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ISSUE NO. 6 PROPOSAL


FRONT OF BOOK

“TO BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN YESTERDAYS ARTISTS AND TODAYS ARTISTS WE WANT TO CREATE A DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE ‘LEGEND’ AND THEIR MODERN ITERATION”

1970’S ISSUE


FRONT OF BOOK

THE SUPERSTARS

JANE FORTH & COREY GRANT TIPPIN. Jane Forth is an iconic 1970s Warhol superstar and model (named a “new now face” in a 1970 issue of Life Magazine) who starred in Paul Morrissey’s Trash, Women in Revolt, and L’Amour. Known for her exotically aristocratic beauty, plucked brows, rouged cheeks, severe chignons and Bette Davis eyes, Jane Forth is representative of the dizzy glamour of the 1970s factory. Stylist Corey Grant Tippin was a Factory regular and Warhol collaborator who appeared alongside Jane in L’Amour, and the two still remain close friends.We will be featuring Jane and Corey reminiscing about their days in the Factory in the 1970s, and discussing how being a mythic “superstar” has effected the rest of their adult lives.


FRONT OF BOOK

THE ILLUSIONIST

HOLLY WOODLAWN. Holly Woodlawn is a Puerto Rican-born transvestite actress and former Warhol superstar, who appeared in his movies Trash (1970) and Women in Revolt (1972). Her life was summarized by Lou Reed in his song “Walk on the Wild Side”. “...Holly came from Miami FLA, / hitch-hiked her way across the USA, / plucked her eyebrows on the way, / shaved her legs, and then he was a she...”


FRONT OF BOOK

THE PROVOCATEUR

GENESIS P-ORRIDGE. Legend of the Anglo-American underground, and

avant-

and expressive identity and on the language of true

garde anti-hero. In the early 1970s, P-Orridge met

love, P-Orridge and Lady Jaye applied the strategy of

William S. Burroughs, who introduced h/er to Brion

“cutting-up” to their own bodies, in an effort to merge

Gysin, marking the beginning of a seminal and influential

their two identities, through plastic surgery, hormone

collaborative relationship. Burroughs, under Gysin’s

therapy, cross-dressing

tutelage, repopularized the “cut-up” technique of the early

20th

century

Surrealists,

in

which

text,

or

narrative imagery, is cut up and re-organized, creating a new, non-linear formulation. P-Orridge founding

first of

achieved

COUM

recognition

Transmissions,

a

with

the

1969

confrontational

performance collective heavily influenced by Dada, which was later transformed into the band Throbbing Gristle. (P-Orridge would, in 1981, found the ground-breaking band, Psychic TV.) By the time COUM disbanded in 1976, it had helped push the boundaries and shatter the definitions of performance and contemporary art, paving the way for later transgressive work. In the 1990s, P-Orridge began a collaboration with the performance artist Lady Jaye Breyer, which focused on a single, central

concern—deconstructing

the

fiction

of

self.

Influenced again by “cut-up” techniques and frustrated by what they felt to be imposed limits on personal


FRONT OF BOOK

THE SEX SYMBOLS

JOE DELLESANDRO &TONY WARD. Joe Dallesandro and Tony Ward are two iconic sex symbols whose appeal transcends gender lines and sexual orientation. Joe Dallesandro or Little Joe, is the famous Warholian Adonis who served as the object of desire for most men and women in Paul Morrissey’s films. Tony Ward first achieved fame in 1983 as a Calvin Klein underwear model and has managed to transform his sex appeal into art over the course of a three decade career. Joe and Tony will discuss their roles as worldwide sex symbols, and how they have transformed carnal power into for fuel for creativity and art.


FRONT OF BOOK

THE FASHION PHOTOGRPAHERS

THREE PASADENA BOYS. In 1979 Mark Arbeit, Just Loomis and George Holz were photography students at Art Center Pasadena who emulated the great master Helmut Newton. After staking out his backyard, the three were brought on board by Newton and his wife/collaborator June as assistants. Now well-established photographers in their own rights, the Three Pasadena Boys’ very disparate bodies of work still invoke the spirit of Newton and pay homage to his enduring legacy on the concomitant spheres of art and fashion photography.


