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T HE CON T EN T

T h e V oy e u r

Richard Haines photographed by Daniel Moss

LYNN YAEGER text by Cator Sparks, photographed by Andreas Laszlo Konrath

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the icon .8

t h e a rt i s t s

curated by Amy Sadao

Jennie C. Jones Xylor Jane Leidy Churchman Tara Donovan

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“ W H E R E W E F A L L” Metropolis photography by Tim Zaragoza / styling by James M Rosenthal

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Unconditional photography by Eli Schmidt / styling by Richard Aybar

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photography What Lies Beneath by Ryan Michael Kelly

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Come as you are

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Une Demoiselle en Detresse

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photography by Gray Scott / styling by Cameron Cooper

photography by Adam Franzino / styling Emma Cali

No.1: “Collage” by Phillip Lim & Natalie Gracia-Cetto, No.2: “Ende/Anfang” by Damir Doma & Yann Vasnier, No.3: “Solar Donkey Power” by Henrik Vibskov & Louise Turner, No.4: “Smell” by Henry Holland & Stephen Nilsen, No.5: “Nicoll No. 17” by Richard Nicoll & Rodrigo Flores-Roux, No.6: “Whiskey Caramélisé” by Toga & Alexandra Kosinski. Photography by Gabriel Eid, Art Direction by 3 Deep Design

www.six-scents.com


T HE S T A F F

Editor-in-Chief

Martin-Christopher Harper Art Director

warren corbitt Art’s Curator

Amy Sadao Fashion Director

James M Rosenthal

Assistant to the Editor-in-Chief

Anita Pandian

Contributing Photographers

Adam Franzino, Daniel Moss, Gray Scott, Ryan Michael Kelly, ELI SCHMIDT, Tim Zaragoza

Contributing Fashion Editors

Cameron Cooper, Emma Cali, Richard Aybar

Interns

RADBYRADHOURANI.COM

RAD BY RAD HOURANI

Imani Whythe, J.L. Sikorski, K. Schmidt and Forrest Pierce Bastien


T HE L E T T ER

w e s t a n d ! WHERE

Welcome to my first issue of OAK.A.ZINE. This specially curated body of work was conjured up to encompass many elements of interest — Art, Fashion, Icons, Voyeurs and History. This is a fresh look into the amazing world of our subjects: Yaeger, Donovan, Haines, Jane, Churchman, and Jones. Each and every subject we explore has continually kept a great sense of individuality, creativity and swagger that we covet and pay homage to in the coming pages. I have been given the opportunity to work with some of the greatest artists and photographers in the industry. Each of them expresses a voice individual to their craft. I have been exhausted by homogenization, in all mediums. The tiring of those that are gifted. The allowance of those characters who were just lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time — are you talented? In this issue we insist that we hold fast and give a voice back to the idea that individuality is everything. That we must know where we are and

W H E R E

W E

S T A N D

“I am what time, circumstance, history, have made of me, certainly, but I am also, much more than that. So are we all.” james Baldwin

Martin-Christopher Harper Editor In Chief

OAK.A.ZINE

martinchristopher (at) oakazine.com / oakazine.com


THE VOYEUR

RICHARD HAINES

men.style.com, refinery29.com and getkempt.com for his wildly popular site www.designerman-whatisawtoday.blogspot.com. Haines showcased his personal and professional work in his first solo show at one of the Lower East Side’s most respected galleries, Envoy Enterprises, in July 2009.

P H OTO

Daniel Moss

R I C H A R D H A I N E S often refers to New York City as an endless runway. This is a befitting description of his own New York story: he moved to the big city to pursue illustration and along the way became a successful fashion designer who has come full circle as one of today’s most sought after fashion illustrators. In fact, many look to Haines as the impetus of fashion illustration’s resurging popularity today. Haines, seated front row at fashion week’s most desirable shows, busily sketches images for magazines and blogs who hire him to record what no camera is capable of capturing. His illustrations regularly grace the pages of InStyle magazine and retailers such as Barneys, J Crew and Pennyblack. He’s received accolades from respected critics, including Paper Magazine, New York Magazine,

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Haines’ expertise in fabrication, piquancy, proportion and in the often missed details of how a garment falls on the body deliver remarkable perspectives that beguile the eye. His unique style can be traced back to his successful career as a designer for selective companies like J Crew, Calvin Klein, Perry Ellis, Sean Combs and Bill Blass. The experience garnered at each of these companies helped to complement and nurture his formal training as an illustrator. To be sure, Haines is no mechanic. His deeply-rooted interest in fashion design, from childhood to present day, is mostly sentimental. It informs his every stroke, making his works surpass the realm of simple figurations by crossing into the rarely penetrated dimension of art. Haines was recently commissioned to do a series of sketches for Pennyblack. You can view his sketches of the 3-day shoot of Scott Schuman (The Sartoriliast) and Josh Olins in their flagship store, in Milan on February 4, 2010.

