as “U.S. Foods,” “Concord Feed,” “North Bay Meat,” and other vendors. For some of the animals, keepers use branches and leaves found on Zoo grounds.

www.oaklandzoo.org

25


February 8, 2012 / Photo: Alten Construction

June 6, 2012 / Photo: Alte n Constructio

n

All Creatures Great and Small O

ne of the vervet monkeys is limping badly due to a suspected spinal injury; the animal is darted with a tranquilizer, and safely transported to the veterinary center for treatment. Suddenly, the room becomes dark as the electricity unexpectedly goes off (again). The equipment monitoring the monkey’s vital signs switches to battery back-up, but the constant alarm reminds us that this power is temporary. My stethoscope confirms that the monkey is stable as my mind races; how do I proceed from here? The most important diagnostic tool for this exam, the x-ray machine, needs electricity! We experienced this event very recently here at Oakland Zoo, as our aging veterinary facility inexplicably lost electricity. With our resourceful, team-oriented staff, we quickly had an extension cord supplying power from another building, supplemental lighting, and blankets to keep the monkey warm. Thankfully, the exam proceeded without another glitch. At approximately 1,200 square feet in size, the current Veterinary Care Center (VCC) has provided medical care to the animals at the Oakland Zoo for over thirty years. In that time, the science of zoo medicine has evolved dramatically. The VCC

26

has been renovated to reflect some of those advances, but with the Zoo’s guest collection expanding — and standards of veterinary care for zoo animals changing — the current VCC is no longer adequate. That’s the bad news. The good news? We are extremely proud to announce the opening of the new Oakland Zoo Veterinary Hospital in the fall of 2012! This 17,000 square foot, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) silver certified “green” facility has been designed for the safe and efficient care of the varied species at the Zoo. Our new hospital features both small and large animal exam and surgery rooms, a radiology suite, and an intensive care ward. Additionally, a separate wing of the building is designated for those animals requiring hospitalization. This wing contains multiple pens with both indoor and outdoor access, an aquatic animal pen with an indoor pool, and several climate-controlled rooms for animals with very specialized temperature and humidity requirements. A quarantine area with its own airflow system provides separation for animals with contagious diseases. Our goal is to provide an optimal, comfortable respite for every Zoo


March 12, 2012 / Photo: Eric Maul

Oakland Zoo’s New Veterinary Hospital will take care of them all Dr. Andrea L. Goodnight : Associate Veterinarian

animal in order to speed recovery from illness or injury. The new hospital also contains the latest in veterinary technology. A diagnostic lab including both a blood chemistry and CBC analyzer will provide critical patient information within minutes of sample collection. Digital radiographic imaging will allow us to obtain superior quality diagnostic radiographs (x-rays) with less radiation exposure. New endoscopy equipment will expand our diagnostic capabilities, while decreasing the invasiveness of sample collection and promoting faster recovery. In the future, this Veterinary Hospital will allow Oakland Zoo’s Veterinary Department to expand its contributions in zoo veterinary science, education, and conservation. Our plans include further partnerships with the UC Davis Veterinary School, the California Condor Recovery Team, and many other veterinary specialists and students. The first national endeavor made possible by this facility will be in October 2012, when 500 of our closest colleagues arrive! The Annual Conference of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians is a comprehensive week of information-sharing through scientific presentations and hands-on workshops. We are www.oaklandzoo.org

excited to be able to host and facilitate such an important educational experience. Finally, a personal note... The Veterinary Staff would like to express our gratitude to those who have contributed to make the new Veterinary Hospital a reality. Each individual animal at the Oakland Zoo holds a special place in our hearts. Thank you for helping us to provide the veterinary care they deserve. Andrea Goodnight, DVM Karen Emanuelson, DVM Maria Trenary, RVT Rachel Wells, RVT » Turn to page 10 to meet our Veterinary Team!

27


Zena’s KidZone

Zena’s Zoo Journal D

id you know that Oakland Zoo had more than 500 babies born this year? Everything from a baby giraffe, to baby birds, to baby cockroaches. That’s a lot of little ones running around! In this issue of Zena’s Zoo Journal, we will take a look at some of those babies and find out fascinating facts about each one. Be sure to pay special attention to what we call these babies, so you can play our Name that Baby games on page 21. North American River Otter: We had baby otter triplets this year – a sister and two brothers. If you are a baby otter, you have no need for earplugs or nose-plugs. When these little guys dive into the water, they can shut their ears and nostrils to keep the water out. They can also stay underwater for up to four minutes! Did You Know? A baby otter is called a pup. Can you think of any other animal babies that are also called pups? (Dog, fox, seal, and gerbil babies are also called pups.)

