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Contents The challenge of the Upper School ....................................................................................................................... 5 Opportunity and Choice ........................................................................................................................................ 5 The International Baccalaureate Diploma or GCE A-levels? ................................................................................ 5 Choosing your academic subjects ........................................................................................................................ 7 Choosing your academic course and subjects ...................................................................................................... 9 A guide to subject requirements for degree courses ........................................................................................ 10 A comparison of A-level and IB ........................................................................................................................... 13 Suitability of subjects for university ..................................................................................................................... 14 A-levels .................................................................................................................................................................. 16 A-level subject grid 2017-19 ............................................................................................................................... 17 A-level subject listings ......................................................................................................................................... 18 A-LEVEL ART: CRITICAL AND CONTEXTUAL ................................................................................................. 18 Pre-U ART .......................................................................................................................................................... 19 A-LEVEL BIOLOGY ............................................................................................................................................ 20 A-LEVEL BUSINESS .......................................................................................................................................... 21 A-LEVEL CHEMISTRY ....................................................................................................................................... 22 A-LEVEL COMPUTER SCIENCE ....................................................................................................................... 23 A-LEVEL CLASSICAL CIVILISATION ................................................................................................................ 24 A-LEVEL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY ............................................................................................................ 25 A-LEVEL ECONOMICS ...................................................................................................................................... 27 A-LEVEL ENGLISH LITERATURE ..................................................................................................................... 28 A-LEVEL FRENCH ............................................................................................................................................. 29 A-LEVEL GEOGRAPHY ..................................................................................................................................... 30 A-LEVEL GERMAN ............................................................................................................................................ 31 A-LEVEL GREEK................................................................................................................................................ 32 A-LEVEL HISTORY ............................................................................................................................................ 33 A-LEVEL ITALIAN............................................................................................................................................... 34 A-LEVEL LATIN .................................................................................................................................................. 35 A-LEVEL MATHEMATICS .................................................................................................................................. 36 A-LEVEL FURTHER MATHEMATICS ................................................................................................................ 37 Pre-U MUSIC ...................................................................................................................................................... 38 Pre-U PHILOSOPHY (and Theology) ................................................................................................................. 39 A-LEVEL PHYSICS ............................................................................................................................................ 40 A-LEVEL SPANISH ............................................................................................................................................ 41 A-LEVEL POLITICS ............................................................................................................................................ 42 A-LEVEL SPORT SCIENCE ............................................................................................................................... 43 BTEC BUSINESS ............................................................................................................................................... 44 BTEC SPORT AND EXERCISE SCIENCE ........................................................................................................ 45 The International Baccalaureate .......................................................................................................................... 46 The Core of the IB Diploma Programme ............................................................................................................. 47 Creativity, Action and Service ............................................................................................................................. 47 FAQs ................................................................................................................................................................... 48 IB Subjects 2017-19............................................................................................................................................ 49 IB Subject Index for September 2017 ................................................................................................................. 50 Group 1 – Language.............................................................................................................................................. 51

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IB ENGLISH A LITERATURE ............................................................................................................................. 51 IB GERMAN A LANGUAGE and LITERATURE HL ............................................................................................ 52 Group 2 – Language.............................................................................................................................................. 53 Modern Languages ............................................................................................................................................. 54 IB FRENCH......................................................................................................................................................... 54 IB GERMAN ........................................................................................................................................................ 55 IB ITALIAN ab initio (beginners).......................................................................................................................... 56 IB MANDARIN ab initio (beginners) .................................................................................................................... 57 IB SPANISH ........................................................................................................................................................ 58 IB SPANISH ab initio (beginners) ....................................................................................................................... 59 IB GREEK ........................................................................................................................................................... 60 IB LATIN ............................................................................................................................................................. 61 Group 3 – Individuals and Societies .................................................................................................................... 62 IB BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................................. 62 IB ECONOMICS ................................................................................................................................................. 63 IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES .......................................................................................... 64 IB GEOGRAPHY ................................................................................................................................................ 65 IB GLOBAL POLITICS ........................................................................................................................................ 66 IB HISTORY........................................................................................................................................................ 67 IB PHILOSOPHY ................................................................................................................................................ 68 Group 4 – The Sciences ........................................................................................................................................ 69 IB BIOLOGY ....................................................................................................................................................... 69 IB CHEMISTRY .................................................................................................................................................. 70 IB DESIGN TECHNOLOGY ................................................................................................................................ 71 IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES .......................................................................................... 72 IB PHYSICS ........................................................................................................................................................ 73 IB SPORTS, EXERCISE AND HEALTH SCIENCE ............................................................................................ 74 Group 5 – Mathematics ......................................................................................................................................... 75 IB MATHEMATICS AND MATHEMATICAL STUDIES ....................................................................................... 75 Group 6 – The Arts ................................................................................................................................................ 76 IB MUSIC ............................................................................................................................................................ 76 IB THEATRE ....................................................................................................................................................... 77 IB VISUAL ART................................................................................................................................................... 78

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The challenge of the Upper School Opportunity and Choice The Upper School experience at Oakham should be fun, challenging and exciting. Learning and living will be very different to how it has been in the Middle School and you therefore need to choose the direction of your academic programme and develop a capacity for self-motivated study. You will have many opportunities for individual development, but with these come the need to take an increasing personal responsibility for your own progress and achievements. We do understand that this booklet is full of words and not many pictures – but taking a little bit of time to read and consider will help you make the best possible choices.

The International Baccalaureate Diploma or GCE A-levels? To provide you with the best possible options, the Upper School academic curriculum offers the International Baccalaureate as well as A-levels. You are free to choose either to take A-levels, or study for the IB Diploma. We also offer BTEC and Pre-U qualifications, which can be chosen alongside A-levels. The decision to choose between the IB Diploma and the A-level programme will be individual and personal. Both are accepted as university entrance qualifications. You will be offered advice and guidance during the course of this year which will allow you to choose the best route for you, taking into account your ability, your higher education and career plans, as well as your personal preferences.

1. The IB Diploma Oakham School has been teaching the Diploma Programme since 2001 and has a wealth of experience in delivering the courses. Many of our staff are IB workshop leaders, examiners or develop curriculum for the IB. We have one of the largest IB DP cohorts in the UK with most of our IB students being British nationals. Our results are far above the global average and have been above 36 points for the over five years. All students study six subjects, three at Higher Level and three at Standard Level, plus a course in Theory of Knowledge. Students also conduct some academic research for their Extended Essay. Creativity, Activity and Service contribute as part of the core to the holistic learning experience. In the IB DP, you study a wide range of subjects, but may specialise through your choice of Higher Levels. All external examinations take place at the end of the two-year course in May, but each subject has considerable coursework elements, such as essays and oral exams and therefore offers a wide range of different types of assessment. For more information, please read p.47.

2. A-levels The reforms instigated by former Education Secretary Michael Gove include, amongst other adjustments, a change to the structure of A-level qualifications. These replace the old AS/A2 regime with terminally examined A-levels. There has also been significant change in assessment at A-level. AS levels are now ‘standalone’ qualifications, having been decoupled from A-levels. This means that any AS examination taken under the new arrangements will not contribute to the overall A-level grade. In the reformed A-levels, the school is only offering the full, two-year courses: it will not be possible to sit the AS examination at the end of Form 6. In unreformed subjects (at the time of writing, these include Mathematics, Politics and Design Technology), AS units will be sat at the end of Form 6, which can at that point be ‘cashed in’ for an AS qualification; alternatively, further units can be sat at the end of Form 7 to complete the full A2 qualification. Some subjects (Music, Philosophy and Art) are offered as a ‘Pre-U’; this is a two-year, A-level equivalent qualification. Although three A-level subjects is the minimum, we strongly recommend that most or all students should start off studying four A-levels or equivalent. This gives greater breadth and, consequently, more opportunity to develop the qualities prescribed by employers and universities. In addition, many of the

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courses available in the Upper School will be either be completely new to students, or will manifest in a way that is very different from the GCSE equivalent, and the option to drop to three would be helpful and, obviously, would not be possible if only three were selected from the outset. The breadth afforded by four subjects would also be of benefit to students with high academic ambitions. Students starting with four A-levels or, exceptionally, five, who wish to drop one or more subjects will have the opportunity to apply to do so at a number of points in the Upper School. The A-level programme has no formal requirement for ‘Creativity Activity and Service’; however A-level students need to ensure that they too make the most of their time outside the classroom or laboratory and we expect all students to engage in our co-curricular programmes.

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Choosing your academic subjects Your choice of what to study should reflect your own aptitudes, ambitions and interests. Your enjoyment of a subject, or the motivation provided by clear career aims, should be key factors in deciding what to study at A-level or in the IB. What GCSEs do you need? Careers advice and guidance can help you make decisions which are both well matched to your talents, and realistic. To be successful at A-level or at Higher Level in the IB, most students need to achieve at least a grade B at GCSE in each of the subjects (or a related subject) they want to study. For AS courses only, or Standard Level IB courses, this is, perhaps, not quite so crucial. In contrast, our experience is that, in some subjects, students would be ill-advised to embark on a course without at least an A or even an A* in the relevant GCSE course: examples including IB Higher Level Mathematics or A-level Further Mathematics. In practice this means a minimum of four B grades at GCSE within a total of at least seven GCSE passes at a minimum of grade C, if you are to keep your A-level options open or to feel confident with the breadth of the IB Diploma. In particular, you must gain at least a C grade in both English and Mathematics. If you enter the Upper School with grades of less than a C in English and Mathematics you will be expected to to undertake remedial work and then re-sit. This should give you sufficient breadth and depth to benefit academically from your time in the Upper School. Housemasters and tutors are in the best position to advise you whether you are likely to fulfil the entry standard for the Upper School at Oakham. If this looks unlikely, then during the course of Form 5, with the help of the Careers Department, you should consider the various alternatives to A-levels or the IB. ICT Skills ICT is an important tool for Upper School students, and you will need a range of ICT skills whatever subjects you choose to study. Depending on your particular course there will be more or less emphasis on particular ICT areas , but all Upper School students are expected to be able to make effective use of software for word processing, spreadsheets, presentation (e.g. PowerPoint), internet research and email. The ICT department is able to provide assistance if you need to improve your ICT skills, through a combination of self-learning courses and personal help, and there is also the option to take the ECDL (European Computer Driving Licence) if you would like to gain a recognised qualification. Succeeding Talent alone will not bring examination success. You will need to be determined and well organised. By approaching study in this way you will be surprised at your results compared to the results of those who just ‘tick over’ and who will probably end up disappointing themselves. ‘Time management’ is particularly important if your choice of subjects includes some that require coursework. In the Spring Term of Form 6, with the help of your tutor, you will be setting targets for your exam grades. You must be ambitious but realistic. Every extra grade at A-level or point in the IB means more opportunities from which to choose after Oakham. Assessment Regular assessments are in place to help you, your tutor, your housemaster and others to see how you are doing. In each term in the Upper School (except in the Summer Term for Form 7), you will receive a Progress Report (PR), which provides a summary of your present standing and of the effort you are making. The Deputy Head (Academic) and the Head of Upper School consider effort grades to be of equal importance to attainment grades. Whatever your marks, nobody is justified in criticizing you if you are working hard to improve your understanding and performance in a subject. Your teachers should discuss with you their suggestions for how you can improve. You should also make it a priority to attend the parent/teacher evenings in Form 6 and Form 7 together with your parents or guardians. If your education is being discussed you should be there, even if they are unable to attend.

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Your Tutor Your Upper School Tutor will help you meet the demands your teachers will place upon you, and the other challenges you will have to face. He or she will help and guide you in the decisions you need to make about what to do after Oakham. You need to help your Tutor to compose the best possible reference for your application form that records your ambitions for when you leave Oakham. Total Curriculum Learning at Oakham takes place in the classroom, but also beyond it. In the classroom the focus of learning is academic. However, this academic learning is complemented by broader learning achieved through the Total Curriculum. It is this quality and breadth of the broader learning that is a distinguishing feature of Oakham. The range and variety of opportunities offered by the Total Curriculum means that when you come to leave, whether to university or elsewhere, you will be able to demonstrate academic ability and important life skills. In the Upper School you have considerable choice about what you learn and where (making such choices are themselves an important aspect of learning). Your aim, in consultation with your Tutor, should be to choose a Total Curriculum that plays to your strengths and aspirations, and is both challenging and enjoyable. So, in addition to your lessons you should aim be to be involved in other aspects of school life, and through this involvement learn. Indeed, it is expected that Oakhamians will take at least one weekly activity alongside any sport, music and drama. Universities and employers are looking for much more than pure academic achievement. “Most employers are less interested in the precise details of what (undergraduates) have studied than in what the experience has taught them….What matters is that (graduates) have the framework which allows them to keep on learning” Richard Lambert, Director General CBI, 2010 Enjoy it! Academic life in the Upper School is not easy. It is, and is meant to be, a challenge. But meeting this challenge should prove to be a rewarding, satisfying and, most of all, an enjoyable experience. Oakham also excels in the enormous variety of opportunities it provides outside the classroom for sport, service, leadership, teamwork, individual initiative, music, art, drama and societies as part of the total A-level or IB Curriculum. The more you put in, the more you get out. Stretch yourself!

Mrs Simone Lorenz-Weir Head of Upper School slw@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Mr David Harrow Deputy Head (Academic) dah@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

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Choosing your academic course and subjects The decision to choose between the IB Diploma and A-level will be individual and personal. During the course of this year you will be able to discuss your ideas with subject teachers, tutors, housemaster and your parents. Although many of you will not make a final career choice for several years, career and higher education ideas need to be discussed alongside the decisions about Form 6 courses so that as much future choice as possible is retained. Every Form 5 student has an individual guidance interview with one of the members of the Careers team. The interviews take place in the Winter Term. The results of the Morrisby series of psychometric tests will be available to you for discussion at the interview. We will suggest further research using the various sources in the Careers Library and on the Careers Intranet. We will suggest careers experience to help you clarify your ideas and to appreciate the varied demands of the workplace. A written summary of the interview, including suggestions for further research on courses and careers, is given to you after the interview and a copy is sent also to your parents, tutor and housemaster. All Form 5 will also participate in the careers part of the activities programme. The course you take in the Upper School, whether IB or A-level, requires you to narrow the range of subjects you studied at GCSE. You also need to consider some new subjects which have not been available at GCSE. Here are some questions which you should ask yourself about your subject choices: • • • • • • • • • • •

Am I interested in the subject and will I enjoy it? What are the differences between the A-level and IB syllabuses for the subjects I am interested in? Do I need any particular subjects for a career choice? Do I need any particular subjects for a higher education course? What are the right abilities to succeed in the subject? What are the differences between the subject at GCSE and at IB or A-level? Do I want variety in my courses or subjects that relate to each other? Do any of the new subjects use my talents? Do I want to develop any particular skills through my choice of course? How much coursework is involved? Which will suit me better, A-level or the IB?

Tutors will be asking you for preliminary choices once the interviews are completed. Students who doubt their suitability for the academic route of A-level or the IB may need to explore alternatives to this path. NVQs, BTECs and apprenticeships, which are available in local colleges, offer an alternative, more vocational route ladder into higher education or employment. You and your parents are welcome to come along at any time to the Careers Department for further discussion or to use the resources of the Careers Library. Students applying to join the Upper School from outside Oakham are particularly encouraged to come and discuss their subject choices. The Careers Department is also available after GCSE results in August for any further discussion that might be needed. If you discover that you have made the wrong choice, you may be able to adjust your choice of subjects in the first weeks of Form 6. Further delay means that catching up will be difficult.

