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OAK BAYNEWS Exploring the outdoors A popular hiking and environmental group will celebrate its 70th anniversary in Oak Bay next month. Community, Page A3 Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Oh boy, O’Byrne

Local Market Expert

JIM BAILEY

www.jimbailey.ca jimbailey@royallepage.ca 1933 Oak Bay Avenue 250-592-4422

Former Oak Bay boy Ryan O’Byrne spends the NHL allstar break back home. Sports, Page A14

Watch for breaking news at www.oakbaynews.com

Building a better watershed Municipalities agree to discuss mutual development rules for Bowker Creek Ryan Flaherty News staff

O

n a bright, crisp January morning, the ringing of a bell signals the start of recess at St. Patrick’s elementary. About 15 seconds later, a steady stream of students emerges from the building. Laughing and shouting, the children make their way over a bridge to the playground. Few, if any, seem to notice the gently flowing water of Bowker Creek below, nor do they acknowledge the paddling of ducks on its surface. St. Patrick’s is just inside the Victoria municipal line; its schoolyard spills over into Saanich. A few hundred feet to the east lies Oak Bay. Nowhere else in the Capital Region do the three municipalities intersect in this way. It’s fitting, then, that the creek flows through this spot. The narrow channel plays a vital role in all three communities. A recently-adopted 100-year plan for the watershed will shape future development and conservation efforts in and around Bowker Creek.

Jody Watson, chair of the Bowker Creek Initiative steering committee, stands beside the creek near St. Patrick’s School.

A blueprint for the future In 2003 the Capital Regional District and the three municipalities agreed to join with the community to create a watershed management plan for the creek. Stakeholders such as B.C. Hydro, the University of Victoria, Camosun College and several schools, including St. Patrick’s, contributed to the discussion. The result was the Bowker Creek Initiative. “To be able to truly do some effective restoration of the creek, we all need to be working together,” says Jody Watson, the CRD’s harbours and watersheds co-ordinator, who also serves as chair of the BCI steering committee. The creek is home to a variety of plants and animals, but over time, urbanization has reduced its habitability. It has been years since fish were found here – 60 per cent of the creek is routed through underground culverts, whose concrete bottoms don’t support life. Development has also minimized the watershed’s role, eliminating areas where rainwater once seeped into the ground.

Don Denton/ News staff

This leads to a “flashy” creek during heavy rains, increased erosion and further reduced natural habitats. So what could the watershed look like for future generations, and what steps are required to get there? The answers are the basis of the Bowker Creek Blueprint, a vision of the next 100 years for the watershed. “It took 100 to 150 years of agricultural development, and then urban development, for the creek to get to the state that it’s in. We’re not going to be able to fix that overnight,” Watson says. With the Blueprint in place, steps are being taken to do just that, and restore the watershed to a state where it can be a key part of a greener community.

A co-operative vision To make the Blueprint a reality, it will take a co-operative effort. “We were saying how great it would be if instead of doing this in small parcels we could have a co-ordinated effort to maybe look at this holistically,” says Saanich Coun. Paul Gerrard. Along with fellow Saanich councillor Vic Derman, Gerrard recently invited Victoria and Oak Bay councils to discuss the creation of common development permit guidelines for the watershed. PLEASE SEE: Bowker Creek Blueprint, Page A4

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday Wednesday February February 1, 1, 2012 2012 

Solar storm showed little, if any effects

The

great

outdoors

But we could soon see Northern Lights here

Club celebrating its 70th anniversary

Natalie North

Natalie North

News staff

News staff

When Joyce Folbigg joined the Outdoor Club of Victoria, it was a way for the 19-year-old to make friends and explore the outdoors around Greater Victoria and beyond. Sixty-four years later, Folbigg, the club’s longest-standing active member, may have scaled back her involvement for health reasons, but hasn’t changed her appreciation for the outdoor social group, which turns 70 next month. “It’s certainly been a good club to belong to, right from the beginning,” said Folbigg, now 83. “The hikes and the activities were available to us right from the beginning when there weren’t so many available to (the public). Some of the things that we did, I’ve really cherished my whole life.” Hiking Sooke, building the trails in Goldstream Provincial Park and taking group trips through the Olympic Mountains are among some of the highlights from the Oak Bay resident’s time with the club. After undergoing surgery, Folbigg no longer hikes. But she does attend all of the club’s social events, and plans to take part in the upcoming 70th anniversary celebration for past and present members. That event happens Saturday, March 3 at 10:30 a.m. at Uplands Golf Club. The Outdoor Club of Victoria’s mandate – it hosts hikes and other outdoor activities and fosters an interest in nature – also hasn’t changed much since its inception in 1942, said club president Mary Hof. “It’s nice to have companions and to get out there,” said Hof, crediting the club with uniting many couples and friends. “It’s just a good feeling getting high up in the mountains. I like to bag peaks.” Folbigg remains close with friends she has known for many decades through the club and hopes it will continue for many more.

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Mary Hof, left, president of the Outdoor Club of Victoria, and Joyce Folbigg, a member for 64 years, take a stroll at Willows Beach Park. The two will help celebrate the club’s 70th anniversary next month. “We are absolutely blessed to live in this part of the world,” she said. “The scenery that we have here and the things that are available to us, we are just so lucky.” The Outdoor Club of Victoria has about 150 members and continues to host a variety of regular hikes and camping trips, both at home and at destinations throughout B.C., Alberta and the United States. Membership is $22 per year or $40 per couple with no charge for the first three hikes. Visit www.ocv.ca for hike schedules and membership applications. Members may contact berbel@shaw.ca to reserve a seat ($20) at the celebration. nnorth@saanichnews.com

BC Government tore up contract A fair contract

700 fewer special needs teachers 12,000 overcrowded classes

Teachers’ pay fallen to 9th in Canada

Invest in schools, teachers and kids

Join the club ■ Members of the Outdoor Club of Victoria take part in various hikes, on Tuesdays and Thursdays as well as on weekends. One upcoming hike (Feb. 12) travels along a beginners’ level route, stretching west from Clover Point. Participants are asked to meet at Clover Point at 10 a.m. ■ The first three hikes are free without membership. Call Janice at 250-386-9769 for more information or visit www.ocv.ca for a hike schedule.

Few could overlook the snow and wind that recently battered Greater Victoria, but unless you were aboard am inter-continental flight, the effects of a much greater storm last week likely went unnoticed. Since Jan. 19, the Earth has been buffeted by an extraterrestrial storm. Solar flares, followed one to two days later by proton-rich particle clouds, were strong enough to theoretically affect satellites and electronics once they collided with the planet’s magnetic field. Fortunately, the planet was not in the storm’s direct pathway. The most noticeable effect for earthlings was that airlines scheduled to fly across the Arctic took more southerly routes as a precaution. “It’s a bunch of electrically active particles that come here from the sun and when they interact with anything electronic here on Earth – GPS satellites or even power-generating facilities – anything that uses electricity can be affected,” said Dmitry Monin, astronomer with the National Research Council of Canada on West Saanich Road. A solar storm in 1989 caused a massive power grid failure in Quebec – something that wasn’t expected during this latest event. The storm’s only flare was relatively average sized and came more or less in the direction of Earth on Sunday, Monin said. Solar storms have been known to create visible aurora borealis outside of the usual northern regions. The natural phenomenon has been observed as far south as Mexico. Sky watchers in some northern latitudes were treated to a spectacular light show as a result of Sunday’s flare, but people in Greater Victoria didn’t have much to see. “This time it was a pretty big flare, but not big enough,” Monin said. The storm is a sign the sun is becoming more active as it nears the end of an 11-year cycle, which is likely to culminate in more flares – and more chances to see the Northern Lights in Greater Victoria – within the next three years. “It’s like a humongous reactor generating a lot of energy, different types of radiation,” Monin said. “It’s pretty normal. The sun’s been doing it for a few billion years.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

It’s time for government to invest in schools, teachers and kids again.


A4 A4 • • www.oakbaynews.com www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday Wednesday February February 1, 1, 2012 2012 -- OAK OAK BAY BAY NEWS NEWS

Bowker Creek Blueprint gaining traction Continued from Page A1

The details of those discussions have yet to be determined, but the three municipalities have agreed to participate. That alone suggests a recognition of the issue’s importance, says Soren Henrich, who sits on the BCI steering committee as a representative of the Friends of Bowker Creek, whose members live within the watershed. “We need a balance between urban and natural and rural landscapes for our community health,” he says. Saanich and Victoria have incorporated the Blueprint into their official community plans, and Oak Bay will look at possibly doing the same when it completes its own OCP review over the next year or so.

Meanwhile, work is already underway to improve the state of the watershed. Rain gardens, which allow water to seep through the ground and into the creek, rather than running off roads and sidewalks, have been installed in Victoria and Saanich. The redevelopment of Oak Bay High, which borders the creek, must take the watershed into consideration, says Coun. Pam Copley, who chairs Oak Bay’s municipal planning section. “This will be one of the items on the table, a very important one.”

Work just beginning The next century holds many possibilities for the watershed. More rain gardens, the establishment of

transportation corridors known as greenways, and perhaps even bringing the creek out from underground in some areas – a process known as “daylighting” – are all on the table. The Bowker Creek Blueprint has been endorsed by Victoria and Saanich councils. Oak Bay hasn’t done so yet, but the municipality supports most, if not all, of the document’s guiding principles. “It’s important to work with municipal partners to celebrate and manage places like Bowker Creek,” Copley says. The scenario bodes well for students at St. Patrick’s, who continue to laugh and shout on the banks of the creek. reporter@vicnews.com

At Your Service

Map details the 100-year vision for the Bowker Creek watershed, which ranges from a trickle in some spots to a full-fledged creek in others. Courtesy Bowker Creek Initiative

Correction A photo that ran with a story on electric scooters in the Jan. 27 News mistakenly showed a gaspowered scooter. We apologize for any confusion.