FRONT OF BOOK

THE NO-WAVE MOVEMENT

AMOS POE. Amos Poe is a revered filmmaker who was on the scene, Super 8 camera in hand, during the first days of CBGBs. His resultant footage became the watershed art- punk documentary “Blank Generation” which exposed the world to the first stirrings of punk on the Bowery. Eventually he coined the term “no-wave” which referred to a downtown band à part who made dynamic art, music and film on non-existent budgets.Nowadays he teaches film at NYU.


FRONT OF BOOK

THE ARTIST

SCOTT BROMLEY. Architect Scott Bromley designed one of the most important structures of 1970s art, fashion and music -- Studio 54. Bromley has remained a prestigious architect whose other projects have remained on the forefront of architectural thought. Bromley offers insight into the way spaces and their functions have changed since the 70s, and how the space he designed made itself an integral part of the Studio 54 dialogue.


FRONT OF BOOK

THE JETSETTER

PAT CLEVELAND. It’s hard to find a person more representative of 1970’s jet-set glamour than Pat Cleveland. A habitue of Studio 54 and Halston’s apartment, Cleveland’s gazelle-like beauty made her a muse to many photographers and fashion designers. Still modeling, Pat remains an icon of Uptown 70s.


FRONT OF BOOK

THE TRIBE

THE BOSTON SCHOOL: NAN GOLDIN, DAVID ARMSTRONG, MARK MORRISROE, It took a multi-sexual band of outsiders studying art in Boston in the 1970s to elevate photos of ones own “tribe” to art. The now iconic photos of these close-knit artists feature the love, heartbreak, drugs, violence, sex and transgressions of their own youthful clan.

They illustrate what it’s like to be eighteen or nineteen in the world

on your own for the first time. Goldin, Armstrong and DiCorcia have gone on to vast success in the art world while sadly Morrisroe passed away of AIDS in 1985.


FRONT OF BOOK

SHE’S IT

KIM ANN FOXMAN. Originally hailing from Hawaii, Kim Ann Foxman’s blurry ethnicity, fluid gender, and laid-back charisma have established her as an icon of 2000s New York City nightlife and dance music. Her membership in the wildly popular acid-house group Hercules & Love Affair (whose track, “Blind”, was named Pitchfork’s best song of 2008) established her as a performer known worldwide. She recently released a solo EP and continues to tour with Hercules and Love Affair.

Past creative endeavors have included a popular line of jewelry sold at OAK.


FRONT OF BOOK

NIGHTLIFE

ANTON PERICH. Anton Perich is a legendary figure of art and nightlife in New York City. He moved to New York in 1970, became friends with Andy Warhol and contributed as a photographer to Warhol’s Interview. He also worked as a busboy at the legendary Max’s Kansas City, where he photographed the scene as an ongoing art performance every night, along with exhibiting the photos on the walls. In 1977-78, he designed and build an electric panting machine, an early predecessor of the inkjet printer. The development of this machine made Anton a pioneer of electric-digital-computer art. In 1978, he founded NIGHT as a interactive “gallery space” for his photography and the nightly activities at places such as Studio 54. In 2006, had a video retrospective at the Anthology Film Archives, in New York.


FRONT OF BOOK

THE UNICORN.

LADYFAG.

Ladyfag is a New York nightlife and fashion icon known for her over-the-top parties, over-the-top personality, and over-the-top vintage ensembles. Known to have deemed “being Ladyfag� her full-time occupation (a time-consuming job which includes hosting five parties a week and writing a column), Ladyfag has elevated her identity to art through the mixture of performance, drag, and campy self-parody.


FRONT OF BOOK

THE CHAMELOEN.

DIAMOND RINGS. Diamond Rings is a Toronto-based singer/songwriter whose sexual ambiguity and bizarrely pastiched style (channeling everything from B-boy to glam rocker) has made him one of the most exciting performers to burst out onto the music scene this year. Reminiscent of 1970s David Bowie and all that he stood for -- androgyny, peacockery and glamour -- Diamond Rings is pushing 1970s glam rock style into the 2010s.


