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Appendix Geography of Poverty, continued Table 11.  Change in poverty in Ohio’s urban, suburban, and rural areas, 2000–2013

Geography

Population for whom poverty can be determined, 2000

Population in poverty, 2000

Poverty rate, 2000

Share of Ohio’s poor, 2000

Population for whom poverty can be determined, 2013

Population in poverty, 2013

Poverty rate, 2013

Share of Ohio’s poor, 2013

% Change in population, 2000–2013

% Change in poor population, 2000–2013

Ohio

10,956,170

1,147,329

10.5%

100.0%

11,177,058

1,765,228

15.8%

100.0%

+2.0%

+53.9%

Urban areas Suburban areas

2,075,971

436,702

21.0%

38.1%

1,871,270

584,108

31.2%

33.1%

−9.9%

+33.8%

6,176,860

458,648

7.4%

40.0%

6,557,475

801,977

12.2%

45.4%

+6.2%

+74.9%

Rural areas

2,703,339

251,979

9.3%

22.0%

2,748,313

379,143

13.8%

21.5%

+1.7%

+50.5%

Source: Community Research Partners analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data Notes: Urban, suburban, and rural areas are defined by ZIP code boundaries and classified based on density of development. Classification was developed by Trulia, the real estate website using a variety of thresholds including the density of households, business establishments, and jobs, as well as the share of auto commuters and single family homes.

▪▪ ▪▪ ▪▪

Ohio’s poor are more likely to live in the suburbs (45.4%) than in the denser urban neighborhoods (33.1%) more commonly associated with poverty. The number of poor in Ohio’s urban areas has grown by 33.8% since 2000, while the total population in those areas has declined by 9.9%. While the poverty rate in Ohio’s urban areas (31.2%) is still more than twice the rate in the suburbs (12.2%), the poor population in the suburbs has grown by 74.9%, more than twice as fast as it has in the state’s urban areas (up 33.8%).

State of Poverty 2015

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2015 State of Poverty in Ohio Report  
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