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Appendix Defining Poverty Table 1.  Federal poverty level thresholds by household size and number of children, in dollars, 2013 Household size

Number of related children under age 18 0

One person, under age 65 Age 65 and over

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8+

12,119 11,173

Two people, under age 65 Age 65 and over

15,600

16,057

14,081

15,996

Three people

18,222

18,751

18,769

Four people

24,028

24,421

23,624

23,707

Five people

28,977

29,398

28,498

27,801

27,376

Six people

33,329

33,461

32,771

32,110

31,128

30,545

Seven people

38,349

38,588

37,763

37,187

36,115

34,865

33,493

Eight people

42,890

43,269

42,490

41,807

40,839

39,610

38,331

38,006

Nine people or more

51,594

51,844

51,154

50,575

49,625

48,317

47,134

46,842

45,037

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

▪▪ ▪▪

The U.S. Census Bureau calculates the federal poverty level (FPL) thresholds and estimates annually for the previous year The FPL is based on the cash resources shared by related individuals in a household and varies based on the number of adults and related children

Table 2.  Comparison between the Official and Supplemental Poverty Measures Official Poverty Measure

Supplemental Poverty Measure All related individuals who live at the same address and any co-resident unre-

Measurement Units

Families and unrelated individuals

lated children who are cared for by the family (such as foster children) and any co-habiters and their relatives

Poverty Threshold

3 times the cost of a minimum food diet

Threshold Adjustments Updating Thresholds

Vary by family size, composition, and age of householder Consumer Price Index

Mean of the 30th and 36th percentile of expenditures on food, clothing, shelter, and utilities of consumer units with exactly 2 children, multiplied by 1.2 Geographic adjustments for differences in housing costs by tenure and a 3-parameter equivalence scale for family size and composition 5-year moving average of expenditures on food, clothing, shelter, and utilities Sum of cash income; plus noncash benefits that families can use to meet their

Resource Measure

Gross pre-tax cash income

food, clothing, shelter, and utilities needs; plus tax credits; minus taxes, work expenses, out-of-pocket medical expenses, and child support paid to another household

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

▪▪ ▪▪

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The official measure does not account for differences in housing costs in different parts of the country The supplemental measure considers government assistance and necessary expenses to establish a more accurate amount of resources available Ohio Association of Community Action Agencies

2015 State of Poverty in Ohio Report  
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