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www.oakbaynews.com • A5 www.oakbaynews.com • A5

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday February 1, 2012  OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday February 1, 2012

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Jim Halston was driving eastbound across the Johnson Street Bridge on Oct. 4 when “a huge thump” startled him. He first assumed he’d been hit from behind, but the driver behind him was too far back. “I saw the look on her face in the rear-view mirror. It was a look of shock,” Halston said. He pulled over at his first opportunity. “I saw the dent (in the roof of the car) and the dust from the rust.” Halston waited for a gap in traffic and returned to the spot, where he retrieved a chunk of rusty metal with blue paint – proof it had flaked off the bridge. His primary concern was one of safety. “Had it come down one or two seconds sooner, it could have hit the cyclist (ahead of me).” So, could it happen again? It’s a question the City of Victoria is looking into. “We retained Stantec (an engineering firm) to have a look at it and determine what we need to do,” said Dwayne Kalynchuk, the city’s director of engineering and public works. “We’re supposed to receive a report from them shortly as to any additional loose metal that we have to scrape (from) it, or remove (from) it, just to continue to have the bridge operate in a safe condition … It’s more than likely we’ll have to, at some point, remove some.” Halston’s other concern is compensation. Advanced Collision estimated the repairs to his car at $773. Last week, he received a letter from the Municipal Insurance Association denying his claim for compensation because the event was “random” and “not foreseeable.” “This was an isolated incident, and the City is not aware of any history of debris falling from the bridge and striking vehicles,” reads the letter. “We turn it over to our insurance and it’s up to them to make a call,” said Kalynchuk. He agrees, however, that it’s

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Jim Halston drives the Johnson Street bridge two or three times a week, but began questioning its safety after a piece of metal fell from the bridge onto the roof of his car. fair to characterize the incident as isolated and unpredictable. Halston disagrees. “Maybe this is fairly random, but I doubt it,” he said. “We all know the issues with the bridge.” In April 2009, Delcan presented an assessment report of the bridge outlining many concerns. They included extensive corrosion, areas of pack rust and failed paint, as well as mechanical and electrical systems at the end of their life span. Delcan recommended either replacing or refurbishing the bridge within three years. That deadline is almost upon us, but a replacement is still two to three years away. The city has, however, “beefed up” its annual inspections since receiving the Delcan report, said Kalynchuk. It was a Stantec inspection that led to the closure of the rail portion of the bridge last April. “We continue to do our maintenance as best we can,” Kalynchuk said. The insurance agency, he added, likely took the city’s diligence into account when

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determining responsibility for the falling debris. The experience has left Halston wary. “I should stop using the bridge,” he said. “Maybe it should be shut down.” rholmen@vicnews.com

Metal chunk a mystery The piece of metal that struck Jim Halston’s Saturn car weighed roughly 150 grams and measured 10 to 15 centimetres in length, according to his own estimate. Dwayne Kalynchuk, Victoria’s director of engineering and public works, estimated it at about half that size. The real measurements, however, can’t be known. “I naively left the piece of metal with them (staff at city hall),” Halston said. Kalynchuk says he doesn’t know if the city still possesses the evidence.

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A6 • www.oakbaynews.com

2009 WINNER

OAKBAYNEWS

EDITORIAL

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Oak Bay News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-598-4123 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.oakbaynews.com

OUR VIEW

Conservatives building legacy Prime Minister Stephen Harper raised the spectre of reduced retirement income for Canadians last week as a way of controlling his government’s expenses. While he has since clarified his comments by saying Old Age Security would not be reduced, he maintains that the federal government must look at every possible place to “ensure vital programs are sustainable in the long-term and for future generations.” The PM’s need to clarify his previous statements shows the feds aren’t above listening to the public on matters of such grave importance. We also shouldn’t be surprised to hear such statements coming from Harper and his party, now that they enjoy a solid majority government. Still early in his mandate, the PM appears ready to take risks on such decisions as increasing spending on prisons when the crime rate is falling, while holding the line at best on spending for seniors. We don’t doubt that Harper is keen to place his stamp on history in some way. It’s rather tough for him and his government to take credit for the relatively stable state of the Canadian economy, with so many other factors affecting it. The surest way to leave a mark, then, is through reforming legislation that affects a large percentage of the population. Previous majorities have yielded such gamechangers as same-sex marriage legislation, the sending of Canadian soldiers and sailors to war in Afghanistan, the Clarity Act relating to possible Quebec secession, the North American Free Trade Agreement, Meech Lake and the new Charter of Rights, to name a handful. In tough times, bold measures can be taken and consequences accepted, or small steps can be taken to avoid rocking the boat too much. Whether Harper’s Conservatives choose the former or latter, time will tell. But we shouldn’t be surprised to see this majority government take aggressive steps rather than delicate ones. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@oakbaynews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Oak Bay News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009

BCTF skips math homework sitting, conflict-weary parents can Teachers in parts of B.C. wore expect to hear of new legislation to black on Friday to mark the 10th address the class size and special anniversary of legislation that their needs support issue. And union insists “stripped” there will likely also be an their “right” to control imposed contract, with staffing levels in public the two-year “net zero” schools. wage mandate that has This crucial already been accepted by management tool was most other government abruptly taken back in unions. 2002 by the B.C. Liberal After months of fruitless government’s huge meetings, political majority. Too abruptly, posturing and work-toaccording to a B.C. rule action, the BCTF Supreme Court judge last Tom Fletcher finally tabled a revised year. B.C. Views contract offer last week, The court decision typically by staging a stemmed from a landmark Supreme Court of Canada news conference in Vancouver before sharing the offer with the ruling that led to $80 million in compensation for contract-breaking government’s bargaining agent. It called for wage increases of in the B.C. health care support three, six and six per cent, plus sector at around the same time. benefit improvements that tinkered In the B.C. Teachers’ Federation with the breathtakingly extravagant case, the judge gave the provincial demands the union tabled last year. government a year to consult and The BCTF estimated the package come up with a replacement to would cost a mere $300 million in the offending legislation, which the first year. “Show your work,” will then cease to be in effect. That my math teachers used to tell year is running out, with no more me, but the BCTF didn’t show progress being made than the talks to replace the BCTF’s expired union its calculations. Union officials dismissed the B.C. Public School contract. Employers’ Association’s $2 The pattern of all this is drearily billion cost estimate of their initial familiar. The B.C. government has demands as “enormously inflated,” already tabled legislation to wrest but didn’t show how or by how control of teacher discipline away much. from the union, after an outside BCPSEA crunched what numbers expert found that a convicted the union gave them in the new drug dealer and a sex offender proposal, and came up with a firsthad managed to get their teaching year cost of nearly $500 million. credentials restored. The BCTF, again to the media After the legislature resumes

rather than at the bargaining table, allowed that its total package would cost $565 million. Again, no calculations were produced. BCPSEA estimates the union’s proposal would cost an additional $880 million over three years. And that’s not counting the union’s demand for $300 million a year to reduce class sizes and increase special needs support staff. Teachers are still being compensated under the final terms of a contract that provided 16 per cent in wage increases over five years, in the midst of a harsh recession. And here’s a fun math fact. With percentage wage increases, three plus six plus six doesn’t equal 15. It’s closer to 16, because later raises are calculated on a larger base. So on wages alone, the BCTF wants the same in three years that it just got in five, at a time when private sector unions take layoffs and wage cuts, and the province is billions of dollars in the red. The president of the Langley Teachers’ Association went on CKNW radio and succinctly summed up the BCTF’s position. Raise income taxes across the board. Gordon Campbell cut everyone’s taxes by 25 per cent in 2001, and cut education to pay for it. They’re still fighting the 2005 election. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘‘Show your work,’ my math teachers used to tell me.’


www.oakbaynews.com www.oakbaynews.com •• A7 A7

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Case-by-case heritage analysis doesn’t cut it Re: Value of Oak Bay heritage questioned (News, Jan. 27) Well, that settles it. We should all go to Oak Bay municipal hall right away to apply for a demolition permit for our houses. It is apparently the only way to determine if the district values the heritage qualities of our homes. Just don’t knock it down if they issue the permit. It is unacceptable for the municipality to lie back and react on a case-by-case basis like this. The heritage register is supposed to be an exhaustive list of buildings of interest. That allows property owners to plan accordingly and is fair warning that Oak Bay may wish to buy the property or compensate for loss of market value. Maybe council should just put all of our homes on the heritage register. Clearly some councillors think they already have. David Wilkinson Oak Bay

History and heritage go hand in hand Re: Value of Oak Bay heritage questioned (News, Jan. 27) The community heritage value of 1231 Victoria Ave. is only one reason to oppose demolition of this home. The heritage value lies, not only in the home’s social history – for 40 years it was the St. Michael’s School boarding home – but as an integral part of a heritage neighbourhood of 20 or more century-old homes. The structural integrity of these neighbouring heritage homes is at risk during redevelopment, due to blasting and water runoff created by changes in the topography, tree loss

and increased lot coverage. Unless sympathetically designed, two new homes will affect the ambience of the established streetscape. Redevelopment brings many community costs, including those related to the significant environmental impact associated with demolition, subdivision and infill. Consideration should be given to the community cost of destroying viable housing, carbon costs associated with trucking building materials to the landfill, costs and inconvenience incurred by neighbours due to blasting damage, possible flooding and water damage in downhill homes, loss of green space and loss of trees and wildlife habitat. Jean Sparks Oak Bay (editor’s note: Jean Sparks is Oak Bay municipal archivist)