COUNTERCLOCKWISE, TOP LEFT

MAN

3 A.M., PEDI, BOYS AT MAIN


T HE ICON

__The snip it of the telephone call.

LY NN Y AE G E R

I C O N Y A E G E R and C A T O R S P A R K S reflect and project.

Everyone knows who Lynn Yaeger is. She is an icon in New York (although she is going to guffaw when she reads this). But it’s true! Her magical presence is enough to garner Japanese kids to whip out cameras and uber hipsters to worry just how cool they really look. And speaking of looks, Ms. Yaeger gives the world major looks daily. She is one of the few in fashion who still ‘do it up’ on a daily basis. Her cupid bow lips, her severe red Louise Brooks bob and her dots of rouge have become a trademark. Not to mention her habille. The drapes! The capes! The purses! She never disappoints on the fashion front. Then there is her writing. Beyond compare. Her column in The Village Voice was every fashion and shopping guru’s must read for 30 years. She was laid off last year, (how rude!) but don’t worry, she is moving full steamer trunk ahead with pieces in Vogue, The New York Times and a regular column on Sundance Channel’s FullFrontalFashion.com. She is frank, funny and very smart. Yes, she is the Dorothy Parker of the fashion world. I gave her a bell to have a catch up and to hear her thoughts on her old stomping grounds, the East Village of the past, present and future.

Cator Sparks. Lynn, I have done a heap of research and haven’t found a pinch about

your past. Spill it!

LY.

I lived for a long time on East 9th Street between 1st & 2nd Avenues.

CS. And what was your apartment like? LY. My rent was $135 a month! It was wonderful because everyone had their own

apartments back then. Nobody had roommates. I mean, they were dumps, but they were our dumps. I think that is long gone in the East Village now. Everything is so expensive, and they are still dumps! CS. What was the vibe in the area back then?

LY. I was totally submerged in a 1920’s fantasy. I wasn’t a punk. I tried! But it just Well, I moved to New York City from Long Island, Massapequa Park actually. I didn’t like it very much. Not a good fit. I always looked how I look now and didn’t work. I did go to Danceteria a little bit but I really thought of myself more as Dorothy Parker at The Round Table than bouncing around a punk show. it’s a conservative suburb. So you catch my drift. I never liked art. Still don’t! But I do know there were some galleries around down CS. So where did you land in New York City? there. There was an art scene there, right? Sure! Lynn Yaeger.

CS. So what happened? Did it gentrify? LY. You know a friend of mine still lives over there and she has kids. She invited me

to join her on the playground. Absolutely not! So we found a café on 12th Street and you know what? It was full of kids! Everywhere! I couldn’t believe it. And I find it so odd that Avenue A is a big straight bar scene today. People never used to come down to the East Village to drink. On the other hand it is safe. So there is that. I got mugged once back then but that’s it. CS. What are your favorite places in the neighborhood? LY. Veselka is still nice. And you know I really love this little statue in Tompkins

PHOTO

A n d r e a s L a s z l o K o n r at h

Square Park. There was this ship called the General Slocum that took hundreds of local Germans out for the annual church picnic on the river back in 1910. The ship went up in flames and everyone died. It was quite tragic. There is a statue of two children in the park to commemorate this disaster and I always enjoy stopping and admiring it. I also love the new Cooper Union building don’t you? I hate that new Cooper Square Hotel though. I was so sorry to see Love Saves the Day close. That was there since time began. CS. What do you consider the new East Village? LY. Somewhere in Brooklyn I don’t know about! Is it Bushwick or Redhook or

something? You know I ventured out to Williamsburg one time and gave my self an hour to get there. It took 10 minutes! I had no idea. But aesthetically pleasing it is not. Nothing can touch the beauty and history of the East Village.

