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Related Research

EEO Trust Survey on Parenting and Paid Work 2005 The EEO Trust’s on-line survey on Parenting and Paid Work 2005 was completed by 4,475 New Zealand parents. The Executive Summary noted that: …. the one thing that workplaces could do to help parents be effective at work and at home is to provide some flexibility around working hours. This could include flexible starting and finishing times, or occasional time off during the day to see to family matters like medical appointments or school activities…… Affordable, quality, conveniently located childcare is also important to working parents, with a number of respondents saying how helpful it would be to have childcare facilities located close to work. They also want breastfeeding rooms and breast-milk storage facilities, special leave provisions so parents can care for sick children or attend school and sporting activities and they want to be able to take work home occasionally. Review of Parental Leave at The University of Auckland 2005 The Review of Paid Parental Leave noted clear distinctions between academic and general staff experiences of parental leave. General staff had more opportunity for their duties to be covered in their absence, while academic staff ‘flexibility’ resulted in duties often being condensed more than reduced. Academics tended to continue to participate in the workplace during parental leave. Flexible employment options and good childcare facilities were highly desirable. There was a demand for simple clear information on parental leave. Following the Review and advice from AUS, there were changes in policies to allow eligible parents to receive both Government and University Paid Parental Leave, greater flexibility in when leave was taken and production of a booklet called Parental Leave Guide for Staff. Survey of Work, Life and Family Responsibilities at The University of Auckland 2005 Survey findings: ƒ The majority of staff (63%) rated their work-life balance as satisfactory or above. This is consistent with the findings of the Ministry of Social Development’s Social Wellbeing Survey 2004 which rated 62% of New Zealanders as being ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with their work/life balance. ƒ Slightly less than half the sample (45%) believed that the University allowed for an appropriate work-life and family balance ‘most of the time’. ƒ Half of the respondents had not required flexibility to accommodate their responsibilities but, of those who did have special needs, the majority (86%) had them accommodated. Making flexible work options available to all staff was regarded as a highly effective means of assisting work-life balance and supporting staff with family responsibilities. Reducing excessive workloads was the second most frequently made suggestion for supporting work-life balance. In response to the request for suggestions on how the organisation could provide more support for staff with family responsibilities, some said that their needs were already well catered for. The majority of suggestions for improvements related to more flexible employment, promoting a ‘family friendly’ workplace culture, the need for improved childcare facilities, after-school care and holiday programmes and

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Profile for Tertiary Education Union

Women Returning to Work  

a joint project by the University of Auckland and the Association of University Staff analysing women’s experiences returning to work after...

Women Returning to Work  

a joint project by the University of Auckland and the Association of University Staff analysing women’s experiences returning to work after...

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