EDITORIAL INSPIRATION The 1970s were an especially ripe time if you were some sort of creator. Downtown Manhattan was a wasteland of cored-out, junkie-populated warehouses, and rents were starving artist-friendly. On any given night you would find those would one day be international legends checking out Television at Studio 54, dancing to the newest Larry Levan mix at Paradise Garage, shopping at Fioruccis, hobnobbing at Studio 54 or discussing ideas in the back room of Max’s Kansas City. David Bowie made androgyny and peacockery acceptable for both men and women, Warhol elevated the people you would avoid on the street at night to “superstars”, and artistic transgression in all its forms reined. It was out of this clime, immediately following the social upheavals of the 1960s, that many of the most enduring cultural and sub-cultural movements were born. In the newest issue of OAKAZINE we want to go back and explore why this cultural moment continues to be an inspiration to creators and appreciators of all affiliations. The people featured in this issue embody all that OAKAZINE finds most interesting, groundbreaking and experimental about the 1970s.To bridge the gap between yesterday’s artists and today’s artists we want to create a dialogue between the “legend” and their modern day iteration. Our fashion editorials will serve to reframe the aesthetic implications of the 1970s in new ways – play with concepts of time, iconography and nostalgia. We want to give the top photographers and stylists an arena to collaborate on new explorations of what exactly the 1970s were.

1970’S ISSUE


EDITORIAL INSPIRATION

HIGH GLOSS. High gloss pays tribute to the new attitude of liberation and experimentation that was the norm in 1970s high fashion editorial photography. Exemplified by the work of Guy Bourdin, Cris von Wagenheim and Debora Turbeville, high gloss is defined by bold pops of color, heavy makeup, razor sharp cheekbones, nudity, richly tailored clothes, flowing Halston-esque goddess gowns, and oddly extravagant uptown scenarios.


EDITORIAL INSPIRATION

1970’S AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE. Embodying all that Americans immediately visualize when they think “1970s”, 70s American pop culture pays tribute to that general, pervasive, delocalized 1970s American aesthetic. It encompasses 70s interiors (wood-paneling, shag rugs, printed wallpaper), common trends (paisley, leisure suits, polyester, bellbottoms), 70s colors (brown, beige, brick red, mustard), and the look of faded Kodachrome and Polaroid.


EDITORIAL INSPIRATION

ART PHOTOGRAPHY. In the vein of Helmut Newton, Mapplethorpe and Andy Warhol. Bold nudes and odd, decadent scenarios.


EDITORIAL INSPIRATION

MAGAZINE COVERS. Covers of the magazines that embodied the 70s era.


EDITORIAL INSPIRATION

DOWNTOWN PUNK. Downtown punk pays tribute to the dirty, raucous, music-centric culture that cropped up on the Bowery in the mid70s. Defined by hyper-sexuality, drug use and a gritty DIY ethos, downtown punk pays tribute to hazy, boozy nights and early mornings spent at CBGBs and Max’s Kansas City. Some representative bands are The Stooges, Television, The Ramones, Patti Smith, and Blondie.


EDITORIAL INSPIRATION

MACHO. Macho encompasses the muscular, unbuttoned hyper-masculinity of 1970s gays culture. Embodied by places such as Chelsea Piers, Fire Island, and the bathhouses, Macho is all about that mustachioed, short shorts-wearing, chest haired brand of overt male sexuality.


EDITORIAL INSPIRATION

NIGHT LIFE. Night life pays homage to the over-the-top decadence of exclusive discos and dance clubs like Studio 54, Xenon, Paradise Garage and Mudd Club. Full of booze and drugs, glitter and glamour, smoke and mirrors, New York 1970s discos have become storied for their anything goes environments and star-studded fetes.


Night life pays homage to the over-the-top decadence of exclusive discos and dance clubs like Studio 54, Xenon, Paradise Garage and Mudd Club. Full of booze and drugs, glitter and glamour, smoke and mirrors, New York 1970s discos have become storied for their anything goes environments and starstudded fetes.


DESIGN & ART DIRECTION INSPIRATION

TYPOGRAPHY, LAYOUT ART DIRECTION.

1970’S ISSUE


DESIGN & ART DIRECTION INSPIRATION

EDITORIAL. FASHION + TYPOGRAPHY.

21


DESIGN & ART DIRECTION INSPIRATION

COVERS. MASTHEAD IDEAS.

22


DESIGN & ART DIRECTION INSPIRATION

BODY COPY. PAGE LAYOUTS AND TYPOGRAPHIC TREATMENTS.

23


CONTACT INFO.

OAKAZINE.

MARTINCHRISTOPHER@OAKAZINE.COM | PETER@OAKAZINE.COM | MARLO@OAKAZINE.COM



OAKAZINE 6 PROPOSAL