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THE ARTISTS

JENNIE C. JONES

Jennie C. Jones lives and works in Brooklyn NY. Her work will be on view at Lawrimore Projects (Seattle) February-March 2010; Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco) traveling to LAXART (Los Angeles) January -March 2011; and can currently be seen in “30 Seconds off an Inch” through March 14, 2010 at The Studio Museum in Harlem. www.jenniecjones.com

“I love the Art World, I have all their albums.”

j ennie c . j ones is witty as fuck. In her studio or at her home, I always overstay. She creates spaces that breathe, where you want to sit and talk, and keep talking, and where you find yourself glancing up at the work in progress or on display until you have to walk over and give it your full attention. Plus if Jennie is present, as I said, you will be doubly engaged. It is rare to encounter work so smart and so sublime you can’t stop thinking about how it came into being, and about what the artist who made it might be doing right now. The drawings here are selected from a series of twelve; one was recently acquired by The Studio Museum. The conceptual art of Jennie C. Jones actualizes ideas originating from thinking about jazz: about how and why we listen, “the riff”, co-option, modernism, obsolescence. Encounters with her sculptures, drawings, sound works, and installations morph into imagined memories of the works turning under a pin light. They emit an aura of assuredness, the pared-down refinement of singularity. To wit, observe Jones’s tape case objects. Titled for the “albums” they once held, the pieces haunt, and amuse. I once posited Jones’s work was about emptiness, about that which has been evacuated. “John Coltrane has left the building…and we’re here with Kenny G.” Thankfully, Jones doesn’t traffic in nostalgia. Silence is not simply absence – it can be radical.

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THE ARTISTS

XYLOR JAN E Massachusetts based painter Xylor Jane is represented in NY by Canada. Her work is on view through February 28, 2010 in “Ecstatic Resistance”, organized by Emily Roysdon, X Initiative, New York City

X Y L O R J A N e ’ s paintings and mail art are transparently weird. Arriving unannounced a Jane can startle, like stepping outside to fetch the paper and discovering a meteor has demolished your stoop. I turned the corner in a gallery the other day to find her work conversing with an A.L. Steiner installation. While Steiner’s photo-homage shared an avalanche of bodies in nature - and in each other - signs and symbols exploding, the Jane works silently radiated energy. Vibrating, as if under pressure. Need I explain further that standing between these two artists’ works defined the transcendent? A little more on what takes her paintings beyond formalism and why they stand outside hard and fast post-dec categorization (post-Pattern & Decoration): swarming, Leonardo Pisano (otherwise known as Fibonacci), and deep time. It’s tempting to view contemporary art as a riddle, straining to find a clue. Confronted with a Xylor Jane painting, the viewer understands that there is a system underpinning the enormous task of making, every single mark. But by making opaque, or, at least, by making it more deliciously secretive, Jane relieves us of the burden of fantasizing that there is a single answer. I leave the coda to Canada’s Phil Grauer, describing “NDE” their most recent Xylor Jane exhibition: “An overt investment in pattern drives the paintings to a

place where they fall from comprehension, and return to a visual tapestry of the absurd and sublime. Any notion that the idea creates the art is put to rest by the shear madness of the machine.”

Bombinating, 2009 oil on panel; 44"x 41" courtesy canada

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THE ARTISTS

LE I DY CH U RCH MAN

Leidy Churchman lives and works in Brooklyn. His work is represented in NY by Horton Gallery. www.leidychurchman.com

Untitled (Simultaneously 1), 2009 video still from Simultaneously MEN music video, 6:38 min. Untitled (PAINTING TREATMENTS 3), 2009 video still from PAINTING TREATMENTS, single channel, 2:38 min. Untitled (Simultaneously 5), 2009 video still from Simultaneously MEN music video, 6:38 min. Untitled (PAINTING TREATMENTS 5), 2009 video still from PAINTING TREATMENTS, single CLOCKWISE, TOP LEFT

channel, 2:38 min.

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A triangular rock masquerading as brie. Bearded faces painted on foam core, trans bodies painted on wood. A wonky Mondrian and a music video for MEN. L E I D Y C H U R C H M A N has been “my favorite artist” for the past six months. Attempting to describe his multifarious oeuvre I’ve used the names Martin Kippenberger, Richard Tuttle, Mike Kelley, Joan Jonas, and Trisha O. I am not sure I am comfortable with the current use of “trans” to describe objects Brown. I’m thrilled to present Churchman in Oak.a.zine because it enabled and processes that are not lived experiences or political positions of transpeople. me to further contemplate his work, and to discuss his current thinking But art is sometimes described as trans. about making art. Oak.a.zine. Your recent suite of short videos, excerpted as stills, play as a comedy

LC. Picture making is transgendered. When you are putting together a picture, you

of artifice explicating painting. I enjoy that you are puncturing, literally flogging, the masculinist tradition of action painting while declining the composition of a single, final image. The works aren’t strictly performance, video, painting, or printmaking…and yet they aren’t not any of these either.

are looking for it to be many things all at the same time, to be in orbit. Artists are trying to make a queer thing. What does it mean when you are a queer artist? Where is that conflict and that freedom, and how does it live in the work? I don’t know what it is like not to be trans. But I see that everyone, everywhere, and constantly, is interested in manicuring his or her body. Making art can be like this. It’s tending to your things, or materials. Setting it all right, making it just so, is how artists set the picture up so it can become unreal.