Mrs Pippa Gibbs Head of Careers and Higher Education pcg@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

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A guide to subject requirements for degree courses This document is a guide only for both A-level and IB courses. For IB, where a subject is specified, it is likely to be at Higher rather than Standard Level. Full details of degree requirements can be found on university websites and course entry requirements on UCAS (www.ucas.com). The more competitive or specialized the course, the more prescriptive the subject requirements are likely to be. The Russell Group of UK universities has produced a guide to subject requirements for some of their courses (www.russellgroup.ac.uk/informed-choices.aspx). This document should be used with care: although the advice is of general use, universities not in the Russell Group may be more flexible. Some universities offer Foundation Degrees whose requirements are less strict in many subjects. Increasingly, competitive courses are asking for B grades in English and Mathematics at GCSE. MEDICAL Dentistry

At least two Sciences/Mathematics including Chemistry.

Health Sciences

Variable, but one or two sciences (preferably Biology and/or Chemistry) advisable, for Nursing, Biomedical Sciences, Speech Therapy, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Nutrition.

Radiography

One or two Sciences required.

Medicine

A good spread of Sciences and Non Science GCSE’s. At least two Sciences or Mathematics, including Chemistry and preferably Biology at A Level or HL IB. A few universities ask for Chemistry and two other Sciences or Mathematics. Three Sciences and Mathematics provide strong profile especially for those courses requiring BMAT as an entry Aptitude Test, see www.medschhols.ac.uk IB Maths Studies is accepted at most medical schools in combination with two Sciences at HL (typically Chemisty and Biology).

Optometry

One or two Sciences.

Pharmacy / Pharmacology

Chemistry required and preferably two of Biology, Physics, Mathematics.

Veterinary Science

Chemistry and Biology and Mathematics or Physics.

Sport Science

An A-level Science subject often Biology preferred. PE required for some Sport Study courses.

SCIENTIFIC Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry

One or two Mathematics/Biological Science subjects required. Geography may be accepted as a Science.

Food Science

Chemistry and another Science; for management/marketing options, the Science requirements are less, although one science is useful.

Biochemistry

Chemistry and usually Biology.

Biology

Biology, Chemistry and a science/Mathematics for some courses.

Genetics/Biotechnology

Biology and Chemistry.

Microbiology

At least Biology and Chemistry. Some want Biology and Chemistry and Mathematics/Physics.

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Chemistry

Two Science subjects including Chemistry.

Computer Science

Mathematics or Computer Science.

Environmental Science

Two Sciences (Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Geography, Biology).

Geology

Two Sciences (Chemistry advised).

Geophysics

Mathematics and Physics recommended.

Mathematics

Mathematics (and possibly Further Mathematics and/or STEP). [IB Mathematics – Higher Level only required.]

Physics

Mathematics and Physics.

Statistics

Mathematics.

Psychology

Two types of degree. BSc like one or two Sciences. B.A. (Social Science) - no special subjects, but Mathematics and Biology useful.

ENGINEERING / TECHNOLOGY / DESIGN / ARCHITECTURE Engineering

Usually Mathematics and Physics. Mathematics is required more than Physics. Some flexibility. Electronic and Mechanical nearly always require Mathematics and Physics. Chemistry for Chemical Engineering.

Technology

Usually Mathematics and/or Physics, with Chemistry for Materials/Metallurgy.

Architecture

Artistic ability in terms of drawing skills may be preferred and a portfolio asked for in many cases. Mathematics and or Physics are sometimes required.

Surveying

Mathematics sometimes asked for Quantity/Construction Surveying.

Design

A relevant IB or A-level Design course. Mathematics and or Physics required for some courses.

SOCIAL SCIENCES Business / Management

Mathematics useful (required for some courses). Language required for European/International Business courses. Business Studies/Economics gives useful background, but not required.

Economics

Mathematics, either A-level or IB HL, is required for certain types of courses. Sometimes S2 maths is acceptable with a higher score. For the more competitive courses such as LSE and Oxbridge Further Mathematics is an advantage. Economics/ Business Studies gives useful background, but not required.

Accountancy / Finance

Mathematics required for Financial Analysis/Actuarial Science.

Geography

Geography is usually required. Two types of course (Science or Arts/Social Science). Maths and Computer Science preferred for BSc courses.

Law

No specified subjects. Essay subjects such as English and History may be helpful.

PPE

Mathematics can be required by some universities, but access does not explicitly requre any of the consitutional subjects prior to entry.

Politics / International Relations

Politics useful but not required. Other useful subjects include English, History, Geography, Economics, and Languages.

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Sociology / Social Studies / Anthropology

A wide range of subject combinations acceptable. Biology and Geography may be preferred for some Anthropology courses.

ARTS Archaeology

Not specified, although a Science and Classical Language can be useful.

Art

Many students go on to do a one year Foundation Course, prior to a degree in Art/Design areas. The basic requirement is a good portfolio of work, although in general a student would be expected to study Art or Design.

History of Art

Critical and Contextual Studies useful but not required. History is preferred on some courses.

Drama

English, Drama may be preferred.

Education

No specific subject; PGCEs require relevant degree subjects.

History / Economic History

History is usually required.

Music

Music generally required, plus an instrumental grade.

Philosophy

No specific requirements.

Languages

Usually the relevant language is required for French, German, Spanish, and Italian, with a specified grade. Two Languages give more scope.

African Oriental Asian Studies

Many places do not require a language, but SOAS does - so Language advised.

Celtic Studies

Welsh or Irish sometimes asked for.

Classics

Latin is usually required to study Classics but Greek is not. For a Classical Studies course, Classical Civilisation is recommended but there is no ancient language requirement. Latin may also be studied as part of a joint degree with another subject such as a modern language or history, in which case a modern language/history may be required.

English

English Literature. Foreign language useful for joint courses. English Literature often acceptable.

European Studies

A Modern Language usually required.

American Studies

English, Humanities subjects or Social Sciences preferred.

Russian and East European Studies

One or two Modern Languages often required.

Linguistics

Modern Language often useful. English may be required.

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A comparison of A-level and IB A-level

IB

Numbers of Subjects

Usually three or four subjects at A-level

Three subjects at Higher Level, plus three subjects at Standard Level

Compulsory elements

None

English Lit, a Language, a Humanity, a Science, Mathematics ToK Essay 1,200 to 1,600 words Extended Essay 4,000 words CAS, first year only

Subject combination

Any combination that can be timetabled

A subject from each of the 6 groups BUT instead of a Group 6 subject, one extra subject is allowed from groups 2-4 (2 Languages, 2 Humanities, 2 Sciences) Environmental Systems and Societies can be used as either a group 3 and 4, so frees up lesson time for 3 languages, 2 arts, or another Humanity or Science

F6 Teaching Time (per week)

Four subjects Six periods per subject Total periods = 24

Five periods per HL subject Three periods per SL subject Theory of Knowledge = 2 periods per week (4 terms only)

+ CCF/DofE/Community Service

Total periods = 26 CAS: not timetabled

F7 teaching

The courses finish in June

The Diploma finishes in May

Depends on whether three of four subjects are being studied.

Teaching hours remain the same in term one, but ToK and EE finish at the end of the Winter Term.

Prep

16 hours per week

13.2 hours per week

Public Examinations

Linear

Linear

(with the exception of ‘old style’ AS examinations)

All exams in May of the second year

No coursework in new linear Alevels

All subjects have coursework.

Coursework

Pre-U and BTEC, please see subject sections Grades

Retakes

Retakes possible (usually May after exams)

Varies by subject from 20% to 50% (100% in Art), see individual subject sections

Individual subjects graded

Diploma average is based on subjects, EE and ToK

Grades A-level; A*, A, B, C, D, E, U

Grades for SL and HL: 1 to 7 points per subject ToK and EE maximum of 3 points Maximum possible, 45 points Diploma awarded for at least 24 points

Possible, but only in November after the course has been completed. More than one retake per subject possible.

Possible, but only in November (elsewhere) or May after the course has been completed. More than one retake per subject possible.

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Suitability of subjects for university You may have read within the popular press that some universities do not recognise some subjects. In 2011 the Russell Group published a list of what they term ‘facilitating subjects. The Russell Group is made up of the following universities: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

University of Birmingham University of Bristol University of Cambridge Cardiff University Durham University University of Edinburgh University of Exeter University of Glasgow Imperial College London King's College London University of Leeds University of Liverpool London School of Economics and Political Science University of Manchester Newcastle University University of Nottingham University of Oxford Queen Mary, University of London Queen's University Belfast University of Sheffield University of Southampton University College London University of Warwick University of York

Their list of facilitating subjects are: •

Mathematics and Further Mathematics

Physics

Biology

Chemistry

History

Geography

Modern and Classical Langauges

English Literature

In their guidance (www.russellgroup.ac.uk/informed-choices) they state “If a particular subject is not listed as a facilitating subject, this is because it is not generally required for entry onto degree courses. This classification does not imply any judgement about the importance of the subject per se; it merely reflects typical university entrance requirements. There are some subjects which provide suitable preparation for entry to university generally, but which we do not include within the facilitating subjects, because there are relatively few degree programmes where qualification in these subjects would be a requirement for entry. Examples of such subjects include Economics, Religious Studies and Welsh. Some courses - such as Medicine or Dentistry - do require three specific subjects. But for most other courses you won’t necessarily need to have studied three facilitating subjects. Some courses require one or two facilitating subjects, whilst for other courses there are no specific subject requirements. If you don’t know what you want to study then it’s a really good rule of thumb that taking two facilitating subjects will keep a wide range of degree courses and career options open to you”.

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Three points to note First, the list of ‘facilitating subjects’ is the creation of just 24 UK universities. There are many other very good universities to whom this list does not apply. This means it is important to check the entry requirements for courses at individual universities when choosing your Upper School subjects. Second, the list is a starting point for choice. It is often not necessary to take three subjects from this list. Rather, two subjects with another not on the list might be appropriate for the Russell Group. For example, History of Art (V350) at the University of Warwick states the following “History, History of Art, English or a Language are ideal subjects at Advanced or Higher level, but applications are welcomed from strong candidates offering qualifications in other humanities subjects” If you are aiming to take an Art-based route at a non-Russell Group university then the list becomes marginal. Third, all of the subjects offered by Oakham on their own are appropriate for university entrance. However, some subject combinations may limit an application for a particular course at a particular university. For example, taking both Economics and Business Studies may reduce university choice. If you are at all concerned about the link between subjects and university entrance you should check the most recent literature and the websites of a sample of universities.

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A-levels A-level represents a well-established and widely understood route to university or employment. A-levels are graded from A* to U. The most competitive universities often make offers based on A*, such as A*AA. With A* being awarded to those who are academically exceptional, for those who aspire to a top university the implication is clear: work hard! Don’t choose to take A-levels, in preference to the IB Diploma, based on the erroneous perception that A-levels are somehow easier, or that less work is involved. The IB represents a coherent, broad program of study, which explicitly develops a Learner Profile. In contrast, Alevel makes no such claim. Rather, each individual subject stands alone, with no overarching curriculum or educational principles connecting them. Hence, within A-level it is entirely possible to create a combination of courses that are very narrow in the skills developed. For some destinations a narrow range of skills does not represent a significant issue. This is particularly so for university courses where specific subjects are specified, for example medicine, which requires Chemistry (and often Biology as well: see “A Guide to Subject Requirements for Degree Courses” on page 10). For an aspirant medic, their curriculum is narrow in that it will be science orientated, and often with a third science or Mathematics. That this curriculum doesn’t develop skills such as essay writing, languages or creativity is not a weakness given the proposed destination. However, there is a risk that a narrow Alevel curriculum can limit course choice should the plan to apply for medicine change. In contrast, it is equally possible within A-level to create a combination of courses that are very broad in the skills developed. So, for the aspirant Lawyer, where grades matter more than subjects, a broad curriculum is appropriate and indeed, arguably, beneficial. Such a curriculum might be History, Mathematics, Physics and French. Another example might be if the post-Oakham destination is Geography at university, then taking Geography at A-level is sensible. The decision is then what other subjects to offer alongside this core subject. Again, by selecting subjects carefully it is possible to assemble a broad curriculum which creates an attractive portfolio of skills to an admission tutor whilst also offering an interesting course of study. Within the Total Curriculum many useful skills can be developed away from the classroom. In thinking about what subjects to take, also think about how activities can be used to complement classroom learning, and how involvement in the Total Curriculum can be used most effectively to evidence the acquisition of a range of skills. Within IB this widening of learning beyond the classroom is essentially the role of CAS. In contrast, if you take the A-level route the onus is on the individual, in the absence of the structured IB programme, to choose Total Curriculum commitments that offer a similar outcome. Arguably, this makes A-level a more challenging route for holistic learning.

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A-level Subject Grid 2017-19 -Provisional (February 2017) You should generally choose FOUR subjects, no more than ONE subject from EACH column below.

A

B

C

D

E

Business

Biology

Biology

Biology

Art & Design (PreU)

Chemistry

Business

Chemistry

Chemistry

Business

Design & Technology

Critical & Contextual Studies

Classical Civilisation

Economics

Economics

Economics

Economics

English Literature

French

English Literature

Geography

Maths & Further Maths+

French

Latin

Geography

German

History

Geography

Maths & Further Maths+

Classical Greek

Italian

Mathematics

History

History

Philosophy

Music (Pre-U)

Politics

Mathematics

Mathematics

Physics

Physics

Spanish

Sport Science

Philosophy

Politics

Politics

Sport Science

Theatre Studies

Computer Science

BTEC Business Management~

BTEC Sport and Exercise Science^

Spanish Theatre Studies

BTEC Sport and Exercise Science^

+If you wish to study A-level Further Mathematics, please select ‘Maths and Further Maths’ in both columns B and D. The course includes A-level Mathematics, so do not select Mathematics elsewhere. Music and Art & Design are offered as a Pre-U qualification: this is a two-year A-level equivalent course. ^BTEC Sport and Exercise Science must be selected in both columns C and E, as it is the equivalent to two A-level courses. ~BTEC Business Management may be chosen as the equivalent to one A-level subject.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 17


A-level subject listings

Student study pages for CCS coursework

A-LEVEL ART: CRITICAL AND CONTEXTUAL Head of Department – Mr Simon Poppy slp@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

You will need to enjoy looking at, and talking about, Art and Photography. You will write, make visual presentations and use ICT.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Visits to Exhibitions and Museums in London, Nottingham and Birmingham. The option of joining the Bi-annual visit to New York.

Possible Career Pathways

Students go on to study a wide range of subjects at University: the humanities, the Social Sciences, Art, Architecture, and of course Art History.

ORGANISATION OF WORK: A modern approach to Art History that suits both the academic and the practical student. Develops research and presentation skills tailored to match the student’s strengths; purely as a written course or as text supported by visual presentations using Power Point, video and audio. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: OCR

Module

Topic Covered

Personal Investigation

A portfolio of investigations into a range of Art works. Students will learn the formal critical language of Art analysis as well understanding function and meaning in art from the Renaissance through to the Turner Prize. Similarly a wide range of media is covered, from painting, sculpture, architecture and photography to installation and video.

When examined

Assessment Method

May

Moderated Coursework

60%

15 hour exam project

40%

Form 7

% of grade

A focused written study on a topic chosen by the student. Externally Set Task

Ten weeks of preparation from a set theme. Presentations can be creative, electronic, graphical or academic in style.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

May Form 7

Page | 18


Detail from paintings by Pre-U Student Luke Deering

Pre-U ART Head of Department – Mr Simon Poppy slp@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A ‘B’ grade in GCSE Art

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Visit to London Exhibitions. Artist and Textiles workshops. Student exhibitions. Option of the biannual New York Art tour.

Possible Career Pathways

The study of Art is essential for careers such as Architecture, Graphic Design, Film, Animation, Photography, Media and Fashion. It is a good pathway for careers in Marketing, Sales, PR, Tourism and Software Design. In the UK creative industries contribute 6% of GDP, employ over 2 million people and export over £16bn annually.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and PRE-U: The course builds on the working methods of GCSE; though as with all Upper School Art courses there is an increased emphasis on drawing (life drawing will be part of the course). ORGANISATION OF WORK: This is a two-year course. You will specialise in in Textiles, Painting or Sculpture. There is considerable freedom to develop individual styles, themes and skills. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: CIE The Pre-U is graded on a nine-point scale that rewards achievement up to and beyond the A* ceiling at GCE A-level, enabling students to achieve more UCAS points than with A-level. Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Portfolio

Developing skills in a wide range of traditional and new media and techniques, leading to specialisation in ONE of: Textiles, Painting/Print or Sculpture.