Faith organization poor choice for care Re: Updated care home design on the way (News, Jan. 18) I am deeply troubled by the idea of any type of public housing being under the control of a religious group, especially when we are told to ‘take it or do without.’ Such a stance is not what was envisioned under Medicare and the residents therein are virtually held captive. My earliest memories are of my father being told again and again that he would burn in hell’s fire unless he converted to a certain faith, while they would look down on us doing so from some wondrous garden. It lasted at least 10 years. I do not know whether my father believed in hell. I did not. Nevertheless, the constant repetition of what they alleged to be our fate

did little for my self-image and impressed upon me our rejection by them. One day a teacher decided to walk with me on my way to school, which was four miles from where I lived. She tried to convert me, despite me still being a child. After walking for a mile, she turned back, presumably deciding to let me go to hell rather than walk further with me. Occasionally I take a short cut to Oak Bay Avenue past Elgin Gardens. A woman who lives there, when I fail to avoid her, delivers a sermon to me. I do not say anything to avoid a confrontation, and move on. In general, no housing or business establishment should have been built adjacent to Bowker Creek. People need places to refresh themselves. Bowker Creek should be landscaped along its length some distance from the creek itself. Ann Kuczerpa Oak Bay

Harper needs to discover 21st century Listening to Prime Minister Stephen Harper at the World Economic Forum was an embarrassment. Here is our highest elected political leader delivering platitudes that were common in another era to other

political leaders and the elite of the corporate business world. Painfully obvious to us listening back home was the fact that he just doesn’t get it, or he’s so ideologically fixed on the economic orthodoxies that were true in the 20th century. He doesn’t realize that today those same economic concepts are widely understood to be bogus and are no longer relevant or appropriate. Prosperity and economic growth, words he uses to celebrate his vision of the brave new world of tomorrow, must be jettisoned for the sake of a viable, livable world. In their place we need to hear words like sustainability and green economy. They are pointing us in another direction and approach toward living responsibly. And what did Harper hold up as the glorious future envisioned for Canada? Major changes to our pension plan, unbridled resource extraction and trade, and a definite move away from services and entitlements to a new order offered by the likes of the Fraser Institute and other apologists of the private corporate world. What a travesty. Dale Perkins Victoria

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes opinions and comments. Letters should discuss issues and stories covered in the News and be 300 words or less. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity. Phone numbers are not printed. ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Oak Bay News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ Email: editor@oakbaynews.com

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Wednesday, February 1, 1, 2012 Wednesday, February 2012--OAK OAK BAY BAY NEWS NEWS

The Corporation of the District of Oak Bay VOLUNTEER BOARD AND COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS Oak Bay Municipal Council welcomes expressions of interest from members of the public who wish to volunteer their time as members of the following Council appointed committees: Initial appointments are typically made for terms of one or two years and may be renewed for additional terms. Active Transportation Advisory Committee The role of this new committee is to advise Municipal Council on matters pertaining to identifying, planning and implementing active transportation opportunities in the Municipality, taking into account the Active Transportation study recently received by Council, along with considering financial impacts, economic viability and social implications. Environmental Advisory Committee This new advisory committee is tasked with advancing environmental sustainability through recommendations to Municipal Council on legislation, regulation, tools, education, and strategic policies that support effective environmental management practices, with financial impacts, economic viability and social implications also being considered. Community Initiatives Committee Although the Community Initiatives Committee (CIC) was originally formed in 2006, its mandate has seen some changes. With the formation of the Active Transportation Advisory Committee, which will take on some of the CIC’s more recent roles, the Committee’s new mandate is to return to its origins, and provide recommendations to Municipal Council regarding community events and celebrations, public recognition, public spaces and monuments. The complete framework or terms of reference for each of the above committees is available at the Oak Bay Municipal Hall, or on the website at www.oakbaybc.org. Persons interested in serving should submit letters to the undersigned, including information regarding your special experience, qualifications, or interest in support of your candidacy, and any other pertinent information that may assist Council in making the appointments, by February 8, 2012: Loranne Hilton, Municipal Clerk District of Oak Bay 2167 Oak Bay Avenue Telephone: 250-598-3311/ Fax: 250-598-9108 Email: lhilton@oakbay.ca

There’s more online

For more stories and web exclusives visit oakbaynews.com

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Pumping floating iron Colwyn Mitchell, 4, tries out a pair of water dumbbells during a swimming lesson session with instructor Jordan Guibels on Sunday at the Oak Bay Recreation Centre.

RBC boosts hospital fundraising campaign The RBC Foundation made a $350,000 multi-year pledge to the Victoria Hospitals Foundation’s Building Care Together campaign. “RBC Foundation is setting a wonderful example of how to give back in a tangible and meaningful way to some of our community’s most deserved citizens,” said Leslee Farrell, co-

chair of the campaign. To provide leading-edge health care to Victoria’s older citizens, $50,000 of the donation has been dedicated to training hospital staff to work with the new technologies in place in the 500-bed Royal Jubilee Hospital Patient Care Centre. The remaining $300,000 will be directed towards geriatric

mental health services. “The technology at work in this new facility is remarkable, and we’re proud to be helping our local citizens receive worldclass care that will improve their quality of life,” said Tom Siemens, vice-president of commercial financial services for the Royal Bank of Canada. editor@oakbaynews.com

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Peoples Pharmacy now offers exclusive cutting edge stress management tools Donovan Walters and Naz Rayani

Adele Fraser knows something about the effects of stress. A mother of two, teacher and an HR consultant for Peoples Pharmacies in Victoria, Fraser works with a broad cross section of ages and personalities. “It amazes me how early in life you can observe the negative impact of stress,” said Fraser. “I see children at the grade one and two levels carry significant stress and as a result they are distracted and often nervous.” “When you look at the causes of disease in our society, a majority of the big ones - hypertension, depression, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, even COPD - stress plays a major part,” said Donovan Walters, Pharmacy Manager, Shelbourne Plaza Peoples Compounding Pharmacy.

“What is compelling about HeartMath is that the science behind it is well documented and it very complementary to the medicinal therapies our patients are already using.” The links between stress and long term health are well documented. In her new book “The Willpower Instinct”, Stanford Psychology Professor, Dr. Kelly McGonigal (Ph.d.) points to stress as a key contributor to the declining quality of health in North America. The challenge is that, for the most part, the symptoms of stress are treated but the underlying issue is ongoing. The vicious cycle of stress: 1. Stress from missing a workout, eating something inappropriate, or work pressure leads to a spike in cortisol and loss of sleep. 2. Cortisol causes increased feelings of hunger and

increased storage of fat while increasing strain on the nervous system and ultimately fatigue. 3. Weight gain and loss of sleep cause more stress go back to #1 and repeat all over again. Peoples Pharmacy now offers a four week program based on HeartMathTM that enables you to quickly reset your physiological response to stress, and shift to a positive emotional state - and track your progress. This innovative program is based on the science of understanding how your body reacts to stress and simple tools that can enable you to manage your hormonal response to minimize the long term damage the chronic stress and over-stimulation of the nervous system causes. In her book, Dr. McGonical, refers to Heart Rate Variability as “a measurement most people have never heard of, but

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one that provides an amazing window into the body’s state of stress or calm.” She discusses at length how reducing stress also contributes increased willpower and focus. Fraser, a trained HeartMath provider, describes it as a great form of feedback, “When you go through HeartMath training you learn to be aware of a stress response and how to change your body’s response to it. Using the emWave, a heart rate variability monitor and tracker, you can actually see how your response to stress improves. It also gets easier to modify your lifestyle to reduce stress - meditation, exercise and diet can all help.” Add regular exercise like walking or swimming to your daily routine and you can find yourself in a very positive and reinforcing loop of wellness and reduced stress. 1. Learn techniques to

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manage your stress response and get exercise. 2. Feel better, sleep better and your DHEA levels rise (DHEA is a hormone that is important for tissue repair and positive hormonal balance). 3. Your energy increases and you look forward to getting outdoors, being social, working hard, focus comes more easily (go back to #1 and repeat). “I was a bit skeptical of the process at first but my experience has been wonderful,” said Tricia Schaddelee, a Cadboro Bay Customer and HeartMath graduate. “I found the program to be effective and I have been able to incorporate it into my daily routine.” More information: Visit video.victoriapharmacy.com to learn more about Heartmath and the emWave. Call 250-418-0866 to book an introductory consultation.

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www.oakbaynews.com • A9

OAK BAY NEWS -- Wednesday WednesdayFebruary February1,1,2012 2012 

UVic personnel information remains in outside hands

Look Like YOURSELF Again!

Investigators dubious of thief’s apparent change of heart Kyle Slavin

Also of concern to police is that all the electronics that were returned were “professionally destroyed.” Anything with a readable hard drive It might be a break in a big case or it could be no longer works. “In other words, we cannot confirm that (an just a clever ploy to lull potential victims of idenitem) has or has not been compromised,” Jantzen tity theft into a false sense of security. Electronics believed to be stolen from a break- said, calling the methodical destruction of the and-enter at the University of Victoria earlier this electronics “sophisticated.” There has yet to be concrete month have been located. Police confirmation that these electronare concerned, however, that “We think this is a ics are, in fact, those taken from an unencrypted flash drive that ruse by someone who UVic – Jantzen said the school stored confidential information for nearly 12,000 employees was wants to allay the public’s has not been able to provide numbers for items taken not among the returned items. fears. But what they may serial – though the descriptions of the Canada Post workers found a items recovered match what was garbage bag containing the elec- have done is transferred stolen. tronics deposited in a mailbox in the data. They’ll sit on it UVic employees have been the 1300-block of Bear Mountain urged to contact their financial Pkwy. on Jan. 18. The thief also and then go ahead and apparently included a written start defrauding people in institutions to take the recommended steps in protecting their apology, with a reassurance that bank accounts. no one’s personal data was com- a couple of months.” Saanich police have received promised, according to Saanich – Saanich police four complaints from employees police Sgt. Dean Jantzen. Sgt. Dean Jantzen about fraudulent banking activity “We think this is someone try– though investigators have doubts about whether ing to pull a fast one on us,” he said. “We think this is a ruse by someone who wants three of those are related to the UVic theft, Jantzen to allay the public’s fears. But what they may have said. Last month UVic president David Turpin done is transferred the data. They’ll sit on it and then go ahead and start defrauding people in a announced that B.C.’s former Information and Privacy Commissioner, David Flaherty, will conduct couple of months.” Two data storage flash drives were stolen in an external review into how personal information the break-in, which happened on either Jan. 7 or is secured on campus. “The review will address the events leading up to 8. Two drives were in the garbage bag, but one the privacy breach and the university’s response. It wasn’t the same as the one stolen. “The one key flash drive is not included in the will also examine the university’s plans to protect (returned) materials,” Jantzen said. “(By giving us sensitive personal information and make appropria different flash drive), they’re trying to make us ate recommendations,” Turpin said. The review is expected to take four months. think we recovered all the stuff. … This is fairly kslavin@saanichnews.com devious if that’s the case.”

