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Organisational rules, practice or behaviour that support or maintain occupational segregation The survey identified three issues as contributing to occupational segregation: lack of career paths within or between occupations; lack of flexible or part-time work in a range of occupations and at all levels; and a gendered workplace culture. These are discussed briefly below. Lack of career paths within and between occupations are considered a concern by both men and women at Massey University. A low 33% of general staff men, and 29% of general staff women agreed or strongly to the survey question “There is an obvious career path from my current position at Massey University.” This means that where staff are recruited into male- and female-dominated positions, there is little opportunity for movement. And the data reported earlier in this section suggest that female-dominated occupations are more limited than male-dominated occupations. Lack of flexible or part-time work in a range of occupations is one of the major findings of the PaEE review and is discussed in detail in the report. Evidence for the inclusion of a gendered workplace derives from the large number of comments to this effect in the open-ended PaEE review survey questions. The committee considered that gendered behaviour in the workplace has the effect of maintaining occupational segregation and keeping women ‘in their place’, as illustrated in the following comments. Individual managers …often view women as 'girls', may consider that they are not the main breadwinner, or just take men more seriously… Many of the positions that females have been appointed to have no career progression nor any thought about the need for it. Q31, Line 206 There is a somewhat old-fashioned male culture on campus, where an old boys club exists, senior male managers will not take women seriously (thinking their careers are second to their partners and perhaps just a hobby), and being very condescending, patronizing, patriarchal. Q31, Line 363 It appears to me that most general staff are women, so it is likely that pay and rewards may be used to encourage more men into the workplace…. In our workplace there are a small number of women, and a young man was employed who was paid much more than the current salary band limit. When that became apparent it created a demotivator for the women as it was perceived as inequitable. They are as qualified, did the same job and had more experience yet the pay was quite different. Q31, Line 603 Other factors considered by the committee as possibly contributing to occupational segregation at Massey University were: gender-based assumptions in advertising and recruitment failure by those recruiting to actively consider women for work that is, or has been, traditionally done by men , and vice versa preferentially recruiting of women for low-paying/female-dominated work and men for high-paying male-dominated work work of similar value (job size) not similarly rewarded. 70

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Massey PaEE Review Final Report  

http://teu.ac.nz/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/Massey-PaEE-Review-Report-Final-Report.pdf

Massey PaEE Review Final Report  

http://teu.ac.nz/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/Massey-PaEE-Review-Report-Final-Report.pdf

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