Page 76

The representation of men and women in the Senior Leadership Team in the last four years is captured in Table 21.66 In this time there have been only 6 vacancies. The sole PVC vacancy was filled by a woman, and by early 2011 four of the five AVC vacancies were filled by women candidates. Table 21: Gender representation on the Senior Leadership Team67

January 2007 January 2008 January 2009 January 2010 August 2010 (1 vacancy)

Women No. 3 3 3 5 4

% 23% 23% 23% 33% 36%

Men No. 10 10 10 10 7

% 77% 77% 77% 67% 67%

It is clear from the information provided above that the previous male over-representation on SLT is in part a function of historical appointments and low turnover of this group, given that in the past four years, women have been appointed to five of the six vacancies that have arisen and that by 2011 the gender balance at that level is 50% women and 50% men. This change in gender representation on SLT in a relatively short time is extremely positive. Nevertheless, because progress for women has often found elsewhere to be followed by a decline (for example, because changes have been the result of a particular individual rather than been built into the way the organisation operates as a whole), the committee compiled and explored a list of other possible contributing factors to women’s under-representation in SLT. The fact that there are just 34% of Level 3 managers are women, suggests there are factors contributing to women’s under-representation at this level. Given the change in gender composition that has occurred at SLT level in the past three years, the committee determined that the focus of intervention for the PaEE review should be on women managers at Level 3. The committee identified the following factors as possibly at play for this group: Barriers within the management culture Recruitment consultants not putting women forward for senior roles Women not applying Women not accessing appropriate training and development Massey University not deliberately preparing women for senior roles The position does not accommodate family responsibilities. Academia The PaEE review committee identified a range of possible factors that may be contributing to the over-representation of women in the lower levels of academia and under-representation in the more senior levels, in an attempt to ascertain whether the difference could be a) explained, and b) 66 67

This information excludes the Vice-Chancellor. (Massey had a female Vice-Chancellor 2003–2008, and a male since then). Information provided by HR.

74

Profile for Tertiary Education Union

Massey PaEE Review Final Report  

http://teu.ac.nz/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/Massey-PaEE-Review-Report-Final-Report.pdf

Massey PaEE Review Final Report  

http://teu.ac.nz/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/Massey-PaEE-Review-Report-Final-Report.pdf

Profile for nzteu
Advertisement