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www.oakbaynews.com •• A11 A11 www.oakbaynews.com

OAK BAY BAY NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, February 1, 2012 OAK February 1, 2012 

Province to manage PCC assets

Susan Jacks

Review follows drawn-out process for CPR building tenant Roszan Holmen News staff

Management of key downtown properties, such as Crystal Garden and the CPR Terminal Building, is changing hands. On Tuesday, the B.C. Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development announced the shakeup. “As part of an overall crossgovernment review of Crown corporations and agencies, we are restructuring the Provincial Capital Commission so that it can focus on its mandate to provide community outreach programs,” said a prepared statement by the ministry. The PCC is an agency run by a board composed of regional politicians, including Oak Bay

Shark advocate speaking at UVic

Coun. Pam Copley. In 1977, the provincial government broadened its mandate to include stewardship of six downtown properties. This governance, however, was publicly questioned in April 2011, after the PCC rejected all three proponents bidding for tenancy in the CPR Terminal Building. “In my opinion the (Provincial Capital Commission) is not effectively managing the assets,” wrote Bob Wright of the Oak Bay Marine Group, in a letter to Community, Sport and Cultural Development Minister Ida Chong. Wright’s bid had

Rob Stewart, the filmmaker who brought the slaughter of sharks for the fin trade to light in the 2006 film Sharkwater, continues his efforts tomorrow (Feb. 2) at the University of Victoria. In Beyond Sharkwater, Stewart will revisit the situation that prompted him to take action, give an update on the global outcry against the killing of

& Friends

been rejected by the PCC during the process. In response, Chong agreed to have her staff look at Wright’s concerns, and examine the Minister Ida PCC board. Chong had The board staff look into will maintain Provincial its decisionCapital Commission’s making powers. However, facilities management. financial services and property management services will now be handled by the ministry and by Shared Services B.C. The change will save taxpayers an estimated $200,000. The agency employs 12 people, half of whom manage the properties and half co-ordinate outreach initiatives. rholmen@vicnews.com

sharks for their fins, and outline his current environmental projects. The presentation goes from 8 to 10 p.m. in the Farquhar Auditorium. Tickets are $10 ($5 for students), with proceeds benefitting United Conservationists. Call 250-721-8480 to reserve tickets or visit www.auditorium.uvic. ca/tickets/.

in concert

Saturday, March 10, 2012 7 p.m.

University of Victoria Farquhar Auditorium

Presented by the Kidney foundation of Canada Tickets available at

http://auditorium.uvic.ca

Encourage investment. Support training. Grow small business, right here at home.

We’re extending the Apprenticeship Training Tax Credit and increasing the Small Business Venture Capital Tax Credit. And that helps small business grow. To learn more about the BC Jobs Plan, or to share your ideas, visit BCJobsPlan.ca

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Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - OAK

THE ARTS

Hot ticket: Jazz Vespers at St. Philip Anglican Church, 2928 Eastdowne Rd.

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Jazz Vespers featuring Tom Vickery, Bruce Meikle and Bob Watts. Superb jazz music in a reflective atmosphere. By donation, on Sunday, Feb. 5, at 7:30 p.m. Info at 250-592-6823.

Film festival includes international flavour From Quebec to Switzerland, the Victoria Film Festival, which runs Feb. 3-12, crosses the globe in its 18th year. Here are a few impressions from our writers on a sampling of this year’s offerings. Lloyd the Conqueror (Alberta, 2011, 95 min.) The story follows three friends, Lloyd, Patrick and Oswald, who begrudgingly sign up to participate in a live action role-playing tournament, a fantasy world they know nothing about, in order to pass their community college medieval literature class. In an attempt to vanquish dark fantasy forces, led by their professor, the trio enlists the help of a local role-playing expert, known as the White Wizard, and Cassandra, a beautiful and tough-as-nails ex-cage fighter who Lloyd has feelings for. Directed by Calgary award-winning filmmaker Michael Peterson, the 95-minute feature film is laugh-out-loud funny. The charming narrative flick, co-written by Peterson and Andrew Herman, is brilliantly shot, lit and scored, and features admirably witty dialogue and top-notch acting. Comedic Toronto-born actor Harland Williams makes a hilarious appearance. It is a wonderfully told story of light versus dark forces, friendship, putting down the video game controllers for once and finding the leader – or conqueror – within. Older teen and adult audiences will not only treasure the epic fantasy battle scenes, but will also be charmed by each character as they Brian Posehn stars as a high- discover their inner raning wizard in the full-length hero. ✰✰✰✰ - Erin McCracken comedy Lloyd the Conqueror. 9:45 p.m. Feb. 4, Capital 6 Theatre

Lone Twin (Belgium/Ontario, 2012, 75 min.) Bonded in utero and forever connected by both genetics and societal fascination, twins share a kind of unique human experience most of us will never experience or begin to understand. Director Anna Van Der Wee quickly moves past the obvious in twin talk – of mythology, shared physical similarities and secret languages – to the darkness created when one twin dies. Unable to heal since the sudden death of her twin brother at 20, Van Der Wee embarks on a journey to find wholeness told through interviews with her daughter, past partners and lone twins from around the world. Sure, her narration may lean on a cliché or two, but it never gets in the way. And while the concept of lone twins is strong enough to stand on its own without watching Van Der Wee take a bike ride with an old flame, her presence in the film is more than merited by the lengths she goes to find answers – and closure. One question Van Der Wee doesn’t address, however, is the reasoning behind some documentarians relying on campy animation to set the tone for otherwise beautiful work. Regardless, anything lost in style is more than gained in substance. ✰✰✰1/2 - Natalie North 2:45 p.m., Feb. 4, Cineplex Odeon Theatre

Using a car crash as a catalyst to weave seemingly unconnected storylines together, Swiss film 180º takes a page from the Oscar-winning film Crash, but doesn’t execute it as well as its Hollywood counterpart.

180º

Many of the people in Fleury’s life, past and present, were interviewed for the film, and it’s clear that although Fleury may have come to terms with his demons, there is still much healing to be done. Though he should be commended for speaking out about his abuse, and serving as an inspiration for fellow victims -- an encounter at a book signing is particularly heart-rending -- it seems as though Fleury’s definition of healing and those of the people he alienated are quite different. And bubbling just under the surface, even boiling right over at times, is the lingering resentment Fleury feels toward those who he feels didn’t do enough to protect him. It’s an unvarnished picture of just how deep the damage of abuse goes. ✰✰✰✰ - Ryan Flaherty 9:15 p.m., Feb. 3, Capitol 6

(Switzerland, 2010, 93 min.) It’s impossible to sit through 180º without drawing comparisons to the very similar, and uber-successful Crash. And where the 2004 Oscar-winning film convincingly weaves unconnected storylines amidst poignant overarching themes, this Swiss entrant to the Victoria Film Festival apparently strives to do the same – but fails. The multiple stories told – from a gunman’s rampage (and toothache) to a Turkish family’s attempt to start anew in Zurich – mostly get glazed over, and lack the genuine depth required to pull them all together. There are redeeming aspects to 180º, though. While the plot never reaches the same gravitas of Crash, it does beautifully show how personal struggles and tragedies can change on a dime. For the cinemaphiles out there, a beautiful score and terrific cinematography are engaging enough to make this film worth seeing. Just don’t expect greatness on the whole – otherwise your hopes will crash and burn. ✰✰ – Kyle Slavin 9:30 p.m., Feb. 7, Odeon Lone twin director Anna Van Der Wee and her Theatre twin brother Dirk with their mother.

Theo Fleury: Playing With Fire (Alberta, 2011, 93 min.) Former NHL star Theo Fleury’s story is well-known. After being sexually abused as a teenager – by his junior coach – Graham James, Fleury went on to a successful pro career with the Calgary Flames, New York Rangers and Chicago Blackhawks. However, the scars of his teen years lingered, and Fleury spiralled out of control into a life of substance abuse and destructive behaviour. Fleury’s struggles, and his effort to overcome them, are already the subject of a bestselling book, and now that story is told in this documentary, which follows him across North America as he revisits the places and events that shaped him.