Leidy Churchman. As a painter, I was always jealous of friends who were video makers

or performers and the events that surrounded their art. But I still always want an object when I’m done working. I can’t ever decide which I want more: to be in the action, sharing it with the audience or to have the object to reflect my process. So I guess I’m doing both. O. I love how you handicap the image making, the painting, by incorporating a

variety of found and made tools. I notice that sticks, rocks, and other nature-walk detritus appear in your work. Jimmie Durham told us that someone said Maria Thereza Alves couldn’t use wood because it was too sentimental.

O. Is there a hierarchy to your interest in mediums? The old saw is that painters

create the image while photographers capture it. Both require editing and when we move into time-based works, the image making process and the product become blurred. LC. Right now I’m really enjoying working with pictures in a space that exists over

time as opposed to showing finished, dried paintings.

O.Yes, I see the wet in your work as living and the dry as dead. Wood is sentimental. I actually, usually, hate seeing sticks in other people’s art. You know how William Wegmann says, “I don’t think people should dress up dogs LC. Sometimes it seems like that! I use video like a pool of paintings from which to and take photographs of them”? But there are two sides to every object, because it extract pictures. This seemingly inextricable continuity of pictures in their is maybe more sentimental - following Rauschenberg and Dada not to mention plurality allows for an oscillation between moments that present themselves as “the unmonumental” - to pluck found objects from city trash. Attempts to find the painting and anti-painting. poetic in the accumulation of the metropolis are limited. When I use a rock, or a stick, or a flogger, or a dildo, I try and use just one. So it might be about only that one. O. Robert Blanchon wrote about coming up against “the big guns” of contemporary art. I think he was referring to Richard Serra and other monumental sculptors. Who are your big guns? LC.

LC. In one direction there is Vito Acconci, Paul McCarthy, and the Viennese

Actionists. But all that work stops with the rubbing of a soft cock. When Paul McCarthy pours the ketchup on his thighs, it’s all over – I question how different I am than that. I’m amazed that whenever you get sloppy with paint it becomes sexual, scatological. I think of your work as a trippy, queer homage to art history, specifically painting: you use dirt brown for Spanish blacks in a messy cooking still life, insert trans bodies in to traditions of portraiture, show us where mechanical reproduction blossoms through space and time. I experience so many associations viewing your video works. It’s a paean to a new space, a new territory. O.

In conclusion, I should tell our readers that “The Painting Tunic”, pictured here, will be included in a silent auction at Participant Gallery, February 18 to benefit one of our favorite non-profits, the Sylvia Rivera Law Project: http://srlp.org/bigchange. Thanks so much Leidy.

The Painting Tunic, 2007 acrylic on canvas, 41" x 33"


T HE INS P IRA T ION

TA R A DONOVAN

Tara Donovan is a Brooklyn-based artist. She is represented in New York by PaceWildenstein

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In November 2009, artist T ara D ono v an graciously answered some questions by email. __The following has been edited slightly... Oak.a.zine. I recently heard a Boston-based painter describe his motivation for

traveling abroad as, “the most boring and most basic reason an artist ever wants to go somewhere...to look at things.” What do you find yourself wanting to look at? Have any of these places/things/people remained consistent over time in their ability to remain interesting to you? Or do you identify a shift in the things you used to need to look at versus what is compelling now? Tara Donovan. I am always looking for fleeting details as these often provide the

inspiration for my work. I would love to offer the rationale that exotic places allow for more opportunities for me, but, in truth, I am probably more likely to spot something truly inspirational at the local bodega than at some legendary beach. O. I think it would be interesting for the reader if we could explore your career

trajectory and how it impacts your work and your life. Would you speak about the progression of your career, the “how you got here from there”? And how being a recognized artist has changed your practice? When did you shift to being a full-time artist and how is that going? Do you see it continuing? TD. I think career progression is something that is experienced very differently

depending on your viewpoint. For me, I really feel like I have just been working— doing what I need to do to keep my studio functioning at a pace that corresponds with demands. It’s a very basic business model on some level. Certainly, public validation, relative financial security, and a comfortable lifestyle are nice, but the demands and stresses also increase in tandem. I certainly hope it all continues at a manageable pace.


O. If there were no limits, is there a project you would really like to realize? TD. It’s actually really difficult for me to answer this question, because I already work

with relatively limitless amounts of materials. At the same time, limitations are what define my work...whether it is the specific visual qualities I choose to exploit or the architecture defining the spaces in which my work is displayed. Without limitations, I am afraid I would be quite lost. O. Are there differences between the art you love and the art you make? TD. Certainly, there are many artists who I admire whose work is entirely different

from my own.

