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Part B – Findings and conclusion justified. Those factors judged as not contributing to the over-representation of women at lower levels and under-representation at senior levels were: Gender differences in level of qualification Recruitment consultants not putting women forward for academic positions Those factors judged as contributing to this gendered pattern of participation in academia are discussed next. Appointment issues An issue that came through strongly in the survey was concern about gendered appointment processes. This has two aspects – starting pay rates; and gendered processes that impact on the particular position, and the step or placement within the range. Starting pay rates for the previous two years are discussed in relation to professors in Part B.2 and in detail in the next section B.6. These sections show that there are differences in average starting salaries for professors, tutors and senior tutors, but not for lecturers and senior lecturers. The second aspect is more difficult to track. This aspect is concerned with whether women are appointed to the correct level in the first place, and how this compares with appointment levels of ‘equivalent’ male academics. There were a number of responses to the open-ended survey questions that explicitly raised this issue, such as the following examples: It appears to me that men with similar skills and abilities are employed, starting on higher steps up the salary scale, and not expected to carry as high a teaching workload as female peers in the same college. Q31, Line 942 For academic staff, I believe the most discrepancy in gendered pay stems from the level of the original appointment for women. More women are appointed at lower pay to begins with than are men. This original appointment then has detrimental effects that last the entire career. Q31, Line 404 I think women staff members are ill-advised about their worth when they set their first contract with the university and will consequently, unlike men, agree to start on a lower salary level than men, which makes it very difficult for them to ever catch up. I also consider that there is little or no guidance for women staff members within their school setting, that encourages them to seek promotion. That has certainly been my experience. Q31, Line 1414 One section of the survey asked staff appointed in the last 24 months whether they considered they were appointed on the appropriate level on appointment. A slightly higher proportion of women than men (35% compared with 32%) felt this was not the case. In raw numbers this is 370 women compared with 226 men, and for academic staff, 101 women and 112 men. However, of this group of 113 academic staff, slightly more women than men believed that their appointment had left them with a long-standing anomaly that disadvantaged them (61 compared with 58). The committee considered that further exploration of appointment process was justified. 75

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Massey PaEE Review Final Report  

http://teu.ac.nz/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/Massey-PaEE-Review-Report-Final-Report.pdf

Massey PaEE Review Final Report  

http://teu.ac.nz/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/Massey-PaEE-Review-Report-Final-Report.pdf

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