Cerro Rico, Tierra Rica Rich Hill, Rich Land

(Columbia/Bolivia/USA, 2011, 110 min.) This documentary captures the landscape and working conditions of two nearby mining communities in Bolivia. Despite having little dialogue, it explores the myths, history of exploitation, and attitude toward the mountain and salt flats, which have been mined for centuries. Eight million indigenous Bolivian slaves died within deep tunnels in a search for silver for the Spanish. Today, the workers have organized co-operatives and the conditions are vastly improved since colonial days, but it’s still a grueling life with little payoff. Lithium, a valuable resource under the salt, is the next mining frontier. The yet-untapped resource, however, is unlikely to improve the lives of the people. The slow pace of this filmis enjoyable. Heavy on scenery, it is reflective and beautiful, but at 110 minutes, it cries out for a good edit. To anyone with a short attention span, stay clear. ✰✰1/2 - Roszan Holmen 7 p.m. Feb. 7, Odeon Theatre PLEASE SEE: Tatsumi, Page A15


www.oakbaynews.com • A13 www.vicnews.com • A15

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, February 1, 2012  VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Tatsumi

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Continued from Page A14

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(China, 2011, 98 min. Subtitles) Director Eric Khoo’s tribute to the manga comics and stories of Yoshihiro Tatsumi is not light entertainment. Rather, it is a deeper look at the internal struggles and observations of the artist as a young man, and later as a mature family man. Reading up a little on the subject matter – unless one is fluent in Japanese – is a good idea, to get a better sense of who the characters are and how they interweave. The flow of the stories, from post-atomic bomb Hiroshima to a soon-to-be retired office worker who dreams of extra-marital affairs, seems a bit scattered until one realizes that some scenes are from Tatsumi’s life, others from his imagination. This edgy, adult-oriented film tells a pretty good story of how a unique, adult genre of manga came into existence. ✰✰✰1/2 - Don Descoteau 9:30 p.m., Feb. 3, The Vic. 7:15 p.m. Feb. 8, Parkside Resort theatre

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To Be Heard

(United States, 2010, 87 min.) To Be Heard offers an authentic, honest glimpse into the lives of three teens living in the Bronx who use poetry and spoken word to express the complex The Girls In The Band emotions of growing up poor, in a society that offers little hope (United States, 2011, 83 min.) The Girls In The Band tells for a future. The film follows four years of Anthony, Pearl and Karina, three untold stories of female jazz and big band instrumentalists and friends bound by poetry, but who follow independent but intertheir ground-breaking journeys. The documentary doesn’t offer any mind-blowing insight into connected paths. Lauded by the New York Times, each piece women who simply wanted to play music over the decades. of the film opens a new window into the teens’ often gritty and It does however, confirm easily created suspicions. As femi- difficult lives. Despite frustration with the law, with nism brought on the belief women can boyfriends, and with poverty, poetry lifts achieve what men can, there continue to the teens above their circumstances. be tales of teasing, ridicule and pretty pink The youth remain resilient and optimisfrilly dresses that these musically talented tic throughout the film, despite serious women were forced to endure. obstacles that face young black men As expected, the music is incredible in and women surviving in the ghetto. The Girls In The Band. The women and Anthony, a profoundly talented but stories are interesting, each developing a troubled poet, sums it up: “When I write character as the interviews unfold. The a rhyme, that’s like my exit path, my gettimeline flows easily and follows history out-of-jail-free card. This city ain’t helpstarting from the 1930s to present day, withing us … they give us a basketball and out using a calendar to mark each decade. a gun and say shoot a basket or shoot ✰✰✰1/2 - Christine van Reeuwyk One of three teens featured in To Be each other.” ✰✰✰1/2 - Edward Hill 6:45 p.m., Feb. 6, Capitol 6 Theatre Heard, Pearl works hard to lift herself 7 p.m., Feb. 10, Cineplex Odeon out of poverty.

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A14 • www.oakbaynews.com

How to reach us

Travis Paterson

250-381-3633 ext 255 sports@vicnews.com

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 A18 • www.vicnews.com

Top scorers to meet as Cougars host Braves

Original WHL Cougars franchise makes first return Travis Paterson News staff

Vikes swimmer splashing closer to Olympics Open-water swim specialist Richard Weinberger of the UVic Vikes is zeroing in on an Olympic berth for Canada at the London Games. Weinberger won bronze in a FINA 10-kilometre swim in Brazil over the weekend, with a time of two hours, 11 minutes and 42.34 seconds. His finish was just seconds behind world champion Spyros Gianniotis (Greece) in first and second-place Nicola Bolzonello (Italy). “To be racing side by side and keeping pace with a guy like (world champion) Spyros was exhilarating,” Weinberger said. If no other Canadian places higher than third next week in Argentina, Weinberger will compete in the Portugal Olympic Qualifier race in June. sports@vicnews.com

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SPORTS

Royals fade in pink The power of pink was not enough for the Victoria Royals on Saturday. A sellout crowd of 7,006 fans showed up at Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre in support of Pink in the Rink night, only to watch the home team lose 5-1 to the Kamloops Blazers. With the win the Blazers split the weekend series and took over top spot in the WHL standings with 74 points, two ahead of the Tri-City Americans and Eastern conference-leading Edmonton Oil Kings. The game opened with a promising start, as defensive-minded forward Tim Traber scored his second goal of the year for the Royals. Then came Jordan Fransoo’s second scrap since coming to Victoria in a trade for leading scorer Kevin Sundher. “We started out not bad, better than (Friday’s 4-2 win),” said Traber, the game’s second star. “I thought we battled back. But we broke down (tonight) halfway through the second.” Rookie Tim Bozon was at it again for the Blazers, adding a goal and an assist on Saturday after a two-point effort for Kamloops on Friday. The sensational Swiss import, still only 17-years-old, scored first for the Blazers to tie it at 1-1 in the second period. Bozon’s wrist shot from the top of the faceoff circle clanked bar-down over goalie Keith Hamilton’s shoulder. Brendan Ranford, Colin Smith, J.C. Lipon

- OAK

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Royals forward Steven Hodges carries the puck past Kamloops Blazer Tyler Bell at Save-OnFoods Memorial Centre for the Pink In the Rink breast cancer fundraiser on Saturday. The Royals lost 5-1 but raised thousands for B.C. Cancer Foundation.

“Friday we had that extra. ... (Saturday) we were a half step off.”

– Royals coach Marc Habscheid

and Brock Balson also scored for the Blazers. “I thought (Friday) we had that extra. And today we just didn’t have that extra,” said coach and GM Marc Habscheid. “We were a half step off.” A series of in-game promotions and events during Saturday’s game supported the B.C. Cancer Foundation, including an auction of the gameworn pink jerseys. Going into the evening, the Royals were seeking back-to-back wins for the first time in 2012 but have now dropped six of seven games to the Blazers this season. The Royals meet the Blazers once more, in Kamloops on Feb. 22. This week’s games (Jan. 31 and Feb. 1) against

the Prince George Cougars are important to both teams’ playoff hopes. But the fact the Cougars franchise makes its first return to Victoria since leaving after the 1994-95 season won’t be a distraction for his players, Habscheid said. A sweep of the two-games would increase the Royals’ (37 points) lead over the Cougars (32 points) from five to nine points, as the Royals hang onto the eighth and final playoff spot in the West. Game time is 7:05 p.m. tonight.

Forsberg one to watch The ninth-place Cougars aren’t without their stars, with centre Alex Forsberg a key cog in the club’s rebuild. Forsberg, from Saskatchewan (not Sweden), is a talented playmaker who turned 17 on Jan. 5. He is already gaining attention for the 2013 NHL Entry draft. sports@vicnews.com

There’s no denying Ty Jones is the engine that runs the Saanich Braves this season. The Braves won their 17th win of the season, 3-1 over the Kerry Park Islanders on Saturday and are third overall in the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League. But Jones, whose offensive prowess has carried the Braves all season long, went scoreless for the third time in his last four games. Stepping up was James Kellington, who scored twice in the third period, including the game winner to lift the Braves over Kerry Park. Jones’ scoring pace may have cooled but the Braves captain is still second in overall points with 30 goals and 33 assists (63 points) behind leagueleader Brody Coulter of the Victoria Cougars, who has 27 goals and 66 points. The two captains will meet Thursday (Feb. 2) as the Cougars (31-50-1) host the Braves (17-14-0-4) at Archie Browning Sports Centre, 7:15 p.m. It’s the second night of back-to-back games for the Braves, who host the Peninsula Panthers tonight (Feb. 1) at George Pearkes arena, 7:30 p.m. sports@vicnews.com

Oh boy, O’Byrne Ryan O’Byrne, a member of the NHL’s Colorado Avalanche, takes to the ice at the Ian H. Stewart Complex at UVic with a group of kids representing the local minor hockey associations. O’Byrne was in town to promote the upcoming Ryan O’Byrne Charity Camp at the Complex in August, home of the Victoria Racquet Club Minor Hockey association, where O’Byrne played as a youth. All proceeds from the camp will support Kidsport Victoria. The website Ryanobyrnecharitycamp.com goes live today (Feb. 1). Don Denton/News staff


OAK BAY NEWS -

Wednesday February 1, 2012 

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - VICTORIA

www.oakbaynews.com • A15

NEWS

Castaway-Wanderers reload for another run Premier rugby kicks off with national players watching from sidelines Travis Paterson News staff

A new rule limits the amount of national players in the Castaway-Wanderers’ starting lineup but on Saturday the club showed there’s still plenty of depth on its roster. The Castaway-Wanderers beat the UVic Vikes 28-27 in the first game back from the CDI Premier Rugby League’s mid-winter break. The Vikes took an early lead at Windsor Park with a try from eight-man Dustin Dobravsky, followed by two from national sevens winger Beau Parker. A solid kicking demonstration by Vikes fly-half Patrick Kay – converting all three tries, a penalty and a drop goal – added to the total. But it was all CW in the last 20 minutes, with size and experience pushing back over the youthful varsity squad. Scoring for CW were props Hubert Buydens and Andrew Tiedeman, with second row Dylan Jones and winger Johnny Morris crossing the line late in the match. Four tries meant getting the much needed bonus point for CW, while UVic earned one for being within seven points. The win puts CW (2-1) in third place with 11 points in the CDI Premier League. The Vikes sit in fifth. “I thought it was a typical first game of the season; a bit scrappy,” said CW coach Lee Lindwall. “UVic has a lot of speed

Joining CW from UVic this year are national-level props Tiedeman and Toby Peyton. Though Peyton was only briefly carded by Rugby Canada in 2011, it was long enough to make him the odd man out on Saturday. Instead, Peyton played Div. 1, while Tiedeman lined up in the front row for CW’s premier team with Rugby World Cup teammate Hubert Buydens and ex-national Mike Pletch, in from Velox (along with versatile back Pita Savea). CW also boasts highly touted Ontario Blues scrum half Kyle Armstrong, who’s carded, but missed the world cup campaign rehabbing a long-term injury. “Normally we wouldn’t play our carded guys in Div. 1,” Lindwall said. “But players want to come here because we provide such a good program. We’ll have to work within the rule.”

and talent and (they ran) away with it three times. “(But) we did a lot of the running of the play, and played with a lot more possession, and so we should have, we’ve got a lot of really good players this half.” While post-game talk centred around both squad’s high levels of skill and fitness, there was also a fair amount of chatter regarding roster changes and rules that affect them.

