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7. c

That an information sheet on research funding, scholarships and awards for women be produced. It would include information on funding which takes periods of parental leave into account and funding which is tagged for women.

8. Information gathered from the focus groups and questionnaires indicated that there was some interest in part-time employment while on parental leave. Attitudes were mixed with more general staff than academic attracted to the idea. The proposition may be more attractive to women who are on extended un-paid leave than to those who were on University or Government paid leave, although this was not tested in the project. Recommendation 8. That a database of staff on parental leave who are interested in part-time and temporary work be collated and, when these vacancies arise, the staff on this database be automatically notified by email. 9. The health and well-being of pregnant women and women returning to work must be of uppermost concern. Physical exhaustion was frequently mentioned as a barrier to morale and performance. In a few circumstances, women had rest space handy or sofas and comfortable chairs. Others were inhibited or embarrassed at having to ask for space or time to lie down. Participants in a focus group agreed that a ‘reclining armchair’ would be an ideal piece of furniture to have on loan. If it was easily moved around to where it was needed for a period of weeks, it could be used to benefit a number of women. This may be a very practical alternative if no designated to ‘rest rooms’ are available. Recommendation 9. That an ’endowed chair’ (reclining armchair on casters) be provided to enable pregnant women and women returning to work to rest. 10. A number of the issues identified in the 2005 Review of Paid Parental Leave remained as barriers in 2006. In particular, academic women complained that, to compensate for their absence, their teaching load was sometimes doubled when they returned to work. General-staff women reported being overloaded with work in their final weeks before taking leave and then feeling pressured to return earlier than they intended. A response to the 2005 review was to provide more information for staff. It may be necessary to focus future resources on managers and heads of department to provide them with assistance in managing their staff taking parental leave. Recommendations 10. a That a fact sheet be produced for managers to assist them in responding appropriately to staff requests for parental leave. This fact sheet will include information such as: ƒ Legal requirements; ƒ University policies; ƒ How to create a supportive climate for pregnant women, women returning to work, women breastfeeding; and ƒ Guidelines for covering work for both academic and general staff.

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Women Returning to Work  

a joint project by the University of Auckland and the Association of University Staff analysing women’s experiences returning to work after...

Women Returning to Work  

a joint project by the University of Auckland and the Association of University Staff analysing women’s experiences returning to work after...

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