June

Moderated coursework folder

30%

An illustrated essay that develops research and analytical skills linked to the concepts that learners are developing in their portfolio.

June

Moderated coursework.

30%

An externally set theme, with no time constraints, allowing students to fully develop their final ideas.

June

Externally examined exhibition

40%

Study

Project

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Form 7

Form 7

Form 7

Page | 19


A-LEVEL BIOLOGY Head of Department – Dr Patricia Ingles pji@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE Double Award Science (or Biology) Grade BB.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Biology field work and a visit to Twycross Zoo. The Biology Society ('BioSoc') –a range of topical lectures by external speakers, and visits. Further Biology - seminars aimed at stimulating the interest of the more ambitious pupils. EPQ or CREST award. The British Biology Olympiad competition.

Possible Career Pathways

A-level Biology lays foundations for further study in university courses ranging from Agriculture to Medicine, and Sports Science to Zoology. Biology is a natural partner to Chemistry, and has areas of overlap with Physics and Geography allowing entry to Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biogeography courses. It is a versatile qualification.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-level: Pupils will find that A-level Biology progresses naturally from GCSE. However, there is far more detail, and the approach is much more analytical, and more quantitative, so a questioning approach is vital. If you have coped well with GCSE Science, you should cope with the analytical approach in AS/A2 Biology. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to do background reading in preparation for lessons, and maintain an orderly folder. Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the different topics. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Edexcel Biology A (Salters-Nuffield) Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1 The natural environment and species survival

Topic 1: Lifestyle, Health and Risk

June

2 hour exam

33% of A2

Topic 2: Genes and Health

Form 7

2 hour exam

33% of A2

2 hour exam

33% of A2

Topic 3: Voice of the Genome Topic 4: Biodiversity and Natural Resources Topic 5: On the Wild Side Topic 6: Immunity, Infection and Forensics BN0/01.

Paper 2 Energy, Exercise and Co-ordination

Topics 1-4 and

June

Topic 7: Run for your Life

Form 7

Paper 3 General and Practical Applications in Biology

Includes questions from topics 1-8. A prereleased scientific article released 8 weeks before the examination will underpin one section of the paper.

Topic 8: Grey Matter.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

June Form 7

Page | 20


A-LEVEL BUSINESS Head of Department – Mr Jeremy Rowe

jsr@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

B in GCSE Maths and English or equivalent is desirable.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Trips and excursions across the UK to visit businesses varying from Jaguar, JCB and Emma Bridgewater, plus notable industry speakers.

Possible Career Pathways

Multitude of career opportunities across all industries, with an additional insight into jobs in international business.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: Business Studies is a new subject at A-level and therefore there is no assumed knowledge when students start the course. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to do background reading from the business press in preparation for lessons, and to maintain an orderly folder. Research tasks, presentations, written responses and case studies will be set. Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the differing themes of work. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Edexcel Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Theme 1

Marketing and people: focus on the role of entrepreneurship; how businesses understand markets in order to develop marketing strategy and the management of people.

June

Paper 1

35%

Form 7

2 hour exam

Managing business activities: focus on the core functions of finance and production, as well as competitiveness on local and global scales.

June

Business decisions and strategy: focus on the strategic management of a business and how leaders must examine both internal and external influences in their decision-making.

June

Paper 2

Form 7

2 hour exam

Theme 2

Theme 3

Theme 4

Pre-released context

(Themes 1 and 4) Form 7

(Themes 2 and 3)

Global business: focus on how UK businesses trade within a single, global market, exploring the opportunities and constraints that will determine competitiveness.

June

Industry-specific context released in November of Form 7: focus on the broader business context of an industry or market that provides opportunity to conduct independent learning and research.

June

Paper 3

Form 7

2 hour exam

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

35%

Form 7

30%

(synoptic paper based on context)

Page | 21


A-LEVEL CHEMISTRY Head of Department – Mrs Joanne Griffiths

jeg@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE Dual Award Science Grade BB or Chemistry Grade B or equivalent. (At least a grade B but preferably grade A in the Chemistry paper).

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities will include practical extension sessions, discussion groups, Olympiad challenge, a trip to a student conference and visiting speakers.

Possible Career Pathways

Chemistry is essential for those considering Medicine, Dentistry or Veterinary Science. Students will acquire a wide variety of skills which are useful in many careers. To find out about your future in chemistry see www.RSC.org.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: A-level students should be able to build upon the skills developed within GCSE, particularly in terms of quantitative chemistry, energetics, organic chemistry and bonding. There is an increase in the level of mathematical demand required and smaller groups ensure that students develop really confident practical skills. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be split between two teachers covering different topic areas within the syllabus. Students will be expected to use their textbooks and notes to support the development of their understanding as they work through the course. Some background reading is encouraged through journals such as Chemistry Review. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: OCR Chemistry A Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1: Periodic table, elements and physical chemistry

Periodic table and periodicity, group 2 and the halogens, enthalpy changes, entropy and free energy, reaction rates and equilibrium, pH and buffers, redox and electrode potentials, transition elements.

June

Multiple choice and structured questions 2hr 15 min

37%

Paper 2: Synthesis and analytical techniques

Organic Chemistry: hydrocarbons, alcohols and haloalkanes, aromatic compounds, carboxylic acids and esters, nitrogen compounds, polymers, organic synthesis and analytical techniques.

June

Multiple choice and structured questions 2hr 15 min

37%

Paper 3: Unified chemistry

Structured summative questions and extended response questions covering aspects from the whole course.

1hr 30 min

26%

Practical endorsement

Reported separately to exam grade, emphasises development of practical skills over the two year course.

Teacher assessed in lessons

0%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Form 7

Form 7

June Form 7 Non-exam

Page | 22


A-LEVEL COMPUTER SCIENCE Head of Department – Mr Michael Crofts mdc@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

Minimum B in GCSE Computing (or equivalent). Students who have not studied GCSE Computing but have a strong interest should first discuss this with Mr Crofts.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

The department is open after games on Tuesday/Thursday afternoons so that students wishing to use the facilities can continue with their work. Students may opt to take the British Informatics Olympiad competition in December.

Possible Career Pathways

Computer Science has become an essential tool for many Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) degrees. For instance, consider the work of the 2013 Nobel Prize winners for Chemistry who “took the chemical experiment into cyberspace” by building complex computer simulation software to understand chemical processes. “Today the computer is just as important a tool for chemists as the test tube” Michael Levitt, Nobel Prize winner.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: A-level Computer Science is a chance to build upon skills developed by GCSE, particularly computer hardware and programming. There is wider scope for students to immerse themselves in developing computer systems of their choice, particularly when students move on to the coursework project. Smaller groups offer more potential for collaborative development and discussion. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to complete some preparation work for lessons and maintain an orderly folder. Written questions, group research/presentations and project work will be set. Students will be mentored for their coursework but need to be able to organise their time effectively and take responsibility for meeting key deadlines EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: WJEC Component

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessmen t Method

% of grade

Programming and System Development

Study programs, data structures, algorithms, logic, programming methodologies and the impact of Computer Science on society.

June Form 7

2 hours 45 minutes exam

40%

Computer Architecture, Data Communication and Applications

Investigate computer architecture, communication, data representation, organisation and structure of data, programs, algorithms and software applications.

June Form 7

2 hours 45 minutes

40%

Programmed Solution to a Problem

Discuss, investigate, design, prototype, refine and implement, test and evaluate a computerised solution to a problem chosen by the student.

June Form 7

Coursework

20%

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A-LEVEL CLASSICAL CIVILISATION Head of Department – Mrs Caroline Lomas

cml@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

None

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities will include trips to the British Museum, the Cast Gallery in Cambridge and Classical plays.

Possible Career Pathways

Combines well with English Literature, Theatre Studies, CCS, Philosophy, Latin, Greek, and History. It may lead to a university course in Classical Studies.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: There are four stand-alone topics. Apart from an introduction to Homer and the ancient world in general, none of these is covered at GCSE. All literature is read in English; there is no element of Latin or Greek language. There is no coursework. ORGANISATION OF WORK Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the differing module content. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: OCR Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

AS Greek Epic

Homer, Odyssey selections (the adventures of Odysseus on his ten-year voyage home from Troy).

June Form 6

1.5 hour exam

25%

AS Greek Tragedy

Aeschylus, Agamemnon, Sophocles, Antigone Euripides, Medea and Electra (sex and violence in ancient Greece).

June Form 6

1.5 hour exam

25%

A2 Roman and Greek Epic

Virgil, Aeneid selections (the fall of Troy and the rise of Rome)

June Form 7

2 hour exam

25%

June Form 7

2 hour exam

25%

Homer, Iliad selections (the highlights of the Trojan War). A2 Greek Art and Architecture

Greek vases, archaic and classical sculpture, temples.

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A-LEVEL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY Head of Department – Mr Timothy Weston tcw@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Possible Career Pathways

It is possible to study Design and Technology at advanced level with no previous experience (please contact TCW first). Preferably, students will have taken GCSE Design and Technology. The department is open to students after games on Tuesday/Thursday afternoons and Saturday and Sunday afternoons 2.00-5.30pm. DT visits include factory tours in the UK and an optional trip to Bologna. Guest speakers are also invited to the school to lecture on engineering, product and sustainable building design. Pupils can also participate in the Engineering Education Scheme. Most students go to their first choice university to study a product design, industrial design, architecture or engineering degree. Universities include Newcastle, Leeds, Brunel, Northumbria and Loughborough. Some students have combined the subject with Maths and Physics and have gone on to read Engineering at Cambridge. The subject also has close links with art and design related courses.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: Students should be able to build upon the skills developed throughout GCSE: analysis of products, material properties and manufacturing processes. Pupils learn how to select appropriate materials and processes to design and make products, as well as consider ergonomics, sustainability and safety. They will also have opportunities to explore the impact of technology on society and manufacturing, how social and political issues influenced design movements and the design of everyday products. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to complete some preparation work for lessons, and maintain an orderly folder. Written questions, group research/presentations and project work will be set. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: provisional at 3/11/2016, tbc Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1: Written Exam

Core technical principles and core designing and making principles

June

Mixture of short answer, multiple choice and extended response

25%

Paper 2: Written Exam

Commercial manufacture.

June

Section A: Product Analysis.

25%

Product Analysis

Short answer questions based on visual stimulus of product(s). Section B: Mixture of short and extended response questions Non examined assessment (coursework)

Practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles and specialist knowledge.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

June

Written or digital design portfolio and evidence of final prototype.

50%

Page | 25


A-LEVEL DRAMA AND THEATRE STUDIES Director of Drama – Mrs Gilly Norell

gn@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE in Drama is incredibly useful but more important is a keen and driving interest in theatre. However (at least) B grades in English, Religious Studies or History are a good an indicator that you will be able to cope with the written components.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

A wide range of Theatre visits. A one week trip to the National Student Drama Festival and a bi annual trip to the Edinburgh Fringe.

Possible Career Pathways

Theatre – acting, directing, producing. TV and film. For those not wishing to pursue a career in the profession, the confidence and skill to effectively use your voice and the development of enhanced presentation skills are vital in each and every pathway.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: More in depth study of play texts involving the creative exploration of plays as well as more sophisticated devising work. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be divided between two teachers to reflect the structure of the modules. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Edexcel Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Component 1

Students to devise an original performance piece using one key extract from a play along with a practitioner as stimuli. This must be accompanied by a written portfolio documenting the process.

June

Practical performance and portfolio moderated by Edexcel

40%

A group performance realisation of one key extract from a text and a monologue or duologue from another text. Pupils could take on the role of performer or designer.

May

Practical Examination by external examiner

20%

A written examination containing three sections. Section A is a live theatre evaluation based on a performance seen. Section B is based on an unseen extract of a play studied and is about how you would realise this extract in performance. Section C is based on a second play text where the focus will be on your concept for the play.

June

Practical performance

40%

Devising

Component 2 Text in Performance

Component 3 Theatre Makers in Practice

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Form 6

Form 7

Form 7

Moderated by Edexcel

Page | 26


A-LEVEL ECONOMICS Head of Department – Mr Paul Nutter Prerequisites

pn@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

GCSE Maths Grade B and GCSE English Language Grade B, or equivalent. An interest in current affairs and the world around you.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Include a range of speakers, trips to London and abroad.

Possible Career Pathways

Students will acquire a wide variety of skills, useful in many careers.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: The subject is not offered in the Middle School at Oakham. Therefore we assume students have no theoretical knowledge. We move from zero to hero over the course! ORGANISATION OF WORK: Activities, discussions and presentations will be incorporated into lessons. Students will be expected to do background preparation for lessons, and maintain an orderly folder. Written essays and some calculations will be set. Multiple choice questions and definitions tests will also be used. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: AQA Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Markets and market failure

Market structure (competition), market failure (environmental), government solutions, the labour market and poverty and inequality.

Summer of Form 7

Data response and essay

33%

National and International economy

Inflation, unemployment, growth, development, economic policy, financial markets and the international economy.

Summer of Form 7

Data response and essay

33%

Economics principles and issues

All of the above.

Summer of Form 7

Multiple choice and case study

33%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

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A-LEVEL ENGLISH LITERATURE Head of Department – Mr Malcolm Fairweather

mmf@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

IGCSE or GCSE Language and Literature B grades.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Literary Society membership is expected. This entails a series of lectures, workshops and seminars. Theatre trips as available.

Possible Career Pathways

Students will acquire a wide variety of skills which are useful in many careers: law, journalism, media, teaching and many others; any career area in which critical thinking and research skills are required.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IGCSE and A-LEVEL: a greater number of texts will be studied, including critical texts, building upon the skills learnt at IGCSE and developing skills that will be used in many subjects at university. ORGANISATION OF WORK: students will be expected to undertake reading and research in preparation for lessons and to play a full role in discussions. Teaching will be split between two teachers. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Edexcel Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Component 1: Drama

One Shakespeare play and one other tragedy/ comedy (pre or post 1900); critical essays from the anthology.

June

2 hours 15 minutes exam.

30%

Component 2: Prose

Two prose texts from a chosen theme. At least one text must be pre-1900.

June

1 hour.

Form 7

One comparative essay on chosen theme. Open (clean) texts.

Component 3: Poetry

One poetry selection of post-2000 works (anthology); one chosen collection from a period or a poet.

June

2 hours 15 minutes.

Form 7

Two essays: one comparative; one thematic.

Component 4: Coursework

Two linked and complete texts in any genre, not studied elsewhere in the specification.

June

One comparative essay

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Form 7

Two essays. Open (clean) texts.

Form 7

20%

30%

20%

Page | 28


A-LEVEL FRENCH Head of Department – Mr Edward Milner ejm@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A* or A grade at IGCSE (or equivalent). It is usual to score a grade below GCSE performance, if you get an A grade or below.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Work Experience Trip to France in Form 6. Also various day project opportunities, business and international journalism.

Possible Career Pathways

Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: The language, of course, remains the same, but the course is a step up from GCSE. A solid core of grammar has to be developed early with topic-specific vocabulary being a priority. Topics covered are listed below. Form 7 includes literary and film study and an individual project which feeds into the oral examination. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Two teachers to deliver topics with public examinations at the end of Form 7. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: AQA Module

Topic Covered.