New to the Zoo! • One squirrel monkey (called a baby) • Twelve taveta weavers (called hatchlings or chicks) • Four Fischer’s lovebirds • Six golfodulcean frogs (called tadpoles) • Eighteen amazon milky tree frogs (called tadpoles) • Two spotted turtles (called hatchlings) • Three lined flat tailed geckos (called hatchlings) • Four green anoles - by Genny Greene

Meerkat: A baby meerkat was born this year. When the rest of the meerkats leave the burrow to find food, some of them stay behind and babysit the young. Because meerkats don’t get to eat while they babysit, they all take turns finding food and watching the babies. A group of meerkats is called a mob. Did You Know? A baby meerkat is called a kit. Do you know other animal babies called kits? (Rabbits, beavers, and ferrets also have kits.) Wallaroo: We had three baby wallaroos born at the Zoo this year! If a wallaroo is thirsty, it can dig into the ground as much as three feet to find water.

Peters A wallaroo joey / Photo: Lorraine

28

Did You Know? A baby wallaroo is called a joey. Baby kangaroos, opossums, koalas and Tasmanian devils are all called joeys. Giraffe: We are very proud of Maggie, our new baby giraffe. She was voted the cutest baby zoo animal in all of the United States by Budget Travel! When Maggie is all grown up, she’ll be able to run up to 35 miles per hour. That’s probably fast enough to get a speeding ticket in your neighborhood! Did You Know? A baby giraffe is called a calf. Hmmm…does that name sound familiar? (Elephant, rhino, whale, and cow babies are all called calves.) Spiny Lizards: Nineteen blue spiny lizard babies were born at the Zoo this year. Sometimes you can see male spiny lizards doing push-ups! They do this to show how strong and tough they are, so that all the other animals around them know they are in charge of their territory. Did You Know? A baby spiny lizard is called a hatchling. Some other kinds of animals are called hatchlings, too. Do you know who they are? (Turtle, alligator, and bird babies are also called hatchlings.)


Zena’s KidZone

Does Your Teen Have Summer 2013 Plans? They Do Now! | Melinda Sievert : Teen Programs Manager

W

here did you go on vacation when you were a teen? To visit relatives? Sleep-away camp? For over ten years, Oakland Zoo has broken new ground with our teen travel program. Each summer, teen volunteers can sign up to join one of our epic adventures, to destinations like Guatemala, Uganda, and Thailand, where they have the opportunity to meet conservation professionals working in their home countries to preserve some of our most endangered species. From feeding orphaned howler monkeys, to trekking for snares among chimps and colobus monkeys, these adventures provide young people with unparalleled opportunities to experience wild animals, exotic ecosystems, and to see firsthand how one individual can truly make a difference in conservation. For our intrepid teens traveling to Borneo this summer, getting ready for the trip has been almost as exciting as the trip itself! In preparation for our visit to the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre (BSBCC) in the Malaysian state of Sabah, the teens worked with our String 3 keepers to help care for our three female sun bears, morning to night. From cleaning the enclosure, to cutting invasive weeds, to www.oaklandzoo.org

spreading out each of the bears’ four daily feedings, we were kept constantly busy. As natural foragers, sun bears like to climb, dig, and sniff for food. To keep the bears using these natural instincts, keepers must hide enrichment throughout the exhibit in the form of pinecones, balls, bottles, rice cakes, live bugs and a host of other things. Hiding them in challenging areas for the bears was more difficult than you might think! The bears would find items in seconds that we spent considerably longer placing there – we had to use ladders and teamwork while they climbed and dug like it was a breeze. It was an exhausting but rewarding day. Now, we’ll be able to take those skills to Borneo to help the BSBCC care for their collection of injured and rescued sun bears. Are you a teen interested in joining us on a trip? We will next host a teen trip to Guatemala in July 2013. Orientations will be held in fall 2012. Want to help a teen experience one of our trips? Contact Melinda Sievert, Teen Programs Manager at (510) 632-9525 ext 201 or melinda@oaklandzoo.org for information about making a tax deductible donation to our scholarship fund.