“It keeps the playing field a bit even, but it keeps a lot of the top guys out of the competition.” – UVic Vike Tony Lacarte This year the B.C. Rugby Union introduced a rule limiting the number of nationally carded players to three per starting roster in the premier league. University teams UVic and UBC aren’t affected, though UVic’s Bret Beukeboom was his side’s lone carded player – sevens stars Phil Mack (injured) and Sean Duke (away with national team) were unavailable Saturday. “It keeps the playing field a bit even, but it keeps a lot of the top guys out of the competition,” said Vike Tony Lacarte, who played scrum half in place of Mack. A former national level and CW player himself, Lacarte is playing out his university eligibility while studying geography. He is familiar with the many additions CW made for the winter season. They include both elite provincial and national level players crossing over from Velox and UVic to play for the reigning provincial champs.

Bays hop to first Across town on Saturday, James Bay hosted and defeated the up-and-coming premier team Abbotsford Rugby Football Club, 27-10. The first-place Bays (3-0) secured a bonus point with four tries, as Zac Coughlan, Hugo Belanger, Morgan Williams and Adam Drury all scored. Winger Pat Fraser kicked for goal, converting two tries and a penalty. The Bays could also be affected by the rule change but weren’t this weekend as Connor Braid is away with the sevens team and Sean White would be if not for injury. The Velox Valhallians will play their second straight season in the Okanagan Spring Brewery Tier 1. Velox visit the Vancouver Rowing Club at Stanley Park’s Brockton Oval this Saturday (Feb. 4). sports@vicnews.com

Hockey

Basketball Results of 2012 Jr. Boys Basketball Spartan Invitational Tournament at Claremont, Jan. 27-28 Quarterfinals Claremont 55 Cowichan 33 Handsworth 43 Stelly’s 18 St. Michaels 58 Dover Bay 30 Walnut Grove 50 Belmont 25 Consolation round Stelly’s 42 Cowichan 36 Dover Bay 48 Belmont 31 Semifinals Claremont 58 Handsworth 46 St. Michaels 57 Walnut Grove 46 1st/2nd Claremont 49 St. Michaels 29 3rd/4th Walnut Grove 66 Handsworth 57 5th/6th Dover Bay 50 Stelly’s 29 7th/8th Cowichan 41 Belmont 26 Tournament MVP Alex Jordache, Claremont

All-Spartan Team Luke Collombin, Claremont Jason Scully, St. Michaels Varun Senthilkumar, Walnut Grove Kevin Franklin, Handsworth Taylor Davies, Dover Bay David Heywood, Stelly’s Derien Hunchak, Belmont Brayden Aumen, Cowichan

Rugby Canadian Direct Insurance Premier League standings GP W L BP Pts Burnaby Lake 3 3 0 2 14 James Bay 3 3 0 2 14 Cast.-Wand. 3 2 1 3 11 Capilano RFC 3 2 1 1 9 UVic Vikes 3 1 2 2 6 Ravens 3 1 2 0 4 Abbotsford 3 0 3 2 2 Meraloma 3 0 3 2 2 Jan. 28: Abbotsford 10 James Bay 27 (+1) Vikes 27 (+1) Cast.-Wand. 28 (+1) Burnaby Lake 25 Capilano 0 Feb. 4: Vikes at Burnaby Lake Meraloma at Abbotsford UBCOB Ravens at Cast.-Wand. James Bay at Capilano

Stars Sharks Knights Stingers Tritons Lions Brewers Rangers Results Rangers 6 Lions 5 Sharks 2 Knights 4 Tritons 4 Brewers 8 Lions 7 Stars 11 Rangers 1 Sharks 6

W 16 15 13 12 9 7 2 2

L 4 5 8 7 11 11 15 15

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CALL FOR ENTRIES 10TH ANNUAL Kitty Coleman Woodland Art & Bloom Festival. Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show. Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting May 19,20, 21 Applications for Artisans are available at woodlandgardens.ca or phone 250-338-6901

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!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

Greater Victoria Police Chorus

Now recruiting male voice singers. Police and community members welcome. Wednesday practices 7:30-9:30 pm. Guaranteed fun! Details: 250-383-7408

to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca Be Your Own Boss! Attention Locals! People req. to work from home online. Earn $500$4500+ P/T or F/T. Toll Free 1.877.880.8843 leave mess.

Become a Psychiatric Nurse - train locally via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements and some regional classroom delivery. Wages start at $30.79/hr to $40.42/hr. This 23 month program is recognized by the CRPNBC. Govâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t funding may be available. Toll-free 1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com

PERSONALS

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

DATING SERVICE. Longterm/short-term relationships, free to try!!! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #7878 or 1-888-5346984. Live adult 1on1. Call: 1866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877804-5381. (18+).

AUTOMATED TANK Manufacturing Inc. requires a Spray Foam & Paint Applicator. Must have min. 2 yrs exp., and must be in good physical health. Great wages, benefits, full insurance package 100% paid by company, savings plan for retirement, profit sharing bonus, long term employment. Wages $33-$35/hr. Join a winning team. Call 780-846-2231 for appointment or send resume to: Fax 780-846-2241 or email Blaine Ross at blaine@autotanks.ca or Basil Inder at production@autotanks.ca.

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. Locations in Alberta & BC. Hands on real world training. Full sized equipment. Job placement assist. Funding Avail. www.iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853

FOUND: SUNGLASSES, (in colourful bag), in Oak Bay by waterfront, Jan. 23rd. Call (250)592-5265. LOST: WOMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S zipper wallet, between Hillside/Cadboro Bay, Jan. 26th. 250-592-6573

TRAVEL GETAWAYS LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ.Storm watchers 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299. Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

TIMESHARE CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No Risk Program. Stop mortgage & maintenance payments today. 100% Money back guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

TRAVEL BRING THE family! Sizzling specials at Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best beach! New Smyrna Beach, Florida. See it all at: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166 HAWAII ON the Mainland, where healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica â&#x20AC;&#x153;the most friendly country on earthâ&#x20AC;?! 1-780-952-0709; www.CanTico.ca.

EXPERIENCED DRILLERS, derrickhands, motorhands and floorhands. Seeking full rig crews. Paying higher than industry rates and winter bonus. Send resume c/w valid tickets. Fax 780-955-2008; info@tempcodr illing.com. Phone 780-955-5537. EXPERIENCED PARTS person required for progressive auto/industrial supplier. Hired applicant will receive top wages, full benefits and RRSP bonuses plus moving allowances. Our 26,000ft2 Store is located 2.5 hours N.E. of Edmonton, Alberta. See our community at LacLaBicheRegion.com. Send Resumes to: Sapphire Auto, Box 306, Lac La Biche, AB, T0A 2C0. Email: hr@sapphireinc.net. MEDICAL TRAINEES needed now! Hospitals & Doctors need well trained staff. No experience needed! Local training & job placement available. Call for more info! 1-888-7484126.

CHILDCARE

QualiďŹ ed ECE needed as of 01/Feb 2012; must hold current Licence to Practice in B.C. Criminal Record Check, valid First Aid Certificate. Starting salary $15/hr. Call 250-474-7324. DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

AUTOMOTIVE

Looking for a NEW job? .com

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIANS Salmon Arm GM on Shuswap Lake in beautiful British Columbia requires fulltime journeyman automotive technicians. Email: m i ke g @ s a l m o n a r m g m . c o m fax: 250-832-5314.

DRIVERS NEEDED Part time and Full time. Requires Class 4 DL, Chauffeurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permit. Call Bluebird Cabs 250-414-6239.

TRADES, TECHNICAL MILLWRIGHT JOURNEYMAN BCTQ certification mandatory. Fulltime opening @ West Coast Reduction Ltd in Vancouver. Competitive wage and benefits. Email resumes to rpretorius@wcrl.com.

LEMARE GROUP in Port McNeill is seeking an Accounts Payable Clerk to join our team. Your skill set should include strong organization skills, effective time management, attention to details, excellent communication skills, computer literate and accounting knowledge. Fax resume to 250956-4888 or email jcornin@lemare.ca

COASTAL LOG SCALING COURSE

Nanaimo Based Log Scaling Co. is seeking motivated students. Course to Start in March (5 days/week.) Government Exam in June. E-mail for further info. scalingjobs@gmail.com

LOST AND FOUND

HELP WANTED

AIRLINES ARE Hiring- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783.

EARN EXTRA cash! - P/T, F/T immediate openings for men & women. Easy computer work, other positions are available. Can be done from home. No exp. needed. www.HWC-BC.com

HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com

HELP WANTED

TRAIN TO be an Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456.