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

1 Social issues and trends

Aspects of French speaking society: The changing state of the family, The digital world, Youth culture

May Form 7

Paper 1 2hr 30 min combined listening, reading and writing exam – student controls listening

40%

Multiculturalism: Immigration, racism and integration 2 Political and artistic culture

Aspects of French-speaking society: the changing nature of family, the cyber society, the place of voluntary work Current Issues: Positive features of a diverse society, life for the marginalised, how criminals are treated

3 Literary texts and films

Students will study one film and one text

May Form 7

Paper 2 2hr written exam on the film and text they have studied

30%

4 Individual research project

Student will identify one aspect or key question which is of personal interest to them and related to a country where French is spoken – this is discussed in the oral exam

May Form 7

Paper 3 20 min oral exam using a stimulus card to discuss topic areas. Presentation and discussion of Individual Research Project

30%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 29


A-LEVEL GEOGRAPHY Head of Department – Mr Howard Collison hac@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE Geography Grade B

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Students have the opportunity to go on a variety of field trips. Compulsory trips include a visit to Birmingham and a 3 day residential stay in Yorkshire. The department also runs a biennial field trip to Italy. Other trips in the past have included Iceland, Switzerland and the USA.

Possible Career Pathways

Geography is an intellectually challenging subject and at degree level has one of the highest employment rates of any university course. Students will acquire a wide variety of skills useful in a vast array of careers. These include directly and indirectly related careers such as Environmental Consultancy, Urban Planning, Property Development, The Foreign Office, Law, Business and Finance.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: A-level students should be able to build upon the skills developed by GCSE, particularly numeracy, literacy and analytical. Data manipulation, statistical and fieldwork skills will also be further enhanced. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to do background reading in preparation for lessons, and maintain an orderly folder. Short answer questions, as well as longer essay style tasks will be set. Teaching will be split between two teachers according to module content. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Cambridge International A Level Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1

Physical Geography In this unit students will study Hydrology, Atmosphere and Weather and Plate Tectonics

June Form 7

1.5 hour exam

25%

Paper 2

Human Geography In this unit students will study Population, Migration and Settlement dynamics.

June Form 7

1.5 hour exam

25%

Paper 3

Advanced Physical Options In this unit students will study Coastal Environments and Hazardous Environments

June Form 7

1.5 hour exam

25%

Paper 4

Advanced Human Options In this unit students will study Globalisation, Tourism and Economic Geography.

June Form 7

1.5 hour exam

25%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 30


A-LEVEL GERMAN Head of Department – Mr Christopher Morgan crm@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A* or A grade at IGCSE (or equivalent). It is usual to score a grade below GCSE performance, if you get an A grade or below.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Form 6 trip to Berlin in the Summer Term. Exchange with Oskar von Miller Gymnasium, Munich during first week of October half term. Work experience and immersion course opportunities in Austria and Germany. Also various day project opportunities, business and international journalism.

Possible Career Pathways

Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism. There is no limit.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: The course is a step up from GCSE and a solid core of grammar is developed early. Topic-specific vocabulary is a priority. There is also literary and film study in Form 7. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Two teachers to deliver topics over two years. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS – AQA (Draft Syllabus) Module

Topic Covered.

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

1 Social issues and trends

Aspects of German-speaking society: The changing state of the family, The digital world, Youth culture

May Form 7

Paper 1 2hr 30 min combined listening, reading and writing exam – student controls listening

40%

Multiculturalism: Immigration, racism and integration 2 Political and artistic culture

Artistic culture: Festivals and traditions, Art and architecture, Cultural life in Berlin, past and present Aspects of political life: Germany and the European Union, Politics and youth, German re-unification and its consequences

3 Literary texts and films

Students will study one film and one text

May Form 7

Paper 2 2hr written exam on the film and text they have studied

30%

4 Individual research project

Students will identify one aspect or key question of personal interest which relates to a country where German is spoken

May Form 7

Paper 3 20 min oral exam using a stimulus card to discuss topic areas. Presentation and discussion of Individual Research Project

30%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 31


A-LEVEL GREEK Head of Department – Mrs Caroline Lomas

cml@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE Greek Grade B.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities will include a trip to the British Library and Classical plays including the Greek play at Cambridge or Oxford.

Possible Career Pathways

Law, Foreign Office, GCHQ, Civil Service and the City. As an A-level, it combines well with English, History, Philosophy, Languages and Mathematics.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: As Greek is demanding at GCSE, the transition to A-level is relatively smooth. The grammar is already covered and the pace considerably less than Gratin. The literary passages are longer but the technique is essentially similar to GCSE. There is no coursework. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the differing module content. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: OCR Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Component 1

Translation of unseen Greek prose and verse

June Form 7

1 hour 45 mins exam

33%

June Form 7

1 hour 15 mins exam

17%

June Form 7

2 hour exam

25%

June Form 7

2 hour exam

25%

Prose author: Xenophon Verse author: Euripides Component 2

Prose Composition (English to Greek) OR Comprehension question on unseen passage

Component 3

Prose Literature Study of extracts from Thucydides, Histories 4, or Plato, Apology, in Greek. Further study of chosen prose author’s work in English to understand the context of the set text.

Component 4

Verse Literature Study of extracts from Homer, Iliad 18, or Euripides, Medea, in Greek. Further study of chosen verse author’s work in English to understand the context of the set text.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 32


A-LEVEL HISTORY Head of Department – Mr James Roberts jnr@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE History Grade B or GCSE English Language and Literature Grade B if History was not studied.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Trips on offer will include a possible visit to the USA and a three-day trip to Paris.

Possible Career Pathways

Journalism, Law, Business, Civil Service and Banking. Students will acquire a wide variety of skills which are useful in many careers.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: A-level students will build on skills developed by GCSE, particularly analytical and evidence-based skills. There is wider scope for independent learning, particularly when students move on to the coursework option. Smaller groups offer more potential for discussion and debate. There is opportunity to study a greater variety of History from contrasting periods: ranging from the development of the United States as a twentieth century superpower, to the reasons for the English Civil War and the execution of Charles I. The qualification is assessed through two exams at the end of the two-year course and through a single coursework essay. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Background reading, essays, document work and maintain an orderly folder are expected. Teaching is split between two teachers according to module content. Pupils will be mentored for their coursework but need to be able organise their time effectively and take responsibility for meeting key deadlines. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: AQA A-level 7042 Component

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

The Making of a Superpower: USA, 1865-1975

Focus on the political, economic and cultural developments in the USA following the Civil War, and the reasons why a previously isolationist nation became a globally dominant force in the second half of the twentieth century.

June

2 hours 30 minutes

40%

The English Revolution, 16251660

Study a narrower period in depth, examining the reasons why England was plunged into a bloody and sustained civil war, leading to the execution of Charles I and the establishment of a Republic. This encourages an in-depth understanding of how government works, the nature of arbitrary government, and how political and religious opposition could develop into open rebellion.

June

2 hours 30 minutes

40%

Personal study: a 3000 word essay on either: The Crusades, 10711192 or: France in Revolution, 17701871

A wonderful opportunity to research a particular period through your own initiative and, with some guidance, to discover and interrogate both secondary and primary sources. You will therefore have the opportunity to develop the independent working skills that will be essential when you embark upon your degree course at university.

June

Essay marked internally and moderated by AQA

20%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Form 7

Form 7

Form 7

Page | 33


A-LEVEL ITALIAN Head of Department – Mr Richard Breag rsb@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

As a new subject, no previous experience of Italian is required, but a knowledge of at least one other modern foreign language is essential.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Upper School trip available for both Form 6 and Form 7 Italian students.

Possible Career Pathways

The sky is the limit. Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism. A recent Cambridge graduate is now a pilot for British Airways.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: The language, of course, remains the same, but the course is ultimately a bit of a step up from GCSE. A solid core of grammar has to be developed early. Topics covered start with familiar material and move to science, technology, cinema, popular culture and, in the Form 7, literary study. Italian is studied from scratch and by the end of the Form 7 you should have: a GCSE; an AS Level and A2 in Italian. A high proportion of our students go on to study Italian post-18. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Two teachers, split evenly by topic. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS - EDEXCEL Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Italian 1

AS Youth culture and concerns, Lifestyle, The world around us, Education and Employment.

April/May

Oral (internal examiner)

30% of AS

Exam- student controls listening

70% of AS

35% of A2

Form 6

Oral (internal examiner)

June

Written Exam

65% of A2

Italian 2

Unit 1 is spoken expression and response AS topics as HL above.

Form 6 June Form 6

Unit 2 is comprehension and written response. Italian 3

Student decides on issue they wish to present and defend.

April/May

Unit 3 is comprehension and spoken response. Italian 4

AS topics. Customs, traditions, beliefs and religions. National and international events, Literature and the arts.

Form 6

Unit 4 is research, comprehension and written response.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 34


A-LEVEL LATIN Head of Department – Mrs Caroline Lomas

cml@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE Latin Grade B

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities will include a trip to the British Library and Classical plays.

Possible Career Pathways

Law, Foreign Office, GCHQ, Civil Service and the City. As an A-level, it combines well with English, History, Philosophy, Languages and Mathematics.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: As Latin is demanding at GCSE, the transition to A-level is relatively smooth. The grammar is already covered. The literary passages are longer but the technique is essentially similar to GCSE. There is no coursework. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the differing module content. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: OCR Module

Component 1

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Translation of unseen Latin prose and verse

June Form 7

1 hour 45 mins exam

33%

June Form 7

1 hour 15 mins exam

17%

June Form 7

2 hour exam

25%

June Form 7

2 hour exam

25%

Prose author: Livy Verse author: Ovid Component 2

Prose Composition (English to Latin) OR Comprehension question on unseen passage

Component 3

Prose Literature Study of extracts from Cicero, Pro Milone, or Tacitus, Annals 1, in Latin. Further study of chosen prose author’s work in English to understand the context of the set text.

Component 4

Verse Literature Study of extracts from Virgil, Aeneid 8 & 10, in Latin. Further study of Virgil, Aeneid 10 in English to understand the context of the set text.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 35


A-LEVEL MATHEMATICS Head of Department – Mrs Wendy Singhal

ws@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE Mathematics at least a B grade, preferably an A.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Students may opt to take the UK Senior Maths Challenge in November. Senior Maths Team practices are open to all in the Winter term.

Possible Career Pathways

Mathematics is an essential tool for many scientific degrees, and students have gone on to study Science, Engineering, Medicine, Economics and, of course, Mathematics at university. Joint Honours between Maths and other subjects is a possibility.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: A-level students will build upon the skills developed by GCSE, particularly algebraic manipulation and the presentation of rigorous mathematical arguments. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be shared between two teachers. Students will be expected to keep an orderly folder and complete weekly preps. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Edexcel (provisional specification) Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1:

Proof, algebra and functions, coordinate geometry, sequences and series, trigonometry, exponentials and logarithms, differentiation, integration and vectors.

June Form 7

2 hour examination

33.3%

Proof, algebra and functions, coordinate geometry, sequences and series, trigonometry, differentiation, integration and numerical methods.

June Form 7

2 hour examination

33.3%

Statistical sampling, data representation and interpretation, probability, statistical distributions and hypothesis testing.

June Form 7

2 hour examination

33.3%

Pure Mathematics 1

Paper 2: Pure Mathematics 2

Paper 3: Statistics and Mechanics

Kinematics, forces and Newton’s laws and moments.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 36


A-LEVEL FURTHER MATHEMATICS Head of Department – Mrs Wendy Singhal

ws@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

Mathematics to a high A* standard, and preferably Additional Maths.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Students take the UK Senior Maths Challenge in November. Senior Maths Team practices are open to all in the Winter term.

Possible Career Pathways

Many have studied Mathematics, Natural Science, Economics or Engineering at top universities. Many Further Maths students successfully apply for Oxbridge and the most competitive London universities, with others pursuing courses at top universities elsewhere.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: This course extends mathematical knowledge at a rapid pace beyond GCSE, with a significant reliance on algebraic fluency and accuracy. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be split between four teachers and students will be expected to keep an orderly folder. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Edexcel (provisional specification) Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1:

Proof, complex numbers, matrices, further algebra and functions, further calculus and further vectors

June

1.5 hour examination

25%

Complex numbers, further algebra and functions, further calculus, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions and differential equations.

June

1.5 hour examination

25%

Further calculus, further differential equations, coordinate systems, further vectors, further numerical methods and inequalities.

June

1.5 hour examination

25%

Linear regression, statistical distributions, correlation, hypothesis testing and Chi squared tests.

June

1.5 hour examination

25%

1.5 hour examination

25%

Further Pure Mathematics 1 Paper 2: Further Pure Mathematics 2 Paper 3: Further Pure Mathematics 3

Paper 4: Further Statistics 1

Form 7

Form 7

Form 7

Form 7

OR Further Mechanics 1

Momentum and impulse, collisions, centres of mass, work and energy and elastic strings and springs.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 37


Pre-U MUSIC Director of Music – Mr Peter Davis

pd@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

Ideally a minimum of Grade B at GCSE Music, but strong instrumentalists/singers with sufficient theoretical/harmonic understanding may opt for the course having first consulted Mr Davis.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Regular curricular concert trips, plus everything offered by Music Department’s vibrant and exciting extra-curricular programme.

Possible Career Pathways

Obviously working as a professional musician/teacher. However, the transferable skill-set of a trained musician makes them exceptionally attractive to graduate recruiters in any employment field.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and PRE-U: There is a similar course structure (Listening/Composing/Performing), but with more in-depth analysis of a set work and contextual understanding of set periods. There is a natural progression from GCSE of all course elements, plus the opportunity to specialise in Component 4 to shape the course to your strengths. A Grade 7 standard is ideally required for the compulsory performance elements (Grade 8 for Advanced Recital). ORGANISATION OF WORK: Strong organisation skills required, including maintaining an orderly folder, balancing preps from three teachers, and a strict programme of coursework deadlines during Form 7 to spread the workload. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: CIE Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Component 1

Listening, Analysis and Historical Study:

June

30%

 The Symphony in the Classical Period  Orchestral Music in the 19th Century  Innovation/Exploration in 20th Century Music  General questions.

Form 7

2 x 90 min exams

Performing

March

22.5%

 Recital (15-20 minutes) [15%]  Extended Performing (8-10 minutes) [7.5%].

Form 7

Exam in front of external examiner

Composing

Form 7:

 Portfolio of 10 stylistic exercises [7.5%]  One ‘commissioned’ composition [7.5%]  Stylistic exercise exam [7.5%].

by Easter by Easter June

Coursework Coursework 2 hr exam

Personal Study - one of the following options:

Form 7:

Coursework

Dissertation (41) 3,500 words on any topic Advanced Recital (42) 30 mins, plus essay Free Composition (43) two contrasting pieces Music Tech (44) arrangement/composition.

by Feb exeat

Component 2

Component 3

Component 4

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

22.5%

25%

Page | 38


Pre-U PHILOSOPHY (and Theology) Head of Department – Mrs Megan Fairley mjf@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE Grade B in Religious Studies and/or History and a GCSE Grade B in Mathematics

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities include the Philosophy Society, which organises regular lectures and discussions.

Possible Career Pathways

Law, Finance, Journalism, Marketing, PR, Politics, Civil Service, business. Students will acquire a variety of useful skills much sought after by a wide range of employers.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and Pre-U: The evaluative skills developed in GCSE Religious Studies are built on in the Pre-U and there is some continuity in content in the form of the ethics module and Paper 1, which contains an introduction to philosophy of religion. However, it is possible to study the Pre-U without having studied GCSE RS, and students who do so will not be significantly disadvantaged. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to complete questions in preparation for class discussion, further note-taking in lessons and to engage fully in class discussions. Teaching will be split between two teachers. Papers 2 and 3 will be taught separately and Paper 1 will be taught simultaneously, with different parts being covered by each teacher. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: CIE Module

Topic Covered

Paper 1 Introduction to Philosophy and Theology

Foundational debates in philosophy and epistemology

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Exam

30%

2hrs 15 mins

Ethics The nature of belief Conscience, free will and determinism

Paper 2 Epistemology

Scepticism Knowledge, belief and justification Theories of perception

Paper 3 Ethics

Ethical theories: how do we decide what is morally right?

