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forest talk

The 5,000th John Deere swing machine emerges from the factory in British Columbia.

John Deere marks forestry milestone JOHN DEERE HAS CELEBRATED PRODUCTION OF ITS 5,000TH Forestry Swing Machine at its Langley, British Columbia factory. The John Deere 2656G Log Loader has been purchased by US contractor Bighorn Logging and its owner was presented with a plaque and joined other guests in a tour of the John Deere-Hitachi Specialty Products (DHSP) factory. Meanwhile, John Deere has announced upgrades to its machines sold to forestry customers in New Zealand. CablePrice has confirmed that some of the changes will be seen on swing machines this year, including:

• larger final drives on the 2654G and 2656G models, along with 2154G and 2156G models as they are specc’d with the same undercarriage for our market • shovel and axe mounts • addition of a USB port on the side entry cabs for device charging and relocating the auxiliary and USB ports to behind the seat • fuel filter shut-off valve • low level alarm for the hydraulic reservoir fitted as standard, and • improved left hand side door-structure. NZL

Investing in the future of forestry EIGHT OUTSTANDING STUDENTS HAVE been presented with inaugural forestry scholarships by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Forestry Minister Shane Jones at a special awards ceremony at the University of Canterbury. The Ngā Karahipi Uru Rākau scholarships were developed to encourage young and talented individuals into New Zealand’s growing forestry industry. They are available to Māori and/or female students enrolling in a Bachelor of Forestry Science or Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) in Forest Engineering. “Developing skills, capability and leadership for New Zealand’s forestry sector is a priority for the Government and Te Uru Rākau (Forestry New Zealand),” says Ms Ardern. “These scholarships are the first step

14 NZ LOGGER | April 2019

towards an exciting and rewarding career in forestry for eight exceptional individuals, who in turn will strengthen the future labour pool in this vital industry.” The 2019 recipients are: Robyn Patient from Waikuku Beach; Jessica Stock from Tasman; Cole Grace from Gisborne; George Fanning-Ihaka from Dargaville; Nicholas Melvin from Winton, Thomas Brown from Matamata; Max Gomez from Dunedin and Hannah Humphreys from Wanaka. Ms Ardern adds: “Over the last five years less than a third of graduates of forestry degrees were women. While the industry is a significant employer of Māori, Māori are under-represented in the professional and scientific areas of the industry. “We hope this group of talented scholarship recipients will pave the way for

the future and encourage other women and Māori to enter higher education within the forestry sector. Mr Jones says the One Billion Trees Programme is about planting the right tree, in the right place, for the right purpose, and for this we also need the right people. He says: “As technology and science change the way we do things, we need people who can work with robotics, help develop new forestry products and processes, and take them to the market. Our scholarship recipients add to the pool of talent that can accomplish this.” Further Ngā Karahipi Uru Rākau scholarships will be awarded for the 2020 and 2021 academic years – applications for the next round open in June and close on August 15. NZL

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NZ Logger April 2019  

NZ Logger April 2019  

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