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Appendix Geography of Poverty, continued Table 12.  Change in poverty in the urban core and suburbs of Ohio’s largest metro areas, 2000–2013 Population for whom poverty can be determined, 2000

Population in poverty, 2000

Poverty rate, 2000

Population for whom poverty can be determined, 2013

Akron

159,072

31,303

19.7%

143,050

44,938

31.4%

−10.1%

+43.6%

Canton

57,216

12,316

21.5%

49,868

16,722

33.5%

−12.8%

+35.8%

Geography

Population in poverty, 2013

Poverty rate, 2013

% Change in % Change in population, poor population, 2000–2013 2000–2013

Urban core

Cincinnati

234,431

57,675

24.6%

210,522

74,230

35.3%

−10.2%

+28.7%

Cleveland

612,933

135,198

22.1%

515,499

157,684

30.6%

−15.9%

+16.6%

Columbus

341,681

71,529

20.9%

327,776

100,630

30.7%

−4.1%

+40.7%

Dayton

110,025

24,076

21.9%

119,107

44,250

37.2%

+8.3%

+83.8%

Lima

40,376

8,001

19.8%

37,613

11,828

31.4%

−6.8%

+47.8%

Springfield

37,452

6,893

18.4%

32,832

10,103

30.8%

−12.3%

+46.6%

Toledo

199,199

41,283

20.7%

180,448

57,094

31.6%

−9.4%

+38.3%

Youngstown

142,757

24,928

17.5%

123,530

33,663

27.3%

−13.5%

+35.0%

Suburbs Akron

482,061

32,523

6.7%

510,062

57,392

11.3%

+5.8%

+76.5%

Canton

270,594

19,041

7.0%

273,009

34,291

12.6%

+0.9%

+80.1%

Cincinnati

1,160,750

76,379

6.6%

1,256,126

139,753

11.1%

+8.2%

+83.0%

Cleveland

1,354,579

83,112

6.1%

1,373,170

141,060

10.3%

+1.4%

+69.7%

Columbus

984,610

67,491

6.9%

1,209,278

144,164

11.9%

+22.8%

+113.6%

Dayton

579,184

41,892

7.2%

595,426

76,260

12.8%

+2.8%

+82.0%

Lima

22,329

2,378

10.6%

23,475

3,698

15.8%

+5.1%

+55.5%

Springfield

60,318

5,659

9.4%

57,575

10,535

18.3%

−4.5%

+86.2%

Toledo

310,772

25,698

8.3%

328,820

45,129

13.7%

+5.8%

+75.6%

Youngstown

254,917

23,621

9.3%

240,000

33,468

13.9%

−5.9%

+41.7%

Source: Community Research Partners analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data Notes: Urban cores and suburbs are defined as the urban and suburban areas within metropolitan areas. Urban and suburban areas are defined by ZIP code boundaries and classified based on density of development. Classification was developed by Trulia, the real estate website using a variety of thresholds including the density of households, business establishments, and jobs, as well as the share of auto commuters and single family homes.

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Dayton’s urban core—the only one among the Ohio’s largest metro areas to experience any population growth since 2000 (up 8.3%)—has experienced the fastest growth in urban poverty (up 83.8%) and has the state’s highest urban poverty rate (37.2%), while Cleveland still has the greatest concentration of urban poor (157,684) Between 2000 and 2013, Columbus’s suburbs have experienced both the fastest population growth (up 22.8%) and the fastest growth in suburban poverty (up 113.6%) in Ohio, and have the greatest concentration of suburban poor (144,164), while Springfield has the state’s highest suburban poverty rate (18.3%)

Ohio Association of Community Action Agencies

2015 State of Poverty in Ohio Report  
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