Exam Summer

35%

2hrs 50 mins

Form 7 Exam

35%

2hrs 50 mins

Applied ethics: war and peace, abortion and euthanasia, embryo research and genetic engineering, environmental ethics, business ethics.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 39


A-LEVEL PHYSICS Head of Department – Dr John Chilton jac@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

The standard GCSE subjects which support A-level Physics are Maths, Physics and Chemistry. Ideally you should have at least Grade ‘B’ but preferably ‘A’ in Physics and Maths.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Huge amounts including The Physics Society, Further Physics and extra FP sessions in the evenings, the Engineering Scheme, CREST, EPQ, The Physics Challenge and Olympiad and a Physics Books Club.

Possible Career Pathways

Physics is important for Engineering, Design or Architecture, Medicine, Dentistry or Veterinary Science, Physiotherapy or Sports Science, Metallurgy or Materials Science, Geology or Environmental Science, Computer Science or Archaeology. It is a key qualification for those interested in Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology, Pharmacy, Philosophy and Psychology.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: GCSE is the start of a journey for Physics. It lays down the foundation that the higher levels build on. It is important to get the GCSE knowledge as strong as possible when you remember that Physics is the study of nature. By this we mean absolutely everything from objects smaller than atoms to objects larger than the universe! In Physics we try to understand nature – try to explain why everything is the way it is. This makes Physics the major pure science. It underpins all other pure and applied sciences as well as most areas of engineering and medicine. ‘How’ and ‘why’ are important questions for the Physicist – knowing that something happens is not good enough. The Physicist tries to understand the basic reasons driving all events. Physics explores such questions as “Why is the sky blue?”; “What makes the sun shine and what will happen when the sun dies?”; “What is matter made of?”; “How do forces push and pull?”; “How did the universe begin and will it ever end?” Physics explains how a pile of sand may be an opaque solid (a ‘brick’), a transparent solid (glass) or the chip at the heart of every computer. ORGANISATION OF WORK: The Sets are team taught by two teachers and like all subjects in A-level or IB, students are expected to pour effort into the subject to ensure they get a grip of all they meet. Topic areas are Mechanics, Electricity, Physical Properties, Fields and Forces, Medical Physics, Thermal, Atomic and Nuclear, Astrophysics, Waves, Energy and Power. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: OCR – Syllabus A Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

Modelling Physics

Forces, Motion, Work, Energy, Thermal, Astrophysics.

June Form 7

Exam

37%

Exploring Physics

Waves, Electricity and Magnetism, Particles, Medical.

June Form 7

Exam

37%

Unified Physics

All areas

June Form 7

Exam

26%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 40


A-LEVEL SPANISH Head of Department – Mr Cameron Pauls cmp@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A* or A grade at IGCSE (or equivalent). It is usual to score a grade below GCSE performance, if you get an A grade or below.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Lightning Trip to Madrid, Summer Term Form 6. Immersion Week to Salamanca combining staying with host family, language classes and work experience, first week October half term in Form 7. Also various project day opportunities, business and international journalism.

Possible Career Pathways

Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and A-LEVEL: The language, of course, remains the same, but the course is ultimately a bit of a step up from GCSE. A solid core of grammar has to be developed early. Topics covered are listed below. Form 7 includes literary and film study. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Two teachers, split evenly by topic with the public examinations at the end of Form 7. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: AQA (Draft syllabus) Topics Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of Alevel grade

1.

Social Issues and trends. Aspects of Hispanic Society: modern and traditional values, cyberspace, equal rights. Multiculturalism in Hispanic Society: Immigration, racism, integration

May Form 7

Paper 1 2.5 hours combined listening, reading and writing exam – student controls listening

40%

2.

Political and artistic culture. Artistic culture in the Hispanic world: modern day idols, Spanish regional identity, cultural heritage or cultural landscape. Aspects of political life in the Hispanic world: Today's youth, tomorrow's citizens, monarchies, republics and dictatorships, Popular movements

May Form 7

Paper 2 2 hours written examination – on the studied film and text

30%

May

Paper 3 20 mins oral exam discussing a stimulus card based on the topic areas followed by a presentation and discussion of the Individual Research Project

30%

3. 4.

Literary Texts and films. Students will study one film and one text Individual Research Project. Student will identify one aspect or key question which is of personal interest to them and related to a country where Spanish is spoken – this is discussed in the oral exam

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Form 7

Page | 41


A-LEVEL POLITICS Head of Department – Mr Laurence Ward law@oakham.rutland.sch.uk We live in a complex world with significant challenges including global terrorism, poverty, economic instability, weapons proliferation, failing states and environmental degradation. This course encourages discussion and debate, and requires students to study and present different global perspectives as well as interpreting competing and contestable claims. In short, Politics is ultimately about people. Prerequisites

GCSE Grade B in History / Geography / Religion & Philosophy are desirable as constructing arguments and evaluating evidence are key skills.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities will include trips to the UK / EU Parliament, Model United Nations conference, Crown Court and the UK Supreme Court. We visit Washington DC every two years.

Possible Career Pathways

Law, Journalism, Foreign Office, NGOs, Banking and Management.

WHAT SKILLS DO YOU NEED TO STUDY POLITICS? Politics is a subject that should appeal to pupils who take an active interest in current affairs. Some of the skills that you will need when studying the subject are similar to those you may have developed when studying History or other Humanities subjects earlier in your school career (e.g. essay writing or data response). You will want to know more about Politics as well as asking how and why things are happening around the world. Developing an interest in, and engagement with, contemporary politics is essential. ORGANISATION OF WORK: The course is taught in a variety of learning styles from debates, presentations and supplemented by textbooks. If you are in the habit of reading a quality newspaper, or listening to the broadcast news, then you will have noticed that there is always a Politics story. The willingness to keep up to date with current issues is an important attribute. Our best pupils combine their passion for the subject with solid academic skills of good time management and organisation. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Edexcel Module

Topic Covered

When examined

Assessment Method

% of grade

UK Politics

Elections, Political Parties, Democracy and Voting Behaviour.

June Form 7

2 hour exam

33.3%

UK Government

Parliament, Prime Minister, Constitution, Supreme Court and optional Political Ideas

June Form 7

2 hour exam

33.3%

International Politics

Superpower Status, UN, Human Rights, Terrorism, Poverty and State Sovereignty

June Form 7

2 hour exam

33.3%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 42


A-LEVEL SPORT SCIENCE Head of Department – Mr Thomas Stokes tgs@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

No prerequisites but an interest in sport is essential. Advantageous to have studied IGCSE PE.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Trips to Loughborough University, Leicester Tigers RFC to observe Sport Science in action

Possible Career Pathways

Sport Scientist; Medicine, Physiotherapist, Sports Psychology, Military, Sports Media, Journalism, Teaching, Coaching, Engineering

Note

AS is still available for this programme

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IGCSE and A-LEVEL: the structure is similar to the IGCSE course in that it is linear. Topics are covered in far more detail; the key focus is on the application and understanding of theory. Class sizes are generally smaller so there is plenty of opportunity for Sport Science research. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching is split between four teachers to ensure that each component of the course is delivered by an expert in their field. Pupils are expected to engage in the material and produce a combination of short and long answers under examination conditions. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: OCR Module

Content overview

When examined

Assessment method

% of grade

H555

Applied anatomy & physiology Exercise physiology Biomechanics

June Form 7

2 hour written paper 90 marks

30%

Skill acquisition Sport Psychology

June Form 7

1 hour written paper 60 marks

20%

Sport & Society Contemporary issues

June Form 7

1 hour written paper 60 marks

20%

Performance or coaching Evaluation and Analysis of Performance for improvement

June Form 7

Coursework 60 marks

30%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 43


BTEC BUSINESS Head of Department – Mr Jeremy Rowe

jsr@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

The Level 3 BTEC Extended Certificate in Business is a suitable study route for students who have a genuine interest in learning about the business sector. There are no prerequisites for the course.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Participation in trips to large and small businesses and business-related lectures.

Possible Career Pathways

Wide variety of options related to business.

SIZE AND STRUCTURE: Equivalent in size to one A-level; 4 units of which 3 are mandatory and 2 are external. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Coursework and examination. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Pearson BTEC Unit

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

Mandatory units 1

Exploring Business

Internal

2

Developing a Marketing Campaign

External (supervised task)

3

Personal and Business Finance

External (written examination)

Optional units – learners complete 1 unit from: 4

Recruitment and selection process

Internal

Investigating Customer Service Market Research The English Legal System Work Experience in Business

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 44


BTEC SPORT AND EXERCISE SCIENCE Head of Department – Mr Thomas Stokes tgs@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

The Level 3 BTEC Diploma in Sport and Exercise Science is a suitable study route for students who have a genuine interest in sport and physical activity, through participation with School or clubs, and most likely through previous study of Physical Education at IGCSE or similar, although this is not a requirement. The course structure would also suit students who are involved in ĂŠlite pathways.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Participation in School sport and sports-related lectures.

Possible Career Pathways

Sports Science, Sports Coaching, Sports Therapy/ Physiotherapy, PE Teacher, Sports Psychology, Sports Management, Sports Development. Strength and Conditioning.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IGCSE and BTEC: The BTEC Level 3 Diploma is mainly coursework based and is equivalent to two A-levels. Over the two year course students take 8 units from the list below. The diploma is graded, pass, merit, distinction and distinction*. Two of the units are assessed through examination and one through an internal written assessment. Students will need excellent organisational skills and be disciplined about submission dates. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Coursework and examination. EXAMINATION BOARD AND SYLLABUS: Pearson BTEC Unit

Topic Covered (* = mandatory unit)

Assessment Method

1

Sport and exercise physiology*

1.5 hours exam

2

Functional anatomy*

1.5 hours exam

3

Applied sport and exercise psychology*

2 hours Case study

4

Field- and laboratory-based fitness testing*

Coursework

5

Applied research methods in Sport and Exercise Science *

Coursework

6

Coaching for performance and fitness*

Coursework

7

Biomechanics in Sport and Exercise Science

Coursework

8

Specialised fitness training

Coursework

9

Research project in Sport and Exercise Science

Coursework

10

Physical activity for individual and group-based exercise

Coursework

11

Sports massage

Coursework

12

Sociocultural issues in sport and exercise

Coursework

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 45


The International Baccalaureate The IB Diploma programme is the perfect pre-university qualification for all students who are open-minded, do not yet want to only specialise, embrace the idea of critical thinking skills, value opportunities within a holistic curriculum which prepare them to work and think with others, debate and present as well as enjoy scholarly work within an international context. The IB Diploma combines breadth in Standard Level subjects with depth in academically rigorous Higher Level subjects and each subject combination can be tailor made for the individual student. Intrinsic to the Diploma programme are not just academic qualifications, but many interesting opportunities to learn how to communicate effectively, research and write on a high academic level, think creatively and independently and to develop excellent working and time management habits together with the ability to reflect on one’s own learning and progress. You will choose 6 subjects, 3 at Higher Level and 3 at Standard Level. You will also engage in the Core of the Diploma, too. Each subject is assessed out of 7 points + 3 core points = 45 points. Internal Assessment (coursework) plays an integral part in all subjects and contributes to the final grade. Oakham School average: 37 points (worldwide average: 29 points) The IB Diploma is highly regarded by UK and US universities and employers. Most subjects offer different levels to suit the academic ability of each student, no one is expected to be equally good at every subject – there are for instance: • • •

3 different levels of Mathematics new languages for beginners DT, Sports, Health and Exercise Science, and Environmental Systems and Societies as Sciences

Students choose their individual subject combination to support their passions and interests out of: • • • • • •

English Another language A Humanities subject A Science Mathematics And a sixth subject of their choice: another language, another humanities subject, another Science or Visual Art or Theatre

Specialisation for medicine, engineering, up to 3 languages, two Humanities and Visual Art is possible! Simply talk to us about options.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 46


The Core of the IB Diploma Programme Theory of Knowledge (ToK) ToK brings together everything you’ve learned in your other subjects. Its purpose is to make you think reflectively about what you’ve learned, and to ask the questions ‘How do I really know that?’ and, ‘Is that really true?’ In ToK you’ll ask (and perhaps find answers to) questions like… • • • • •

How do I know that 2+2=4? How do I know that events in History really happened? How do I know what art is? Does it even exist? How do I know that scientific experiments work? Do scientific experiments work? How do I know that the books I’m studying in English are worth studying?

ToK is assessed entirely though coursework: you’ll make a presentation (where you’ll try to answer a question like one of those above); and you’ll also write a 1,200-word essay on a similar theme. There is no ToK exam. Extended Essay The EE is an extended piece of academic writing in the student’s choice of subject and topic. You will undertake academic research with the support of a supervisor and the library and engage for the first time in higher end research tasks both in traditional and online resources. It may seem a daunting task - 4000 words is no mean feat. In order to prepare you for this important part of the diploma, we offer induction seminars, ICT workshops on how to use the Oakham APA template, guidance with regard to referencing, the bibliography and the tools of the Microsoft Word programme. The EE process starts in January of IB6 with a structured timetable, culminates in EE week (when all IB students write their EEs in academic lesson time) and is handed in at the beginning of IB7. The EE is the foundation of all Internal Assessment in the Diploma programme, but more importantly, the best possible preparation for academic research and writing at university.

Creativity, Action and Service The CAS programme challenges you to develop new skills outside the classroom and learn more about yourself through critical reflection. You will learn to ‘think globally; act locally’, and take the initiative in improving the society in which you live and learn. The list of CAS activities at Oakham is extensive and may be tailored to the individual. Activities may be regular or form part of a longer service project. However, all experiential learning will push you to: • • • • • •

see the application of your learning in and beyond school life become a confident, capable and reflective individual develop your emotional intelligence bring real benefit to yourself or others make decisions that have real consequences be proactive and positive in your approach to planning and problem solving

CAS is at the core of the IB experience and is closely linked to TOK and the Extended Essay. It is not formally assessed and it is not about ‘logging’ hours. Rather, you must show personal development through a sustained commitment to activities and careful written reflection.

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FAQs Is there a university or course which does not accept the IB? After A-levels and Scottish Highers, the IB Diploma is the third most common university entrance exam in the UK. More and more schools are offering the IB in the UK (state and independent) and some schools only offer the IB in the Upper School. All universities in the UK accept the IB for all courses and the IB is highly regarded throughout the world for both its high academic standard and its philosophy. For university requirements (IB points scores) please consult the UCAS website and our website for a list of offers which have been made to our students over the years. For more information, please contact the Careers department or the Head of Upper School. Is it harder than A-levels? It is different. Students study all 6 subjects over the course of the two years (5 terms). It will appear to some that IB students have fewer study periods than A-level students – this is perception, not necessarily reality. IB students have totally different times of “pressure” during the course of the diploma – there will be times when they have less to do than A-level students, and times when A-level students have less to do than IB students. Anyone who wants to do the IB can do the IB – there are more subjects to juggle, organisation needs to be good (or to be learnt), students need to be motivated. On the other hand, the range of subjects and the core of the diploma keep a greater variety of subjects, activities and prep during the week. We also hear that IB students hit the ground running when they get to university, because they are used to giving presentations and have the academic skills which are needed. Is it easier to get a top grade at A-level than a 7 at IB? Whether any grade, or points score, is easy or not depends on so many variables; your ability, motivation, organisation and so on. With the introduction of the A* grade at A-level, getting the top grade will become more difficult. Only those who get an average of 90% will get an A*. Although the marks needed for a 7 vary from subject to subject, recent experience suggests that somewhere around 80% is required. Will I still see my friends who are not doing the IB? Yes! In house, in tutorials, in games, activities, on Dof E, in the theatre…everywhere apart from lessons. But not all A-level students are in the same set either… Are all Oakhamians able to achieve the IB Diploma? If a student has made the entry requirements for the Upper School and works well, then yes. It is important, however, to discuss with your tutor, Head of Middle/Upper School which Upper School course suits you best. What if I don’t do well at the end of the course in the exams? Every subject has an element of internal assessment which will be completed before the exams in May in Form 7 and counts towards the final grade. All written exams can be retaken the following May (or November at other IB schools in the UK and abroad). The concept of terminal exams can be frightening, but students are very well prepared for them by the beginning of May and have enough exam practice to do well.