My work approaches very basic units of design (e.g. cups, toothpicks, tape, glue, etc.) as raw materials, which, in massive aggregations, trade their functionality for an aesthetic sublimation. O. True, always so true, and on that note, could you speak to the crossover of your

work and other creative practices? Specific to the current issue of Oak.a.zine, where Martin-Christopher Harper draws inspiration from your installations, do you find inspiration in fashion, costuming, styling - on the street or as photographed - the ready-to-wear, the repurposed, couture? Are there any specific designers or styles or simply, people who wear clothes you could cite here? TD. I have always had an interest in lifestyle industries and not simply because I am

always seeking products and services to enhance my own living situation. Design, at some basic level, always corresponds to functionality (no matter how hard many designers try to complicate this relationship). My work approaches very basic units of design (e.g. cups, toothpicks, tape, glue, etc.) as raw materials, which, in massive aggregations, trade their functionality for an aesthetic sublimation. Outside of this more conceptual approach, I do have my favorite designers such as Maria Cornejo, whose clothes maintain an organic sculptural tendency while at the same time being very wearable. Jason Wu, Thakoon, and J. Mendel have all cited my work as one of the inspirations for their collections, so I guess there is some definite crossover in both directions.

là où

NOUS

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O. Thank you so much for your time Tara. Have a great 2010; we look forward to

seeing your new work.

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metro PHOTOGRAPHY

TIM ZAR AGOZA

STYLING

JAMES M ROSENTHAL

GERLAIN JEANS jacket


JOSEF STATKUS dress and underpinning MARIO MOYA corset PRADA bustle belt NICHOLAS MENDISE neck-pin brooch MIU MIU head piece CHANEL cuff


ACNE dress ERICKSON BEAMON necklace MARIO MOYA thigh high TATTERED GOSSAMER hat

SONIA RYKIEL bra, shorts and headpiece ADRIENNE LANDAU shrug CHANEL shoes DROACH cuff


CREDIT

FIFTH AVENUE SHOE REPAIR corset VPL skirt EDDIE BORGO cuff

ANA SEKULARA dress EDDIE BORGO earrings WUNDERKIND thigh high


ACNE dress ERICKSON BEAMON necklace TATTERED GOSSAMER hat MARIO MOYA top and thigh high FIFTH AVENUE SHOE REPAIR tulle dress CHANEL neck muff and arm cuffs NICHOLAS MENDISE camellia head piece SONIA credit item RYKIEL shoes

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C O N D I T I O N A L

PHOTOGRAPHY

E L I S C H M I DT

STYLING

R I C H A R D AY B A R

PAIGE NOVICK necklace worn as crown vintage veil


Im white long shirt dress Acne button down shirt woolrich vest Marc Jacobs sweater Hazard Koch necklace Society For RationaL DRESS belt pouch vintage Hazard Koch necklace(over pouch) Falke and Fogal socks Jil Sander shoes And-I knee brace vintage bags coat Michel Berandi hooded vest Aybar Studio acrylic thermal pants stylist’s own gloves o p p o s i t e RAF Simons

t h i s p a g e Siki


Lia Kess sequined tank Jil Sander t-shirt Jil Sander trousers Marc JacobS linen sweater


o p p o s i t e Elie

Tahari dress Helmut Lang top Risto skirt Aybar Studio veil Heather Huey feather headdress Aybar Studio shoes jacket t h i s p a g e Raf by Raf Simons Adam Kimmel coat Uniqlo thermals Risto Bimbiloski skirt Aybar Studio hat


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Im black dress shirt R af by Raf Simons jacket Yigal Azrouel jacket N ike shorts Aybar studio shinguards thermals C lu dress R obert Geller jacket r i g h t Uniqlo


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STYLING

CAMERON COOPER

Zana bayne

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long hoodie stylists own vinyl poncho oak oversize

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ADAM FR ANZINO

STYLING

EMMA CALI

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Diesel top Prabal Gurung skirt Inhabit knit sweater Prabal Gurung fur shawl Pedro Garcia suede loafers Alexis Bittar bangles and necklace


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photog raph e r Adam Fr an z i no / st ylist E m ma Cali Hai r Marti n Ch r istoph e r usi ng B u m b le an d B u m b le at K ate R yan I nc / Mak e-u p K r isti Matamoro s usi ng mac co sm etic s at K ate R yan I nc Mode l I ngvi ld at For d Mode ls / Photo Assistant Ti m O’Malle y / Dig tech An dr e a Cars on


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