29


Zena’s KidZone

CAMP

Let Your Children Run Wild

F

or over 25 years, the Oakland Zoo has welcomed children to get closer than ever with animals through our summer ZooCamp! Camp sessions are one week long and the days are filled with zoo tours, animal close-ups, crafts, games, songs, skits, puppets, and exploring Knowland Park. We take great pride in creating a fun camp experience filled with hands-on learning and selfdiscovery. We have new Thanksgiving and winter ZooCamps available. If your little mammal is looking for adventure, visit www.oaklandzoo.org for more information. SARAH CRAMER ZooCamp Director

Up Close with Alligators / Photo: Sarah Cramer

Puzzle Time / Photo: Trinity Leiser

Game Time / Photo: Rebecca Stern

Having a Beary Good Time / Photo: Liz Low

Costume Fun in the Discovery Room / Photo: Trinity Leiser

ZooCampers Know What “Quiet Coyote” Means / Photo: Liz Low

30

Cowboy Week at ZooCamp / Photo: Rebecca Stern

Exploring Arroyo Viejo Creek / Photo: Jacki Hope


Zena’s KidZone

ZONE Animal Baby Word Search How many baby animal names can you find in our word search? We’ve included some extras to make it more challenging. Words may go up, down, left-to-right, or diagonally.

ANSWERS: Calf Chick Cub Eaglet Foal Hatchling Joey Kid Kit Kitten Owlet Pup Tadpole

Name That Baby

How well do you remember the baby animal names from the articles? Find out by filling in our crossword puzzle. ACROSS 1. A baby wallaroo and a baby koala are examples of a _________ 2. Do you mean my little sister, or a squirrel monkey? Both are called this _________ 3. Hatchling birds, like our 12 taveta weaver babies, can also be called this _________ 4. What did the zookeeper call Dumbo when he was a baby? _________ 5. Birds and lizards hatch from eggs, so we call the babies _________ 6. A baby dog, a baby seal, and a baby otter are each called a _________ 7. Our Amazon milky tree frogs started out as baby ______ ___ DOWN 1. This name for a baby opossum or Tasmanian devil could belong to a boy in your class. 2. A baby turtle and a baby alligator are each called a _________ 3. A ____ is one name for a baby meerkat, a baby beave r, and a baby ferret. 4. This name for a baby rhino or a baby giraffe rhyme s with “half.” _________ 5. Lions and tigers and bears - Oh, my! Their babies are all called this. _________ 6. What do a baby fox, a baby gerbil, and a baby meerk at have in common? They are sometimes called this _________ baby, calf, chicks, cubs, hatchling, hatchlings, joey, joey, kit, pup, tadpoles

Possible Answers:

www.oaklandzoo.org

31


THIS

Earth Day Gratitude On April 14, Oakland Zoo celebrated Earth Day with a lively day of music, learning and fun.

32


You never know who will show up at Earth Day

Guests meet the Zoo’s beautiful indigo snake

East Bay Municipal Utility District teaches about local plants

Orange Sherbet Kids Band

Thanks to the following organizations for joining us and inspiring action for animals on Earth Day 99.7 Now Bay Area Air Quality Management District Bay Area Puma Project CalFire California Dept of Fish and Game California Farmer’s Market Association DisneyNature East Bay Municipal Utilities District www.oaklandzoo.org

East Bay Regional Park District East Bay SPCA KBLX KQED Quest Lawrence Hall of Science Lindsay Wildlife Museum Marshall’s Farm Honey Metro PCS Oakland Dog Owners Group

Oceans and You Orange Sherbet Kid’s Band Party-ink Organic Bee Keepers Play Café Red Panda Network Save the Frogs! Stopwaste.org Sulphur Creek Nature Center Ventana Wildlife Society

33


Photo: Ben Margot/AP Photo

Discover Your Wild Side at the Oakland Zoo Follow Oakland Zoo Online

A World-Class Destinaton for Bay Area Families Open Daily. Summer Hours: Mon-Fri 10:00am – 4:00pm Members-only Wake-up Hours 9:30am Sat, Sun & Holidays : 10:00am – 5:30pm www.facebook.com/OakZoo www.oaklandzoo.org/blog twitter.com/oakzoo


Oakland Zoo ROAR magazine, Summer/Fall 2012