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IB Diploma Subject Grid 2017-19 Provisional (February 2017) A

B

C1

GERMAN LANG & LIT

Group 1 Language A

C2

D

ENGLISH LIT English Lit

Group 2 Language B or ab initio

SPANISH B Spanish B

Group 3 Individuals and Societies

HISTORY History

HISTORY History

GEOGRAPHY Geography

PHILOSOPHY Philosophy

GEOGRAPHY Geography

GLOBAL POLITICS Global Politics

FRENCH B French B

GERMAN B German B Italian ai

Environmental Systems & Societies Group 4 The Sciences

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY Design Technology BIOLOGY

E

ECONOMICS

Sports, Exercise & Health Science

PHYSICS Physics

FRENCH B French B SPANISH B Spanish B Spanish ai Italian ai Mandarin ai LATIN* Latin GREEK* Greek ECONOMICS Economics BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Environmental Systems & Societies BIOLOGY Chemistry

BIOLOGY Biology

Environmental Systems & Societies

Environmental Systems & Societies

CHEMISTRY MATHS Maths Maths Studies

Group 5 Mathematics

Group 6 Arts

THEATRE+ Theatre+

VISUAL ARTS Visual Arts

Music^

Key: UPPER CASE = HL (Higher Level) Lower case = SL (Standard Level) You must select 3 HL and 3 SL subjects. You cannot select two subjects in the same vertical column (A-E) as they are taught at the same time. * Latin/Greek HL: the placement of these might be flexible +Theatre HL/SL may only be offered if a minimum of 4 students choose it ^Music SL may only be offered if there is sufficient demand Usually you select one subject out of each Group (row). But you may take: a) a second subject in Groups 2, 3 or 4 if you take none in Group 6. b) Environmental Systems & Societies which fulfils Groups 3 and 4. You may then choose another subject from Groups 2, 3, 4 or 6. c) you may combine (a) and (b) and take up to three subjects from one Group, if the grid allows it. d) two Sciences, two Humanities (Individuals & Societies), two Arts and up to three languages may be possible. German students wishing to comply with KMK must take Mathematics OR Bio/Chem/Phys at HL. They also take German A Lang & Lit HL and English A Lit SL at Oakham, but do not need to take another language, unless they wish to do so. They may not choose Global Politics or Maths Studies. They may choose History, Geography, Economics, Philosophy or Business Management in Group 3. Then, Environmental Systems & Societies, Sports, Exercise & Health Science, or another Group 2, Group 3 or Group 6 subject may be chosen as the sixth subject. Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 49


IB Subject Index for September 2017 Group 1

2

Language, A

Languages, B

Languages, ai

3

Individuals and Society

Subject

HL

SL

English Literature

German Language and Literature

German

French

Latin

Greek

Spanish

Spanish

Italian

Mandarin

Business Management

Economics

Environmental Systems and Societies

4

Sciences

Geography

Global Politics

History

Philosophy

Biology

Chemistry

Design Technology

 

Environmental Systems and Societies Physics

6

Mathematics

The Arts

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Mathematics

 

Sports, Health and Exercise Science 5

Maths Studies

Music

Theatre

Visual Arts

Page | 50


Group 1 – Language

IB ENGLISH A LITERATURE Head of Department – Mr Malcolm Fairweather

mmf@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

Grade B at IGCSE or GCSE English Literature and English Language

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

The Literary Society organises frequent lectures, seminars and theatre trips. IB English students (particularly at HL) are expected to attend.

Possible Career Pathways

This qualification is highly relevant for any career that requires communication or expression: the Law, Medicine, Teaching, Journalism, Business and many more.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB DP Higher Level/Standard Level: IB English includes oral assessments and the study of translated texts. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will study 10 works at SL and 13 at HL. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Part 1

Works in translation. Three texts HL. Pupils write a 1200-1500 word essay and a 300-400 word reflective statement on one text.

Written assignment

25%

Part 2

Detailed study. Three texts HL. Pupils present a formal oral commentary and answer questions on one extract. They then discuss one of the other works for 10 minutes.

Individual oral commentary

15%

Part 3

Literary genres. Four texts HL. Pupils write an essay based on at least two works studied in part 3.

Paper 2 written exam

25%

Part 4

Options. Three texts HL. Pupils present to class on one of the works studied for 10-15 minutes.

Individual oral presentation

15%

Part 5

Literary commentary. Students write a commentary on one of two passages.

Paper 1

20%

Part 1

Works in translation. Two texts SL. Pupils write a 1200-1500 word essay and a 300-400 word reflective statement on one text.

Written assignment

25%

Part 2

Detailed study. Two texts Sl. Pupils present a formal oral commentary and answer questions on one extract.

Individual oral commentary

15%

Part 3

Literary genres. Three texts SL. Pupils write an essay based on at least two works studied in part 3.

Paper 2 written exam

25%

Part 4

Options. Three texts SL. Pupils present to the class on one of the works studied for 10-15 minutes.

Individual oral presentation

15%

Part 5

Guided Literary analysis. Pupils write on one of two passages in response to two questions.

Paper 1

20%

Standard Level

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 51


IB GERMAN A LANGUAGE and LITERATURE HL Head of Department – Mr Christopher Morgan crm@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

The course is only available to native speakers of German; formal native speaker German lesson in a middle school are a strong advantage.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

The German department offers a wide range of opportunities through the German Society.

Possible Career Pathways

Degrees in German, languages, comparatives studies, law, politics and more are well served by this course. The analytical skills through literature appreciation and an understanding how language creates meaning are valuable skills in many different professional fields.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB DP Higher Level/Standard Level: This course is only offered at HL and does not correspond to a GCSE in German. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students learn to research and give presentations and how to engage in group discussions; analysis of prose, drama and poetry; students develop an appreciation of how language is used to create meaning and how different types of texts reach different audiences; students learn about the development of the German language. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Literary texts in close analysis, examples:

Paper 1 Comparative textual analysis

25%

Paper 2 Essay

25%

Interactive and individual oral commentary

30%

Written tasks Creative writing Literary analysis

20%

Alfred Andersch: Sansibar oder der letzte Grund Arthur Schnitzler: Die Traumnovelle Max Frisch: Biedermann und die Brandstifter. Literary texts in context, examples: Theodor Fontane: Effi Briest Friedrich Schiller: Kabale und Liebe Text in Translation: Arthur Miller: Tod eines Handlungsreisenden. Language and mass communication Types of texts Advertising The Media and more Presentations. Language in a cultural context Language acquisition Language development Group discussions.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 52


Group 2 – Language There are different levels of language within the IB. You must select your language(s) from this group appropriate to your current language levels as well as inclinations. Language B HL – French, German, Italian, Spanish, Latin, Greek This course is for strong linguists: you will probably have gained a top grade at GCSE or its equivalent. This is the certainly the level to take if thinking about continuing with language study at university. Language B SL – French, German, Italian, Spanish, Latin, Greek This course would suit students who are good at languages but who know that they will probably not wish to continue with the subject at university level. Language ab initio SL – Italian, Spanish, Mandarin This course is for beginners, students with no previous experience of learning the language. This would suit either students who have not enjoyed great success with their existing language study or students who are keen to explore new linguistic experiences. Latin B, Classical Greek B These courses are for students who have gained a good grade at GCSE or its equivalent. The HL course would suit students with a strong prior attainment: this is certainly the level to take if considering the study of classical languages at university. The SL course would suit students who, while skilled in and enthusiastic for classical studies, know that they will probably not wish to continue with the subject at university level.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 53


Modern Languages

IB FRENCH Head of Department – Mr Edward Milner ejm@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A good grade of A or above at IGCSE is highly recommended. For Higher Level, the difficulty is similar to A-level. Standard Level is significantly more accessible and would be appropriate to those who were solid IGCSE linguists.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Work Experience Trip to France in Form 6. Also various day project opportunities, business and international journalism

Possible Career Pathways

Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: French remains French. There is a step up in difficulty, but this is bridged in the early stages of the course. Big differences from IGCSE are that there is no listening exam, and candidates learn to write in a range of styles, rather than just traditional essays. This is taught throughout the course from the very beginning. ORGANISATION OF WORK: HL taught by two teachers, split by topic. SL by one. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Text Handling (Reading comprehension)

Paper 1

30%

Paper 2

20%

Written Assignment – an essay based on a literary stimulus

IA

20%

Oral

Oral Exam

30%

Text Handling (Reading comprehension) – as HL above

Paper 1

30%

Essay Paper – as HL above

Paper 2

20%

Written Assignment – an essay based on material drawn from three other journalistic sources

IA

20%

Oral

Oral Exam

30%

Topics covered include global issues, the Francophone world, health, science and technology, communication and media, personal relations and leisure Essay Paper Topic areas include customs and traditions, leisure, science and technology, health and social relations

Standard Level

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 54


IB GERMAN Head of Department – Mr Chris Morgan crm@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

Grade A or A* at IGCSE is recommended. The demands of Higher Level are similar to A-level. Standard Level is more accessible and is appropriate to those who were solid IGCSE linguists.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Exchange with the Oskar von Miller Gymnasium Munich, cultural visit to Berlin, work experience opportunities in Germany and Austria.

Possible Career Pathways

Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: There is a step up in difficulty, but this is bridged in the early stages of the course. The main differences from IGCSE are that there is no listening exam, and candidates learn to write in a range of styles, rather than just traditional essays. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Higher Level is taught by two teachers, split by topic. Standard Level by one. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Text Handling (Reading comprehension). Topics include global issues, the German-speaking world, health, science and technology, communication and media, personal relations and leisure

Paper 1

30%

Essay Paper

Paper 2

20%

Written Assignment – an essay based on a literary stimulus

IA

20%

Oral

Oral Exam

30%

Text Handling (Reading comprehension) – as HL above

Paper 1

30%

Essay Paper – as HL above

Paper 2

20%

Written Assignment – an essay based on material drawn from three other journalistic sources

IA

20%

Oral

Oral Exam

30%

Topic areas include customs and traditions, leisure, science and technology, health and social relations

Standard Level

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 55


IB ITALIAN ab initio (beginners) Head of Department – Mr Richard Breag rsb@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A desire to study a language from scratch. Having studied another language in Middle School is an advantage though not essential.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Trip to Venice and/or Urbania (Forms 6 and 7). Film and pizza evening, guest speakers

Possible Career Pathways

The sky is the limit. Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: The course is exciting as it provides the opportunity to study a language from scratch. The course is accelerated. As an Upper School learner you will have the opportunity to reach a high level of proficiency in 2 years – beyond GCSE. The topics covered are: Individual and society; Leisure and work; Urban and rural environment. Each topic provides you with opportunities to practise and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural understanding, receptive, productive and interactive skills. When you finish the course you will be able to use Italian in real life situations. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Two teachers, split evenly by topic, supported by conversation class with native speaker to develop spoken skills. Standard Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Understanding of four written texts.

Paper 1

30%

Two written questions.

Paper 2

25%

A piece of writing, 200–350 words, demonstrating intercultural understanding and written in the target language.

Written Assignment

20%

Individual oral based on option topics, group oral based on core topics

Orals

25%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 56


IB MANDARIN ab initio (beginners) Head of Department – Mrs Annabel Hurley ach@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A desire to study Mandarin from scratch. You need to have studied another language successfully in Middle School.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Trip to China

Possible Career Pathways

Endless possibilities. Having studied Mandarin is most impressive to employers and universities alike. Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism are just some possible career pathways

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: The subject is not offered in the Middle School so we assume no prior knowledge. The course is exciting and a rare opportunity as not many schools offer Mandarin. You will have the opportunity to reach a level of proficiency that is beyond GCSE - this is possible, even with a challenging language like Mandarin. By the end of the course, you will have the necessary skills and cultural understanding to communicate successfully in China, Taiwan, or Singapore. The course has three themes: Individuals and society, leisure and work, urban and rural environment. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Three lessons a week plus a conversation lesson with Ms He. Standard Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Understanding of four written texts.

Paper 1

30%

Two written questions: 1. minimum 60 characters 2. minimum 120 characters

Paper 2

25%

A piece of writing, 200–350 characters, demonstrating intercultural understanding and written in the target language

Written Assignment

20%

Individual oral conversation, questions, picture/photo based discussion related to topics studied.

Oral examination

25%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 57


IB SPANISH Head of Department – Mr Cameron Pauls cmp@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A good grade A or above at IGCSE is highly recommended. For Higher Level, the challenge is similar to A-level. Standard Level is significantly more accessible and would be appropriate to those who were solid IGCSE linguists.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Lightning Trip to Madrid, Summer Term Form 6. Immersion Week to Salamanca combining staying with host family, language classes and work experience, first week October half term in Form 7. Also various project day opportunities, business and international journalism.

Possible Career Pathways

Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: There is a step up in difficulty, but this is bridged in the early stages of the course. The main differences from IGCSE are that there is no listening exam, and candidates learn to write in a range of styles, rather than just traditional essays. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Higher Level is taught by two teachers, split by topic. Standard Level is also taught by two teachers with one focusing on grammar, the other on topics. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Text Handling (Reading comprehension) based on the core topics: global issues, communication and media and social relationships

Paper 1

30%

Essay Paper (Two sections)

Paper 2

20%

Written Assignment – an essay based on a literary stimulus

IA

20%

Individual Oral is based on cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health and leisure, science and technology.

Oral Exam

20%

Interactive Oral (group oral) is based on the core topics: global issues, communication and media and social relationships

Oral Exam

10%

Text Handling (Reading comprehension) – as HL above

Paper 1

30%

Essay Paper – as HL above

Paper 2

20%

Written Assignment on three other journalistic sources

IA

20%

Individual Oral – this component is based on the options: Cultural Diversity, Customs and Traditions, Health and Leisure, Science and technology.

Oral Exam

30%

Section A includes cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health and leisure, science and technology. Section B comprises the core topics: global issues, communication and media and social relationships

Standard Level

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 58


IB SPANISH ab initio (beginners) Head of Department – Mr Cameron Pauls cmp@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

A desire to study a language from scratch. Having studied another language in Middle School is an advantage though not essential.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Lightning Trip to Madrid, Summer Term Form 6. Immersion Week to Salamanca combining staying with host family, language classes and work experience, first week October half term in Form 7. Also various project day opportunities, business and international journalism.

Possible Career Pathways

Commonly Law, Accountancy, International Relations, International Business, Marketing, Journalism.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: The course is exciting as it provides the opportunity to study a language from scratch, but as an Upper School learner you will have the opportunity to reach a high level of proficiency in two years – beyond GCSE. The topics covered are: Individual and society; leisure and work; urban and rural environment. Each theme has a list of topics that provides students with opportunities to practise and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations. Each language ab initio course has a language-specific syllabus (see “Syllabus content”) that is used in conjunction with the guide. Language ab initio is available at SL only. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Normally two teachers, split by topic, supported by conversation class with native speaker to develop spoken skills. Standard Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Understanding of four written texts.

Paper 1

30%

Two written questions

Paper 2

25%

A piece of writing, 200–350 characters, demonstrating intercultural understanding and written in the target language

Written Assignment

20%

Individual oral based on a picture or photo related to the topics studied.

Oral examination

25%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 59


IB GREEK Head of Department – Mrs Caroline Lomas

cml@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE Greek Grade B

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities will include a trip to the British Library and Classical plays including the Greek play at Cambridge or Oxford.

Possible Career Pathways

Law, Foreign Office, GCHQ, Civil Service and the City. As an A-level, it combines well with English, History, Philosophy, Languages and Maths.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB Higher Level/Standard Level: The advantage of it being a demanding GCSE is that there is very little step-up in difficulty from GCSE, as the grammar is already covered, and the pace considerably less frantic than Gratin. There are longer passages to cover in literature but the technique is essentially the same as at GCSE. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the differing module content. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Language

Translation of unseen Greek

Paper 1

35%

Set vocabulary list and use of dictionary in exam. Literature

Study of two authors, Homer, Iliad 16 (Patroclus v. Hector) and Iliad 22 (Hector v. Achilles) and Herodotus, Histories 1 (as rich as Croesus?) and 7 (the wreck of the Battle of Thermopylae).