HELP WANTED An earthmoving company based in Edson Alberta requires a full time Heavy Duty mechanic for field and shop work. We require Cat Dozer/Deere excavator experience. You will work a set schedule for days on and off. Call Lloyd @ 780723-5051

DELIVERY PERSONS

TELUS

YELLOW PAGES Mature persons with car or truck to deliver Telus Yellow Pages in Victoria, Langford, Sidney, and Sooke areas. Opportunity also exists for:

FUNDRAISER Clubs, Charitable Organizations, Schools / Church Groups, Sport Teams or Individuals! EARN MONEY delivering the Telus Yellow Pages in the Victoria, Langford, Sidney and Sooke areas. No selling involved. Call, fax or visit online for more info.

PDC Logistics Tel: 1-800-663-4383

PORT HARDY-Available immediately, working Bodyshop Manager. Painter/Bodyman. Competitive pay, benefits and bonuses. Also looking for a Journeyman GM Technician. Send resumes to Attention Cory, klassengm@gmail.com or fax 250-949-7440.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

THE LEMARE GROUP is seeking a Machinist. Fulltime union wages. Please send resumes by fax to (250)956-4888 or by email to office@lemare.ca.

INCOME OPPORTUNITY HOME BASED Business. We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

Looking for a NEW career? .com

!'2%%-%.4

INFORMATION

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Seeking experienced PROCESSOR OPERATOR for falling & processing work on Vancouver Island. Full time & year round employment. Excellent wage & benefit package. Possibility of relocation cost coverage for the right applicant. TEL: 250-286-1148 FAX: 250-286-3546 kdcon@telus.net

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

GIFT SUCCEED. STUDY.WORK. S U . O

THE

OF EDUCATION

Register for any Sprott-Shaw Community College program between Dec. 1, 2011 - Feb. 29, 2012 and receive up to $1000* towards tuition. Learn more at sprottshaw.com/gift *Some conditions apply

TRAIN TO BE A PRACTICAL NURSE IN VICTORIA TODAY! With the aging population, Healthcare & Healthcare providers are some of the hottest career opportunities available. Practical Nursing is one of the fastest growing segments in healthcare. Train locally for the skills necessary in this career ď&#x192;&#x17E;eld.

Mon.- Fri. 8 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Fax: 1-604-420-4958 or

Visit: www.pdclogistics.ca

SproUStt-S ha w JOIN ON: THE LEMARE GROUP is seeking Forestry Engineers to assist in road and cutback design. For those that display the qualities we desire we will provide remuneration that is above industry standard. Send resumes to the Planning Manager at (250)956-4888 or email vstavrakor@lemare.ca.

COMMUNITY COLLEGE S i n c e 1 9 0 3

250.384.8121 www.sprottshaw.com

CALL VICTORIA:


OAK Bay BAY News NEWS Wed, - Wednesday, Oak Feb 1,February 2012 1, 2012

www.oakbaynews.com A17 www.oakbaynews.com •A17



PERSONAL SERVICES

PETS AND LIVESTOCK

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

APARTMENT/CONDO

COTTAGES

AUTO SERVICES

SIDNEY CHARMING garden cottage, sea view & beach access on bus route to Sidney & Victoria, close to ferries & airport. Totally renovated, w/beautiful fir floors, 1 bdrm (fits queen or smaller), 1 bath, open kitchen/dining & living area, 4 appls, off street prkg. $1000. NP/NS. Opportunity to garden. Avail March 1. Prefer long term. 250-656-3003.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

TRAVEL/TOURISM

FINANCIAL SERVICES

PETS

HOUSES FOR SALE

TRAVEL CONSULTANTCarlson Wagonlit Athlone Travel is seeking an experienced travel consultant to join our team. We are looking for an enthusiastic individual who can cope with a high volume clientele and deliver outstanding customer service. If you are looking for an opportunity to increase your business in a stimulating environment contact Elizabeth Smith liz@athlonetravel.com for more details. All enquiries are confidential.

DROWNING IN debts? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid Bankruptcy! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500

Registered Belgian Shepherd Tervuren. Import lines. 1-250392-5531 dmcyr@wlake.com

CORDOVA BAY (near Matticks Farm/Golf). Appraised at $615,000. 3 bdrm, 3 bath, water view, clean, good condition, recent upgrades, (suite $800). Quick sale, realtor chosen. Open house: Sat & Sun, 2pm-4pm weekly (until sold). 5177 Lochside Drive. Email: fadadu@hotmail.com

WORK WANTED

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

WANTED: DELIVERY work for my E250 Van. Call (250)419-3598.

PERSONAL SERVICES

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

HEALTH PRODUCTS $10 CASH back for every pound you lose. Herbal Magic. Lose Weight Guaranteed! Call Herbal Magic now at 1-800827-8975 for more information. Limited time offer.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

HOME CARE SUPPORT EXP. CARE aid/ companion/ cook avail. Honest, reliable, mature female. Ref’s on request. Wendy (250)479-8555.

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

BUY & SAVE QUEEN-SIZE MATTRESS SALE!

GOOD

390 Coil 2 Pc. Sets with 10 Yr. Warranty …$399

BETTER

Eurotop 640 Coil Dreamland 2 Pc. Sets

499

$

THE BEST Euro Pillow Top 800 Coil Jumbo 13” Thick Mattress with 7 Yr. FULL non pro-rated Warranty, 2 Pce. Sets ..........$599 39”, 54” and King Size Sets also on sale! WOODEN BUNK-BEDS WITH MATTRESSES

299 49995 $

95

$

NO HST STOREWIDE CLEARANCE on all like new and used furniture and accessories, on all carpenter, mechanic’s and handyman’s tools and hardware.

9818 Fourth Street, Sidney EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

buyandsave.ca

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

WESTERN LABRADORS Perfect Yellow Pups CKC reg. Champ. Bloodlines. $1200. w w w. w e s t e r n l a b r a d o r s . c a Wes 250-337-1814

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE BUILDING SUPPLIES

PARK WEST APTS 55 Bay Street Stes avail. - some immed. 1 Bdrms from $875; 2 bdrms from $1125. Close to Victoria downtown, Save-On, Starbucks & transportation. Please Call Wendy 250-590-7505 Email: pw@ramco.ca

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

FRIENDLY FRANK AIRCAST BOOTS, medical, like new, 1 sz fits all male & female, $99 obo. (250)380-2858 before 9pm.

WETHERBY APTS FOR SENIORS ONLY 55+ Spacious stes Avail. - some immed. Bach $750; 1 bdrm $890; 2 bdrms $1075 & up. Close to buses, Hillside Mall, doctors, dentists all within walking distance. Seniors lifestyle of convenience & comfort. On site laundry, social room. Staff available. Please call Bonny 250-598-1650 Email: weth@ramco.ca

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

SEAGATE APTS 707 Esquimalt Road Stes avail. - some immed. 1 bdrm $875 & up; 2 bdrms $1010 & up. Indoor pool, exercise rm and many other fitness amenities. Full view of Strait of Juan de Fuca. Please call Sylvia 250-383-1731 Email: sea@ramco.ca

MEDICAL SUPPLIES CAN’T GET up your stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help! No obligation consultation. Comprehensive warranty. Can be installed in less than 1 hour. Call now 1-866-981-6591. CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE STEEL BUILDINGS for all uses! Beat the 2012 steel increase. Make an offer on selloff models at factory and save thousands now! Call for free Brochure. 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170. STEEL BUILDINGS steel of a deal - building sale! 20X24 $4798. 25X30 $5998. 30X42 $8458. 32X58 $12,960. 40X60 $15,915. 47X80 $20,645. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

Galleon Books & Antiques Antiques, books, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased.

250-655-0700 REAL ESTATE ACREAGE LANGLEY, BC, 31.24 acres

GORGE VIEW APT 258 Gorge Road East Stes avail. - Some Immed. 1 Bdrm $860; 2 Bdrms $1120; 2 Bdrm & den $1125. Amenities incl’s indoor pool, fitness facilities, above grnd and parkade pkg, on site laundry. Onsite staff avail. Please call Sue or Elena 250-380-6566 Email: gvapts@shaw.ca

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

LAVENDER CO-OP accepting applications for a 1 bdrm, $574/mo. Quiet area, sm pet ok, W/D hook up, insuite storage, lrg bright kitchen. Gross income $25,000.+ share purchase is $2,500. Applications available in the glass case outside the Community Hall at 10A-620 Judah St.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES SIDNEY- 3 bdrm (behind Thrifty’s) 1 bath. Reno’d. NS/NP. $1375+(250)656-4003

SIDNEY: FURNISHED Deluxe suite, newer. Walk to ocean & town. All incl. 250-656-8080.

HOMES FOR RENT 1250SQFT rancher, 2 bed + den, 1.5bath, quiet no-thru rd, ocean view, garage, shed, porch, patio, lrg yard, gas fp, hrdwd flr, appl incl, no smok, sm pet negot, avail Feb 1 $1,500 + Util. 250-652-2511 SIDNEY, 2 bdrm bungalow, new kitchen, 5 appls, elec heat, air tight W/D, fenced yard, $1400 includes water. 250-360-6242, 250-656-3656.

SUITES, LOWER CAREY RD. area, 2 bdrm bsmt, all utils incl’d, $1000, (avail immed) 250-386-8365. CORDOVA BAY- 2 bdrms, W/D, hydro incld. Avail Mar 1. $945/mo. (250)658-4760. GORDON HEAD Bright, clean 2-bdrm. Near UVic, Camosun & bus route. Laundry. NS/NP. $800. inclds util 250-472-2512 LANGFORD: 1 bdrm, main floor, W/D, NS/NP. $800 incld’s utils. (250)220-8750. SAANICH: FURNISHED large 1 bdrm suite. NP/NS. Avail Now. Refs req’d. $900/mo inclusive. Call 250-721-0281, 250-858-0807.

TRANSPORTATION AUTO FINANCING

Call: 1-250-616-9053

www.webuyhomesbc.com

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS 1992 TRAVELAIRE. Bright, clean, sleeps 4. Immaculate condition. Full shower with skylight, generator, air conditioning, 91,000 km. $16,500. (250) 743-6036

MORTGAGES

In ALR, flat land, good drainage, creek. 10 acres in cottonwood trees balance in mixture of pasture & bush. Qualifies for farm taxes. Older barn. Lovely building site for dream home. Drilled well, plentiful excellent water, designated septic field. 5 Mins to hospital, shopping complex, and indoor pool. $1,800,000. (604)534-2748

OAK BAY, 60 plus building, 1 Bdrm, 1 Bath above Oak Bay library, F/S, coin laundry $850. Call Complete Residential 250-370-7093.

with a classified ad!

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO

SELL OLD STUFF

250.388.3535

FREE CASH back with $0 down at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or Bad credit call Stephanie 1-877792-0599 www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309. Free Delivery. WANT A vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in February, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-593-6095.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped! ISLAND AUTO Body & Paint, 25 yrs. 1210 Stelly’s X Road. Call 250-881-4862.

CARS

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

SIDNEY Waterfront- 1 bdrm bachelor. $1000 inclusive. Refs. NP/NS. (250)656-4003.

Mortgage Help! Beat bank rates for purchases and refinances, immediate debt consolidation, foreclosure relief, and equity loans. Free, fast, friendly, private consultations. Call 1888-685-6181 www.mountaincitymortgage.ca

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted! We BUY Scrap Batteries from Cars, Trucks etc. $4.00/ea. & up! Free pick-up Island Wide. Min. 10 (1)604.866.9004 Ask for Brad SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

TRUCKS & VANS

$0-$1000 CASH

For Junk Cars/Trucks

Will tow away any car or truck in 45 mins. FREE!

TowPimp.com 250-588-7172

toll free 1-888-588-7172

LOOKING FOR AN Auction Bedroom Suite Couch Deli Esthetics Fuel Garage Sale House Investments Jungle Gym Kiln Living Room Suite Moving Company Nail Care Open House Poultry Quilt Rolling Pin Sail Boat Venetian Blinds Window Washer Xylophone Yard Work Zebra

250.388.3535 EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY

A18 www.oakbaynews.com A18 •www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February Wed, Feb1,1,2012 2012,- OAK OakBAY Bay NEWS News

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CONTRACTORS

FURNITURE REFINISHING

HANDYPERSONS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

SENIOR HANDYMANHousehold repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

GARDENING

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com CBS MASONRY BBB A+. Chimney, Fireplaces, Rock, Flagstone, Concrete, Pavers, Repair, Rebuild, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee.” Free Competitive Est’s. Call (250) 294-9942/589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

PLASTERING

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601 PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

BUSINESS SERVICES DENIED CANADA Pension plan disability benefits? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca

CARPENTRY CUSTOM PLANER- (Fir, cedar) baseboards, casings, crown molding (any shape). Call (250)588-5920. QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

DRAFTING & DESIGN DESIGN FOR PERMIT. w w w. i n t e gra d e s i g n i n c . c o m Call Steven (250) 381-4123.

DRYWALL AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525. BEAT MY Price! Best workmanship. 38 years experience. Call Mike, 250-475-0542.

DPM SERVICES: lawn/gard, cleanups, pruning, hedges, landscapes, irrigation, pwr washing, gutters 15yrs. 250883-8141. J.ENG LANDSCAPING Co. Custom landscaping design. Rock gardens, water features, pavers. Jan, 250-881-5680. PREPARATION FOR Fall, Winter & Spring. Professional garden & landscape services. Maintenance, design & installations. Call (250)474-4373.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Reno’s plus. Visa accepted. Small jobs ok. #22779 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202.

A1 -DIAMOND DAVE Gutter cleaning, repairs, gutter guard, power washing, window washing, roof de-mossing. Free no obligation est. 250-889-5794. GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323. GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778.

CLEANING SERVICES

GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632.

ABSOLUTELY CLEAN. Husband & wife team. Power Washing. (778)440-6611.

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869

NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

SPOTLESS HOME Cleaning. Affordable, Experienced, Reliable, Efficient. (250)508-1018

WATTS ON ELECTRIC, Residential, Commercial, Renovations. #100213. 250-418-1611.

COMPUTER SERVICES

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519.

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858.

HIRE-A-HUSBAND, 250-5144829. Specialize in bath/kitchen reno’s and accessibility. Serving Victoria for 23 years.

FENCING

IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com

COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites and more. Call 250-886-8053.

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

CA$H for CAR$ GET RID OF IT TODAY:)

250-888-JUNK www.888junk.com CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463. GARDEN CITY Green Hauling & Recycle. Chris, 250-2170062. junkremovalvictoria.com

PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades & maintenance. WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440.

✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

HOME REPAIRS HIRE-A-HUSBAND, 250-5144829. Specialize in bath/kitchen reno’s and accessibility. Serving Victoria for 23 years.

IRRIGATION/SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

HANDYPERSONS

SUMMIT SERVICES. Total property services. Including certified Irrigation & Landscaping, Site Maintenance inside and out. See what everyone is talking about! 250-883-1041. james@summitirrigation.ca

Aroundthehouse.ca ALL, Repairs & Renovations Ben 250-884-6603 AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397.

LANDSCAPING AURICLE LAWNS- Hedge, tree pruning, winter clean, pwr wash, snow rmvl. 882-3129 I’VE GOT a truck. I can haul. Reasonable rates, so call. Phil 250-595-3712. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS 250.388.3535

ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Rockwork, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Fully insured. Estimates. Call 250-588-9471 - 250-882-5181

MOVING & STORAGE 2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton, 5 ton. Prices starting at $75/hr. 250-220-0734.

PAINTING A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

PRICED BY the job. No surprises. Guaranteed. 25 yrs, 2nd generation Master Plumber. 778-922-0334 Visa/MC.

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

TREE SERVICES LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

UPHOLSTERY

NORM’S PAINTING- 15% offQuality work. Reliable. Refs. 25 yr exp. 250-478-0347. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

PLUMBING EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376. FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss, Pwr Wash. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

Give them power. Give them confidence. Give them control.

GIVE THEM A PAPER ROUTE! A paper route is about so much more than money. These days kids want and need so many things. With a paper route they not only earn the money to buy those things, they also gain a new respect for themselves. They discover a new sense of confidence, power and control by having their very own job, making their own money and paying for their own games, phones and time with friends. All it takes is an hour or so after school Wednesday and Friday. And even better... there are no collections required.

It’s so easy to get started… call

250-360-0817

circulation@vicnews.com circulation@saanichnews.com circulation@goldstreamgazette.com www.vicnews.com www.saanichnews.com www.goldstreamgazette.com

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR


A20 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Cadboro Bay Peoples Compounding Pharmacy | 3825 Cadboro Bay Rd. | 250-477-2131 Fairfield Peoples Compounding Drug Mart | Fairfield Plaza, 1594 Fairfield Rd. | 250-598-9232 Shelbourne Plaza Peoples Compounding Pharmacy | 3643 Shelbourne St. | 250-577-1881 www.victoriapharmacy.com

Tuesday February 7th Is Seniors Appreciation Day ENJOY 15% OFF ALL PURCHASES*

Great Prices on Organic Chocolate

Denm Island Assorted Denman Chocolate Bars

Organic Fair Assorted Chocolate Bars

Created locally in a magical chocolate factory on Denman Island these delicious bars contain the finest organic cocoa in ranges from 60% to 72%. Cocoa is a powerful antioxidant and can improve cardiovascular health.

Created in Cobble Hill, Organic Fair bars are all organic and fair trade. With an assortment of exotic flavours including fig, roobios, matcha and chilies you will find something to excite your palate.

279

379

Cocoa Camino Assorted Chocolate Bars

G Green and Black Assorted Organic Chocolate

Camino chocolates are made from quality organic ingredients proudly grown by fair trade certified co-operatives of family farmers.

The UK’s most famous organic chocolate collection. Deep rich flavours and beautiful packaging make Green and Blacks a unique delicious treat.

399

389

Safe, Healing, Natural Products

Weleda Baby Skin Care Line Made from hand-picked Biodynamic calendula, organic chamomile and natural plant-based oils, Weleda formulations support your baby’s skin functions for healthy and natural development.

Webber Naturals PGX Daily - 90 Soft Gels

A. Vogel Menopause - 30 Tab

20% off

Menopause, from A. Vogel the leader in natural remedies, is clinically proven to reduce the number and intensity of hot flashes. Made from a safe, natural tincture of organic sage.

20% off

PGX helps promote healthy blood sugar levels and supports weight management. A unique and effective product made from kelp.

15% off

Lorna Vanderhaeghe Sexsmart - 180 Caps Stimulates and enhances blood flow and promotes romantic energy. A perfect Valentine’s gift for the special someone in your life.

Congratulations to Naz for receiving Leadership Victoria’s Lifetime Achievement Award! Join Naz Rayani for an Open House at Cadboro Bay Peoples Pharmacy on February 8th from 11-2pm. There will be free coffee and muffins. *Regular priced items only. Other restrictions apply, ask in store for details. Get your Peoples First Card for savings and rewards. Prices Valid through February 29th. Consult your pharmacist or physician about supplements and Vitamins. *Regul

25% off

Open House

Feb 8, 11-2pm


Feb.1,2011 OakBayNews