Paper 2

45%

Research Dossier

A collection of primary sources researched and annotated, based on a field trip e.g. to the British or Fitzwilliam Museum.

IA

20%

Translation of unseen Greek

Paper 1

35%

Standard Level Language

Set vocabulary list and use of dictionary in exam. Literature

Study of two authors, Homer, Iliad 16 (Patroclus v. Hector) and Herodotus, Histories 1 (as rich as Croesus?)

Paper 2

45%

Research Dossier

A collection of primary sources researched and annotated, based on a field trip e.g. to the British or Fitzwilliam Museum.

IA

20%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 60


IB LATIN Head of Department – Mrs Caroline Lomas

cml@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE Latin Grade B.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities will include a trip to the British Library and Classical plays.

Possible Career Pathways

Law, Foreign Office, GCHQ, Civil Service and the City. As an A-level, it combines well with English, History, Philosophy, Languages and Maths.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: The advantage of it being a demanding GCSE is that there is very little step-up in difficulty from GCSE, as the grammar is already covered. There are longer passages to cover in literature but the technique is essentially the same as at GCSE. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the differing module content. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Language

Translation of unseen Latin

Paper 1

35%

Set vocabulary list and use of dictionary in exam. Literature

Study of three authors, Tacitus and Suetonius (scandal in the imperial family of Tiberius) and Virgil (Aeneas falls foul of Juno’s fury).

Paper 2

45%

Research Dossier

A collection of primary sources researched and annotated, based on a field trip to e.g. Hadrian’s Wall, Bath, Rome.

IA

20%

Translation of unseen Latin.

Paper 1

35%

Standard Level Language

Set vocabulary list and use of dictionary in exam. Literature

Study of two authors, Tacitus (scandal in the imperial family of Tiberius) and Virgil (Aeneas falls foul of Juno’s fury).

Paper 2

45%

Research Dossier

A collection of primary sources researched and annotated, based on a field trip to e.g. Hadrian’s Wall, Bath, Rome.

IA

20%

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 61


Group 3 – Individuals and Societies

IB BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT Head of Department – Mr Jeremy Rowe

jsr@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

B in GCSE Maths and English or equivalent is desirable.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Trips and excursions across the UK to visit businesses varying from Jaguar, JCB and Emma Bridgewater, plus notable industry speakers.

Possible Career Pathways

Multitude of opportunities across all industries, plus opportunities to develop a career in international business.

ORGANISATION OF WORK: Regular reading about both profit and not-for-profit organisations is essential as the exam expects students to discuss real examples around the themes of Ethics, Innovation, Globalisation, Culture, Change and Strategy. Prep is set weekly using past questions and research tasks. Lessons involve numerate techniques such as accounting and costing; research and presentation tasks; and discursive writing based on case studies. The Internal Assessment is based on investigating a decision made in an organisation of the student’s choice, with support and guidance from teachers. Teaching will be split between two staff to correspond to the differing concepts and themes of work. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Unit 1

Business organisation and management – types of organisation, objectives, stakeholders and the external influences on contemporary businesses.

Paper 1

35%

Unit 2

Human resource management – how we manage people through organisational structure, leadership, motivation and corporate culture.

Unit 3

Finance and accounts – how we manage the finance function, examining budgets, profit and loss accounts, cash flow and decisions on how to invest money.

Unit 4

Marketing – examines how businesses manage the marketing function including research, promotion an e-commerce in both local and global contexts.

Unit 5

Operations management – examining the varying production methods, including research and development and the management of quality.

Internal Assessment (IA)

An individual research project that allows students to demonstrate skills and knowledge and pursue personal interests in a business context, without the constraints associated with written examinations.

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

2 hours 15 mins

Paper 2

40%

2 hours 15 mins

2,000 word report

25%

Page | 62


IB ECONOMICS Head of Department – Mr Paul Nutter

pn@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE Maths Grade B and GCSE English Language Grade B, or equivalent. An interest in current affairs and the world around you.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities to be approved by SLT, but these have included a range of speakers, trips abroad and into London in recent years.

Possible Career Pathways

Students will acquire a wide variety of skills, useful in many careers.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB LEVEL: The subject is not offered in the Middle School at Oakham. Therefore we assume students have no theoretical knowledge. We move from zero to hero over the course! ORGANISATION OF WORK: Activities, discussions and presentations will be incorporated into lessons. Students will be expected to do background preparation for lessons, and maintain an orderly folder. Written essays and some calculations will be set. Multiple choice questions and definitions tests will also be used. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Micro and macroeconomics

Market structures (competition), market failure (environmental), poverty and inequality, inflation, unemployment, growth, government solutions and policies.

Essay

30%

International and Development

Trade, aid, protectionism, immigration, exchange rates, development and global institutions.

Data response

30%

Quantitative techniques

All of the above through calculations, graphs and short explanations.

Short answers

20%

Commentaries on news articles

Any of the above topics – you choose!

IA

20%

Micro and macroeconomics

Markets, market failure (environmental), poverty and inequality, inflation, unemployment, growth, government solutions and policies.

Essay

40%

International and Development

Trade, aid, protectionism, immigration, exchange rates, development and global institutions.

Data response

40%

Commentaries on news articles

Any of the above topics – you choose!

IA

20%

Standard Level

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 63


IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES Head of Department – Mrs Elizabeth Holland aeh@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

Preferably GCSE Biology and Geography but not essential. An interest in global environmental issues would be beneficial.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Fieldwork, local sites and residential in Pembrokeshire. Visits to Twycross Zoo, Rutland Water, and the local aquarium. Guest speakers and specialists from the local environment.

Possible Career Pathways

To study at degree level in Environmental Sciences/Management, Biogeography, Development and Cultural Affairs, International Relations, Environmental Law, Environmental Engineering.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB DP Higher Level/Standard Level: There is only a Standard Level course offered in this subject. It is a Transdisciplinary subject fulfilling the requirements of both groups 3 and 4 and meets the aims of both groups. This course has a Holistic approach allowing students to make reasoned and balanced judgements using appropriate, economic, historical, cultural, socio-political and scientific sources. Therefore it prepares students for many disciplines. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to do individual and group background research in preparation for lessons and investigation of case studies. The aim of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies. Topics studied include: • • • • • • • • •

Foundations of Systems and Models Water Systems and Pollution Energy Production and Climate Change Human Systems and Resource Use Ecosystems and Ecology Biodiversity and Conservation Human Population Dynamics Soil Systems and Food Production Atmospheric Systems

Standard Level

Topics Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1

Resource paper – case study

1 hour exam

25%

Paper 2

Section A: Short answer and data-based questions

2 hour exam

50%

Individual investigation

20%

Section B: Two structured essay questions. IA

An individual investigation report

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 64


IB GEOGRAPHY Head of Department – Mr Howard Collison hac@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

Ideally GCSE Geography Grade B.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Students have the opportunity to go on a variety of field trips. Compulsory trips include visits to Bedford, London and Cambridge. The department also runs a biennial field trip to Italy. Other trips in the past have included Switzerland and the USA.

Possible Career Pathways

Geography is an intellectually challenging subject and at degree level has one of the highest employment rates of any university course. Students studying Geography acquire a wide variety of skills which are useful in a vast array of careers. These include directly and indirectly related careers such as Environmental Consultancy, Urban Planning, Property Development, The Foreign Office, Law, Business and Finance.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB DP Higher Level/Standard Level: IB students should be able to build upon the skills developed by GCSE, particularly numerical, literacy and analytical. The main difference between HL and SL is that HL students undertake 3 options rather than 2 and also complete a course on Globalisation and Global Interactions. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to do background reading in preparation for lessons, and maintain an orderly folder. Both HL and SL students will encounter a range of data analysis, short answer and extended response style questions. Fieldwork is a key part of the IA. Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the differing module content. Many Geography students also complete their EE in Geography. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Core Theme

Population, Disparities, Environmental Issues, Resource Consumption and Sustainability.

Paper 1

25%

3 Options

Hazards and Disasters, Urban Environments, Leisure, Sport and Tourism.

Paper 2

35%

HL Extension

Globalisation and Global Interactions.

Paper 3

20%

Fieldwork

2500 word Fieldwork report.

IA

20%

Core Theme

Population, Disparities, Environmental Issues, Resource Consumption and Sustainability.

Paper 1

40%

2 Options

Hazards and Disasters, Leisure, Sport and Tourism.

Paper 2

35%

Fieldwork

2500 word Fieldwork report.

IA

25%

Standard Level

Oakham Upper School Handbook 3Nov16

Page | 65


IB GLOBAL POLITICS Head of Department – Mr Laurence Ward law@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE History and English Grade B are desirable as constructing arguments and evaluating evidence are key skills.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Engagement activities is essential part of this course. We recommend MUN conferences around Europe, but also visit a Crown Court and the UK Supreme Court. We visit Washington DC every two years.

Possible Career Pathways

Law, Foreign Office, NGO, Journalism, Banking or Management.

STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL STUDENTS: All students complete a common core, entitled ‘People, Power and Politics’. This consists of four core units: • • • •

Power, sovereignty and international relations Human rights Development Peace and conflict

ORGANISATION OF WORK: Our teaching will encourage dialogue and debate, nurturing the capacity to interpret competing and contestable claims. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Higher Level students will also examine two current global political challenges, using a case studies approach, chosen from the following:

IA

20%

Paper 1

20%

Paper 2

40%

IA

20%

Paper 1

30%

Paper 2

45%

IA

25%

Security

Poverty

Culture and identity

The environment and sustainability

Engagement Activity Standard Level

Engagement Activity

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IB HISTORY Head of Department – Mr James Roberts jnr@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE History Grade B or GCSE English Language and Literature Grade B if History was not studied.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Trips include a 5-day visit to Russia and a possible visit to the USA.

Possible Career Pathways

Journalism, Law, Business, Civil Service and Banking. Students will acquire a wide variety of skills which are useful in many careers.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB DP Higher Level/Standard Level: IB students study an international course that covers longer periods of time than GCSE – up to sixty years on some topics. There are similarities in assessment: one essay paper for Standard Level, two essay papers for Higher Level, and a source paper and a course work investigation for both. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to do background reading in preparation for lessons. Teaching for Higher Level will be split between two teachers. Pupils will be mentored in their production of the coursework but must be able organise their time effectively and take responsibility for meeting key deadlines. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment

% of grade

Paper 1 1 hour, 4 source Qs

20

International relations 1918‑36

Terms and impact of the Paris Peace Treaties 1919‑20

Depression and threats to international peace and collective security: Manchuria (1931-3) and Abyssinia (1935-6).

Causes, practices and effects of wars

Different types and nature of 20th century warfare civil, guerrilla, limited, revolutionary, total war Origins and causes of war long-term, short-term and immediate causes Nature of 20th century wars Technological developments, Tactics and strategies Resistance and revolutionary movements.

Paper 2 1½ hours – 2 essays

25

Paper 3 2½ hours – 3 essays]

35

IA 2000 words

20

The Cold War

Aspects of the history of the Americas

• •

The nature of the Depression The Cold War and the Americas 1945‑1981

A study on the international stand-off between the USSR and America and how it impacted on the countries involved. Civil rights and social movements in the Americas

• Historical Investigation

The Investigation enables students to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge, and to pursue their personal interest.

Standard Level

Studies all of the modules above with the exception of Paper 3 – Aspects of the history of the Americas.

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IB PHILOSOPHY Head of Department – Mrs Megan Fairley mjf@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE Grade B in Religious Studies and/or History, and a GCSE Grade B in Mathematics.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

All IB Philosophy students are members of the Philosophy Society, which organises regular lectures and discussions.

Possible Career Pathways

Law, Finance, Journalism, Marketing, PR, Civil Service. Students will acquire a variety of useful skills much sought after by a wide range of employers.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB DP Higher Level/Standard Level: The evaluative skills developed in GCSE Religious Studies are built on in the IB and there is some continuity in content in the form of the ethics module. However, it is possible to study the IB without having studied GCSE Rs, and students who do so will not be significantly disadvantaged. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to complete questions in preparation for class discussion and further note-taking in lessons and to engage fully in class discussions. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Core Theme

‘Being human’

Paper 1

40%

Optional Theme

Ethics

2 hours 30 mins

Optional Theme

Political philosophy

Prescribed Text

Plato’s Republic

HL Extension

Exploring philosophical activity

Paper 2

20%

1 hour Paper 3

20%

1 hour 15 mins IA

Philosophical analysis of a non-philosophical stimulus

Coursework

20%

Core Theme Optional Theme

‘Being human’ Ethics

Paper 1

50%

Prescribed text

Plato’s Republic

Paper 2

Standard Level

1 hour 35 mins 25%

1 hour IA

Philosophical analysis of a non-philosophical stimulus

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Coursework

25%

Page | 68


Group 4 – The Sciences

IB BIOLOGY Head of Department – Dr Patricia Ingles pji@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE Double Award Science (or Biology) grade BB.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Biology field work. The Biology Society ('BioSoc') –a range of topical lectures by external speakers, and visits. Further Biology - seminars aimed at stimulating the interest of the more ambitious pupils. CREST award. The British Biology Olympiad competition.

Possible Career Pathways

Range from agriculture to medicine, sport science to zoology.Biology is a natural partner to Chemistry, and has areas of overlap with Physics and Geography allowing entry to Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biogeography courses. It is a versatile qualification.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: IB Biology progresses naturally from GCSE but with greater detail. The approach is more analytical and more quantitative. The SL level course offers a smoother transition from GCSE and is a good general Biology course for non-specialists. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to do background reading in preparation for lessons, and maintain an orderly folder. Teaching will be split between two teachers to correspond to the different topics. Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Higher Level

Core topics: Cells; Molecular Biology; Genetics; Biochemistry; Ecology; Human physiology Additional Higher level material (AHL): Nucleic acids; Metabolism; Plant Biology; Genetics and Evolution; Animal Physiology.

Paper 1

40 multiple-choice questions on core and AHL material.

1 hour exam

20%

Paper 2

Data-based questions on core and AHL material.

2¼ hour exam

36%

Paper 3

Section A: experimental skills and techniques, analysis and evaluation using unseen data linked to the core material and AHL material. Section B: Questions from one option.

1¼ hour exam

24%

IA

One scientific investigation.

Externally moderated

20%

Standard Level

Core topics: Cells; Molecular Biology; Genetics; Biochemistry; Ecology; Human Physiology

Paper 1

30 multiple-choice questions on core material.

¾ hour exam

20%

Paper 2

Data-based questions on core material.

1¼ hour exam

40%

Paper 3

Section A: experimental skills and techniques, analysis and evaluation, using unseen data linked to the core material. Section B: Questions from one option.

1 hour exam

20%

IA

One scientific investigation.

Externally moderated

20%

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IB CHEMISTRY Head of Department – Mrs Joanne Griffiths

jeg@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

GCSE Dual Award Science Grade BB or Chemistry Grade B or equivalent. (At least a grade B but preferably grade A in the Chemistry paper.)

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Opportunities will include practical extension sessions, discussion groups, Olympiad challenge, a trip to a student conference and visiting speakers.

Possible Career Pathways

Chemistry HL is essential for those considering Medicine, Dentistry or Veterinary Science. Students will acquire a wide variety of skills which are useful in many careers. To find out about your future in chemistry see www.RSC.org.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB Higher Level/Standard Level: IB students should be able to build upon the skills developed within GCSE, particularly in terms of quantitative chemistry, energetics, organic chemistry and bonding. There is an increase in the level of mathematical demand required for both HL and SL and smaller groups ensure that students develop really confident practical skills. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Teaching will be split between two teachers covering different topic areas within the syllabus. Students will be expected to use their textbooks and notes to support the development of their understanding as they work through the course. Background reading from journals such as Chemistry Review will be essential in developing ideas for the IA. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1

Multiple choice questions on core and AHL content across all topics including atomic structure, periodicity, and bonding.

Paper 1 1hr

20%

Paper 2

Short-answer and extended response questions on core and AHL content across all topics including thermochemistry, kinetics, organic chemistry, acids and bases and redox processes.

Paper 2 2 hr 15 min

36%

Paper 3

A data based question based on material from the core and AHL as well as from experimental work, in addition to questions from one area chosen between: Materials, Biochemistry, Energy or Medicinal Chemistry.

Paper 3 1hr 15min

24%

IA

One individual scientific investigation as for SL.

IA

20%

Paper 1

Multiple choice questions on core content across all topics as for HL.

Paper 1 45min

20%

Paper 2

Short-answer and extended response questions on core content across all topics as for HL.

Paper 2 1hr 15 min

40%

Paper 3

A data based question based on material from the core as well as from experimental work, in addition to questions from one option.

Paper 3 1hr

20%

IA

One individual scientific investigation incorporating aspects of exploration, analysis and evaluation.

IA

20%

Standard Level

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IB DESIGN TECHNOLOGY Head of Department – Mr Tim Weston tcw@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

It is possible to study Design Technology with no previous experience, but students wishing to do this should first discuss this with Mr Weston. Preferably, students will have taken GCSE Design and Technology or another similar course.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

The department is open after games on Tuesday/Thursday afternoons so that students wishing to use the facilities can continue with their work. The department is also open on Saturday and Sunday afternoons 2.00-5.30pm. DT visits include factory tours in the UK and an optional trip to Bologna. In addition, we invite guest speakers to the school to lecture on engineering, product and sustainable building design. Pupils can also participate in the Engineering Education Scheme.

Possible Career Pathways

Most students go to their first choice university, many of which choose to study a Product Design, Industrial Design, Architecture or Engineering degree. Universities include Newcastle, Leeds, Brunel, Northumbria and Loughborough.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB Higher Level/Standard Level: Students should be able to build upon the skills developed by GCSE, particularly in the design and make project which accounts for 40% of the final mark. Syllabus content includes the study of human factors and ergonomics, sustainable production, modelling strategies, classic design, innovation and design material properties and commercial production. Higher level studies in additional topics that include user centred design, innovation and markets. Design Technology is a Group 4 Sciences subject. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to complete some preparation work for lessons, and maintain an orderly folder. Written questions, group research/presentations and project work will be set. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

40 Multiple-choice questions on the core and HL material.

Paper 1

20%

One data-based question, several short and extended answer questions based on the core.

Paper 2

20%

3 structured questions on the HL extension material.

Paper 3

20%

Project – Design, make and evaluate a marketable outcome.

IA

40%

30 Multiple-choice questions on the core material.

Paper 1

30%

One data-based question, several short and extended answer questions based on the core.

Paper 2

30%

Project – Design, make and evaluate a marketable outcome.

IA

40%

Standard Level

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IB ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES Head of Department – Mrs Elizabeth Holland aeh@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

Preferably GCSE Biology and Geography but not essential. An interest in global environmental issues would be beneficial.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Fieldwork, local sites and residential in Pembrokeshire. Visits to Twycross Zoo, Rutland Water, and the local aquarium. Guest speakers and specialists from the local environment.

Possible Career Pathways

To study at degree level in Environmental Sciences/Management, Biogeography, Development and Cultural Affairs, International Relations, Environmental Law, Environmental Engineering.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB Higher Level/Standard Level: There is only a Standard Level course offered in this subject. It is a transdisciplinary subject fulfilling the requirements of both groups 3 and 4 and meets the aims of both groups. This course has a Holistic approach allowing students to make reasoned and balanced judgements using appropriate, economic, historical, cultural, socio-political and scientific sources. Therefore it prepares students for many disciplines. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to do individual and group background research in preparation for lessons and investigation of case studies. The aim of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies. Topics studied include: • • • • • • •

Systems and models The Ecosystem Human Population and Recourse Use Conservation and Biodiversity Pollution Management Issues of Global Warming Environmental Value Systems

Standard Level

Topics Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Paper 1

Short answer and data based questions.

1 hour exam

30%

Paper 2

Section A: An Environmental Impact Assessment [Resource Paper]

2 hour exam

50%

Continuous assessment

20%

Section B: Two structured essay questions. IA

A series of scientific investigations both laboratory and fieldwork based. A portfolio of practical work is built up over the course. This is currently under review [Dec 2014] and changes will be made for September 2015.

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IB PHYSICS Head of Department – Dr John Chilton jac@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

The standard GCSE subjects which support the IBDP course are Maths, Physics and Chemistry. Ideally you should have at least Grade ‘B’ but preferably ‘A’ in Physics and Maths.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Huge amounts including The Physics Society, Further Physics and extra FP sessions in the evenings, the Engineering Scheme, CREST, EPQ, The Physics Challenge and Olympiad and a Physics Books Club.

Possible Career Pathways

Physics is important for Engineering, Design or Architecture, Medicine, Dentistry or Veterinary Science, Physiotherapy or Sports Science, Metallurgy or Materials Science, Geology or Environmental Science, Computer Science or Archaeology. It is a key qualification for those interested in Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology, Pharmacy, Philosophy and Psychology.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB Higher Level/Standard Level: GCSE is the start of a journey for Physics. It lays down the foundation that the later levels build on. It is important to get the GCSE knowledge as strong as possible when you remember that Physics is the study of nature. By this we mean absolutely everything from objects smaller than atoms to objects larger than the universe! In Physics we try to understand nature – try to explain why everything is the way it is. This makes Physics the major pure science. It underpins all other pure and applied sciences as well as most areas of engineering and medicine. ‘How’ and ‘why’ are important questions for the Physicist – knowing that something happens is not good enough. The Physicist tries to understand the basic reasons driving all events. Physics explores such questions as “Why is the sky blue?”; “What makes the sun shine and what will happen when the sun dies?”; “What is matter made of?”; “How do forces push and pull?”; “How did the universe begin and will it ever end?”. Physics explains how a pile of sand may be an opaque solid (a ‘brick’), a transparent solid (glass) or the chip at the heart of every computer. ORGANISATION OF WORK: The courses are taught by one (SL) or two (HL) teachers and, like all subjects in Alevel or IB, students are expected to pour effort into the subject to ensure they get a grip of all they meet. Topic areas are: Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Mechanics, Electricity, Astrophysics, Fields and Forces, Thermal, Atomic and Nuclear, Waves, Energy and Power

Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3

20% 36% 24%

IA

20%

Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3

20% 40% 20%

IA

20%

Standard Level Mechanics, Electricity, Astrophysics, Fields and Forces, Thermal, Atomic and Nuclear, Waves, Energy and Power

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IB SPORTS, EXERCISE AND HEALTH SCIENCE Head of Department – Mr Thomas Stokes tgs@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

No prerequisites but an interest in sport is essential.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities Possible Career Pathways

Sports scientist; physiologist, psychologist, biomechanist. Sports agent, sports media, physiotherapy, teaching, coaching.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB Higher Level/Standard Level: The IB SEHS sits as a group IV option and considers the science behind sport. Much of the content covered looks at how sports science is used to develop élite performers and improve the health of the nation. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Skills of being a sports scientist are learnt and opportunity is given to put this into practice by designing and carrying out experiments through the IA. Standard Level 30 multiple-choice questions on the core syllabus; Anatomy, Exercise Physiology, Energy Systems, Movement Analysis, Skill in Sport, Measurement and evaluation of human performance.

Paper 1 – 45 min exam

20%

Section A: one data-based question and several short answer questions on the core syllabus Section B: one extended- response question (choice of 3).

Paper 2 – 1 hour 15 min exam

32%

Several short answer questions in the two options studied: Psychology of Sport and Nutrition for sport, exercise and Health.

Paper 3 – 1 hour exam

24%

30 hours of individual investigation 10 hours on Group 4 project.

IA

24%

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Group 5 – Mathematics

IB MATHEMATICS AND MATHEMATICAL STUDIES Head of Department – Mrs Wendy Singhal Prerequisites

ws@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Maths HL: Maths GCSE at a high A* standard is recommended and, preferably, Additional Maths or equivalent algebraic skills. Maths SL: Maths GCSE at a good A standard is desirable, or equivalent. Maths Studies: None.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

HL students take the UK Senior Maths Challenge in November. SL students may opt to do so. Senior Maths Team practices are open to all in the Winter term.

Possible Career Pathways

Mathematics is an essential tool for many scientific degrees, and Maths SL students have gone on to study Science, Engineering, Medicine and Economics at university. The most competitive universities worldwide often ask for Maths HL for these subjects, to match their Further Maths requirements. (Note: HL does not cover any Mechanics.) Maths Studies demonstrates that students have studied for another two years beyond GCSE. It is a problem-solving maths course.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB: Maths HL will suit students who want to pursue a highly mathematical degree and career. It is a prestigious, challenging course in pure Maths, loosely corresponding to Further Maths. Almost everything in Maths SL is included in Maths HL. Maths SL should be chosen by students who intend to follow a mathematical subject in future, or face university constraints, and, ideally, are mathematically confident. Maths Studies is NOT a subset of the Maths SL course: there is an overlap, of course, but it has some distinctive content. It is a good choice for students who do not intend to pursue a maths-related degree or career, and do not face university-based restrictions. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Both SL courses have one teacher; Maths HL has two teachers. All courses have examinations and coursework (“Internal Assessment” or IA). All courses use a graphical calculator, though both Maths SL and HL have one exam without a calculator. Maths SL and HL Papers 1 and 2 are 2 hours; Maths Studies exams are 1 hour 30 mins, and the HL Option paper is 1 hour. Areas Covered (to varying degrees)

Assessment Method

% of grade

Core areas All syllabuses

Number system; Quadratic Functions; Exponential Functions; Circle Geometry; Trigonometry, Sequences and Series; Calculus; Probability; Sets; 1-variable Statistics.

SL Courses Paper 1 Paper 2

40% 40%

Maths Studies ONLY

Finance; 2-variable statistics and the χ2 test; Logic; Area/Volume/Capacity.

IA

20%

Maths SL and HL ONLY

Logarithms; Functions; Binomial Theorem; Vectors; Probability Distributions; Advanced Trigonometry; 2-variable Statistics.

HL Course Papers 1, 2

30%,30%

Maths HL ONLY

Complex numbers; Mathematical Induction; Permutations and Combinations; Advanced Vectors, Calculus and Probability Distributions. PLUS an Option Paper (choice of 5 areas).

Paper 3 IA

20% 20%

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Group 6 – The Arts

IB MUSIC Director of Music – Mr Peter Davis

pd@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

Ideally a minimum of Grade B at GCSE Music, but strong instrumentalists/singers with sufficient theoretical/harmonic understanding may opt for the course having first consulted the school.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Regular curricular concert trips, plus everything offered by Music Department’s vibrant and exciting extra-curricular programme.

Possible Career Pathways

Obviously working as a Professional Musician/Teacher. However, the transferable skill-set of a Trained Musician makes them exceptionally attractive to graduate recruiters in any employment field.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB Standard Level: There is a similar course structure, but with an option to undertake Composing or Performing at Standard Level. This involves a more in-depth analysis of two set works and a wider contextual understanding of music from many parts of the world, musical cultures and time periods. There is a natural progression from GCSE of all course elements. A performance standard of around Grade 7 is recommended for the performing options. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Strong organisation skills required, including maintaining an orderly folder, balancing preps from two teachers, and a strict programme of coursework deadlines to spread the workload. Standard Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Musical Perception

Study, analysis and examination, comparing and contrasting musical cultures (three questions); includes the study of two prescribed works (two questions)

Listening Paper

30%

2 hr 15 min

Bach Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 Kodály Dances of Galánta. Musical links investigation Submitted as a media script of no more than 2,000 words.

IA Coursework

20%

Option 1: Creating

Two pieces of coursework, from the following options: composing, music technology composing, arranging, improvising, stylistic techniques.

IA Coursework

50%

Option 2: Solo performing

15 minute solo performance (may include one small group piece) recorded as public performances.

IA Coursework

50%

Option 3: Group Performing

20-30 minute group performance (two or more performances) recorded as public performances.

IA Coursework

50%

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IB THEATRE Director of Drama – Mrs Gilly Norell

gn@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Prerequisites

Drama GCSE is useful but more important is a keen and driving interest in theatre. B grades in either English, Religious Studies or History are a good indicator that you will be able to cope with the written components.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

A wide range of theatre visits. A one week trip to the National Student Drama Festival and a bi-annual trip to the Edinburgh Fringe.

Possible Career Pathways

Theatre – acting, directing, producing. TV and film. Work in all areas of the performance and technical media, theatre and company management. Theatre writing and dramatic criticism. The confidence and skill to use your voice effectively and the development of enhanced presentation skills are vital in each and every pathway.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GCSE and IB DP Higher Level/Standard Level: IB Theatre places a much greater emphasis on research and theory of practice and students will gain a much deeper understanding of the themes and political context of theatre. ORGANISATION OF WORK: Students will be expected to undertake reading and research in preparation for lessons and to play an active role in discussion. Teaching will normally be split between two teachers and assessment is both practical and written throughout the course. Higher Level

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Task 1

Solo Theatre Piece: Students research into a theatre theorist and identify aspects of their theory and present a solo piece of theatre (4-8 minutes) based on this aspect. Write a 3,000 word report.

External

35%

Task 2

Director’s Notebook: Students choose a published play text and develop ideas regarding how it could be staged for an audience

External

20%

Task 3

Research Presentation: Students plan and deliver an individual presentation (15 minutes) which outlines and physically demonstrates research into a convention of a theatre tradition.

External

20%

Task 4

Collaborative Project: Students collaboratively create and present an original piece of theatre (13-15 minutes) for a specific target audience. They must include a process portfolio.

Internal

25%

Task 2

Director’s Notebook: as HL above

External

35%

Task 3

Research Presentation: as HL above

External

30%

Task 4

Collaborative Project: as HL above

Internal

35%

Standard Level

NOTE: We currently do not offer Higher Level IB Music. If this is a concern, please contact Mr Davis

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Detail from a drawing by Visual Art student James Ralston

IB VISUAL ART Head of Department – Mr Simon Poppy slp@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Prerequisites

GCSE, IGCSE and MYP are all excellent starting points. However, past students have successfully completed the course without prior formal art training.

Extra-Curricular Opportunities

Visit to London Exhibitions to Nottingham Contemporary. Artist and Textiles workshops. Student exhibitions. Option of the biannual New York Art tour.

Possible Career Pathways

The study of Art is essential for careers such as Architecture, Graphic Design, Film, Animation, Photography, Media and Fashion. It is a good pathway for careers in Marketing, Sales, PR, Tourism and Software Design.

ORGANISATION OF WORK: This course combines the learning of skills with ideas: How to make Art? + Why make Art? It stresses personal growth as an artist and how to use art to explore contemporary issues to consider internationalism and world culture. Life drawing will be part of the course. There is considerable scope to develop individual ideas that are appropriate to student’s interests and career aspirations, as there is no timed exam or set theme. For the final exhibition you will specialise in an area such as Textiles, Painting, Photography or Print. Higher and Standard Levels

Topic Covered

Assessment Method

% of grade

Process Portfolio

You will initially experiment with a range of media and techniques: from photography, drawing, and painting to printmaking, sculpture, photo shop and textiles. SL must use two of these different art forms and HL three of these. Then you will specialise in one of these areas.

IA Power Point

40%

Comparative Study

A visual and written analysis of art works from different cultures. At HL this includes linking these to the candidate’s own creative work.

IA Power Point

20%

Exhibition

Students prepare an exhibition of work in their chosen specialism 4-7 works SL and 8-11 works HL.

Electronic folio Externally assessed

40%

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The information in this publication is correct at the time of printing. Changes may be made for educational or other reasons.

Tel: +44 (0)1572 758758 admissions@oakham.rutland.sch.uk www.oakham.rutland.sch.uk

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Upper School Handbook 2017